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tv   News  Al Jazeera  November 15, 2013 6:00am-9:01am EST

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. ♪ much like the superdome in the aftermath of hurricane katrina the astro dome was a refuge from haiyan and hundreds for people in swaller. >> we fumbled the roll out. >> reporter: a temporary fix for a broken promise and president obama tries to write a wrong with changes to the affordable care act. sending a message to elephant pochers and crush illegal ivory and the next generation of video game consoles hitting the market
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on who will be on top for gaming supremacy. ♪ you're looking at stunning before and after satellite images of tacloban city and you can clearly see the massive devastation caused by typhoon haiyan and the pictures show trees and buildings washed away completely by the storm. good morning and welcome to al jazeera america i'm stephanie si, the destruction of haiyan is turning the city of tacloban into a morgue and death tolls are more than 4400 and the casualties are in once this lively city and a week after haiyan struck bodies are if the streets and others stored in the
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buildings by the airport and facing a task and burying the unidentified dead with a ceremony. >> the mass grave because the cadavers in the meantime needs to be buried and for the dead. >> reporter: for those lucky to survive staying alive in the aftermath is not easy and aid to the city is slow and threat of disease is on the rise and we have more. >> reporter: it has been a week since typhoon haiyan ravaged parts of the philippines and day after day the effects of the devastating impact has been seen on the faces of those effected. >> hunger and no water, no medicine. >> reporter: but in the streets where the storm's destruction left hundreds of thousands
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homeless. >> we need food, safe drinking water and then houses. >> reporter: the international aid effort has been picking up steam. >> we need supplies. >> reporter: but many are waiting for basic necessities including medical help that has been delayed because of the massive logistical challenges. >> no food, no water, no lights, no fuel. >> reporter: but a big boost has arrived if the form of a uss george washington. the aircraft carrier is armed with 5,000 crew members, helicopters and the capacity to produce and distribute more than 400,000 gallons of freshwater a day. a fleet of u.s. ships are in the region and more scheduled to arrive in the next few days and u.s. military is throwing what it can at the problem and these fly like a plane but land like a helicopter and delivered to a town cutoff since the storm hit. another fear the out break of
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infectious diseases because of poor sanitation shortages of freshwater and inability of emergency medical teams to respond quickly. >> they are expecting with businesses like pneumonia. >> lots of dehydration animal nutrition because of most of the patients have not eaten. >> reporter: leaving some to drink and bathe in contaminated water which has been in contact with bodies, raw sewage and debris. >> drinking the water and dirty water, trying to survive. >> reporter: the likelihood of disease adding a new wave of concern for relief workers still playing catch up and a desperate population still struggling and al jazeera.
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>> reporter: the airport is the hub for aid distribution to the rest of the philippines and a makeshift clinic for the sick and injured. al jazeera's paul has been covering this story in cebu and joins us from the airport and you followed the transformation of the airport and how is the relief effort going at this point? >> well, stephanie it's really around the clock, 24 hour effort here and it's nighttime as you can see but crates are piling up behind me and being loaded up, a truckload of equipment and gear just came in from germany a moment ago followed by another huge pickup truck full of rice, soma sheen, equipment and supplies constantly coming in here and being transported out to tacloban and outlying areas and relief efforts are shifting a little bit off shore now that uss george washington and the massive capacities that it and
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the rest of the carrier strike group will bring to the region and thousands delivering aid and the ospraye and there are eight of them already transporting food and supplies to some of the more difficult to reach areas and there is 21 helicopters on the garage washington alone and a huge effort being put forth by the uss specific command. >> reporter: paul, i see a lot of people at the airport and i know a lot of people have been arriving where you have from tacloban, the hard-hit area, is cebu prepared to handle the influx of people? >> that is an excellent question. one thing they are discussing in cebu is how to handle this influx of e vacuum ways from tacloban and areas around there and talk of building a tent city in cebu. what they are also doing is transporting people to villages where they are converting
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villages outside of cebu and converting community centers and structures into temporary structures and there is not the capacity so far to handle this influx of evacuees so they are sort of making it up as they go along right here on the base, building just up the road from us was converted go an intake clinic and health center where people were being treated for open wound after arriving from tacloban and we spoke to a nurse there today and said they were running low on the basics such as treatments for tetanus and can they get what they need and in place fast enough. >> i'm sure a lot of traumatized survivors arriving there and paul is reporting to us from cebu and thanks paul. when the fie foon hit thousands of residents needed shelter, one week later city's astro dome is still home but now the arena has become a pit of filth and rain-soaked trash on the floor and the smell of human feces in
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the air and no one arrived and not a single relief worker is in sight and this is like when the louisiana superdome was used as a makeshift shelter and 20,000 people took reference adjust african that hit on august 25, 2006 and six people died during their stay at the arena. seven days later the superdome was evacuated and everyone shipped to the astro dome in houston, texas. hunger is so widespread in the philippines they are searching for food in abandoned stores and homes and some are trading what they find just to feed their families and charles stratford reports. >> with the homes destroyed, food and drinking water scarce, aid deliveries insufficient or delayed many people in tacloban city are now forced to do this and batter what goods they salvaged for food or money and
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sell produce they find in the shops and other people's destroyed homes. one man said he is selling baby milk for under $7 a box, that is half the people pay to the stores before the typhoon hit. >> translator: we acquired these and now we are selling them so we can buy rice. >> reporter: another man says he swapped three kilo of rice for one kilo of beef. >> translator: i have rice but nothing to eat with so we barter. >> reporter: a woman said she has not received help and desperate for rice for her family. >> translator: if we find someone to barter rice we will give them bacon and sausages. >> reporter: and six days after being ripped apart survivors who stay in tacloban are in urgent need of feed and water and u.n. says half a million people fled
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from what remains of their homes across central philippines and many areas still have not received emergency aid. the storm ripped the vegetation off the trees that line this road, families sit under what makeshift cover they can and have little choice than to wait to emergency help that their government says is on its way. charles stratford, al jazeera. >> reporter: and the typhoon wrecked much of the infrastructure in the hardest hit and slowing the shipment offenders prettily needed supplies and we have ann taylor emergency coordinator for the asia pacific regions with doctors without worry ders and is in cubu this morning and you have teams that have gone out to assess the most devastated areas and how successful have you been to deliver supplies and give medical assistance? >> we have many teams and we
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have something like 200 tons in cebu through the airport and this is really going to be a concern for us today and i will turn that around as soon as possible. talking about tacloban we actually have a hospital that is surviving and we want to be able to get ready for surgery and obstetrics and get the staff as quick as possible and that is going to be a huge challenge and it's been a huge challenge to deal with the whole and the backlog that is happening and to be able to unload it and because of again the airport in tacloban that has carriers we have to and because of the turn around we are looking at other
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alternatives and we possibly will take the material by batch but it all adds time and, in fact, we have things on the ground but tomorrow we will have after 20 day perception of everything and we continue to -- the team continues to grow there but we have to have that hospital there. the material and the medicine is there. >> reporter: we wish you and your team luck ann taylor for the asia pacific region with doctors without borders and thanks for your time. the communities are banning together and donating money and supplies for typhoon victims in their home land and there are collections like this in chicago, that is happening across the country and one new jersey city the haiyan impact is hitting home in a part of town known as little manila. al jazeera's erics is joining us now and good morning. >> look at the storefront and
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you can tell food, max of manila clearly there is a strong philippine presence and it's called little manila and it's no surprise this community is coming together to help. he works with a steady hand even as the crisis halfway around the world weighs heavily on marty's mind. his barbershop is one of several giving to the typhoon relief effort in the philippines. >> sandy was hard enough without power, we had the luxuries of running water but no nothing and no sewage and then you have to look for food and everything you known which is probably not even valuable at all. you have lost, i can't put myself in that position. >> reporter: young barber heard from his family in the philippines two days ago. >> any grandma and grandpa's
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house, it's done, we had to either sell the property or, you know, just to rebuild it is going to take a lot. >> reporter: they are donated 1 100% of revenue of hair cuts to the red cross and taking in canned goods and blankets. >> a lot of people don't have anything to begin with, you know, over there it's all about depending on each other, one person helps another. >> reporter: many local donations wind up down the street at a shipping company that is sending supplies to the philippines free of charge. >> it's really good because we are having like ten calls in a day like ten people that we are asking for donations. >> reporter: , in fact, 15 donation boxes are shipping out this weekend filled with things that so many people need like this box here, baby bottles, water bottles and plenty of
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clothes all headed straight for cebu as a way to show their love for their fellow philippines. >> it's hard and even if they are not our family members, but still you can feel the -- you can feel the loss and devastation. >> reporter: the cargo company sits on this stretch of jersey city new jersey money as little manila because it's home to 18,000 philippine americans and powerful images of the devastation caused by typhoon haiyan in the central philippines are moving the whole community to action and in a single day they donated more than $20,000 in a fundraiser and the president is rolando. >> a very resilient and they have a deep love for their home land as do i as well. >> reporter: you can see that through little manila and talking with the customers inside like arlene, her family
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is fine in the northern philippines and she has already donated cloths and a week's worth of her salary as a nurse. >> they always have a good heart and we always help each other every time when we have this crisis in our country. >> it truly is in the philippine culture to come to each other's aid like this. in fact, they have a word in their language, it's called something recalled to the spirit of unity which is exactly what they have in little manila. >> reporting to us from jersey city. nearly 3 1/2 million americans chased their ancestors to the philippines and the second largest group and 40% live on the west coast and more than 800 though philippine americans in southern california and 450 thou live in san francisco and the
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median household income of a family is $75,000. as we head to the weekend let's see what is hitting the northwest with nicole mitchell. >> this will be a troublemaker for us out here. first i want to talk about the high pressure on the east coast and moving out and behind it we will get warmer air and there is a sign of hope on one side of the country but as we move our way to the other side of the country that is now where we have the next weather system moving in. the low pressure area coming in from canada and the flow will bring winds off the coastline and not only strong winds but the flow and moisture associated with it and this means and cold air on top of it, the snow levels will go down so places like the higher mountain elevations, today you could get some of that snow starting around midday and then in the overnight some of the snow will make it in the valleys and the
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valleys are 3" plus and a foot plus in some higher elbow vagues. if you do not see the snow and at one of the lower emvagues and somewhere like seattle basically 100% sent you will get rain as the system moves in and a lot of problems here. i want to show you something interesting from antarctica the glazier and the crack, there it went, the size of chicago and can actually be big enough with the land to cause tsunamis and are concerned it will get in the shipping channel so something to watch there. >> reporter: thank you, under pressure to keep a promise president barack obama said insurers can reinstate medical policies for a year and must be told what the plans do not cover. these policies which don't measure up to the law's current
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standards cannot be purchased by new customers and republican bill up for a vote today in the house would let health insurers continue to offer plans that do not conform to the affordable care act and the president says if it gets to his desk he will veto it and mike has more. >> i apologize, it looks like we had the wrong story cued up there and we will tie to get it back to you, the house bill will be a vote on that and take president obama's change a step further and let insurers continue to sell policies that don't meet the current law standards and the president again said he will veto it if it passes congress. the president's pick to be fed chief gets grilled on the hill and janet yellen answering questions in the senate hearing
