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tv   News  Al Jazeera  November 9, 2013 6:00am-9:01am EST

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a path of destruction. super-typhoon haiyan barrels through the philippines leaving dozens dead as the storm makes its way to vietnam. >> there are still important issues to resolve. clearly they are not over yet. making progress - still no deal on iran's nuclear program. >> plus - the fight to put an end to age-old customs of isolating women during their menstrual cycle. >> let the games begin - dozens of ethnic groups across brazil
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get set for competition. [ ♪ theme ] we begin with iran's nuclear talks. we are live with phil itner. can you tell us about the latest round of meeting. what are the issues on the table right now? >> well, morgan, it's hard to say exactly what the issues are on the table or what the negotiation pieces are because much of the meetings are held behind closed doors. we believe on the iranian side of things that there's an offer to decrease their level of uranium enrichment, the pelty of putting a cap on the center fuges that are used in the program and increasing transparency. what would the west give in return - perhaps some easing of sanctions on the sale of oil, and also, perhaps, releasing some of the frozen bank accounts
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held by iranian officials in foreign bank accounts. it must be stressed, again, these are held behind closed doors, and while we know the talks are intensive, we don't know what is on the table yet. >> thank you phil. we appreciate you being with us this morning. it's been 100 days since the election of iran's president tsunami. many have blamed him for the outlift in the shift to the west. we travelled to an iranian city to see what the people think. >> reporter: in iran that's a list, ranging from the political to criminal. many caught up in the 2009 election. this man was one of them. he was on the list for four years. with no official explanation he was banned from attending
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university. >> i was in journalism during the post election incident i was arrested. last year i took the exam from my masters during mahmoud ahmadinejad's presidency. they called us starred student and banned us from studying. i was told verbally i was not allowed to study. >> that is until now. he has been allowed back to university and thanks the new president for that. one of iran's respected economic and political minds says hassan rouhani has used his first 100 days in office to begin the process of taking the country back from radicals. he, himself, was gaoled in 2009 and banned from teaching. >> i have been in gaol for more or less one year. personally i have no complaint because it has been a cost which i should pay for my nation and
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for my country. i'm so happy that after the four or eight years, everything is clear at the moment for everybody. >> those eight years belong to the previous government of mahmoud ahmadinejad, which fired hundreds of professors for not sharing its ideology. it gaoled thousands - journalists, human rights campaigners, union leaders, actists and academics. it closed dozens of reformist newspapers and blacklisted the country's largest organization of journalists. sings election the judiciary released hundreds of prisoners - many more in gaol or house arrests. including the leaders of the reformist green movement. in iranian's complicated system, what is concluded is that the domestic situation is change gs, but slowly. since hassan rouhani's election
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many have gained back their freedom. when it comes to human rights, gender equality, internet censorship - many are hardpressed to see improvements. the constitution is still the constitution, the law the law. the president swore to uphold it - not to change it. and for more on the storm's track heading for vietnam, let's bring in our metrologist. >> as a matter of fact you are speaking of the storm that made landfall across the central philippines leaving dozens dead. the storm will continue on its path. it has weakened. you can see the scope of the storm. it weakened as it barrelled across the central philippines, leaving close to 100 dead. the storm will bail towards central vietnam where we expect it to make landfall. the storm now will continue to
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track north-west at 20 miles per hour. in addition to that it's packing maximum sustained winds of 120 miles per hour. in the south china sea, on the home front it will be categorised as a category 3. it will be a formidable storm, and we'll have to monitor this closely. we expect it to weaken a bit because it is tracking into colder water and there's higher wind shear. the reason it was so deadly across the philippines is given the fact we had heavy rainfall, the storm was moving at a fast pace. the heaviest of the rains pushed across the central portion of the philippines yesterday. skies are clearing, high pressure is building into the region. some of those rescuers can get out and look for survivors. we'll look at clearer skies across much of the region. we'll shift the focus to vietnam
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and laos, given the fact we'll see heavy rain fall and gusty winds. we expect it to make landfall across central vietnam as we head to sunday morning. >> across the gaits it is quiet. the main weather story is the cold air. we have a front pushing in. bringing a bit of snow, light rain fall across the great likes of the the system brought know across systems of the north-west. it will bring the cold air as it makes its wi no trier air. today not looking too bad. you wait until tuesday into swens of next week. temperatures will be about 20 degrees below where they should be at this time of the year. miniapp lis reaches a high of
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22. we spoke to nicola jones in the philippines, the coordinate for the international red cross in the philippines. what is the scene like where you are? >> in bohol we had the typhoon pass through about 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon. fortunately it didn't make land fall on the island. we experienced high wind and torrential rain for 24 hours. the implications of that here are serious because this island was the most devastated by the earthquake three weeks ago. what we have had reports of is localized flooding and some landslides in some areas. on the island we are talking about 270,000 people living under tarpaulins, or makeshift
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shelters because homes were destroyed. >> you mentioned flooding and landslides. what recovery efforts are underway. the philippine red cross had already put emergency response teams in place in the areas that were affected. people were on the scene yesterday before it happened. in the coming days we have emergency supplies to distribute to those areas. that includes things like tarpaulins, water carriers, hygiene kits, sleeping maps and that kind of thing for immediate releefl. that is in -- relief. that is in bohol and will be replicated. the island of leyte, and tacloban city has been devastated. there's going be an intense need that now. >> secretary of state john kerry says the u.s. is ready to help
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the philippines in the wake of typhoon haiyan. more than 100 are dead after one of the worst storms on record slammed the nation. the hardest hit was typhoon haiyan. relief workers are struggling to deliver food, aid and roads are blocked by landslides and fallen trees. for the latest on typhoon haiyan, we are joined by marga ortigas in manila. what is the government doing to help survivors? >> well, the government has tried to be more proactive and tried to send relief workers and rescuers along the areas that were directly under the path of the storm, before the storm even hit on friday. however, power has been cut, communication lines fell more than 24 hours ago. roads impassable and, indeed,
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lots of villages, particularly an leyte and samar island have been left as nothing more than rubble. it's difficult to cord nat efforts on the ground. they have sent in the military choppers and relief on military planes to bring them to the remotest of areas. to get to these areas or begin to identify them, once again the president made the metrologists sit with government secretaries to plot the path of the storm, to retrace where it passed and make sure they send the relief goods to the area. medicine foremost, as well as food. they have been without food or clean water for over 24 hours. millions of people were affected. on leyte alone the local government estimates some
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20-30,000 lives could have been lost because of typhoon haiyan. >> as we mentioned the u.s. says it's ready to help. has the philippines reached out to the international community is this. >> in a way, really, that's almost a given. the philippines very used to natural disasters as it is. they put what efforts they can on the ground immediately into operations. but international aid agencies are welcome. already as you said the u.s. government as pledged assistance, so has the neighbouring countries. the u.n. is here, the world food program has representatives on the ground in leyte trying to assist as much as they can. the government not turning aid away. >> not turning any aid away. what can we expect to see in the next few days? well, efforts are being coordinated not just from manila where the president is, but they are setting up
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forward operating command centres, one on cebu island, a large island. there's a large city. it's fairly intact even though the storm passed over cebu. they are setting up another base on leyte. the airport is being temporarily turned into a command center and they'll set up satellite. they'll bring in food, water and other material. they'll distribute it to the people on the ground that have survived this storm. >> marga ortigas in manila, thank you for being with us this morning. it's been called an historic expansion of mental health care coverage. they are calling for deduct ability for mental care match others. kathleen sebelius underscored how important the measure is. >> that incredibly important law combined with the affordable
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care act will expand and protect behavioural health benefits for more than 62 million americans. this is the largest expansion of behavioural health coverage in a generation. >> the obama administration is facing more problems with healthcare.gov. problems with user overload are popping up. the leader of the tech teams working to fix the glitches say they are making progress. family members of a victim killed in the navy yard shooting is suing the government for $37 million, the family says the navy and department of vat ran affairs ignored warning signs about the shooter's mental health. the navy is not commenting. 12 died when keith alexander went on -- when alexize went on a shooting rampage. >> a new york detective was a
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picture, and a bikie gang faces charges. a victim bumped a biker with his suv and ran over another biker while trying to get away from the group. when they did manage to catch up with the man, they dragged him from the car and beat him in front of his wife. marriage equality is almost a reality in hawaii. a bill to legalize same-sex marriage was approved. it is expected to win final approval in the state senate. if passed it will make hawaii the 15th or 16th state to win. >>. a federal judge ruled on friday that trying to change a person's sex orientation through therapy was illegal. a ban was signed. some argued the law violated the right to free speech. california was the first and only other state to ban the
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practice. still to come - our series champions of the economy. experimental currency that could be going global. an artist's mission to drape miles of clothe over a river - creative or costly to the environment? a look at the controversy ahead.