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and the president of venezuela is asking for unlimited powers. plus trinkets and bryces of art destroying a massive stockpile of ivory to make a point and we leave you here with a gorgeous shot of capitol hill and the dome where the healthcare law will be thell be big story toda. ♪
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power of the people until we restore our freedoms
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♪ good morning and welcome back to al jazeera america, i'm stephanie si, straight ahead when janet yellen talks they listen and what they had to say at her confirmation hearing but let's look at the temperatures across the nation and metrologist nicole mitchell is back. >> people will enjoy the forecast because it means mild air for places from the midwest to the south that we have had the cool stuff and the high pressure sitting in place the flow on the backside of that has more air south to north and milder temperatures and even right now we have more
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temperatures in the 40s and 50s in the south starting the day versus below freezing yesterday and you will notice the improvement heading out the door and by the coastline today washington d.c. and new york and boston 60 degrees and boston we went from 38 a couple days ago to near 60 day, that is 20 degrees so even though that is 10 degrees above average it will feel like a heat wave. we will talk about if the wet weather will cause a problem in a little bit. >> thank you. president obama's choice to lead the federal reserves said they are getting the economy back on track and yellen was questioned by the banking committee as al jazeera reports some republicans on the panel are not sold on her ideas. >> do you swear or affirm. >> reporter: yellen under scrutiny from the banking committee and many questions regard the fed and supervisory
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roles and the banks have grown since the crash and will the fed do more to avert a future crash? the message was one of continuity and not a surprise and she has been the vice chair of the feds for the last three years and one of the main architects of the easing and flooding of financial institutions with billions of dollars and will land on main street and create jobs. there is plenty of evidence that banks are holding much of the money and not lending and it led to one of the more pointed of the hearing as to why she is continuing with the policy, because it's working or wall street wants it to continue. >> would you agree while it has been an attempt to simulate the economy the more well off benefitted much better than those at the lower end of the spectrum? >> these policies have probably to some extent boosted the stock market which maybe an example of
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what you are talking about. but it's also played an important role i think in helping the housing sector. >> right. >> and boosting housing prices. >> reporter: whether jobs are created or not the financial markets are booming and greeted the pledge of continuity with relief. she has been welcomed by those who feel she is committed to using fed policy to help create jobs despite pressure from the right to concentrate on inflation. >> i think she is a much more open minded economist that we typically see at the feds so in that sense we have concerns, yes, but who would we get there that would be better. >> reporter: others on the left say she doesn't have the boldness to truly confront the u.s. unemployment crisis. >> she is a team player but unfortunately she has been playing on a team that has been unwilling and unable to turn this economic crisis around. >> reporter: and despite suspicions on the left and right
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yellen will take the position next february and al jazeera in washington. >> yellen is the first woman to lead the central bank if confirmed. this is making business news this morning investors excited by the comments by yelle intersection n and it is rising and at an all time high of 15876 and the record in five days. s&p 5 00's scaling peaks on 1791 and nasdaq is up and cisco plummeting after disappointing earnings and see if they hold after manufacturing numbers this morning and stocks are making some analysts nervous. >> it's creating yet another bubble of artificial injections of capital is giving people few
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opportunities for quality stocks and holdings and a rush to find it and the pie is growing but i'm not sure if the rest is. >> reporter: they are benefitting from the yellen effect and up and markets gaining and tokyo had the best weekly performance since 2009, december. wondering where the big money is going? warren buffet disclosed a $3.45 billion in exxon mobile bought in the second quarter and shares good a boost in after hours trading and reduced the share in oil company conoco phillips by 40%. jp morgan trading scandal a report says one of the former workers indicted by a u.s. jury wants to stay in spain and avoid extradition to the u.s. harvey martin taho is accused with another ex employee of
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hiding hundreds of millions of dollars of losses. these were part of the bigger $6.2 billion jp morgan suffered last year, with thousands of island getting aids to the victims is intact and we will go to a remote island where people feel they have been for gotten and ivory treasures being destroyed on purpose and sending a message to poachers and which system should you choose and we will look at this. it was exciting night in sports, thursday night and items on the menu a controversial ending at madison square garden in sports. a live look at the sony store in new york city where the latest playstation is going on sale today. ♪
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conclusion... >> one other thing points to this being an assassination... >> killing arafat sunday at 3pm et/12pm pt on al jazeera america determining using some sort of subjective interpretation of their policy as to whether or not your particular report was actually abusive, because if it doesn't contain language that specifically threatens you directly or is targeted towards you specifically, they may not consider it abuse. they may consider it offensive. and in that case they just recommend that you block that person. >> i don't want to minimise this, because i mean, there's some really horrible things that are on
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line, and it's not - it's not just twitter, what has happened through social media and the anonymity of the net is that you see websites, hate-filled websites targetting all sorts of groups, popping up. there has been a huge number of those that exist as well. the stream is uniquely interactive television. in fact, we depend on you, your ideas, your concerns. >> all these folks are making a whole lot of money. >> you are one of the voices of this show. >> i think you've offended everyone with that kathy. >> hold on, there's some room to offend people, i'm here. >> we have a right to know what's in our food and monsanto do not have the right to hide it from us. >> so join the conversation and make it your own. >> watch the stream. >> and join the conversation online @ajamstream.
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♪ welcome back to al jazeera america, i'm stephanie si, it has been a week since typhoon haiyan devastated the philippines and an estimate says more than 4400 people are dead. help is slowly trickling in to those who need it in the philippines and the government has been under fire for the pace of the distribution in the city of ormok 97% of the population is homeless, most buildings damaged or destroyed and help is just beginning to arrive there. al jazeera veronica has more. >> the uss a naval destroyer part of the uss george washington group arrived very publically and prominent in the city that was devastated by typhoon haiyan exactly a week
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ago and a u.s. helicopter hovering over the city of 200,000 and a visible sign for people here that help is on its way and we are seeing relief goods arriving in the stadium and being distributed through various different channels throughout the city and into outlying neighbors. we went to one neighborhood that is a neighborhood of fisherman with the houses on stilts right over the water. as you can imagine the whole place is a mess, total chaos. many people sat in those houses through the storm and still speak of it with absolute horror and they will find it very hard they acknowledge to get back on their feet again and back to their livelihoods. they did say they are desperate for food and building materials, those two things are what they hope will soon be coming back from the government and they are
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complaining of politicalzation of the distribution effort. >> reporter: veronica reporting from ormak and that is a city of 200,000 people with little available in the way of food and supplies and survivors have been packing ferry terminals trying to get off the island. many of the smaller villages in the philippines have not received any government help and we visited some remote islands where survivors say they feel completely forgotten. >> they are the forgotten victims of haiyan, the people in the islands north of cebu left to their own fate and most managed to survive they too lost their home. we are on an eerie journey trying to verify reports that populations of some small islands have been wiped out. we are heading to an island with a population of 1800. one report saying they all died, luckily turns out to be untrue.
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the survivors tell us we are the first visitors in a week. all the islands show the same pattern of destruction. >> translator: the government has to help us. we are effected here and getting really hungry so we really need food. >> reporter: many residents have decided not to hope for help anymore and tired of waiting they are now helping themselves. one week after haiyan the villages still look like the storm has just happened. everywhere you hear the sound of hammering, people are trying to fix their own houses as much as they can. not only homes but also livelihoods are destroyed by the typhoon and some fishing boats are still intact but others are damaged when fishing equipment has been destroyed by the wind. although relief efforts are underway elsewhere, the island needs help too. >> we we are doing our very best
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to stand on our own but that does not certainly mean that we do not need any help because we do and we are appealing to everyone to please send help. >> reporter: the most urgent needs are shelter, blankets and medicine but there are also shortages of water and food. although they have been invisible so far, these victims of the disaster say it's about time they got help too. al jazeera northern cebu. >> the philippine population of nearly 100,000 spread across the islands and hard to reach even under normal conditions. cia is secretly tracking money transfers in and out of the u.s., data collection includes transactions like western union, the program is authorized under the same law that let's nsa collect international phone records, the financial tracking is overseen by the foreign
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intelligence court known as fiza, and prices rising and part of the economic crisis in venezuela and the president says he can fix it if she given more power and as al jazeera reports opponents fear he wants to rule with an iron fist. >> translator: following in the footsteps of chavez, 6 months in the job he asked the national assembly for exceptional powers to rule for a year. on thursday he got the first of the two votes he needs. >> translator: we have approved the first discussion of the law that gives nicholas maduro special powers to keep fighting against power and speculators. >> reporter: he needs the powers with inflation running over 50% and shortage of basic goods such as milk and toilet paper and fight what he calls
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economic warfare. over the weekend they sent soldiers in electronic stores to cut prices, sending people into a frenzy of bargain hunting. with the new powers he promises to slash prices of products and crack down on black markets currency speculators but some fear he will use them against political rivals. >> translator: the president will be able to do anything he wants with the law. i have the impression he will use this instrument to legally harass, intimidate and suppress more opposition. >> reporter: maduro socialist party gave him special powers after the assembly removed an opposition politician for fraud. representative maria, a former chavista said the charges were trumped up. >> translator: i call on the
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government and other powers to pretend, don't be so obvious and evident and what you are tying to do to the venezuela people. >> the vote comes one month less than local elections and referendum and the president's rule and hopes the special powers will convince people he can fix the country's growing economic issues, al jazeera karaka. >> more than 100 businessman have been arrested on price gouging charges there. canada has led to arrests on child pornography and helped save nearly 400 children from exploitation. arrest of a man charged with running a child porn site on the internet started the investigation and project spade turned up 1,000 pieces of evidence as they track down users of the site, about 70 arrests were in the u.s. it is a case that has rocked a southern california school district and today a former
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teacher accused of a series of lewd acts involving students will be back in court and 62-year-old mark burnt will receive 25 year sentence after pleading no contest to 2 dozen charges and arrested after a drug store reported processing pictures of him of blind folded children and found a spoon from a classroom test game with fluids in south la for 30 years, and sending a message to elephant poachers and crushing ivory and will not put up with slaughtering elephants for their tusks. >> a giant crushing machine, the same to pulvarize rock and stone went to work outside of the refuge in denver, colorado, six
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tons of illegal ivory was turned to dust to send a message to the world that selling tusks from slaughtered elephants will not be tolerated. >> you can't do it with clean hands, we are the second largest market in the world that is legal to use ivory and unless we get control of our own markets how can we ask china to do the same. by doing there is we are taking the first step. >> reporter: much of the ivory heads for china and other countries in asia and they have been collecting ivory and storing it at a warehouse outside of denver for 20 years. >> ivory is trading at such a high value on the black market there is sufficient incentive for poachers and hunters and traders to move small pieces of ivory and it means on the ground, it's just not hunters removing a single elephant it's
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taking down a herd. >> much of the illegal poaching and trading is carried out by terrorist organizations and cartel that traffic ivory instead of drugs. >> it's low-risk crime where individuals can make hundreds of thousands if not millions on elephant or rhino horn in a short period of time and in some countries they will not face jail time. >> we have a choice, we will either be witness or solution to an unfolding ecological disaster. >> international enforcement needs to be stepped up or elephants will go extinct in our lifetimes. >> one elephant dying every 15 minutes that is 30,000 elephants a year just by simple math and in less than ten years elephants are gone and the time is yesterday. we just have run out of time.