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good morning, welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford. next - we continue our week-long series "champions of the economy", with a look at a massachusetts community with its own currency, it's gaining attention from investors around the world. >> first a look at the weather forecast. it will be a dry day, cold across the north central plains from minnesota to the dakotas. we have a fronts pushing through. it had moisture as it made its
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way across the dakotas, bringing light snow, 2-5 inches in the highest elevations. as it continues to push to the east, making its way into drier air, it will phase out. we may see light snow flurries across the great lakes and light rain across portions of michigan, but for the most start it will be dry. the major story is the temperature. moisture pushing in across mexico. we'll continue to see beneficial rain fall there across the north-west - a few snow flurries. back to you morgan. a decision on detroit's bankruptcy status coming in the next few days - to determine whether detroit can be the largest municipality to file for bankruptcy wrapped up friday. unions, pension fund holders say not enough was done to protect
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their pensions. detroit has more than $8 billion in debt and liabilities. worksers could lose benefits if the judge rules in favour of bankruptcy. and we look at ways americans survive tough times. we visit a town that is bucking the dollar by making its own money. >> reporter: the burke shires of new england is a place where the upbeat is a way of life. home to a workshop that makes thousands of ukka lay lis a year and the money of choice is not the dollar. >> phyllis likes her customers to use burke shares. >> it's an exciting thing. >> launched in 2006 burke shires
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is a local currency. >> when you have burke shares in your pocket you may not go to mcdonald's, but a locally owned restaurant. >> at 25 alice's job is to convince customers and stores to embrace burke shares. >> 140,000 bills are in servingulation. -- circulation, five banks exchange them. >> a lot of people think this sounds crazy. >> i have to remember that sometimes. it's not like hippy dippy businesses taking berkshares, there are excavators, dentists, lawyers,ing accountants. >> there's a discount built into the exchange rate to encourage people to get berkshares. $20 gets you 20 berkshares and an extra dollar.
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it's a 5% discount. it can hurt businesses. >> i can't pay the trick company with the berkshares. right now it's undeniable that the merchants take a 5% hit. we are not unhappy to do it. >> berkshares has international attention, an international granted a million dollars for the town to give out loansism. >> the formal banging systems is not helping the small business. by introducing the berkshares it's an important next step. >> for now, it's a way to connect with neighbours. >> now is a good time to do it. i show you that it means a lot to support local. i took the extra step. >> keeping it local. a place where even the money doesn't travel.
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. twitter takes a tumble. the day after its big debut the stock closed down more than 7%, finishing at $41.64, that's 60% above the price set for yesterday's ipo. not everyone, where twitter is based, is celebrating the ipo. as each infusion of high tech money comes into the city, long-term residents are priced out of their neighbourhood. >> when twitter employees and others live new buildings are shooting up - block after block - supply doing its best to keep up with demand. the start-up economy left san francisco's less advantaged goodnight. >> now it's about money and greed and it's very competitive. the ip crowd is competitive.
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>> reporter: this artist lived four decades in the mission district. he says he's being e-victoriaed to make way for tech workers and community activists say he's not alone. >> what we are seeing is gender fibbingation and our neighbourhood in different forms. one is tenants are bought out by their existing landlords to make room for newer residents that can pay higher fees. >> many people are not happy in the city offered a tax break to keep twitter in twoun. supporters, starting with the mayor, argue that it benefitted the economy. that, they say will offset the cost of the tax break. >> we see the beginning of a renaissance that people want to be here.
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others disagree. >> there are new businesses opening up around the corridor, close to where twitter is haired. there's a lot of businesses leaving, that can't afford to be there. >> for people like renae new businesses are too expensive. >> it's sucking the soul out of san francisco, the soul out of the district. >> reporter: reportedless the forward march continues, part of the price of success. the ribbon cutting ceremony for four world trade center is next week. the port authority of new york and new jersey which owns the site is leasing 600,000 square feet but doesn't expect to move in until 2015. >> the spire of new york's one world trade interest is glowing red, white and blue.
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some 300 led lights atop the skyscraper is being ilumated. it was built on the site of the 9/11 attacks. the spire is made of steel from the world trade center remains. on a clear night it will be visible from 50km away. >> now for a look at weather. we bring in our metrologist. it will be chilly across the north-east and north central plains. we are talking about cooler area. it's not going to feel as bad as it will next week. you have this weekend to get your winter coat ready. look at temperatures. billing coming in at 39. i want you to make your way to the east coast to new york city, around 39 degrees.
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by the end of the day temperatures are expected to climb to a high of 45, right around where they should be at this time of the year. back in seattle, it's going remain consistent with a high coming in at 53. look at seattle - a little rain in the forecast today, into monday. cloudy skies, and a worm up as the front black warm up as the front pushes through. today and tomorrow will be spent in the 40s. look at monday. chilly temperatures, they are about 20 below where they should be at this time of the year. when you factor in the wind shield temperatures will feel like they are in the single digits. we make our way into new york city, the cool down arriving on tuesday. the forgotten crisis in central africa, officials are calling on the international community to step up as the u.n. says the crisis is spiralling out of control.
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the fight to end a long-time practice of segregating women who are men truating.
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welcome back, i'm morgan radford. theets are the top store -- these are the top store at this hour: no deal on iran's nuclear program. british foreign secretary william hague says a deal still needs to be done. but they have made good progress. death and destruction in the philippines, more than 100 dead after typhoon chuck hagel slams the nation. relief efforts hampered by fallen debris. the storm headed to vietnam as residents brace for the worst. the u.n. warns that violence
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in the central african republic is troubling and could lead to destablilization. the u.n. high commissioner or human rights says the escalation of violence and head red must be stopped before it spins out of control. in our third and final part of the series on the forgotten republic we have this report. >> reporter: soldiers from chad arrived too late. most of the people who used to life in the burned -- live in the burned village are hiding in the bush. locals say members of seleka, part of government force, targeted them as they searched for a group of rebels calling themselves anti-balaka. >> translation: after burning our houses they took our cows to slit their throats.
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>> reporter: local seleka commanders say it was a bushfire, not them that burnt the village and showed us where anti-balaka fighters attacked their base with ak-47s and mort a and they say they defeated more than 1,000 rebels. they can't explain why four of their soldiers and anti-ball abbinga men died. we are told these are pictures of the dead rebels, dressed in military uniforms with green ribbons, and local charms around their neck. the rebels are facing a rebellion of their own. it's not clear whether the enemy is a group of young disorganised people or if they are well armed and disciplined and royal to the former president. >> francois bozize was toppled in a coup in march. several members of his army went on the run. some here say the former
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president is funding anti-balaka in an attempt to retake power. >> translation: most of anti-balaka are members of former president francois bozize's army. i saw them, around 30. eight with bows andaro, the rest with kalache ni coffs. >> the rise of anti-balaka comply cade the issue. seleka are mostly muslim, and anti-ball abbinga christian. this is a monk that spent 20 years helping people. he said enough is enough. >> translation: never has the country been so humiliated and devastated by the crisis. we have seen regular systematic looting. >> anti-ball abbinga rebels are on the move again.
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whether they are vigilantes or soldiers intent on taking power. everyone is certain they'll strike again. the nrs and the center african republic is causing suffering. more than a million are at risk of going hungry because of the conflict. police in italy arrested a man in connection with the death of hundreds of african migrants killed in a boating disaster. the somali man is believed to be a member of a group that organised a might grant boat that caught fire, capsized and sank mere lampedusa. some of the 55 african migrants said they were taken hostage. the practice has been banned. but many suffer from an old
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tradition that sees them separated from the family during men's trusion. >> for five days every month this girl has to come to the shed upped her house to sleep. men's fruiting women are not allowed to sleep in houses because they are considered urn clean. >> translation: the older generations say the tigers will come, the gods will be angry. >> many nepalese consider menstruating women to be impure. >> the shed is tiny, it's impossible to stand straight. you can touch both walls with your hand. this is one of bigger, it's dark over here once you close the door. >> it's what happens in the dark that they were afraid of. many have been raped. many died - some bitten by snakes and other asphyxiation after lighting fires to stay
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warm. down the road is the house of a woman whose 14-year-old daughter was found dead. she was in the nine grade. the parents don't understand what happened. >> translation: some say it was because of the lack of oxygen in the shed. some say it was because of the cold. it was winter at the time. >> even though the government banned the use of men's truly sheds 90% of villages abide by the rules. some villages are trying to change that. in this village the men and the women decided they needed to stop the tradition. they met with a lot of criticism. >> translation: we boycotted the tradition. it rained around us, but not in our village. everyone said it was because we stopped staying in the men's truly hut. >> >> translation: it rained after a month, and i said, "you said it would stole", and it didn't.
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>> >> translation: many may be eaten by tigers. we have to warn others. report report this used to be a community men's truly shed. the women kept this to remember how they spent many years suffering. later in the program elhave a guest on to tell us about the huts later. we want to take you back to the stop story typhoon haiyan. craig is in manila. what is the latest where you are? >> reporter: flying in across manila you could see the extent of damage done, just from the water that the system dropped on the country. to give you some idea as to how big it was, it crossed 44
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prifanses on its -- provinces on his way across before heading to the south china sea. they are looking at trying to get first responders into the areas. places like the prove joins of leyte -- province of leyte, where it made landtall. 100 are dead. but estimates could be at 20,000-30,000. >> have authorities been able to reach of the survivors in the areas that were hardest hit? >> no, not yet. these areas of cut off. they are almost impossible to get into the airport's, particularly in leyte. it has been damaged. these roads are covered by landslides and flooding. the storm surge in leyte was said to be as high as 15 feet. their correspondent was caught in the surge and had to climb on
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the top of a hotel to escape it. the first responders are trying to assess the amount of damage in these areas and trying to get into them to help people that are still there. the problem now is whether they can get fresh water and food into the areas. >> given that scope of damage, what can we expect to see in the next few days? >> i think what we'll see as first responders get in pictures of devastation, but also of the death toll, and that will rise significantly as we - as reports confirm. we have been getting. thank you, that was craig live from manila. >> and we have sport with another development in the miami hazing scandal. >> we'll find out all the
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details of the bullying scandal that rocked the nfl. jonathan martin is set to meet with an nfl-appointed incident regarding hazing he received from ritchie, hays team-mate -- his team-mate. >> the meeting will take place near martin's home during the latter part of the week in los angeles. he's looking forward to sharing his side of details. he left the dolphins following a you taunting incident in the lunchroom, leading to the revelation that he'd been subject to several months of harassment. incog neato has been suspended for conduct detrimental to the team. it's the latest controversy. the other hot button topic has been concussions, and the effect they have on the long-term
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health of the players. "outside the lines" reported former miami dolphins receiver mark doouper is the 9th former player to be diagnosed with a brain disease, resulting from head trauma, leading to depression and dementia. duper and tony dorset and marshall were among a group of players tested over the past three months and have been diagnosed. >> on the college grid iron. stanford koed their oponds hopes. saturday is must-see tv. it turns to top alabama hosting lsu. the tigers poping to be the buster despite two losseses. tigers manage a great fight against scc opponents and alabama has the most to lose as
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nick staven and company look to nab the title. last year's thrilling 21-17 come-from-behind victory in baton ruj. re wind in 2010, the tide turns. lsu having won five of seven games against teams that ranked no the top five. the then number two alabama in 2011. >> basketball - the only unbeaten team hails from the who's your state. yes, a year removed from the eastern conference finals lose to miami, it's the indiana pacers, not the heat, off to their best start. the pacers put in a perfect five in a record on the line. toronto was a 10-point lead after the first quarter, but played four. the pacers got to going after the break.