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>> reporter: remains of destruction will be saved to build a memorial for slaughtered elephants and other historically significant pieces were saved for schools and museums. jim with al jazeera denver, colorado. >> reporter: the illegal trade is $10 billion a year industry. these are tough times for the video game industry, sales of the games themselves and platforms they are played on have plummeted, look at this chart, hardware sales down two thirds from $314 million to $99 million and game sales off behalf by $403 to $310 and they are trying to reignite interest with two new gaming platforms and the playstation 4 launches today and x-box one will come out next friday, the price for the playstation four is $400, x-box one will cost $100 more
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and joining us to break down the next generation of gaming console and seeing if they can reignite the profession and he is from albany, new york this morning and good morning to you, first things first have you gotten your hands on either of the hot consoles? >> yes, i had the opportunity to play with both of them and both are great and interesting approaches. playstation four is focused on gaming and x-box one is a home entertainment system taking over your living room and your television watching and really deliver a more complete experience. >> reporter: so it's been seven years since the last release from sony or microsoft and now they are both coming out at the same time, how big of a deal is this for the gaming community? >> it's a huge deal for sure. it has been 7 years since the last new launch and ninetendo a couple years ago but did not
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rock the boat like these are and gamers are waiting and sales declining because they are saving up money for the consoles and playstation for is $400 and cheaper and the last generation when the playstation 3 launched it was more expensive than microsoft and priced at $600 and sony said it was too expensive and lowered the price for play station four and better sales of the 3 when it launched eight years ago but this time it's the more expensive option of $500. >> reporter: they are saying sony this is the last shot in the gaming sector and what has gone wrong in the gaming industry and we have a chart that illustrates how far sales have fallen and it's pretty extraordinary. where are consumers going? >> the vast majority of gamers are going to mobile devices and smartphones and so many people have smartphones in their pockets now and okay playing
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more simple games and they have horse power and experiences and ap graphics and surround sound at home but younger gamers are playing angry birds on their phone or simple games that don't deliver the experience but are cheaper and you can play them on the bus or school or home and for a lot of people that kind of tickles the gaming need for them and they are okay with that. >> reporter: as you said these systems now, these two new systems are promising more than game console, is that the strategy to bring it in with skype and netflixs and social networking features? >> yeah, it certainly is and that is what bill gates wanted with the original x-box, wanted an entertainment system and a computer in your living room and that evolved to what we see with x-box one and it's more than a gaming machine, it's really a home hub for entertainment as
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well as communication and skype looks great and high definition camera in there and it costs more than playstation four because it includes a camera and you can do netflix and streaming and rent through your x-box and it's more of a home entertainment hub more than a pure gaming system and that is how they need to evolve to stay competitive because people are not willing to spend $400-500 to play games. >> they have come a long way since sega-genesis and we have the alleged bully in the miami dolphins hazing scandal is now challenging his team. >> the last game i had is atari. >> i still love pacman. >> we start with the latest in the miami dolphins and the ring leader of the campaign against martin filed a grievance against the dolphins and his grievance
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is of the non-injury variety according to the nfl players association and wants to speed up the appeals process as he end suspension by the miami dolphins, under this he is entitled to a hearing in seven days and losing $235,000 for each game he misses. on the field thursday night chuck and the colts starting fast for a change and out scored 49-3 in the first halves and it continued in tennessee and chris johnson had 30 yard force the score and they are 14-0 in the first quarter and by the third quarter they are within four and they will set you free for 11 yard touchdown and 17 points in the third quarter and a three-point lead and 11 yard score of his own and beat the titans and the only team with
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the winning record in the afc. and they ventured to death valley and clemson tried to win over unranked op opponents and taking on georgia tech and in this game he was career leaders in touchdown in the third quarter and watkins makes a fresher cut than the barber will give you and watkins two touchdowns and ran for another and got hurt and left the game and clemson said he was bruised and not broken and tigers win 55-31 to keep their at large hopes alive. it's always a dilemma for us here when we bring you highlights from madison square garden and which star do we open with, bacon and woody allen is alive and well and he is saying i'm truly honored.
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it's honoring from highlights and scored 26 for 15 shooting and in the quarter and houston 3 point lead and six seconds to play and go to carmello and hits and shoots and it was none. refs say he fouled carmello and should he be? you be the judge. the coach wants to give the call the death penalty thumbs down and carmellow would have the free throws and one more shot for them to tie it and smith puts it up and no good and the next ball to rockets 109-106. they are hosting this and doves trail with the ball and catches the in bound and drains the fourth game winner of his nba career, warriors stunned them 116-115 and much rejoicing and
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third base man cabrera and say he was better this year and sold and he is the american league most valuable player for the second straight year because his batting average on base and batting is higher and led al in all three categories for the second season and the first from frank thomas in 93 and 94 and 317, 84 runs, 27 stolen bases and 20 of 30 first votes and the first since barry bonds. >> that was a good woody allen impressions and didn't know you did that. >> working on one of you. >> giving without giving, unique ways to support charities that won't cost you money. ♪
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>> audiences are intelligent and they know that their
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. ♪ welcome back to al jazeera america, just ahead how you can help your favorite causes without going into your wallet
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but let's look at what potential precipitation we are looking at across the u.s. and nicole mitchell is back. >> we are a couple areas going on with high pressure moving out that left enough space kind of behind the blocking high for moisture to come in to the southeast and what we see with that is most of this will stay light rain and not a lot of available moisture that enough that along the gulf coast and we can watch that and the next big weather system is the one in the northwest, already by the next couple day, midwest tomorrow, through the great lakes region sunday so this is a mover and we will talk more about it coming up, and back to you. >> thank you. today is national philanthropy and it is hard to donate to causes there is a new twist on fundraising and as stacey tisdale report they let voters chip in without opening their
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wallet. >> when she was grewing up in massachusetts her family emphasized the importance of giving back and last summer became charitable became difficult when she lost her job. >> when you give or spend when you are unemployed you know everything you spend is going out and you have nothing to refill it. >> reporter: but using a website called good search.com she is able to donate money simply by using the good search search engine. >> a penny a search for the charity or school. >> reporter: veteran in the field with 15 million last years alone and raised $10 million through 1.2 billion transactions taking place on the site and they are helping you give without giving and charity miles for champ earn 10 cents a mile for biking and 25 cents for walking or running including autism speak, habitat for
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humanity and michael j fox and people raised $300,000 and money goes to help feed hungry children in the united states and it provided 1.3 million meals and on shop.com and retailers including amazon, 800-flowers and apple will give to a charity of your choice. >> people want to do good and want to give back but in this economy they don't have money and don't have time and doing good is not convenient so we take your simple daily actions and giving ways to give back the way you live your life. >> reporter: why would some of the biggest corporation rayes in the world partner with companies like these to raise money for charity? experts say it can boost their bottom lines. >> they see evidence they will get more people to buy their product. >> in fact, a survey found 89%
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of participants will be likely to switch from one brand to another that is associated with a good cause but give your cause and your cause-related advertiser a close look. >> look at the finances. you need to look at who is in charge, the governance and look for evidence of results, meaning the mission. >> reporter: the mission of heper is the charity of choice. >> it's an organization that is dedicated to ending poverty and hunger through the model of if you give a man a fish he eats for a day, if you teach a man to fish he will eat for a lifetime. >> reporter: giving and teaching one click at a time stacey tisdale al jazeera new york. >> according to giving usa americans lead the world in donations with more than $316 billion each year. thomas joins us with a look at the stories we are following for the next hour. >> a week after typhoon haiyan slammed the philippines the
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death toll is rising as international aid arrives and president obama says he will change the healthcare law to help people's current policies being cancelled and the house of representatives is working on a fix to change the affordable healthcare act more and the bill is up for vote today. i'm john henry smith would you endure mixed martial arts for free, i will have a story about guys who do that. >> i'm nicole mitchell and a storm system is taking hold in the northwest and i will show you where conditions are turning treacherous and we will be back with you in just 2 1/2 minutes.
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>> al jazeera america brings you live coverage: typhoon haiyan. >> relief efforts are well underway here in cebu. >> we have a problem with no homes to go back to. >> clean water, food, medicine, all vitally required. >> the australian medical team arrived. >> this is a government warehouse that is preparing relief for the families most effected. >> al jazeera america is there with continuing live coverage. >> the water rose to half-way up to the second story. >> to find out how you can help, go to aljazeera.com.
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>> support effort gets a boost as u.s. forces arrive with aid. >> a battle for water, life could change for some fisherman. >> play station four's here as
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excited fans stand in line for the game. some big, as the fight between sony and microsoft is no laughing matter. >> good morning. said friday, welcome to aljazeera america. >> in a reversal of policy, president obama says he will make changes to the new health care law, allowing insurers to reinstate canceled medical policies for a year. >> the first test of the president's changes will come in just a few hours from now when the house is set to vote on a bill that would take his moves a step further. the republican-sponsored bill would allow americans to buy plans that don't meet the law. democrats will likely vote against it, but the white house
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is watching to see how many still side with republicans. >> when it comes to this health care law, the white house doesn't have much credibility. let's be clear. the only way to protect the american people is to scrap this law once and for all. there is no way to fix this. >> house leaders are expected to offer their own plan today. republicans are likely to reject it. the president said he would veto the republican sponsored bill. >> the changes would allow insurers to reinstate policy's for a year. they would be required to tell those customers what those plans do not cover. we have more on the changes. >> with public support sinking and democrats on the verge of revolt, president obama decided it was time for a full mea culpa. >> that's on me. i mean, we fumble would the rollout on this health care law. >> the president denied he was aware of prelaunch tests that warned of disaster for
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healthcare.gov. >> i was not informed directly that the website would not be working. i don't think i'm stupid enough to go around saying this is going to be like shopping on amazon or travel os city a week before the website opens if i thought it wasn't going to work. >> with millions having their plans canceled, the president proposed a fix. >> insurers can extend current plans that would otherwise be canceled into 2014 and americans who's plans have been canceled can choose to reenroll in the same kind of plan. >> there is no guarantee insurers will offer the old plans. the top lobbyists slammed the proposal. changings rules could destabilize the market and result in higher premiums for consumers. it wasn't good enough for republicans. they told tales of canceled coverage. >> nearly 25,000 people in
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nevada lose insurance plans under obamacare. >> a greater concern, democrats threatens to did he have mr. obama with some pushing bills to force insurers to offer oh the old plans. the senate's mary andrews faces a fight for reelect. >> we will probably need legislation to make the president's plan stick. >> top aids were sent to capitol hill to calm nervous democrats, whose eroding support threatens the second term agenda. >> it's legitimate to expect me to have to win back credibility on this health care law in particular and a whole range of issues in general. >> even as he showeds the blame, he insist the health care reform will work. >> these are two fumbles on a big game, which the game's not over. >> mike viqueira, aljazeera, the white house.
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>> the leading industry trade group warned the president's changes might increase premiums. >> president obama's vision for health care reform has evolved since he first ran for president. this is what then senator obama told americans in 2007 during his presidential bid. >> let's be the generation that says righted here, right now, we will have universal health care in america by the end of the next president's first term! >> the president took a different tack in june of 2009 when he was selling the affordable care act to the country. >> if you like your plan and you like your doctor, you won't have to do a thing, you keep your plan. >> in the fall of 2009, president obama was working to get congress to pass it and here's what he promised americans. >> now is what we must bring the best ideas of both parties together and show the american people that we can still do what we were sent here to do. now is the time to deliver on health care.
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>> when it was time to sign the bill in march of 2010, the president again assured americans they could keep their plans. >> if you like your current insurance, you will keep your current insurance. >> we're going to oh have more coming up with the assistant professor of public health. let's go to stephanie. >> zack cooper is an assistant professor of public health and economics at yale university in new haven, connecticut and that's where he joins us from this morning. professor cooper, thanks for being with us this morning. help us clear the confusion. what is president obama's announcement yesterday that people can keep their n plan actually mean for these people? >> let's talk about the fix, which i think is quite problematic. he proposed that insurance companies can keep offering it. the law essentially said if your plan didn't meet some minimum benefits, if it had lifetime caps, if it didn't offer certain
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preventative services, it wasn't going to be grandfathered in. it says these plans can exist. the first challenge is i think this is pretty unlikely to work. what it doesn't do is compel, it doesn't require these insurance companies to offer them. it simply hopes they will. i don't think they actually are going to. i think that's going to present the credibility problem for the administration. they said the exchange would work. it isn't. they've said this is going to fix the problem. i don't think it will. more than that, they said the website's going to be live on the 30th and i don't think it will be. i think this is a real challenge. i think the bigger problem would be if this did work and we could see these plans in the market, because what we're going to see is healthier people will go towards these plans which are typically less generous and cheaper, leaving the sick people stuck the exchange. >> as you said, some industry executives within the insurance industry have come out and they don't like this rule change.