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roy hibbert with a season high. paul george took over. how about this. 17 of the 23 points in the third. the home crowd changing nvp. we are only six games in. the fans love him. the 91-84 win. it's the best start since 1970. >> now, we go to the san antonio spurs hosting the golden state warsiers. stefan kurry - great news for tony parker - scoring the spurs final seven points to secure the victory in the low-scoring affair. 76-74. parker with a team-high 18, and san antonio's regular season win. >> great expectations in the college ranks, that's what we can dump every recruiting class. for the fourth straight season
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the wildcats have been ranked number one, and it's the reason they are at the top of the pre-season polls, and uk opened up against u&c ash feel. julien randell showing why he's a top pick, scoring 15 of 23 points in the second half, leading five kentucky players. randell grabbed 15 boards. here are a few scores: duke putting up 111 points. that is a look at your morning sports. plenty more, of course, with the
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nfl scandal going on. >> and go, duke, go. >> brazil prepares to host the 2014 world cup and 2016 olympics, another competition is booming. it's brazil's ethnic games. we went to take a look. >> reporter: chants from indigenous people getting ready for competition. indigenous tribes from all over brazil pouring into the city to take part informant 12th edition of the indigenous games. they'll complete in traditional sports, bow and an arrow, blow competition, and football - this is brazil after all. >> translation: in previous years in kanus we were champions, in the tug of war we
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got to the finals but lost. >> translation: we came to share with other tribes that are our brothers. we'll integrate among different eth nisties and meet new tribes. >> the world cup and olympics are coming to the country. there's a case to be made. it's the indigenous games that are the most colourful. what they lack in sponsorship they make up for with passion. it's the biggest cultural gathering and held every other year. >> there are more than 1500 indigenous people for more -- from more than 40 tribes taking part informant games. for them it's about more than competition. >> it's a tradition, our culture. this is why we came from so far away to share our culture with the outside world. >> before the games begin they participate in a ceremonial fire dance to celebrate being
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together. >> clearing the air tribal song and dance, energy that will be transformed into bouts of oath lettizism -- athleticism. a visionary's dream or environmentalists nightmare - why some say an artist's mission so drape cloth covering a river is over the top.
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why some say an artist's mission
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. now we return to our segment on thestlation of women -- the isolation of women in nepal. belinda, an international writer joins us from ethiopia. i understand that it is the ritual isolation of men's fruituting women -- menstruating women.
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what is it based on? >> it's a religion that interprets men trusion as impure. it's practised in different parts of nepal. in kathmandu - some women won't go to the tem mr or kitchen thering their periodful different families think of it differently. it is an extreme example taking place in a remote region of nepal, in the far west, where women are sent outside the family center, to dangerous or less than san itry conditions, into huts or sheds to stay during their period. they can't eat with their family or touch water. >> you mentioned san itry conditions. given that. how dangerous is the practice, is it threatening to women's health? >> i mean, it's dangerous to different degrees, depending on
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the situation. it is practised differently in different villages. different families have different setups. sometimes there'll be a perfectly secured shed outside a compound where people can stay during men's struings, but there's opinion dangerous consequences when women are subjected to the elements, they get too cold, they can - if the housing is ipp secure -- insecure, animals can get in or there can be snake bits. and there has been sexual violence incidents. it's dangerous in some cases. they are extreme examples. many women do it all the time without having that problem. >> do all women in nepal have to do this? >> no, absolutely not. this is something practised by most women. the vast majority in acham, it's
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a small section of nepal in the far west. other women in the rest of the country do not do this. when we did reporting we'd get a lot of comments from different nepaly women from the capital and other parts of the country that didn't practice it, and considered it strange. it's not something all nepaly women are doing. >> in this region where it's prevalent the supreme court of nepal deemed it illegal. why hasn't it stopped? . >> it's an entrenched cultural practice, while the supreme court deems it illegal, it does not have a lot of state presence. there's not so much thought about law. and with the cultural issues, similar to child marriage, if you outlaw it, it doesn't mean
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something entrenched will change. it's a social issues, cultural issue, something that is changing with tile. i think the law is not always the be all and end all of these questions. >> thank you. international freelance writer joining us from ethiopia. the world renowned artist christo is fighting legal battles over his latest project - involving draping fabric over areas in irwin collier. residents oppose it because of damage it will call. >> it's called "over the river," this is the river, the arkansas. what christo wants to do is suspend hundreds of panels of silvery cloth - nearly six miles of it, along a 42 mile stretch
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of the river, hays drawing showing how the sunlight will filter through the fabric of the the best way to see it will be underneath on a raft drifting through sheep horn cameron. >> there's 1,000 rap ids. it is spectacular to experience the project from inner space. it's play of lights passing under the fabric, reflecting. up, not down. >> christo and his team have been working on "over the river" for 20 years and had to get approval from state and federal agencies because much of the project is on protected lands. christo is raising the $50 million by selling perhaps atry works. christo and his laid wife and collaborator jean clawed for their outlandish projects -
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every one controversial in its own way. "over the river" is no different. >> all the projects have of the journey when it's in the minds of people who try to stop us and help us. i say to the opposition - you are part of the project. willing or not willing, you are related to the project and you created the energy. >> christo said he and jean clawed travelled over the rocky mountains scaling 8 the rivers before deciding this was was perfect. critics say it's anything but the ideal locations. >> it's on the scale of a mining operation. >> ellen is the vice president of roor - standing for rags over the arkansas river they are taking legal action saying the works will damage the landscape.
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>> it's a major construction project in an area of critical joinder concern. >> christo says they'll minimise the damage. others support the project. >> it will create attention for this part of colorado. it will do a lot to put thear of state on the map. >> assuming christo wins the fine rounds of legal rangling it will begin next summer. when it's completed "over the river" will be up for two weeks. christo is famous for outmanoeuvring and landing his opponents. at 80 years old it could be a last work of his long and wiping career. >> at the end of the first hour, here is what we are following: super-typhoon haiyan left a path of instruction. more than 100 have been killed.
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diplomats in geneva say they are making progress. at this point there's no deal. hawaii - the state's house of representatives has approved a bill to legalize same-sex marriage. >> the player at the center of the miami dolphins hazing champion meets with social council, and he says he is ready to tell his side of the story. >> al jazeera conditions and i am back with you in 2.5 minutes. follow us for minute to minute news on aljazeera.com. i look forward to seeing you in a few moments.
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a a path of destruction. super typhoon haiyan barrels through the philippines leaving dozens dead as the storm makes its way to vietnam. >> there are important issues to resolve. so clearly they are not over yet. >> making progress, but still no deal on iran's nuclear program. >> and ending the violence - members of syria's national coalition hold a 2-day general assembly to determine who will participate in upcoming peace talks. [ ♪ theme ]
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>> hello, welcome to al jazeera america. live from new york city. i'm mad for. >> secretary of state john kerry says the u.s. is ready to help the philippines in the wake of typhoon haiyan. more than 100 are dead after one of the worst storms on record slammed the nation. the hardest hit was leyte, south-east of manila. the storm wiped away buildings, reducing homes to rubble. relief workers are struggling to provide food and aid. >> typhoon haiyan is heading for vietnam, where people are bracing for the worst. we are joined by our correspondent craig in manila. what is the government doing to help the survivors? >> well, the government is trying to get into the areas. the devastation is so great it's
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difficult to land choppers in many places. in fact, we have just been getting in aerial pictures now, which show the complete devastation. the government has been trying to do aerial surveys across the path of this typhoon as it traced its way through the philippines, and they have a c130 ready to go in cebu, but they are waiting for tomorrow and clearance to get in and help people in that part of the philippines. the government estimates are putting the potential death up to 20,000-30,000 people. so far, as you mentioned only 100 confirmed dead. >> 30,000, that's a big difference. the u.s. - we mentioned that they said they are ready to help. has the philippines reached out to the international community for aid. >> yes, well, they do need help. there's ngos on the ground
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moving in to assist, particularly bringing in food and water. many areas have been cut off and food and water supplies ran out. the government was aware that - of the damage likely to have been caused by the typhoon, and they moved in a pre-emptive strike before the typhoon arrived, bringing in food and water. much of that was washed away. in leyte, they had storm surges of 15 feet, causing major problems. we are getting reports from our correspondent that bodies in the street - correspondents and crew were forced to abandon their position, climbing on to the roof of a hotel to scope floodwaters and had to wait for them to recede before they could seek help. >> given the scope of devastation with bodies in the streets and our own correspondents on rooftops - what can we expect in the next
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few days in terms of aftermath. >> that's the point. that's why the government is saying that they are getting ready for a high death toll count. as i megesed they are saying estimates could -- mentioned they are saying estimates could be as high as 20,000-30,000. power and communication has been cut across the country and many of the islands are without communication. they are still to receive any sort of help. it won't be until tomorrow, where as soldiers deployed into the area, and first responders are able to help and report back. >> thank you so much. craig from manila. for the latest on the track of the storm, let's break-in in our metrologist. we'll watch the formidable storm as it makes its way west
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and north-west. as it made its way across the philippines, tracking across the central philippines. typically when they push across the central philippines and portions of leyte, they move slower, and it triggers landslides. as the storm moved is dumped an abundance of rain fall. we are talking a storm surge as much as 20 feet high. a lot o areas is below sea level. rescuers were dealing with over cast skies and now the storm has pushed to the west, it sky is clearing up, but there's debris over the roadway. the water is high across the terrain. it's hard to get in and assess the damage and rescue people. now we have to worry about
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vietnam, the storm pushing across the south china sea. the water is cooler. it will weaken tremendously as it made its way across the central philippines, packing winds of 190 miles per hour. it's an estimate. a lot of you have heard in reports that the storm may be the strongest storm to make landfall across a nation, across a country and we won't know that because unlike the united states, this area of the world, they do not send flights into the path of a storm. this is an estimate. as i said we are going to have to worry about vietnam. preparations are under way. the storm will pack maximum sustained winds close to 120 miles per hour, when it makes land fall sunday morning. evacuations are underway, preparations under way. we'll monitor the system as we track into the next 24 hours.
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back to you. thank you so much. now, some progress in talks on iran's nuclear program. british foreign secretary william hague is not certain a deal will be reached by the end of the day, but many important issues need to be resolved. leaders have made trogz. hague and foreign count parts, including secretary of state john kerry are on the third day of meetings. >> phil itner joins us now. what can you tell us about the latest round of meetings? >> well, these meetings - the amount of these meetings is increasing and the intensity level seems to be increasing alongside. we know that last night there was a trilateral meeting between e.u. representative catherine ashton, the iranian foreign minister mohammad javad zarif, and the secretary of state john kerry. he has cancelled a trip to stay here and continue more meetings,
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and since the talks have begun, there's an air of cautious optimism and there remains that air. as british foreign secretary william hague says - there's no guarantee there'll be a deal. >> there are important issues to resolve. clearly they are not over quote. we'll have to give time and attention to the issues during the course of today. there is no fixed time for us to reach a conclusion. . >> so, there you have it. a lot of this is happening behind closed doors. we don't know what is on the tail. with the russian foreign minister having arrived today and news that a chinese high level dig natry is on his way it appears that the heavy hitters are coming to down or are already here, and some are taking that as a sip that we may -- sign that we may see a
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breakthrough. >> phil itner, live from geneva. thank you for being with us. >> the opposition syrian national coalition is holding a 2-day general assembly to determine whether to take part in upcoming peace talks. what have the members come to discuss. >> sorry, i didn't quite hear that, can you go again. >> sure, anita, what has the members come to discuss? >> they have come to discuss a number of issues, four principle ones - the routine is the confirmation of the shadow syrian government the the one that everyone is watching is the issue of whether they participate in the geneva ii. these are the delayed much talked about and almost everyone would agree badly needed
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negotiations over how to resolve the dispute in syria in nonmilitary ways. this is an issue that divides many syrians. it divides the syrian national coalition, and it's an issue that is hotly contested within syria, many people inside syria do not feel there is any piece negotiation unless the president of syria commits to stepping down. that is the platform on which the many of the delegates here are entering this. they are dammed if they do and damned if they don't. everyone else, including the regime said they'd be there. the syrian national coalition - if it designs it isn't going to be a party, then it has to come up with good reasons why. it will be whether the stakes are too high or whether it finds a way to refuse to go. these issues that they'll be
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discussing. two other issues on the table is including the kurds, more in the opposition grouping. the kurds have been in and out of negotiations. we have seen them participate, walk out because there are as many lines between the kurds and the arabs in syria as on any other issue as you might expect. thirdly, fourthly, and in a way most importantly, they have to do more to negotiate with the fighters inside. >> thank you for joining us. ending the violence, members of syria's national coalition hold a 2-day general assembly. police in italy arrested a man in relation to the death of hundreds of african migrants killed in a boating accident. he's believed to be a member of an armed group that organised the boat which caught fire, capsized and sank near lampedusa. some of the 55 migrants that
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survived said they were taken hostage. 366 died in the accident. >> it's been called an historic expansion of mental health care coverage. the obama administration demands co-paids, deductible match those for other medical care. kathleen sebelius underscored how important this measure is. >> now, that is incredibly important law, combined with the affordable care act will expand and protect behavioural health benefits for more than 62 million americans. this is the largest expansion of behavioural health coverage in ta generation. >> the obama administration is facing more problems with the healthcare.gov. problem with user overload are popping up further down the progress. the leader of the tech team is saying, "hold on", they are making progress. >> a family of a victim killed
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in the navy yard shooting has taken steps towards filing a $37 million lawsuit against the government. the family said the navy, and department of veteran affairs ignored warning signs about the shooter's mental health. 12 died in the shooting. the navy put two admirals on leave while they are investigate in a bribery scandal costing taxpayers more than $so million. advice admiral ted brans and rear admiral bruce loveless on the right are suspected of incoopt conduct -- inappropriate conduct but not of leaking false information. five others have been charged for leaking information for money. >> on the veterans day weekend president obama is taking time to remember the men and women who served in the armed forces.
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the president says his administration is focused on making sure every soldier had a job when they returned to civilian life. >> we are doing everything we can to connect more businesses with highly skilled veterans. more help for job searches, and tools. to earn licences and credentials for civilian jobs, and tax credits for companieses that hire veterans. >> president obama said his administration is helping more returning troops get a college education under the post gi11 deal. >> a vote in hawaii brings good news for same-sex couples.
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>> a vote in hawaii brings good
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top of the morning, it's a dry morning. textures will plummet. if you are looking for the rain, light showers across michigan, most is tapering off as the front makes its way into drier air. looking across texas, the rain is coming up into central and eastern portions of texas. the activity is light in nature, and if you travel along i so, you may see a shower. quiet day across much of the country. there's a few light showers as we make our way into tomorrow. engineers at tokyo electric power or tepco are in the process of removing fuel rods from the fukushima nuclear plant. it's one of several dangerous stages of decommissioning the plant that was destroyed in the
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2011 earth quick and tsunami. >> reporters and journalists are given a tour of the number 4 nuclear facility to provide an insight into the work ahead. the process of removing the rods is daegez and could be -- dangerous and could be disastrous if it goes wrong. >> translation: wearing protective suits makes working conditions more challenging. it's important to make every effort to have proper procedures. >> removing rods is routine and safe. but the earthquake left debris in the cooling pool, making it a delicate operation. each rod contains uranium and a small amount of ploout ownium. if it heats up. it could lead to a nuclear reaction. the worse case scenario is it
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could start a chain reaction, putting greater tokyo at risk. tok coe stricke power company or tepco has not specified when it will start of the work. it's expected to begin in the coming days. the fukushima nuclear plant suffered a series of disasters since going into meltdown following the tsunami. thousands have been able to return to their homes and tepco and the government admitted hundreds of tonnes of radioactive water has been leaking into the sea and ground. removing the rods is one of a step. >> commune unfortunate party leaders are meeting in china to discuss unprecedented economic performs. disparity and land ownership
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rules between urban and rural residents are withdrawing unrest -- causing unrest. >> in woman lived in bj all her -- beijing all her life. she's not a resident nor her twins - despite living o in the city all their life. >> they don't own a certificate. their parents came from a rural province. it matters. without the certificate the adults can only apply for lower paying jobs. they can't access health services or by a car or property. the children are restricted to certain schools and can't apply to university. >> translation: we pay tax like bg people. we are -- beijing people, we are treated differently, like we are a second-class people. >> for rurm chinese -- rural chinese the system feels like a con. the government encourages
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urbanisation but discriminates about those that come. it those in the city complag that they don't have the same land rights as urban rites. people in the city cap by, sell and mortgage their property. not here. that man would like to tell his 700 square metres and reccions he'd get $50,000 if he good. >> i'd use the money to rebuild my house, send me daughter to a better school. >> allowing people to raise capital on rural land could help to drive the economy, putting disposable income in the hands of million. people in urban area earn six times was those in the country do. >> china's political leaders appear to have heard the
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message. the speculation is rural reform is top of the agenda issues. >> the government is well aware of the grieve appses of the rural -- grievances of the rural chinese. reform land lights and the system in cities like bj will be slow. this week's plenery will begin. >> china's leader are expected to discuss measures that could give people more economic freedoms, political freedom is not expected to be addressed. marriage equality may be a reality in hawaii. they overwhelmingly approved a bill to allow same-sex marriage. it would make hawaii the 15th or 16th u.s. state to legal its gay marriage, depending on whether illinois finalis a deal. >> the family of a chillan poet
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is investigating his death, despite a report indicating that he was not poisoned 30 years ago. >> effort to prove one of the world's widely lead poewe et cetera was poisoned by chile's dictatorship suffered a setback. >> we have not found relevant chemical agents that could be related to the death of mr pablo. >> those were the test results following the exhumation of his body. the former driver and secretary and nephew thaing he was poisoned after chile's military coup, to prevent him going abroad. >> this is where he died and where, according to the family the poewe et's death -- poet's death certificate was tampered with. >> a current investigation
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indicates that in the early '80s. former president was poisoned to death, as were other opponents of the military regime, at home and abroad. in this case it is well-known that he had prostate cancer. his family argues at the time of his death his can was not yet terminal. the family's lawyer argues that the absence of chemical substances is not evidence that he was not murdered, adding that poisons, such as sarin gas would not have left a trace. >> the report refers to toxic elements of a chemical make up. there's no study in respect to toxic elements. this is another type that remains to be studied. >> those who are convinced that he did not die of natural causes admit that the forensic results rule out an important line of investigation. as far as they are concerned the
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case is nowhere near to being closed. a decision on detroit's bankruptcy status will be announced. the trial wrapped up on friday. the result will determine whether detroit will become the largest municipality to ply for bankruptcy. young yn's, retirees and city workers say they didn't do enough. many city workers could lose pensions and retirement benefits if the judge rules in favour of the bankruptcy. >> al jazeera is focussing this week on innovative ways that americans have survived chick times. >> jonathan betz visited one down trying to buck the dollar by making its own money. >> the berk shires of new england is a place where the
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offbeat is a way of life. home to a workshop that makes thousands of ukka laicallies and where the money of choice is not the dollar but something different. >> phyllis likes her customers to bus berkshares. >> i bring you berkshares. it's exciting. we develop a relationship. launched in 2006, berkshares is a local currency for the berkshare region of western massachusetts. it was a defies to strengthen the local an economy. >> when you have berkshares, you might not go to mcdonald's, but a locally-owned restaurant. >> at 25, alice's job is to convince custodies mers and storms to embrace berkshares. 140,000 bills are in circulation. five banks exchange them. more than 400 businesses accept
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them across rural towns. >> a lot of people thinks this sounds crazy m. >> it's not just hify diffy businesses. they are excavators, dentists, lawyers, accountants. and there's a discount built into the exchange rate to encourage people to get berkshares. $20 gets you 20 berkshares and an extra dollar. they convert businesses. >> i can't pay the electric company with berkshares. it's deniable that the merchants take the 5% hit. we are not unhappy to do it. berkshares has international tapes. in amsterdam a nonprofit gave them a grand to start issues berkshare loans, thinking local currencies could protect towns from the europe ip crisis.