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it's not clear to me why they don't want to offer these types of insurance. >> well, here's the big issue. i don't think it's that they don't want to. i think what they're worried about is risk segmentation. insurance markets work really, really well when you have a lot of people under the same roofs. you can spread risks across the population. the more we have a cheap plan out there, stripped down benefits at a lower price, you're going to see the healthier people going to that product, leaving the sicker people to the exchanges. what that does, if you only have the sickest folks, the premiums for that product are going to rise. >> is it possible and it sounds like this is what you're saying is that these new rules that president obama is suggesting may create more problems than they solve. >> i think there's a real risk of that. i think the bigger challenge here is we're forgetting that this is a big picture, year long process. the time to judge the a.c.a. is really going to be a year from
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now. what worries me is reaction to short term politics that could make the law essentially worse than it was before we started. >> one thing's for sure, it's leaving a lot of people confused. thank for clearing up some of it for us. >> continuing our coverage now in the philippines, thousands throughout that battered country are still desperate for food and aid and received a boost with the arrival of the uss george washington. 5,000 sailors arrived, they will provide hundreds of thousands of gallons of water every day. it is welcome news for tacloban residents. thousands stood in line at the city's airport waiting for food. u.s. officials say there's more to come. >> a large volume of assistant was pushed through to tacloban. now together with the helicopters from the george washington carrier strike group, together with the philippine's
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own helicopters, all of those assets moving resources from tacloban out to multiple points. i think 16 or 18 different prop points. >> the destruction left behind by haiyan is turning the city into a morgue. the city has suffered the most casualties and workers are starting to bury the unidentified dead in mass graves. >> the airport in cebu has become the hub for the aid in the philippines. we have covered the story in cebu. paul, you have followed the transformation of this airport. how is the relief effort going at this point? >> it's around the clock operation here. you see a mix of civilian and military aircraft from around
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the world. this pile of creates behind me tells the story in itself. that is water purification equipment that has come in from germany. it is going out of the airport to north of cebu, but it's been there all day waiting for the trucks to get here to take it out. meanwhile, troubles are coming in, delivering rice and supplies going the other direction toward tacloban and other outlying areas where they're still waiting for supplies to arrive. >> there have been issues with distributing aid. is there a sense from officials there that there are enough industries at this point? >> that's what we really seem to hear is that the supplies are coming in. it's a bottleneck of distribution in getting enough planes in and out as well as distributing once they land in the outlying areas. the roads are often still blocked. it's very difficult to get out to these outlying areas. we spoke to two australian aid
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officials here planning to make three flights today. they could only make two. they simply couldn't get in and out of the airport here and in tacloban quickly enough. the issue is the congestion, the lack of capacity at the airports and unclear roads. >> how soon will we see the impact of the uss george washington's arrival and its relief and rescue efforts? >> what we're hearing is that's really going to pick up tomorrow. there are 21 helicopters on the uss george washington alone and planes that are able to fly and land like a helicopter, as well. those will mike an enormous difference. we've seen them taking off and landing here. that's going to have a huge impact, those 5,000 troops and enormous supply capacity of that carrier strike group. >> paul beban reporting from cebu, thanks, paul.
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>> when the typhoon hit, thousands of desperate residents in tacloban needed shelter. one week later, the city's astro dome is still home to many of them. now it has become a pit of if it. the smell of human feces is in the air. no aid has arrived at the astro dome and not a single relief worker is in fight. the scene is reminiscent of the days after hurricane katrina when the astro dome was used. >> 20,000 took refuge after hurricane chris hit. seven days later, the superdome was evacuate'd and everyone sent to the astro dome in houston. >> it was the town where haiyan first struck exactly one week ago. the destruction so extensive, many people still can't believe they actually survived.
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we have more. >> this used to be a tourist town with a 16th century church as one of its main attractions. it's all gone now. guyian was the first to experience the pure rye of haiyan, a fury that lasted for many terrifying hours. >> only there is a toilet. we wash to the toilet. >> what are you thinking? >> i think this is my first -- my last day of my life during the typhoon. >> the old pictureesque town is in radio indianapolis. the place where the super typhoon landed first has to start from scratch. people here are spiced that they are alive. >> it took five days for aid to arrive. the u.s. military is airlifting relief around the clock. medical personnel from abroad
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are setting up field hospitals and people are cueing for hours to be treated. >> we are worried about the infectious diseases, because the sanitary conditions are not very good. there's no electricity, lack of running water, so the toilets are not functioning. people live in makeshift buildings with plastic sheeting or in the schools. they want to open the schools, but families are cramped together, so the national health authorities are really trying hard now to monitor. >> this man says he has not had any help except for two kilos of rice. although aid is now coming in, he is still worried it won't reach him. >> i'm asking the help, the whole world, and it must be directed to the homeless people. >> one week after the disaster,
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the people are geeian say their main feeling is of sadness for a town gone forever. >> before the storm devastated the area, local people hoped to create a resort area for surfers in the beach town. >> the c.i.a. is secretly tracking money transfers in and out of the sufficient, including transactions by americans with companies like western union. the program is authorized under the same law that lets the n.s.a. collect international phone records. financial tracking is overseen by the foreign intelligence known as fisa. >> the northwest is dealing with winter weather today. let's bring in meteorologist nicole mitchell. >> it will be going downhill, snow picking up and today into tomorrow, starting to see that. the pattern we've had kind of broad term is the high pressure
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in the east coast influencing that cold air. on the backside of that, we're finally starting to get warmer temperatures, more 60's up the coastline. we are already cool in the northwest. across the country, we've got low pressure coming in from canada. the flow around that will be on the coastline picking up the moisture and increasing winds. those add to problems if you're going to see snow, that heavy snow in some cases and winds driving that. this is all just starting to come in now. by mid-day, more of that. as temperatures drop overnight, snow in the higher elevations will start to hit the valleys in some cases. watch for some valley locations, maybe three inches plus, some of the higher elevations, that could be a foot plus that we're dealing with, so these are some of the precipitation totals we're looking for. seattle, almost 100% chance for rain, but that will be rain. this system is going to be on the move, already in the midwest
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tomorrow, great lakes sunday, so one we'll have to keep our eye on. i'll have more on the temperatures in a couple minutes. >> record highs on wall street as the president's choice to lead the fed goes to capitol hill. >> the vow she makes for the economy. >> evidence for unfound rape cases found in a warehouse. >> the video war is heating up as sony's play station hits the stores. you are looking live where plenty of people will be lining up for play station four. they've within waiting what, seven years? playing the new gaming system. we'll be right back, stay with us.
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>> good morning. welcome back to aljazeera america. >> good to have you with us. coming up in just a moment, a critical tool in building evidence for rape cases, but in detroit, financial problems are
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threatening efforts to prosecute sexual attackers. that's coming up. >> first let's get a look at what temperatures we can expect across the nation today. nicole mitchell is back. >> we have a lot of improvements, the high pressure in place that brought on the front side of it air from the north now on the backside of it with air out of the south, so warming in a lot of cases. you felt it outside in some of those forecasts. you get the sunny skies, helping us warm up. in the south, those blow freezing temperatures are back in the 40's in some cases today. all up and down the east coast, some places have gone 20 degrees warmer, so we've had definitely some relief. back to you guys. >> sony's play station four, the latest in gaming consoles hit u.s. stores today. hundreds of fans lined up for hours in new york city for sony's official release party. despite the cold, fans were
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excited about the midnight release of the console. >> sony has done many great things for me and every gamer to not be excited. you've got a whole bunch of things coming with the p.s.4. it's here finally. >> sony says gamers will notice improved features, including faster game play, social networking features and an array of game. >> those gamers don't care about the weather. >> taking the course of the economy, president obama's pick to lead the federal reserve said she will continue the fed's policies. janet yellen was questioned by the senate banking committee. some expressed concerns that the bond buying strategy is creating a market bubble. yellen vowed to do what is necessary to create jobs and get america back on track. >> senator, the objective of our policy is to broadly benefit all americans, especially those who are seeing harm come to them and their families from high
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unemployment in a recovery that's taken a long time and been frankly disappointing. >> if confirmed, yellen would be the first woman ever to head the world's most powerful central bank. >> the comments that yellen made are boosting stock. futures are still up after wall street set another world. the dow has set its fourth record in five days. the s&p is 17,091. the nasdaq is up. we'll see if gains stick after two key readings of manufacturing of out later this morning. >> one analyst says wall street would enjoy it if yellen becomes fed chair woman and continues the easy money policy. >> the unemployment is higher that that the numbers suggest, because more people have left
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the workforce than we've ever seen and the numbers of artificial at this point in time. the second thing that's going on is corporate earnings are still growing, but slowing. the fed is the only one with the playbook and enough capitol to inject that back in the market and keep the liquidity train moving. >> overseas, the yellen effect is spreading to other markets and europe, major indexes are up, asian markets up. the nikkei had its best performance since 2009. >> samsung is gaining more ground on the smart phone wars, selling ate .4 million devices in the third quarter, up from 55 million a year ago. it's closest rival apple sold 33.3 million. global shares fell from 14% to 18%. >> an update on j.p. morgan trading scandal. one of the former workers
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indicted wants to stay in spain and avoid extradition to the u.s. javier martin ortello is accused with another employee of hiding hundreds of millions of dollars of losses. these are part of the losses j.p. morgan suffered last year. >> have you ever wondered where the big money is going? it has a stake in exxon mobil. berkshire also revealed that recently reduced its investments in rival oil company con co phillips by more than 40%. >> d.n.a. tests are the strongest physical evidence in rape cases, but houses of kids are often put in storage untested. prosecutors in detroit be trying to reopen unsolved cases and say they are running low on money.
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>> over 11,000 untested rape kits, some dating back two decades. for years, the kits hospitals used collected dust inside this old detroit police storage facility. >> i was surprised, but i wasn't completely shocked. >> wayne county prosecutor kim worthy made the discovery during a tour of the warehouse back in 2009. >> so there was nothing else to do but pursue it with, and make sure that at least at some point in these victims' lives that we get justice for what happened to them, five, 10, 15, 25 years ago. >> fighting these cases comes at a cost. without county funding, the office depends on donations and grants to test these abandoned rape kits. money is running out and resources thin. >> the fact that i now have to have fundraisers to source this office is what we have to do. >> is that normal?
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>> no, it's not normal. it's ridiculous. it's ridiculous, but that's what we have to do. >> so far, 1,154 rape kits have been tested and reviewed by michigan state police. through d.n.a. analysis, they've identified 300 suspected rapists, and 59 serial offenders. as a result, over a dozen rapists have been prosecuted, including this man. >> mr. grant, you will be sentenced to a minimum term of seven years to a maximum of 20 years. >> 39-year-old antonio grant, recently sentenced to prison for raping a woman in 2004. the rape kit crisis isn't exclues i have to detroit. in 1984, carol bart of dallas, texas was raped. her kit went untested for two decades. she speaks about the issue and the need for more funding to test these kits. >> i want them to know that
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there are people like me who will come out and speak about the rape kits until we get all the money with he need to have them all processed. >> worthy says an additional $15 million is needed to test the kits and investigate and prosecute the cases. with countless rape victims still out there, the prosecutor hopes funding issues won't compromise justice. >> there are about 400,000 untested rape kits nationwide. >> working in america to help those suffering in the philippines. >> filipino american communities across the country are working to send help back home. >> we're going to take you to one community offering their time and money to make a difference. >> making their voices heard in the political machine. students in one country looking to make their lives better through the power of voting. >> people in a florida community, how a legal battle
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over water could bring generation of oyster fishing to an end. >> professional mixed martial arts is illegal in new york state. how one fight club still manages to stage perfectly legal fights. coming up this week on techknow. san francisco's bay bridge, an engineering marvel but this is earthquake country. >> how close are we to one of those faultlines? >> now inovation, that might change everything. >> how safe is this building? >> earthquake inovations, >> where would you wanna be if a big quake hits? >> techknow sunday 7:30 eastern on al jazeera america
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al jazeera america - a new voice in american journalism - >>introduces america tonight. >>in egypt, police fired teargas at supporters of the ... >>a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. [[voiceover]] they risk never returning to the united states. >>grounded.
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>>real. >>unconventional. [[voiceover]] we spent time with some members of the gangster disciples. >>an escape from the expected. >>i'm a cancer survivor. not only cancer, but brain cancer. america tonight weeknights - 9 eastern on al jazeera america >> welcome back to aljazeera america. i'm thomas drayton. >> i'm stephanie sy. in the wake of this disaster in the philippines, the huge filipino community here in the u.s. is really pitching in to send aid. we're going to have a live report from a community in new jersey that's doing just that, helping their family members, as well as total strangers. >> it's a tight knit community, certainly in pain. we're going to take you down to florida. a billion dollar industry is under threat over a legal battle
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for fresh water. this could end generations of fisherman. we'll have that story in a moment. >> i know you have some acting chops. maybe you want to head to chick, because the next star wars film, they are casting for a couple major roles. >> people are lining up already. >> the general public is lining up in chicago to try to be in the next star wars. >> these are big roles. >> it's a huge film franchise, one of the biggest ever. >> the story coming up. >> it's been a week since typhoon haiyan did he have stated the philippines. a new estimate says 44 must not of dead and thousands desperate for aid. the arrival. uss george washington should help the relief effort, bringing 5,000 sailors and providing hundreds of thousands of gallons every day. >> filipino american communities are banding together, donating money and much-needed supplies for typhoon victims in their homeland. there are collections like this one here in chicago. that's happening across the
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country. in one new jersey city, haiyan's impact is hitting home in a town known as little manila. that's where we are this morning. good morning, erika. >> good morning, stephanie. it's easy to see why this area of new jersey is called little manila. look at these store fronts here. we've got max's of manila and filan food thes here. a lot of people here have family in the central philippines, so it's no surprise why many of banding together to help the victims of typhoon haiyan. >> he works with a steady hand, even as the crisis halfway around the world weighs heavily on marty alejandro's mind. his bar herb shop is one of several small businesses in jersey city giving to the typhoon relief effort if the philippines. >> during sandy was hard enough, without power, we still had the normal luxuries of running water.
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with new sewage, then you have to scavenge for food and everything that you own, which is probably not even valuable at all, you've lost, i mean, i can't even put myself in that position. >> this young barber just heard from his family. >> my grandma and grandma's house, it's gone. we have to either sell the property or, you know, just to rebuild it, it's going to take a lot. >> that's why they're donating 100% of revenue generated sunday to the american red cross. they're taking in canned goods and blankets. >> it's bad, you know, especially for them where a lot of the people don't have anything, you know, to begin with, you know, you know, over there, it's all about depending on each other, you know what i mean? one person helps another. >> many local donations wind up at a shipping company sending supplies to the philippines free of charge. >> it's really good, because
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we're having like 10 calls in a day, like 10 people that were asking for donations. >> 15 donation boxes are shipping out this weekend filled with things that so many people need, like this donation box here, baby bottles, water bottles and of course plenty of closed, all headed straight for devastated areas like cebu as a way to show their love for fellow filipinos. >> it's powerful, even if they're not family members, but still, you can feel the loss and devastation. >> the cargo company sits on this stretch of jersey city, new jersey, known as little manila, because it's home to 18 house filipino americans. powerful images of the devastation caused by typhoon haiyan in the central philippines are moving the community to action. in a single day, they donated more than $20,000 at a red cross
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fundraiser. filipino american and city council president rivera. >> they have a deep love for their homeland, as do i, as well. >> you can see that in every restaurant and store on the main road through little manila. by talking with the customers are inside, like arlene, her family is fine in the northern philippines, yet she has donated clothes and a week's worth of her salary as a nurse. >> filipinos always have a good heart. we always help each other, every time when we have this crisis in our country. >> the idea of the filipino community coming together to help each other is truly just a part of the culture. in fact, in their language, they have a word for it, and it refers to the spirit of communal unity which we have truly seen here in little manila. >> we should all learn that
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word. thanks, erika. >> nearly three and a half million americans traced their ancestry to the philippines. they are the nation's second largest asian american ethnic group. 40% live on the west coast. there are 80,000 filipino americans in california and 50,000 more live in san francisco. the medium income of filipino american families is $75,000. >> they're helping, because there's so much work ahead. joining us to discuss the cries is jennifer harvey, communications officer for the catholic relief services, joining us from the philippines. we appreciate your time. i know you've been traveling by ferry for the last four hours. can you tell us what that journey was like? >> i'm sorry, can you repeat that question? >> no problem. i know you were traveling, it's now nighttime where you are, but this morning you were traveling by ferry for the past four hours. can you tell us what that
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journey was like for you, what did you see? >> the journey was actually great. the ferry, i did have trouble getting on the ferry yesterday. i was happy to get a ticket. when i reached i did, the ferry was functional, but i saw a lot of damaged buildings upon arrival. >> are we seeing a lot of aid coming to the outlying islands, where you are? >> in tacloban, has great access to the ferries, there is relief coming there. there are many places that don't have relief goods at this time especially in the more remote areas, such as south of tacloban. those areas still need a lot of help and resources. >> you were able to get on the ferry, but the service is limited. are the people on these remote islands able to evacuate yet?
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>> there is a backlog of people trying to evacuate. with the situation so desperate and resources so limited, there was a huge backlog at the ferry yesterday. one of my colleagues was trying to get off the island yesterday. he stood in line for seven hours and never managed to get on a boat. there's just an enormous backlog of people needing transportation. people are not able to get it at this point. >> how are you communicating with your team members and other i do organizations about the immediate needs of the people? >> right now, we're very fortunate that mobile phone service is somewhat backed up on the island, but the internet is still down, so we are relying on phone calls and text messages at this time, and we're very hopeful that internet service will come back soon, because that will make coordination much easier. catholic relief services on the
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network -- >> what are you hearing about the greatest need at this point, ms. harvey? >> right now, people are desperate for clean water, food, and shelter. it's pouring down rain right now where i am, and my heart just goes out to many of the people who are suffering through this rainstorm without shelter. the needs are still quite urgent especially as the rainy season continues. >> our thoughts are with you. we know you have a difficult road ahead and we certainly hope that rain does subside. joining us from the philippines, we appreciate your time this morning. >> a big change in china's one child policy approximately the communist nation agreed to let parents with no siblings have two children. couples in china are currently limited to one child. critics argue that a rapidly aging population could hurt china's competitiveness in the
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world economy. china announced it would end reeducation labor camps for those convicted of crimes without trials. >> it's a common problem for students, taking out loans to go to college. teens are taking to the streets in chile protesting what they call a major flaw in the education system. we have more. >> nicole is a 20-year-old engineering student. like tens of thousands of young people in chile, she had to choice but to take out a loan to go to university, one when she starts work will take her at least six, perhaps many more years to pay off. >> if i don't have a loan i can't study, but when i finish my career, i have to pay it all back plus interest. this system must change, giving priority to those who need it most. >> education, health care and unemployment are major topics of conversation between nicole and her friends, all voting for the first time in the presidential
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elections. >> previous generations were scared and kept quiet because of the dictatorship, but now my generation can change things. >> started by students three years ago, these protests are now a common sight, and they've attracted other disgruntled sectors of society. the distribution of wealth ranks among the worst in the world, the growing gap between the rich and the rest. >> the rest live in places like this, not shanty towns, but places where people are simply trying to earn a living, educate their children, and have what they feel is a fairer share of the cake. >> democracy was restored after years of military rule. many complain that little has been done since then to fundamentally reform the system.
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>> we're optimistic. the students have demonstrated we can move the goal posts through collective action. >> nicole has two younger brothers. her parents are both in low-paying jobs and say their lives already are a struggle and knowing they have more children to educate is simply frightening. >> our wages are ridiculous. without a loan, we have to choose between educating them and not having enough to eat. that is our reality. >> a reality which with so many calls, they hope will force politicians to turn their words into action. aljazeera, santiago, chile. >> there are no free universities in chief yea, but other south american countries wave tuition at public institution. >> it's time for sports and john henry smith is here with an
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interesting story about the story of underground mixed martial arts. >> i'm glad you find it interesting. i hope you find it interesting after you see this piece. new york stated is one of two states in america where the fights are illegal. on a recent trip, i found a league which manages to put these fights on anyway and it's all perfectly legal. >> 25-year-old jerome nichol is on his way to take part in a sport he has grown to love and hopes will help him take care of a son he loves, a son he was separated from after a run-in with the law. >> i came home and since october, i've been doing damage. >> when jerome says damage, jerome means damage. on this night, jerome's competing in a mixed martial arts fight, a sport which is illegal in new york state.
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>> i first was like wow, i used to see them on t.v. you tell me there are fights like this locally? >> this is an underground combat league bought. he is division a champion. it's the brain child of exfighter peter storm. >> we keep it old school, text people, fight on this day, this location. that's it, that's the have it. >> that's the have it. >> that's the have it. >> is there a reason you don't put it on a facebook page? >> i have a league called the underground combat league. the minute i start advertising it all over, it no longer becomes underground. >> peter started this show in 2003 when the athletic commission was actively trying to shut down anything m.m.a. >> there are two reasons no authority is trying to shut it down. one, it doesn't serve alcohol and two, it doesn't pay its fighters. >> as long as nobody's getting paid, there's only so much they can do. >> i got a guy who wants to go pro, i got a guy who wants to
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get in shape and be in pro fighting shape, so, you know, guys do it to test their skills. everybody has their own personal reason. >> pay isn't the only thing they lack. >> you might be lucky if somebody is scouting the crowd. >> if someday gets injured, we take them to the hospital. >> no prefight aids testing. >> they do just basic physicals. >> no rules except for what the fighters agree to. >> gentlemen rules, no low blows, fighting, scratching, no eyes. everything else. last minute, a guy that just previously fought, maybe two fights before him, say i'll take it if the lighter doesn't show. it's the love of the sport. >> the one thing it does have
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for an aspire fighter like jerome is opportunity. >> if i didn't fight this league, i would say it's good to get in the sport. i found somebody who takes me in and train me and knows i'm willing to do it, it definitely helped me pretty much start the that base of my career. >> the fighter leveled a brutal beating to his opponent and retain his championship belt. i just used the term brutal, but that's a term jerome himself would bristle at. >> it is dangerous, but so is bang marine, so is the army life, police work. i'm not getting shot at in the cage, so it's not that dangerous. a concussion is not that bad, you can wake up well refreshed, too. >> waking up at the highest level is something jim genea says is possible. >> this has ban viable springboard for many fighters.
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franky edgar was u.f.c. champ. >> this is not for the dollar, it's because i grew to love it. >> the biggest m.m.a. league, the ultimate fighting championship is pursuing a lawsuit to lift the ban in new york state. >> john, thank you. >> fresh water is at the cent are of a legal battle in the south. florida, alabama and georgia share river water. the fight has dogged on for 25 years, now florida residents say georgia is taking too much water. andy gallagher visited a bay where oyster farmers say a fresh water shortage threatens their way of life. >> on the bay, they still do things the old-fashioned way, like harvesting out of theres by hand in a time honored tradition. this is a community facing an ecological crisis.