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>> by introducing this loan system within the berkshares currencies, it's an important next step. >> for phyllis uses it to connect with neighbours. >> it means a lot to be to invest locally. i have taken the ca step. >> keeping it local, in a place br even currency doesn't leave the provin. the space walk, the ceremonial tomp to be brought into the vacuum of space. we hope to have answers on the miami dolphins hazing matter.
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conversation the provin.
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conversation conversation . welcome back, you are
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watching al jazeera america, i'm morgan radford. these are the top storize - the opposition syrian national coalition meets to decide whether to take part in a long-delayed peace conference. still no deal ryan's nuclear program. william hague says many important issues need to be resolved. progress has been made. >> death and destruction - more than 100 dead after typhoon haiyan slams the philippines, making its way to vietnam. >> joiping us to follow our top story and mr shell in the international federation of the red cross. what is the latest on the death toll? >> we have reports that definitely the death toll is higher than reported. we have reports from different places, and we have to look into
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the number exceeding the 1,000 level. >> we understand that homes have been destroyed. do people have access to textry shelter? >> not yet. we have heard that 80% of houses are down. the roads and - to the area are blocked, so we don't get relief supplies. we have assessment teams that can assess the rural area of the islands. >> what is it that the survivors need urgently right now? >> definitely we have oh provide them with food and water and looting in the cities and places already. people are looking urgently for food and water. that's the first thing we have to provide, followed by shelter material. >> given the devastation of this size and scope. what can we expect to see if the
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next few days? >> we need one or more cases to assess the full scope of the disaster. we have a lot of remote areas. we have to know the dimension, we believe it's a massive destruction and casualty. we have to think slowly into a bigger dimension of support that people are needing. >> you mentioned remote areas where people are having trouble getting out. >> what is happening for them, how are they surviving. were drops being made. >> we couldn't fly there. the weather condition is not - they are able to supply. we don't get supplies. we have some supplies on the island. those that are not affected by the typhoon are being redistributed. >> bert shell with the
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international agency of red cross in the philippines. thank you for joining us. lost to the world for eight decades. a film uncovers hitler's rise to power. joey chan reports. >> i have never heard a man so able to sway people. >> the production seems crude by today's standards, but in his 1933 film neil vaneder vild tried to warn the world of the threat of hitler. haven't der veldt carried two items. a film camera and his great grandfather's well-known name giving him access in pre-war germany. >> i'm an american business map, what message do you have.
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>> he translated and receiptated a chilling conversation. >> what about the jews? >> she this man here -- see this man here, he'll tell you about the jews. >> the university film professor tom dory wrote "hollywood and hitler", and finds it remarkable. >> when you look at the film with modern eyes, you'll be struck. >> for all the effort "hitler reign of terror was a bomb", called heavy-handed and ridiculed to suggesting hilt ler may be a global threat. it all but disappeared until a chance discovery in the stack of the royal belgium film archive. the only surviving copy of
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hitler's rain of terror. hollywood was accused of forging a pat stretching the reach of the hitler's propa gappeda campaign to -- papa ganneda campaign to hollywood studios. >> half the jewish salesmen were fired and by 1936 all of them were fired in germany. >> the notion that hood war was complicit in stopping films about the rise of the threat is challenged. >> words like collaboration and complicity are overblown. it's the 1930s. the nazis of our imagination are a post war construct: >> a vision of a dark past re-emerging to the light. trying to get ahead of the
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winter olympics games in russia. check him out. to bring olympic values of healthy living, sub weigh stations are accepting 30 squats instead of the russian equivalent to a dollar. >> speaking of the olympics, for the first time in history the olympic torch will be taken to the value of space. it arrived at the international space station where two russian kos ma nauts will venture uds with the torch in two hour's time. jessica joins us with sport. we could be on the verge of a pivotal moment with the miami dolphin phasing moment. >> it may get worse before it gets better. we'll hear all the details. jonathan martin is set to meet with the nfl's appointed
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investigator regarding extreme hazing he received from miami dolphin team-mate rickie incognito. the meeting will take place near martin's home during the latter part of the next week, and martin is looking forward to sharing details of his harass: he left following taunting incident in the lunchroom. it led to it coming to light that he'd been subjected to other issues. irn has been suspended -- rickie incognito has been spned at this time. >> the subject of cop suggests -- concussions hovered over the league. we have learnt that the esp program confirms that mark duper is the ninth living former player to be diagnosed with
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degenerative brain disease from repeated head trauma. duper along with a form erp nfl star and leonard marshall were among a group of players tested and diagnosed. >> stanford ko's oregon's hopes. cardinals held off a dux rally to win the battle of top 12 teams. expect for dramas. here are a few games you'll want to check out. . -- to check out. . . john henry smith caught up with graham watson at yahoo
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sports and asked how closely will fans watch this match up? >> it will be interesting. november is notorious for this. where the teams are knocked off and it becomes a crazy scheme. no one knows who will play for the championship until the weekend. that makes it exciting. it's a hard time saying suv beat alabama. it will be a good game, two good offensive attacks. something we'll never see. >> sounds like you think alabama has an inside track. if that's the case is lsu their last hurdle? >> until they get to the scc title game, in which they can play missouri, it will pose a problem, i think missouri's defense is good. hizb al-tarir has a long way to
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go, alabama has a lon way to go. i think the way alabama is playing should beat lsu and others. >> forest know state - can they stay unbeaten? >> they are going to wyoming, catching them on a good weekend. it's not snowing or too cold. it's rare in november. usually wyoming takes advantage. they'll have an advantage. wyoming you never know what you'll get. they are four and four, played well and awful. if they'll want close games. i think this might be another one. they could run away and come out unscathed. >> we have you set for the college football. george town organ opened their seasons in what could be considered their longest roadtrip.
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playing in the arm forces classic in south korea. no jet lag here. second class action, game at 44. triple at the top of the key. fighting back. down seven. aaron with a follow up jab. let's take a look, there he is again. jonathan setting up a card. another big jam on the other side of things. great feat by lloyd. how about that, the one handed flash. oregon win 82-70. duke, one of the top recruiting classes, the other guy is mississippi transfer helping to make the fourth team.
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hitting five of duke's 13, three pointers. the united states no lodger as a date at un es coe, losing the the vote two years after the u.s. stopped paying dues to the uncultural science unit. >> there's more than 20 unesco heritage sites. the statue of liberty. the grand canyon, the yosemite. at the hours in paris the americans had been warned. if you don't contribute you don't get to vote. >> a vote is precious when you are part of any interprice. we've been raised to believe that. losing our vote, not being able to vote has a verying strong emotional impact for me. >> unesco may be known for heritage, but its mission includes fighting extremism
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through education, promoting gender equality. into 2011 when lion was admitted to un es coe it contributed 22% of its bg. that stopped -- budget. that stopped. u.s. law banned the funding of annas si that has -- an agency that has palestine as a member. >> this issue is so divisive. it triggered the suspension of the funding. it does not go along with the other decisions the united nations, which put this in a different situation. >> although the obama administration tried to amend the law and resume payments. that reform has stalled. >> we need them to be active.