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the out of theres are drastically declining and pushing families to dumping try shells in the bay hoping baby out of theres will cling to them and grow. the fisherman say it feels like the end of a way of life. >> i wouldn't want my son out here. i want want him to go through what we are going through now. flipping burgers at mcdonald's is better than what it is right here. >> it's the delicate nature of a place they call uncommon florida that's made it so vulnerable. >> what makes this bay unique is when the fresh water here meets with the salt water in the bay creating a unique environment for species and florida's out of theres. there's been a battle for the fresh water supply north of here and it's a fight florida is losing. >> the flow of prett fresh wates been locked in legal battle for
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florida and georgia, both claiming the rights. what is reds down state to florida is now tied up in legislation. the longer officials fight, the more damage is done. >> the fresh water, we are dependent on it for our bay activity and oyster harvest. when that goes, so will the harvest and a gateway to a billion dollar seafood industry in the gulf of mexico. >> almost all of florida's out of theres are harvested in the bay and most of the population earns their living here. for joe taylor, it's a race against time before there is irreversible damage. >> it's a labor of love to work on the bay. i hate to see that evaporate and go away, just because we weren't able to come to some kind of common goals. >> for this community then, help can't come soon enough. many have survived hurricanes, droughts and oil spills.
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now they just need fresh water to float. aljazeera, florida. >> florida has filed a lawsuit with the u.s. supreme court insisting that georgia restore water levels to where they were in the early 1990's. >> how would you like a chance at a big movie role? set in a galaxy far, far away. you might get your chance with a search for star power in the new star wars film. >> 150 years later, one newspaper's belated regret for slamming the gettysburg address.
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consider this: the news of the day plus so much m
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>> good morning, to aljazeera america. i'm thomas drayton. >> i'mster sigh. up next, how would you like to in the new star wars film? the hope was looking to be the next jedi warrior. >> people are lining up. they want that chance to have some star power. we're going to have that coming up. >> if you ever wanted to be a
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jedi knight, here is your chance. >> casting agents are filling big roles in the next star wars film. aljazeera has more from chicago. >> here in chicago, it's freezing, bitter cold and windy, yet hundreds of here in full force, hoping for a chance at sci-fi stardom in the seventh star wars film. some camped out overnight. j.j. abrams is stepping away from the star wars reboot to help the film. casting directors are casting a word wide net in search of one male and one female to play major roles but were instructed not to come in costume. >> i was really looking forward to doing the chain with my bikini and all that. i had that at home, leave it at home, probably a good idea for that right now. i would be chafing right now. >> it's star wars. my brother got me hooked when i was seven.
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i'm doing this for him. hopefully, i'll make him proud. >> auditions have taken place in st. louis and england. after just one day in chicago, the team moves to detroit, michigan, austin, texas and nashville, tennessee. can't make it? on line video auditions are also accepted. the two characters are described as rachel, a young woman 17-18 years old, beautiful, smart and athletic, while the young man thomas is 19 to 23 years old, hand some, that right and athletic. if hope.s make it through, it will be years before they are seen in a galaxy far, far away. it isn't scheduled to hit theaters until december of 2015. aljazeera, chicago. >> young, hand some, smart, athletic. >> you could be an ewok. >> the first star wars movie featured acto actor mark hammel.
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it was his first time on the screen. >> they should find roles for all of us. >> that would be awesome. >> as we head to the northwest, this is the next area we'll see wet weather. it is starting to push in with this area of low. by mid-day, we'll see more snow coming in from the higher elevations overnight. when temperatures drop, lower elevations getting that snow and definitely rain for areas of the coast, so look for widespread precipitation here along with showers in the gulf coast morning. >> an pal gee for abraham lincoln, 150 years late. a pennsylvania newspaper is retracting its coverage of the gettysburg address. at the time, it called lincoln's words silly. now the paper says sorry in an editorial. the paper said seven score and 10 years ago, the forefathers of this needy institution brought fort to its audience a judgment
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so flowed, so lacking in the perspective history would bring that it cannot remain unaddressed in our archives. >> better late than never. >> del walters joins us with a look at what we're following this morning. >> a week after typhoo typhoon n struck the philippines, aid begins to arrive. >> the affordable care act is reviewed. we'll be back in a few minutes. coming up this week on techknow. san francisco's bay bridge, an engineering marvel but this is earthquake country. >> how close are we to one of
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those faultlines? >> now inovation, that might change everything. >> how safe is this building? >> earthquake inovations, >> where would you wanna be if a big quake hits? >> techknow sunday 7:30 eastern on al jazeera america >> al jazeera america is the only news channel that brings you live news at the top of every hour. >> here are the headlines at this hour. >> only on al jazeera america. determining using some sort of subjective interpretation of their policy as to whether or not your particular report was actually abusive, because if it doesn't contain language that specifically threatens you directly or is targeted towards you specifically, they may not consider it abuse. they may consider it offensive. and in that case they just recommend that you block that person. >> i don't want to minimise this, because i mean, there's
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some really horrible things that are on line, and it's not - it's not just twitter, what has happened through social media and the anonymity of the net is that you see websites, hate-filled websites targetting all sorts of groups, popping up. there has been a huge number of those that exist as well.
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>> much like the superdome in the aftermath of hurricane katrina, the astro dome in tacloban has become a refuge, now a temporary home for hundreds living in squall lower. >> we fumbled the rollout on this health care law. >> a temporary fix for a broken promise, president obama trying to right a wrong with changes to the affordable care act. >> a small college football player with a huge heart. how he worked his way on to the field despite his size. >> entrepreneurs in the shark tank, making a pitch for a very good cause.
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>> good morning, welcome to aljazeera america. i'm del walters. we want to show you stunning before and after satellite images of tacloban city. you can clearly see the massive devastation caused by typhoon heyian. the pictures show how entire city blocks were washed away by the storm. all of that destruction has turned it into a makeshift morgue. the death toll there now climbing to more than 4400 and one week later, bodies till line the streets, others stored in government buildings and at a local airport. there is no ceremony, only the grim task of burying the dead body by body, trench by trench. >> right now, what we are doing is a collective mass grave. it is temporary, because for all the cadavers here, in the meantime needs to be buried to
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give them a decent burial and dignity for the dead. >> for those who survive, aid now just starting to trickle in and disease has become the new threat. aljazeera has more. >> it has been a week since the typhoon ravaged pats of the philippines. day after day, it's devastating impact is seen on the faces of those affected. >> we are suffering from hunger, no water, no medicine. >> and in the streets where hundredion of thousands are left homeless. >> we really need food, safe drinking water, and then materials for us to fix our houses. >> the aid effort has been picking up speed. >> we need support! >> but many are still desperately waiting for basic necessities delayed because of the massive logistical
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challenges. >> 5,000 crew members, helicopters are and the capacity to contribute more than 400,000 fresh gallons of water every day has arrived. a fleet of ships are in the region and more scheduled to arrive. the u.s. military is throwing everything it can at the problem, including these os prays, which ply like a plane but land like a helicopter. the outbreak of diseases is another fear, because of poor sanitation shortages of fresh water and the inability of emergency medical teams to respond quickly. >> we're expecting an in flux of patients with diarrhea, pneumonia. >> lots of dehydration,
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malnutrition. most of the patients haven't eaten since the typhoon. >> leaving some to drink and bathe in contaminated water in contact with bodies, raw sewage and debris. >> i'm just tired. drinking dirty water from the canal, trying to survive. >> the likelihood of disease adding a new wave of concerns for relief workers still playing catch up and a desperate population still struggling. >> the airport in cebu has become the hub for aid distribution and a makeshift clinic for the sick and injured. aljazeera's paul beban joins us live. we see stories of people begging for aid. how is the relief effort coming? >> well, del, it's really a 24/7
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around the clock operation here. night has fallen, but the activity has not slowed a bit. a mix of civilian and military aircraft going in and out constantly from planes here from the philippines, from malaysia, new zealand, australia. you can see german aid workers bundling up water purification equipment on its way to the northern part of cebu islands. most of the aid flowing into the airport, flowing out to the outlying areas, tacloban, they're so desperate primarily for medical splice. distribution is the question, but the biggest issue now is the shortage of medical supplies. >> paul, how soon will we see the impact of the uss george
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washington has has arrived and when will we see that relief come to the philippines? >> well, that is really going to be ramping up from what we hear tomorrow automatic the impact is already felt. those ospreys, there are eight that can fly like a plane, but take off and land like a helicopter, very useful for getting to areas that don't have landing strips. there's 21 helicopters on the uss george washington alone and many more coming in on a british helicopter carrier and other helicopters as a part of that carrier strike group, so enormous capacity for airlift and supply delivery coming into the region with the arrival of that carrier strike group. >> paul, this is not a static situation. we understand that more and more people are arriving in cebu. are they ready to handle the in flux of people fleeing the
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devastation where they are? >> what they're doing here is considering setting up a tent city in cebu city, also moving people to outlying village around cebu that have volunteered to take in evacuees, villages that have community center or other public buildings that can be converted into temporary shelters, but really for the most part, they're not prepared to handle this. they're really almost making it up as they go along, how they're going to handle this exodus and influx of evacuees, 30% of tacloban reportedly has left the city. >> when the typhoon hit, thousands fled to shelters, many going to a huge sports arena, but it has become a pit of
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filth, rain soaked track littering the floor. no aid has arrived and not a single relief worker is in strike. the cities astro dome reassembles the astro dome after katrina. six people died in the superdome. everyone was shipped to the astro dome in houston. there is also the crisis of hunger. it is so widespread survivors are searching for food in abandoned stores and destroyed homes. some are now trading whatever they find just to feed their families. we have that story with charles strad ford. >> with their homes destroyed, food and drinking water scarce, aid inas you have for delayed, many in tacloban are now forced to do this. they barter what goods they've salvaged in exchange for food or money and sell produce they
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found in shops and homes. one man is selling baby milk for under $7 a positively box, half the price people paid in the stores before the typhoon hit. >> we are selling them so we can buy rice. >> another man swapped three-kilos of rice for one kilo of beef. >> i have some rice, but nothing to eat with, so we barter. >> a woman said she hadn't received help and was desperate for rice. >> if we find someone to barter rice with us, we will give them our bacon and sausages. >> close by, the dead are lined up in body bags. more than six days since haiyan ripped the city apart, survivors who have chosen to stay are in urgent need of food and water. the united nations said more than half a million people have fled from what remains of their
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homes and many areas still haven't received emergency aid. the storm ripped the vegetation off the trees that line this road. families sit under what makeshift cover they can. they have little choice but to wait for the emergency help that their government says is on its way. charles stratford, aljazeera. >> as you can see, long lines for gas increasing frustrations in filipino cities like tacloban and cebu, some waiting six hours just to find fuel for power generators that provide electricity to hospitals and cell phone batteries. some stations giving their fuel away to help with the relief efforts. >> an iceberg is being watched for its potential to affect shipping lanes. it's a pretty big one. >> the size of chicago, there's different estimates, but possibly the size of chicago they are saying. let's head out well to the other side of the world and this is
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what we're talking about. we're talking about the shipping lanes. i'll get to the image in just a second. between the drake passage between south america and antarctica, there's ships that have to go around the continent that way. it's also known as one of the most violent seas in the world. i've actually been through there with high seas. it's not the for the easily seasick. this is the image. this is the different estimates, almost as big as new york minus manhattan or the size of chicago. you can already see this fissure from 2011. it finally just broke off this week. these are so large, they can cause tsunamis. anything that's a large land mass that can move water does this. as this moves out to sea, depending where it drifts and being so large, it could disrupt some of those ships that we're talking about. researchers will be following this as it does its thing.
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one of the signs of global warming is seeing more of this and it has been reducing the snow and ice in this area because it has been getting warmer in an art extra. >> president obama said policies can be renewed for one more year, but consumers must be told what they don't cover. many policies don't stand up to the new standards and they can't be purchased by new customers. the republican vote today in the house will let health insurers offer plans that don't conform to the affordable care act. the president said he is going to veto that bill if it reaches his desk. mike viqueira has more. >> with public support sinking and democrats on the verge of revolt, the president had a mia
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culpo. >> that's on me. i mean, we fumble would the rollout on this health care law. >> the president denied he was aware of prelaunch tests that warned of disaster for healthcare.gov. >> i was not informed directly that the website would not be working. i don't think i'm stupid enough to go around saying this is going to be like shopping on amazon or travelocity a week before the website opens if i thought it wasn't going to work. >> with millions having their plans canceled, the president proposed a fix. >> insurers can extend current plans that would otherwise be canceled into 2014 and americans whose plans have been canceled can choose to reenroll in the same kind of plan. >> there is no guarantee insurers will offer the old plans. the top lobbyists slammed the proposal. changing the rules could destabilize the market and result in higher premiums for consumers. it wasn't good enough for republicans. they told tales of canceled coverage.
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>> nearly 25,000 people in nevada lose insurance plans under obamacare. >> a greater concern, democrats threatening to defy mr. obama with some pushing bills to force insurers to offer oh the old plans. the senate's mary andrews faces a fight for reelection. >> we will probably need legislation to make the president's plan stick. >> top aids were sent to capitol hill to calm nervous democrats, whose eroding support threatens the second term agenda. >> it's legitimate to expect me to have to win back credibility on this health care law in particular and a whole range of issues in general. >> even as he shoulders the blame, he insists the health care reform will work. >> these are two fumbles on a big game, which the game's not over.
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>> mike viqueira, aljazeera, the white house. >> for more on those changes to the health care law, we are joined by libby casey on capitol hill. one would think the president saying he will reverse course would solve the problem, but it didn't. why? >> republicans are certainly playing a game of politics and democrats, as well. the upton bill would allow people to keep their insurance plans through 2014, but let new people get on those plans. the white house says that would gut the affordable care act, so there's push back there. we're watching to see how democrats react today. they've come up with their own proposal. we'll see that unveiled today. leaders were concerned that a lot of their members would vote for the upton bill. they're hearing from people upset they have gotten their insurance plans canceled and
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having trouble signing you have for anything new because of the problems with the troubled website. now that the president has moved, house democrats say they only expect about 27 or so of their members to vote for the upton bill. we're watching to see a move forward coming up with a proposal that would codify and put into law what the president wants insurance companies to do. >> talking about not being able to please anybody anytime, the states are saying they don't like this and so does the insurance industry. >> it's tough. we're seeing state insurance commissioners react in a variety of ways and it's not just split along party lines. some states insurance commissioners are saying we've got things rolling, we can't start changing things now, it would be detrimental that the plans rolling out. others are saying we might be able to make changes. we'll watch to see what happens with the upton bill and what house democrats come up with, but the politics of this
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continue. john boehner, the house speaker said yesterday and of course he's supporting the upton bill, that he wants to scrap the health care law. many still see the republican pushes to change not just alterations, but an attempt to kill the affordable care act. >> as the health care act turns, page four, thank you very much. >> thousands of americans discovering they are eligible for medicaid while trying to sign up for insurance under the affordable care act. it's happened in states that fought the law and refused to expand their medicaid programs. those eligible must enroll in their home state, about 9 million people expected to sign up over the next year. >> the president you is calling for immigration reform, but there is pushback from republicans in the house. what immigration supporters are doing to break the deadlock. >> a look at children in war, where boys are turned into
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soldiers. >> entrepreneurs trying to persuade angel investors to support their good causes. >> to take you back to washington now where the skies are tarting to clear over the nation's capitol. we'll see if anything gets done today. stay with us.
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power of the people until we restore our freedoms and r
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>> good morning, welcome back to aljazeera america, i'm del walters. we're going to focus on the battle over immigration reform, but first we want to find out if there is warm weather coming your way and return to nicole mitchell. >> we're tarting to see a little bit of it. up and down the east coast, a slight warm up yesterday and we'll have more today. that high pressure, on the front side that draws air from canada, because the circulation on the backside once the high starts moving off the coast, you get it warm from the south. the southerly winds have warmed up the south pretty nicely. these tents were freezing yesterday morning, now in the 40's. the east coast, more 60's today. you're loving that in somewhere like boston.
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we went from 382 days ago to 60 today, which is a couple degrees above average. when you swing 20 degrees over a couple of days, it feels like summer to some folks. a new system in the west i'll talk more about later. >> the c.i.a. secretly collecting records from money transfers going in and out of the united states. the data effort includes transactions with countries like western union. reports say the c.i.a. is authorized under the same law that allows the nsa to collect records. >> immigration reform is gaining support. a comprehensive immigration bill is wanted by 2014. house speaker john boehner said that is not going to happen. lisa harper is with christian social justice organization, in
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the fourth day of a fast for immigration reform in washington, d.c. this morning. many of the nation's top faith based organizations have lobbied, staged fasts, but speaker boehner said there is not going to be a house vote this year. is all of this for naught? >> absolutely not. i started my fast four days ago, entering the fourth day today. i started with a number of people who came on to the national mall tuesday morning, including jim wallace, the president of sojourners. we will fast as long as it takes to get reform or our bodies hold out. there are some fasting in the tent and others around the country. two days into the fast, we realized we got a call that the sisters of mercy, 2,000 of them around the country are going to be fasting on november 20, and then on november 25, reverend
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william barber committed to having the moral mondays fast with us, as well in north carolina. >> i hate to be the negative nellie in this, but there's the old saying if a free falls in the woods, so in this case, if you fast outside of really the steps of the capitol, and nobody sees you in the speaker's office, do you recall expect that they're going to change their minds when so much has already been done and so little taking place in the house. >> you really raise a great question, the question of whether or not the speaker is listening to the people. that's the question. boehner knows that 70% of americans actually want immigration reform. we have evangelicals across the country, 300 prayer meetings just in the last few months. we have 400 -- actually 200,000 people who have signed up to be prayer partners through the evangelical immigration table of which sojourners is a member. if speaker boehner and the house are not listening to the people, they have to let their yes be
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yes and their no be no. at this point we've been getting maybe, maybe, maybe. what we know is that god is not for maybe. god wants you to take your stand and suffer the consequences for it. >> let me ask the question this way. why, then, do you think the speaker is not listening if so many people, and you say mentioned, are so for immigration reform? >> honestly, i think that what we're really dealing with is fear, fear in the house of representatives, fear of the super conservatives who are really right now running the house. more than that, i think we're dealing with and jim wallace wrote an article in the washington post exactly about this, we're dealing with the fear of a dominant culture, particularly white male americans afraid of losing power in america and they don't need to. no one is looking to overturn power and create a situation that subjugates the former majority.
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by the year 2025, people are color are going to be the majority. they are looking to stop that from happening by blocking immigration reform. that is sin. >> ronald robinson from transafrica fasted so long it almost caught him his life when the issue was apartheid. however are you willing to go? >> i'm willing to go as far as good tells me to go. i only planned on fasting for two days with, but at the end of the first day, we had a prayer vigil where an african woman sung a french song. i have no idea what she said, but i felt in my spirit, i felt gold say to me keep going, don't stop until i tell you to stop, or until your body gives out. you know, so i'm not planning to die. this is not a hunger strike. this is a spiritual fast. in other words, it's a time for me to get my spirit in line with gods spirit. one thing i found about fasting is it makes you completely
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intolerant of sin. you get intolerant of the mess. we're seeing mess on capitol hill that is about politics, but immigration reform is not about politics. it's a moral issue and a family issue. >> ok. i thank you very much. we thank you, lisa sharon harper, director of mobilization for sojourners and we will stay in contact with you. >> thank you very much. >> stay the course. president obama's pick to lead the federal reserve said she will continue the feds pro growth policies. john net yellen questioned thursday by the senate banking committee. some republicans express concern that the feds bond buying strategy is creating another market bubble, but yellen vowing to do whatever it takes to create jobs and get america back on track. >> well, senator, the objective of our policy is to broadly benefit all americans, especially those who were seeing harm come to them and their
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families from high unemployment in a recovery that's taken a long time and been frankly disappointing. >> janet yellen would be the first woman ever to lead the fed. >> here's what's making business news that morning, that testimony from janet yellen is fueling stocks, up 33 points right now, suggesting we could have another day on wall street, the dough ending at all time highs. the s&p 500 also looking at new heights, 1790 and the nasdaq is up despite shares plunging after disappointing earnings. one analyst telling aljazeera he's nervous about that recent stock surge. >> i'm very much a reluctant bull at these levels. it's hard to find value anywhere in the world right now, which means you've got to pick stuff on a stock by stock basis today. the assumption that one thing is going to raise all boats i don't believe is true any longer.
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the risks of a correction are growing with every new dollar the fed puts in. >> overseas the yellen effect is spreading to markets in europe. indexes are up overseas. nikkei having its best performance since 2009. >> some disconcerting news from retailers, americans will spend and average of only $704 this holiday season, down from $786 predicted just last month. it's also below the $770 they said they would be spending at this time last year. >> children on the front lines, boys and girls fighting battles they should never have to face. >> one part of the philippines slammed by typhoon haiyan, how people in a popular tourist town were almost wiped out. >> you put your heart and your
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soul and all your energy behind it, that nothing can stop you. >> a football player small in size proofs you can't measure the size of a man's heart. >> i'm john henry smith, quarterback seemented his place among the all time greats thursday night. highlights coming up in sports. ray suarez hosts inside story only on al jazeera america
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consider this: the news of the day plus so much more. >> we begin with the government shutdown. >> answers to the questions no one else will ask. >> it seems like they can't
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agree to anything in washington no matter what. >> antonio mora, award winning and hard hitting. >> we've heard you talk about the history of suicide in your family. >> there's no status quo, just the bottom line. >> but, what about buying shares in a professional athlete? >> welcome back to aljazeera america. i'm del walters. it's been a week since typhoon haiyan devastated the philippines. a new estimate says 4400 of dead, thousands more desperate for aid. the arrival of the uss george washington is expected to boost relief efforts, bringing 5,000 sailors and providing hundreds of thousands of gallons of clean water each day.