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by taking the decision, first of all, they have created big problems for un es coe. they have lost part of the road and we need the road. i'm not sure saying it's very good, bye-bye, leave us. i'm not saying this, buts why did they choose to get out from the game in this way. >> many expect an men return to happen sooner rather than later. the arrears are racking up, but nearly a quarter million a day. prolonging the problem will make is worse. >> a grand jury indicted 11 men inclouding -- including a detective about biker atag. police say -- attackful police say an suf bumped a rider, and
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ran over another. when they caught up with the man they dragged him in front of his car and meet him in front of his wife. >> we take you to an expo where technology is put to the test
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wif more workers are staying on the job into the '60s. they are seeing a larger portion than before. tom ackerman tells us more from dc. >> in this pack of bysic lifts gale stands out. she turned 65. she is not slowing down. biking is a way to spend free time - when she's not making a living as a full-time real estate broker. gail doesn't know when she'll stop working. >> i never thought of retirement. it wasn't anything in my
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concessness. >> the rocky u.s. housing economy made working longer a dollars and cents necessity. >> everything i saved i lost. it wasn't a hum amount, but fairly substantial. ol kind of at square one at this point. >> gail is part of what economists use as a big change in the u.s. job economy. the surge of seniors in the workforce. during the decade government projections see is 12% drop in the number of workingers 16-34, barely an increase among the 25-54. workers 55 and up will grow by 38%. a factor keeping them on the job, a smaller share of americans guaranteed pensions from employers. that's not the only financial consideration. there's an incentive for workers to work past 65.
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a pay check and collect your full retirement pension. younger workers may think they are getting the short end of the stick. they should be encouraged by this. >> as people work longer the rest of society doesn't have to support them. while working they are paying tams. >> gail fleming says she's just begun to plan for life outside the work place, but not until she turns 70. twitter takes a tumble. the tech company's stock closing down 7%, finishing the day at $41.60. still above the price set for the ipo. not everyone is welcoming its success. some residents of san francisco, where it's based, say high tech money is pushing out residents who can't afford to stick
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around. >> >> reporter: where twitter employees and others live new buildings are going up. supply is doing its best to keep up demand. >> now is about money, and greed and dash it's very competitive. the it crowd is a competitive crowd. >> artist rennet lived four decades in the city's district. he's being convicted to make way for tech workers, community activists say he's not alone. >> we see gender fibbingation in our neighbourhood in different forms. one is tenants are being brought out by their existing landlords to make room for newer residents that can pay higher rental fees.
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>> many people are not happy that the city offered a tax break to keep twitter in town. >> twitter brought along new business. >> we see a renaissance that people want to be here. >> others disagree. >> there are new businesses oge around chose to where -- businesses around, close to where twitter is located. others are moving because they are too expensive. >> it's sucking the soul out of the nation district. regardless the forward march continues with each ipo dividing the city more and more. part of the price of success.
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is it >> twitter raised $1.8 billion, selling shares for $26 a pop. i keep saying it. you better have your winter coat ready as we track too next week of the the cool air is on the move. minnesota 45. 39 in the bellings, wait until we track into monday morning. cooler air is rushing in out of canada, behind a frontal boundary that pushes to the north central area. the cool air will make it feel like winter. rain in seattle. fairly consistent throughout the course of the week. minneapolis - look at the
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temperatures drop. with a cooler air mass from the north, arctic chilly air on tuesday for the overnight low. what we are about to show you is the stuff of science or perhaps even science fiction. 3d printer that can print out organs and humans. we are told about the newest technology taking many industries by storm. >> hello. >> this is imove a robot controlled by voice command built using a 3d printer. >> it was loaded 89,000 time. s >> 3d printing is a process of building an object by the ground up. it's popular with ark tech, jewellers. >> rather invest in thousands of pounds in sending a prototype up. they crowate it on the desktop
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using a printer. >> the possibility of using 3d printer are explored. the company behind this printer planned enough parts to build a house. you don't have to be a 3d designer to create a model. there is tech nollie that can -- technology that can scan houses, cars and even people. plastic prototypes are the beginning. this man is printing with human embryonic skin sells. >> first was an embryonic skip cell. it contains information that makes you you. >> he's fine tuning the 3d printer that turn these cells
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into 3d. >> if you can create microtissues, there's much stopping you making enough microtissue for an organ. >> with advances, organs coming off the production line won't be a reality. a welcome use of 3d printing used across the world. at the end of the second hour, here is what we are following: more than 100 killed after typhoon haiyan slams the philippines. officials asking for extra body bags. residents are bracing for the worst in vietnam. >> talks on the iran's nuclear programs continues in geneva. syria's bar - the opposition
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syrian national council holds its general assembly in istanbul. the main issue - whether they'll participate in geneva. the spotlight on the nfl as another former player is diagnosed with cte. mark duper the latest player to battle the disease. cooler air invading the central plains. wait until monday, we'll tell you about it in a couple of minutes. >> thank you for being with us. al jazeera conditions. we are back with you -- continues, we are back with you in 2.5 minutes.
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you about it in a coupl you about it in a coupl
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a path of destruction - super typhoon haiyan barrels through the philippines. reports of more than 1,000 dead. >> there are still important issues to resolve. so clearly they are not overyet. making progress, still no deal on iran's nuclear program. let the games begin - dozens of ethnic groups across brazil get set for competition. [ ♪ theme ]
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>> welcome to al jazeera. secretary of state john kerry says the u.s. is ready to help the philippines in the aftermath of typhoon haiyan. the philippine red cross say more than 1,000 have been kill after one of the worst storms on record slammed the nation. the hardest hit was leyte, south-east of manila, the storm wiped away buildings, reducing homes to rubble. metrologist joins us with more on the horrific storm. truly horrific. we monitor the storm, taking aim at vietnam. let's underwhat happened. it barrelous the philippines. heavy rain dumped the rain down into the valees, where there
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are -- valleys where there are large population, sea levels are low. when we see systems move across, we see them moving slower. it moved at 24 miles per hour. because it crossed the islands it slowed. it didn't weak an as much as we needed to. it's a potent system pushing across the south. china sees relatively cooler temperatures. we expect the storm to weaken as it pushes towards the west and north-west. we'll continue to see conditions improve weather wise across the philippines, looking at the crowds pushing to the west. in addition, most of the rain fall ending. now we'll have to struggle with the fact that the water has
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inundated the cities, and in addition to that. benry over the roads - it will mick it difficult for rescue workers to get in and help folks. >> in manila craig joins us on the phone. what are you seeing where you are? >> at the moment we have people on the ground in the worst affected areas on the east coast. there estimating more than a thousand death.
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where. they expect it it rise. they haven't been able to get there. they are doing aerial surveys. it's dive to land the choppers because of debris. on the part of this impact. our correspondent was caught in the middle of the storm. they had to climb to the roof of the hotel. that storm re-seeded. you walked through the street and there were bodies on the left and right. >> it looks like a catastrophe and the results will get worse. until the ngos get them out or provide assistance. >> it will be a difficult few hours. we are appreciate the reporting from manila.
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as you can imagine it will be difficult to get communication there. we appreciate what craig is telling us, and we'll check in with him again. vietnam is buckling down, preparing for the worst of typhoon haiyan. residents were seen placing sandbags and tying down roofs. authorities ask 500,000 to evacuate ricky areas. >> progress to tell you about, talks an iran's nuclear program. british foreign secretary william hague is not certain a deal will be reached, but says leaders made good progress. hague and his counterparts, including secretary of state john kerry. we are joined from there by phil itner. what do you know about what progress has been made? >> well, the exact nature of the
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progress is behind closed doors. it's interesting to note, and we are hearing that the latest round of trilateral meetings between the e.u. representative, and secretary of state john kerry and others - following a five our session yesterday. the talks have been coming. bilaterals, trilaterals - high ranking officials. the russian foreign minister is here. despite the tense talks, the british frect says there's no guarantee there'll be a deal. >> there are important issues to resolve. clearly they are not over yet, we'll have to give time and attention to the issues during the course of today.
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there's no fixed time for us to reach a conclusion. >> now, when secretary of state john kerry arrived yesterday, he said that he was here to narrow gaps. what they are - well, there's a lot of speck u laying, but as the talks continue, a third day. it appears as though sox incremental progress is being made. we'll have to wait and see to hear whether or not there'll be a deal. >> any idea when that will be - when will we get an update? >> well, the clock is ticking. here is the double edge sword about bringing in every country's top diplomat. the secretary of state john kerry cancelled one trip to north africa. he's supposed to go to abu derby. the poiments have other --
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diplomats have other agenda areas. the russian foreign minister is supposed to go to italy. they are all the top dogs, they have other things on their plate. the clock is ticking. it can't go on for longer. >> they are busy people with critical things on their agenda. thank you, fit itner. >> it has been nearly 100 days since the election of iran's new president, hassan rouhani. we travel to one of the holy cities to find out what people think of hassan rouhani's progress so far. >> reporter: in iran there's a list. on it the names of those whose offenses range from the criminal through the political. han are students and k -- many are students and academics caught up in the 2009 election. >> this man was one of them, on the list for four years.
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with no explanation he was banned from attending university. >> translation: i was in journalism. during the post-electoral incident i was arrested briefly. we sat the test and they didn't give us our results and call us star students. verbally i was told i was not allowed to study. >> until now. he's been allowed back to university. he thanks the president for that. >> one of iran's respected minds says hassan rouhani used his first 100 tas in office to gee given the -- days in office to begin the process of taking the country back from radicals. >> i have been in gaol for more or they say one years.
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personalry i have no complaints, because it has been a cost that i should pay for my face and country. i'm happy that after the four or eight years, everything is clear for everybody. >> those eight years belong to the previous government of mahmoud ahmadinejad, which fired hundreds of professors for not sharing its ideaiology. human rights campaigners, activists and academics. it closed doze ebbs of newspapers and blacklisted the largest organization of journalists. since hassan rouhani's election many have been released. including the leaders of the reformist green movement. what iranians conclude is that thekmistic situation is changing, but slowly.