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in one town, the destruct was so massive people can't believe they survived. we are there. >> this used to be a tourist town with a 16th century church as a main attraction. it's all gone now. it is east of the island, the first to experience the fury of haiyan, which lasted for hours. >> almost three hours in the toilet, and then i think this is my first -- my last day of my life during the typhoon. >> the town totally in radio ins, the place where the super typhoon landed first has to start from scratch. the people here are still surprised that they are actually alive. >> it took five days for aid to arrive. the u.s. military is airlifting
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relief around the clock. they have taken control over the destroyed air field. also medical personnel from abroad are setting up field hospitals and people are waiting for hours to be treated. >> we are worried about infectious diseases, because people are displaced, the sanitary conditions not good, no electricity, the toilets are not functioning very well. people are living in makeshift buildings with plastic sheeting or in the schools. they want to open the schools, but familles are cramped together. the national health authorities are trying to hard to monitor. >> this man says he has not had any help except for two-kilos of rice. although aid is now coming in, he is worried it won't reach him. >> i'm asking help, the world world, and it must be directed
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to the homeless people. >> one week after the disaster, the people are the city say their main feeling is one of intense sadness for lives lost and an ancient town gone forever. >> before that storm devastated the area, business owners hoped to create a resort for surfers. that haiyan also causing an oil spill east of latai province. they are trying to contain 5,000-liters of oil today. a barge was driven ashore when the typhoon made landfall. it is spread along a 1.2-mile stretch of coastline. >> filipino americans are banding together donating money and badly needed supplies to send back to the philippines. collection efforts like this one in chicago are taking plagues across the country. in new jersey, the impact of haiyan is being felt in a
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section of town known as little manila. we are in jersey city. erika, where you are right now, what are they saying, how do they feel? >> well, certainly the talk of the entire area here is about the typhoon and how they can help the victims one week later. little manila is made up of several stores and restaurants, all filipino american run. in every place you will find a place to donate to the relief effort. that goes for the barber shop, where they're donating the proceeds from haircuts to the american red cross. there's the cargo company shipping donation boxes for free, and then there is last night, a red cross fundraiser, where they raised nearly $20,000, again, going straight to the devastated areas of the philippines. joining me is the man who
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organized that effort, city council president. thank you for joining me. the turnout last night, very good, more than 100 people. >> i think final count was probably over 200 people. we received $23,000 hopeful i in contributions. we are still tallying it up at this point. >> we are talking about a week later. how soon did you hear from folks in this community that they wanted to help? >> as soon as the typhoon hit over a week ago, almost immediately, people were emailing me and making phone calls asking what can we do to help. the response to all of that, just encourage people to organize and do fundraising and any effort people can do. i looked at the calendar and looked at thanksgiving on the horizon, knowing that the attention span in the window is very short for these sort of
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situations, so just encouraging people to do everything they can to support the efforts in this most difficult time for those in the country of the philippines and to continue to push forward doing that. >> did you hear from concerned families, obviously communication was cut off. did you hear from some frantic people saying how do we get in touch with family members? >> in the past week, that's been the biggest challenge for filipinos in the united states, trying to get in touch with their loved ones. recently, i think communications are being restored there. the united states is going there with military assistance and aid and so fort, so i think along with the efforts of the american red cross and other relief agencies, communications coming back on, i'm beginning to hear great stories of people connecting with their families. >> thank you so much for joining us, i really appreciate it. according to rolando, because of this community is so close knit,
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it doesn't surprise him that literally almost every business has really come together to try to raise at much money to help the victims of typhoon haiyan. del. >> erika, thank you very much. that t.s.a. officer killed at the los angeles international airport lay bleeding for more than a half hour after he was shot. most of that time was after the suspected gunman had been shot and in police custody. the associated press saying paramedics waiting 150 yards away but couldn't reach the officer because police had not declared the terminal safe to enter. it took 33 minutes before he was taken to an ambulance outside that terminal. >> there is new surveillance out this morning of that new jersey malwhere a gunman opened fire. security cameras captured 20-year-old richard shoop calmly walking through the mall. he fired six rounds inside the mall, but didn't hit anyone.
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no one was injured. he later took his own life. >> a major policy shift in china this morning. the communist party there voting to loosen that countries one child only rule. we have more from beijing. >> this isn't official abolition of the one child policy, but amounts pretty much to the same thing. in future, if either member of a couple was a single child himselves, they would be allowed to have two children. the policies been in place since 1979. there aren't many couples left in china of child bearing age this doesn't apply to. going forward, there will be fewer still. in one sense, the policies done its job, 400 million fewer births and if the policy hadn't been in placed, it was introduced because china was a poor country with an exploding population. now it's a relatively rich
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countedry and aging country, as well. they need to boost the birth rate. there's a recognition that this was deeply unpopular and this is a way the ruling communist policy can take accountable people without changing the system. the labor camps fall into the same category, deeply unpopular. millions have been through without having had a child, abused by local officials, people thrown into labor camps for relatively minor things. it really does go against all kind of human rights and judicial fair process. i think both of these policies are a sign the president wants to listen to people without fundamentally changing the system. you can have reform through a system without fundamental change in the political system. >> andrew thomas in beijing. >> the u.s. estimates the number of child soldiers in the central
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african republic. >> pierre was separated from his family. he thought joining rebels would help the central african republic. he was 13 when he was recruited. he soon realized he'd made a mistake. >> it's true, i fired my weapon, but i don't know whether i hit or killed anyone. i saw people killed. i witnessed atrocities. i saw him kill civilians. it hurts me when i think about it. >> the u.n. and local charities helped get pierre out of the group in august. he received money to open a little kiosk. >> the u.n. says there is still around 3,500 child soldiers in the country. its manage said to release more than 150, but admits there is a
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long way to go. >> we filmed several children in uniform at this government base. it's clear that security forces still have children in their ranks. it's not just boys who join armed groups. 40% of child soldiers around the world are girls, like see fee. she says girls are also trained to fight. >> they fight. they'd fairbanks above our heads. sometimes they would fire the blanks while we were running or eating. >> girls suffer from sexual violence. sophie was raped by her commanding officer. she's now back living with her family, but reintegration is always difficult. >> the children tell us they are addicted to drugs because in the armed groups, they see killings, smell rotting bodies, they are constantly in contact with
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blood, so they take drugs. sometimes the children kill people and when they leave the armed groups, the memories come back and they take drugs to forget. >> some children are forced to join, others volunteer because they've never had an education and have no hope of finding work. either way, their experiences will stay with them forever. >> according to unicef, more than 2,000 boys and girls were associated with armed groups before that upsurge in fighting began last december. they i had fight 444 children between the age of 12 and 17 associated with armed groups in that region. >> new clues today for the search for a california family. joseph and sumner mcstay and their two children went missing from their home in san diego three years ago, that case drawing international attention with tips from southern
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california to mexico. remains found in the desert 100 miles away could be connected. the remains still have to be identified. >> it's long been said that good things come in small packages and that's definitely true of a young college football player with a huge heart. as mark schneider reports, he may be small in size, but able to stand tall on the field. >> he's got to be the least intimidating college football player you've ever seen. jason carter stands 4'9" and weighs 135 pounds. his presence here on the rice owls is no joke. >> it's like a full time job, actually, because i have to spend more time here than i do sleeping he. >> as a member of the scout team, he runs the upcoming offense to help the defense prepare for the game. his work ethic and athletic ability has teammates looking up to him.
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>> he can lift up to three times his own body weight, and so, just by that, even though he is smaller than the rest of us, he has a higher sense of respect from a lot of us. >> late last month, late in a game, rice had a huge lead, and after watching him hustle for three years on the scout team, the coach decided it was finally time to call a play for number 25. >> he actually came in for me. when i see him coming in, i just -- my eyes just stopped and i was like ok, well, go in. >> one of the more memorable one yard runs of the season. >> it is just something that you've never seen before, somebody's actually smaller than everybody else can be on the field. i was equally surprised, because almost at the end of the fourth quarter, the coach told me that you're going in to run the play. i said all right, coach, i'll be
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ready on stand by. >> he's played a vital role on our scout team playing a tail backer slot and earned the right to play in a football game and it was great to be able to get him in there to let him, you know, live part of his dream. >> coach said when he first saw carter he had no plans to put him on the team, but high praise from his high school coaches convinced hiconvinced the coachm a shot. >> it's not a surprise going against guys much bigger than i am, because i've been doing it for as long as i remember. it's never been a challenge, because it's either put your best foot forward or go home. >> it proves if you have a dream and you're willing to work hard and you put your heart, soul and all your energy behind it, that nothing can stop you. >> carter has no idea that one yard run will be the only play of his college career, but if it
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is, the aspiring software engineer will be satisfied knowing he did something only a small percentage of people have done, no matter their size. aljazeera, houston. >> at 4'9", and just 130 pounds, carter is one of the smallest players, in fact the smallest r. to take the field in a division one college football game. john henry smith, when these guys if they get to the pros, there have been smaller players before and they have been a nightmare for those linemen. >> i played in high school. the guys really small and compact like that were always a lot of trouble. >> and you were what, 4'11"? >> a little bit more, but not much. very heart warming story, great to see that guy getting a spot. >> the coats had something to prove on the heels of a 30-point loss to the rams, chuck pagano's colts had been outscored 49-3 in
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their last three halves. by the third quarter, colts pulled to within four. and drew luck, the pump fake will set you free. the colts rally to beat the titans. they're the only team in the a.l. south with a winning record. >> clemson trying to add to a win streak, taking on georgia tech. second quarter, the 76-yard score. in this game, boyd became the career leader in completions and touchdown throws. third quarter, watkins makes the treasure cut. two touchdowns, boyd through for
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4t.d.s and ran for another. he had to leave the game bruised, but not broken. >> it is always a dilemma for us when we bring you new york knicks highlights from madison square garden. which highlight do we start with, spike lee, kevin bacon, francis bacon. woody allen. >> scoring 26 of the next 52 points on 11-15 shooting. fourth quarter now, houston's got a three-point lead with under six seconds to play they go the ball to inbound carmel low shoots and hits for three and one. actually it was for none. carmelo incredulous. should he be? the coach wants to give that call the death penalty. fans vote thumbs down. the knicks still trail instead of being tied. one more shot in regulation.
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the heave no good. the knicks fall to the rockets 109-106. >> mark jackson's golden state warriors hosting the thunder. trailing by one with the ball, drains the winner. >> to baseball for detroit tigers third baseman, cabrera, some argue he was better this year than last year. he was made the american league most valuable player for the second straight year. here's why. his batting offering on-base percentage and slugging percentage all were higher than last year. he led the a.l. in all three categories for the second consecutive season. he's the first back-to-back winner since frank thomas did
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it. >> dario fran kitty is retiring. he broke his spine in the indy race in houston. >> woody allen is on the line. he wants to talk to you. he said that's not a good impersonation. >> imagine you had five minutes to lay it on the line, entrepreneurs battling for dollars for are a good cause. >> a new system from the northwest has. >> applications for other parts of the country over the weekend. while have that forecast.
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>>, to aljazeera america. we're going to tell you about a new program pretty close to the
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t.v. program shark tank. first let's find out if it's going to rain where you are with nicole mitchell. >> rain is on the way, system coming down from canada. the air around this or wind flow is picking up the moisture, enough of a pressure gradient that that picks up the wind. those are reasons that we'll see this really kick up. broad picture, moisture southward. tomorrow, sunday, could be strong storms. in the meantime, we're going to see that especially in higher elevations, the snow picking up today. >> people with big ideas to help out their fellow man are finding new ways to raise money for start ups. it may remind you of a t.v. show. it started in seattle. >> this is fast pitch, a little like the reality show shark tank where hopeful entry he prenewers
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try to persuade people with deep pockets to invest in their businesses. they are interested in raising funds for projects to improve society. 13 finalists have just five minutes each to make their best pitches. seattle charity social venture partners provided coaching and consulting. contestants have spent months honing their messages for this make or break moment. >> every year in washington state, we receive more than 2,000 refugees fleeing persecution. >> project feast helps refugee women training them for food service. >> i feel happy, really, because i like to cook. >> i fell in love with the idea of working with refugee women and focusing on the asset that is they bring with them, their strength. >> she hopes to raise $75,000 for equipment and maybe a
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salary. there are for profit and non-profit groups here vying for grants or investments. >> hundreds of people coming together for a community saying we are about social impact and change. they get to be exposed to all of those people. >> some were started by high schoolers. >> we're going to start tonight with a 16-year-old telling us about envirotech. >> imagine our future powered by human footsteps. >> today i'm asking you to rally around the concept that students themselves are a part of the solution by supporting youth ambassadors. thank you. >> the panel of judges decides who gets the big checks. there are many winners and all gain connections, free consulting and visibility. >> $10,000 goes to project feast. >> i think it makes a huge
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difference. there were 600 people that paid quite a lot of money to come to this event. that's our market. >> by evening's end, be this room is buzzing with donation, innovation and hope. aljazeera, seattle. >> that idea has now spread to los angeles and dallas. >> here's a sure sign the holidays are upon us, the swing of the crane in new york city, the rockefeller city christmas tree getting its star. december 4, the switch will be flipped. those lights will shine until january 7. thanks for watching aljazeera america. we're back in two and a half minutes.
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consider this: the news of the day plus so much more. >> we begin with the government shutdown. >> answers to the questions no one else will ask. >> it seems like they can't agree to anything in washington no matter what. >> antonio mora, award winning and hard hitting. >> we've heard you talk about the history of suicide in your family. >> there's no status quo, just the bottom line. >> but, what about buying shares in a professional athlete?
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