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since hassan rouhani's election, many have gained back their freedom. when it comes to other systems, like human rights. many iranians are hard pressed to see improvement. the constitution is still the constitution, and the law the law. and the president swore to uphold it, not to change it. joining us to better understand what a deal on iranon's nuclear program could bean is dr tim walsh. good to see you. >> good morning. >> we don't know what is happening in the room, in the talks at the moment. what are the overarching major sticking points? >> i think there's a little leakage. i think we have some idea. i hesitate to engage in this humour. this is about france.
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they have the ability to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory. france wants - we have two deals, a starter deal an interim deal paving its way to a broader agreement. france on the iraq reactor - this is a special heavy water reactor that could be used as part of a bomb program if you add other components. the french watt that stopped during the initial period. when i was in new york meeting with the president and the foreign minister i was told, "yes, iraq will deal with that in the second phase", france wants to dealt with now. there's issues around the type of of sagess. -- sanctions. the p 5 plus one is acting narrowly. the thing that is holding us up
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is the french. >> the french wanting to see more upfront. benyamin netanyahu says that's what israel would like more of. he feels it's too easy a deal for iran. and do you say to that? >> i question whether benyamin netanyahu wants a deal. he's insisting iran dismantle every nuclear facility, zero enrich m, wipe the ground clean. it will not happen. there's no way the iranians would agree to that. which sissing on that as an outcome -- encysting on that as an outcome - we don't want that. >> the p5 - they all are - they all agree whatever deal we have iran will have limited enrichment. we will not allow 20%. we shouldn't let the perfect be the enemy of the good. >> how do you explain the u.s.'s
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eagerness to close the deal. is it the work of hassan rouhani or driven by the u.s. where does it come from? >> it's a unique moment. it's the first time i can remember where both sides have the same attitude about this. they want to move quickrily. the u.s. wants to move quickly, it doesn't want the program to expand or be on a road that leads to military action. they would rather move faster than slower. wonderfully and incidentally the rainians want to move quickly. you had the wonderful piece about the first 100 tas. the irane president wants to -- iainy president wants to sign a deal. and say, "you voted for change", let us do the job.
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he wants to show both sides are moving quickly. >> the u.s. has a complicated relationship with saudi arabia. where do they fit in to this? >> it is complicated. they are an actor. it was a funder for the syrian rebels. saudi arabia does not like iran. they are rivals. saudi arabia doesn't want a situation where iran gets out of the doghouse, because they are a player, reducing saudi arabia's influence. ed saudis don't think iran will build a bomb and don't want to see military strikes, but want as much pressure on iran as possible. it's not sustainable forever, we can't sanction forever with so much happening. at some point we need to have a deal. we'll have to see what comes of this, dr jim walsh, research
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associate with the mit studies project. thank you. it's been called an historic expansion of mental health care coverage, the obama administration is demanding that deduct ills for mental health match. kathleen sebelius underscores how important it is. >>ment incredibly important law combined with the affordable care act will expand benefits for more than 62 million americans. this is the largest expansion of behavioural health coverage in a generation. >> the obama administration is facing problem with the healthcare.gov website. problems with user overload is popping up. tech take says it's making progress. >> a family member of a victim
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killed in the navy yard shooting is suing the government. the family says the navy and department of veteran affairs ignored warning signs about the shooters's mental health. 12 were killed in the navy compound in september. >> 11 men have been called before the grand jury. the victim bump a bicker with his suv while driving in manhattan and rode over another biker while trying to get away interest the group chasing him and his family. when then caught up with the man they dragged him from his car and bet him in front of his wife. >> the state adds house of representatives in hawaii approved a bill to legal ice same-sex marriage. if it passes it makes hawaii, the 15th or 16th state -
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depending on when illinois allows their bill. new jersey governor chris christie signed a ban, and some argued the law violated the right of free speech. california banned that practice. >> still to come - artist mission to drape miles of cloth or a river - creative or fost -- dangerous to the environment. a lock at that controversy
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argued the law violated th right of free speech ahead. good morning, welcome back to al jazeera america. up next - we continue a week long series "champions of the economy" with a look at a massachusetts community with its own economy. first a look at the forecast across the country. good morning. overall it looks like a nice day for much of the country. snow is falling across portions
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of minnesota. minneapolis - in the upper 40s. the snow is not coming down there. cross portions of texas - light showers into louisiana. keep that in mind if you are on the road. a little bit of snow cross morn portions of minnesota. the snow is falling. want to be careful if travelling. we see anywhere from 2-4 inches of snow in elevations below 5,000 feet. visibilityies low, be careful. the u.n. is warning that violence in the central african republic is troubling and could lead to destablilization of the county. violence and head red must be
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halted before it gets out of control. the third and final part of our series on the forgotten crisis, we have this report from the far west of the country. >> reporter: soldiers from chad arrived too late. most of the people that lived in the burned village are hiding in the bush. locals say members of seleka, who are part of government forces tarted them as they -- targeted them as they searched for rebels, calling themselves anti-ball ebbinga. >> black ball ebbinga. >> >> translation: they took our cows and split their throats and they burn the village. the local seleka say it was a bush surveyor. they showed us where anti-bell
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ebbinga attacked them. they can't explain why four of their soldiers and eight anti-ball ebbinga men died. >> we are told these are managements of the rebels. and local charms arm their neck. they are facing a rebellion. it's not clear if ner crowning, organised people or if ner well armed, disciplined and loyal to the former president. >> francois bozize has toppled in a coup in march. several members of his army went on the run. some say the former president is funding ant balaka in an total to retake power. >> translation: most of anti-bol ebbinga are members of
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the former president francois bozize's army. there was 30 of them. >> the rise of anti-ball ebbinga has complicated the situation. seleka are mainly muslim and anti-balaka christian. this is a monk who spent 20 years helping people here and says enough is enough. >> translation: never has the country been so humiliate. we have never seen anything like it. >> anti-balaka rebels are on the move. some say they are heading east. whether they are vigilantes or soldiers intent on taking power. everyone is certain they'll trike -- strike again.
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unrest in the c axe r is occurring bus of the conflict. >> police in italy arrested a man in connection with the deaths of hundreds of thousands. he was believed to be a member of an armed group, organising the boat that caught fire and sank. of the 55 that survived were taken hostage. 66 were killed in the diselent. >> a decision on the bankruptcy status. coming in the next few days. it will determine wh the city can file for bankruptcy. union, retirees, say city leaders did not do enough. detroit has more than $18
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billion in debt. vi workers can lose benefits if the judge rules in favour of bankruptcy. >> the opening for the world trade center is slaghted for next week. the port authority of new york and new jersey which owned the site doesn't expect to move in until early 215. the spire of new york's one world trade center is blowing red, white and blue. led lights are being tested. it was built on the site of the 9/11 attacks. it was made of steel from the world trade center. on a clear night that will be visib visible. >> all this week al jazeera is focussing on ways americans have
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been surviving. it's call champon of the economy -- champion's of the economy. we visit a town making its own money. >> the berkshares in new demrnd is where the offbeat is a way of life. home to a workshop that makes thousance the ukuleles each year. the money of choice it the berkshares instead of greenbacks. >> i bring you berkshares, it's exciting. we start to develop a relationship. berkshares is a local currency for the boston region the massachusetts. its device was a way to strengthen the comm. >> when you have burke shares, you may not go to mcdonald's.
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>> at 25 alice's job is to convince customers. >> we have local heroes on the front, artwork on the back. 140,000 bills have been released. >> a lot of this sounds crazy. >> it's not all hippy dip iing businesses. they are excavators, dentists and lawyers. >> there's a discount built into the exchange rate. $20 gets you 20 berkshares and an extra dollar. it's a 5% discount, but it can hurt businesses once they convert back to dollars. >> i can't may the electricity money or vendors with
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berkshares. the retailers take the hit. we are not urn happy. >> in amsterdam ta nonprofit extended a half million grant to start offering berkshare loans. >> the formal banking system is not willing to support small and local entertrieses. by introducing the loan system been the berkshare currency. it's an important step. for now it's seen as a way to connect with neighbours. >> i'm showing you it means a lot to me to support local. keeping it local. a place where even the money doesn't travel. >> still to come - sport. >> the subject of concussions haunts the nfl. another former player is dying photographed with cte.
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the latest later on.
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is welcome back, these are the top stories at this hour - no deal on iran's program. apparent issues need to be resolve, but leaders made good progress. death and destruction in the philippines. the country's red cross estimates more than 1,000 are dead after typhoon haiyan slammed the nation. the storm is heading for vietnam as residents brace for the worse. for the latest on the aftermath, let's bring in craig. we are starting to see what happened - the destruction caused. how widespread is it?
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>> well, that's right. this was a massive storm as we seep, covering 34 provinces, we are seeing the death count increasing every moment. the red corks as you mentioned -- red cross as you mentioned reported 1,000 dead in leyte. that's where it made land fall. the capital in tacloban is where they are counting bodies on the streets, and it could rise to 0,000 people. there are places -- 20,000 people. there are places they haven't surveyed because they can't get in. choppers can't land. you can see from the air how bad the storm works and the destruction that it caused. it levelled the village, placed
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cars on the roof of houses and moved mountains, landfalls over roads. >> let's talk more about how realistic was it for people in the affected areas to get to shelt or or have any type of shelter. did that actually happen? >> people looked for the only shelter available. that was hotels and gym faciums. we heard one report that people who crammed into one gymnasium. it flooded and host of those people in there died as a result of drowning. our own correspondent and local news organizations were forced to scramble to the top of a hotel. the flood surge was 15 feet. they scrambled to the roof and
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had to wait for the flood to subside before they got down and went for help. >> at this point it's a matter of trying to get two people to help, as you've said, proving to be extremely diff. we are talking possibly a matter of days or hours before they get help. any way to really know? >> well, the government has three c130s travelling into tacloban airport. it was cleared and cut until recently - they are sending soldiers into the ground now. first response is in there getting food and water in there. we are getting reports of looting in the areas. it's a desperate situation. they are hoping to get soldiers further into the worst affected areas outside leyte.
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as i said earlier, i don't know the extent of the damage. they've been doing aerial survey, but haven't been able to land them because of the trees and benry on the grand. >> we -- debris on the ground. >> we know the storm is heading to vietnam. how prepared are they there? >> well, vietnam, of course, have seen what happened here. they had a central dive on cross into central vietnam. so they are prepared and the government set up emergency response just in case the storm doesn't slow down and causes the damage that it did here in the philippines. >> they were here as well. they had emergency services on the ground. they had food and water in
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place. floods were so strong they carried most of that away. they are hoping the storm slows down and loses power. >> there's only so much preparing you can do. >> students in turkey are protesting after the prime minister promised to end co-ed dorms. they say the government is trying to police people's private lives. >> reporter: this is the statement that left turks arguing whether society is going forwards or backwards. >> there'll be no students dorms sharing. there has been complaints about them sharing the same flats. >> the prime minister gave turkish authorities a green light to close mixed sex
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dormitory. the government partitioned the mixed saying it was at odds in the character. >> translation: anyone would oppose their daughter or son living under the same roof as someone of the same sex. >> others disagree. the government becan a morality campaign. >> they want to limit our freedom, and they want to locus into their their definition. >> students protested against the actions, demanding they stay out of their personal affairs. this says, "we will resist with
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both sexes", they are are still angry. >> the prime minister was crit sist at the time of an earlier demonstration, for ordering a crackdown. now the security services are involved in closing down kixed student dorms. this female lives with a male student. >> i'm angry about the ban. i can't accept it. this is about friendship and studying. >> the reaction from assume young tushes that supported the -- turks that supported the government may be surprising. >> i agree with the prime minister but thooengee inter -- think he intervene the too are door far.
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>> most students are over 18 and the turkish civil code says they can make their own decisions. >> russia is trying to get ahead of the 2014 olympic games. what's he doing. okay, bripinging olympic values and healthy living. subweigh stations will accept 30 scots instead of an ruble which is about a dollar. . ready for the latest in sports. >> thaz the hazing we talk about that should go on. not what's happening now. >> jonathan martin opening our eyes. the league takes it on notice.
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>> we have heart from everyone. everybody but martin. that's about to change. >> al jazeera sports was told that martin will meet with an investigator. there was a last straw in a lunchroom mostly by fell jol team-mate rickie incognito. mart is jonathan martin is undergoing treatment for emotional distress. the subject of concessions is not going to go away soon, as we learn about the health effects. form erp miami dolphins receiver duper is the ninth living player to be dying novembered. and brain results and head trauma leads to depression and
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dementia. sf marshall was among a group of players tested and diagnose with that disease. this week - stamford patched a fourth quarter rally. what can they do. we are about to find out. speck the prime-time match up between alabama and scc nehm sis lxu to be must-see tv. history tells us the road to the national champonship runs to this game. lsu is a dangerous team. there are six meetings between the two.
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they have had victories 2010. don't expect this to be overlooked. >> all the games, it comes down to three or for plays, you never know when it will come up. have you to do it with effort and toughness. eve every one of these games is physical. it's like a heavy wait fi. you can't fade any round. it will ba blow for below type game. it's almost the team that gets the last few punches in wins. i love plays these games. everybody expects so much. >> now to the b pa where the indiana pacers are playing with a chip going all the way back to the finals against meat last
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season. no one had an answer for the pacers. the raptors tried and managed and led at some point after the first quarter. roy with a season high 20. the pacers riding the back of their bigman who has been glands. paul george for his 17th of 23rd. pacers 6 and ox. their best start since the 1970. "great expectations" is a title for the kentucky freshman task. john has the top class for this season. it's the reason they are at the top of the pre-season. last night u.k. opened up again nshville.
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the classy players put on a display. >> julius randell showed why he was a dop five. five kep tuckey players in -- kentucky players in double digits. here are some scores to pass along: >> that is a look at sports. as brazil prepares to host the 2014 world cup and 2016 olympics, another competition is set to begip, it's the indigenous games bringing together hundreds of ethnic tribes for their own version of
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the olympics. we took a look. >> reporter: a chance for indigenous people getting ready for competition. indigenous tribes pouring into the city for the indigenous games. they'll compete in bow and arrow, blow tart competition and wrestling. football breaks with the condition. it is an event. this is practise ill. >> translation: in previous years, in kanuing we were champions. this year we came to try to win of the games. >> translation: we came to share with other tribes that are our brothers. >> the world cup and the olympics is coming to the game.
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the indigenous games are the most colourful. this is the biggest cultural gathering for indigenous people in brazil and held every other year. >> there are more than 1500 indigenous people taking part informant games. for them it's more than competition. >> it's our tradition and culture. >> reporter: before the games begin, they celebrate in a fire dance. filling the air tribal song and dance, energyie transformed in bouts of athleticism. it's beautiful.
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a visionary's dream or an environmentalalists night mare. draping material over a river.
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welcome back. it's a devastating thought. what would you want to happen if you were on life support after a life-altering accident. would you choose life in a wheelchair or prefer to die. recently a man was left paralyzed after falling from a tree. he removed himself from life support. with us to discuss end of life care. is a professor. thank you for joining us mr kaplan. it's unusual about mr bower's situation is he was in a coma. his family had him woken up from the coma to have the discussion with him about what he wanted. what are the riskses in a situation like that? . >> this is unusual in ta the
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speed of the decision is remarkable. he's in a tree hunting. situation up, his family is around and someone is saying, "do you want to stay on ventilation?" he can't speak because he has a breathing tube. shakes his head and says no. says it to his family. when you get decisions like this, if we suffered a terrible injury we'd wait a little bit, maybe a few days, maybe a week to see can you adjust to the circumstance. mr bower made a fast decision. >> the risk being that props this person hasn't had time to process their situation. >> exactly. i don't think he's incompetent, he knew who he was, but he's stunned, staggered. normally you want to give him a little time to adjust. he had had a discussion with his family. he said earlier, "i don't want
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to be in a wheelchair" that makes me feel for comfortable. he had said and had that discussion and said, "i don't want to be that way", as touch as this is, the lesson is you have to have that discussion with family and friends now, before you get into these situations. >> so many people think, "i'll deal with that later in life", he was 3 it. talk about broaching the topic with people you care about. >> you know the holiday even is coming, family and friends will gather. use it case. "i saw that on tv, heard it discussed. this is what i think, i want everything or i want you to be my decision-maker or i don't want anything if i was disabled out of the blue." everyone from 18-88 should have the discussion. it's tough, but you have to have
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it. otherwise, how is your family going to know what you want. >> you are burdening them. if you have the discussion you save them. >> thank you dr kaplan, that's a great point. thank you so much. >> before we let you go we'll check in with the forecast with meteorologist. good morning, it's a cooler morning across the north-east. it will worm up to a comfort -- warm up to a comfortable day. new york city at 39. back in the billings 37. 43 through seattle. the rain is coming down. the higher elevations the snow is coming down. toronto reaches a high of 49. a beautiful day in philadelphia. the cooler air is definitely on the way. we'll be in the 20s and the 30s.
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look at the south-east, beautiful. thank you. world renowned artist christo struggled to finish his latest project, involving draping lots of material across a river. >> reporter: it's called "over the river," this is the river, the arkan saw in south central colorado. what christo wants to do is suspend hundreds of panels of cloth in eight sections, along a 42 mile stretch of the river. christo says the best way to see it will be from underneath, in a raft, drifting through the canon. >> there are rapids, it is
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spectacular, appreciating the project from inner space. creating a play of light. >> christo and his team have been working on "over the river" for 20 years. they had to get approval, because much of the project is on protected land. christo is raising the $50 million it will cost by selling run dreads of prepatory works which he makes by hand. christo and his late wife and collaborator were famous for their outsize and some say outlandish projects. every one controversial. "over the river" is no different. >> all the projects have a journey. 1,000 people try to stop us, 1,000 people try to help us. i say to the opposition your part of the project, willing or
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not willing, you related to the project and created the energy. >> christo says he and jean clawed travel over the rocky mountains scouting 89 rivers before deciding the arkansas river was perfect. citics say it's anything but the ideal location. >> it's on the scale of a mining location. >> ellen is the vice president of roar - rags over the arkansas river. the group is taking legal action saying the work to install anningors, cable and fabric will damage the landscape. >> it's a major present in an area of critical environment concern. >> some support the project. christos says they'll minimise the damage. >>. >> it will create a lot of interest for colorado, and do a lot to put this area of colorado
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on the map. construction will take two years. christo is faumous for outlasting hi opponents. at nearly 80 years owl it could be a last work of his long and winding career. that is gorgeous. that does it for this edition of al jazeera. "consider this" is next. check out the website for updates aljazeera.com.
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determining using some sort of subjective interpretation of their policy as to whether or not your particular report was actually abusive, because if it doesn't contain language that specifically threatens you directly or is targeted towards you specifically, they may not consider it abuse. they may consider it offensive. and in that case they just recommend that you block that person. >> i don't want to minimise this, because i mean, there's some really horrible things that
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are on line, and it's not - it's not just twitter, what has happened through social media and the anonymity of the net is that you see websites, hate-filled websites targetting all sorts of groups, popping up. there has been a huge number of those that exist as well.
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