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tv   News  Al Jazeera  November 18, 2013 6:00am-9:01am EST

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♪ mayhem in the midwest as severe thunderstorm spawn dozens of tornados, in illinois an entire neighborhood is gone and lives losts. they seek comfort and fake, the massive international relief effort is beginning to pick up speed. a delicate and dangerous operations at the fukushima plant and workers start to remove radio active fuel rods and the first step in stabilizing the site. and pushing themselves to the limit, hundreds participated in 24 hour tough mudder competition, it tests physical
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and mental endurance. ♪ a rare november tornado out break across the midwest, dozens of deadly twisters ripped through the region unleashing powerful winds that demolished entire neighbors and good morning and welcome to al jazeera, i'm stephanie s i and this is normally snow season in the midwest but a weather system triggered unseasonable thunderstorms and tornados across 12 state and the worst was felt in illinois, officials say six people are dead, most in the central part of the state. the storms later passed just south of chicago before moving into michigan and indiana. when it was over the storm had left an expansive trail of wreckage across the region al jazeera diane wester brook has
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more. >> with a massive tornado bearing down on them they prays to a higher power to keep them safe. >> forgive us our trespasses. >> reporter: a scene that played out sunday with dozens of twisters tearing through the region cars were crushed and homes flattened and in illinois neighborhoods were blown away in a matter of minutes. >> it was gone within 3-4 minutes and you see what it has done here, just everything. >> our two vehicles sitting across in the field over there one was in the garage. >> reporter: twisters recorded on dash cam went through indiana leaving destruction in the wake and included flipping the car and not sparing the "starbucks" in front of it or the dozens of homes and areas like boone country. >> i saw debris coming towards us and i went inside and hut the door and seconds later they told us to get down and the roof caved in.
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>> reporter: the severe system which fueled the tornados spread across 7 states, effecting more than 50 million people. >> we may need to take shelter right now ourselves. >> yes, we do. >> reporter: not even those covering the storms were immune from the impact, with many roads impassible as night fell search and rescue was different and this morning they will look at the damage that has been done, in hard-hill washington, illinois a curfew in place sunday night and dispatched firefighters came and saw blocks of houses levelled. >> i went back to that end of the house and i heard some blasts. we don't have windows on that end of the house and my husband came back and i said i don't know what to do and we just stood in the hallway where there were though windows and just held each other. >> reporter: the white house said president obama has been briefed on the damage and in touch with federal, state and local officials and fema has a
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team standing at the ready to assist the thousands of victims waking up today to devastation and the difficult task of rebuilding. diane has been covering this across the midwest and joins us from hard-hit washington, illinois and good morning to you. i see the devastation behind you and tell us what else you see on the ground this morning. >> it's hard to see a lot this morning because it's still very dark but what you see behind me is basically rubble is whae we have been seeing around us. to the left of me was an auto parts store that has basically been levelled and it's just sticks and twisted metal and broken glass. you know, they got -- sirens sounded and alarms went off yesterday at about 11:00 a.m. when the tornado ripped through here but despite that some residents like norma said she only had seconds to get to
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safety. here is what she had to say. >> i look at outside and there was debris flying and everything around the building and the trees and just went to my room and i told my son let's go, it's here, let's go so we went running to the bathtub and went and said jesus here i am. >> reporter: and many churches in the area had been turned into makeshift shelters for people there collecting food, clothing, providing a place for people to spend the night. the pastor of the cross roads united methodist church said he is hosting one of the sites and said they were this church yesterday when the storm blew through and, you know, they had just seconds, basically to get to safety. here is what he had to say. >> many families were here when
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the storm struck, went home after church to find there homes are no longer there. >> reporter: and there is a curfew still in effect until 7:00 a.m., the residents here in washington are hoping at that point they can get back in their neighborhoods and recover what maybe left of their homes and their belongings, stephanie >> i know right now we know of at least six people who died in the tornados that hit yesterday. are there any search and rescue operations ongoing right now or is everyone accounted for? >> well, i just talked to the police here in washington about a half an hour ago and they said at this point they think that everybody has been accounted for at least here in washington so right now they are just in the process of cleaning up. i don't know about other areas. >> reporter: what about electricity, are there people who still do not have electricity in that area?
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>> that is another problem, yeah, as of last night about 100,000 people in central illinois were without power, some places are running on generators, but that is a big problem and cell service is another problem, a lot of the cell towers were knocked down and family and friends have been unable to communicate with loved ones because they just can't get through to them. >> al jazeera diane esther brook reporting from washington, illinois. since 1986 there have been 194 november tornado warnings, of 194, 101 of them were issued during yesterday's storm. washington, illinois as we said was one of the many midwest cities struck by the wave of tornados and joining us from cold city, illinois another town that is cleaning up after the storms is nick who is the spokesman for the city's fire protection district and good morning and tell us what it looks like in cold city and what your priorities are on the ground right now.
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>> good morning. pretty much what it is looking like in cold city is what we see in quite a few areas in illinois, not as devastating as some of the other areas but we still have, we are estimating over 100 residents and commercial occupancys that have severe damage to them. we have some businesses as well as some houses that have fully collapsed. at this point in time operations of search operations have been suspended and we believe that everyone is accounted for. we only had four injuries that were transported to the hospital yesterday and lucky enough not to have any fatalities. here shortly continued cleanup operations as well as support operations from the fire and police and villages are going to begin as well. >> reporter: you know, it's amazing to watch these pictures, how you even begin the cleanup process. and are there risks with that as well? i covered these tornados before and residents tend to go in and
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want to salvage what they can, are there risks to that? >> absolutely and we are worried about a secondary collapse that may occur due to the unstable buildings that are there that had wind damage. as well as the simple injuries like the cuts and the scrapes and the falls and the sprains. >> reporter: how unusual is it to have tornados at this time of year in this region? >> very unusual. we have experienced small tornados here in the cold city and diamond area just as short as a year ago, luckily with that inwe d ww ww we inwe -- in that incident we didn't have damage because it hit a rural area and this was rural but did go through a subdivision but it's unusual to have this especially in november. >> nick of illinois and we wish you and your colleagues luck as you begin the clean umprocess
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this morning and thanks for being with us. the storm forced thousands of football fans to take cover in chicago, the bears ravens game was suspended for two hours, tornado absevere thunderstorm warnings were issued and heavy rain fell after kickoff and on the video board it asked fans to seek shelter and no injuries there. the danger is over for the midwest and let's bring in nicole mitchell to see why the storm was so intense and dangerous. >> we have what is considered a second tornado season in the fall, winter and summer and most of the country are more consistent temperature wise and spring and fall when we get the dramatic clashes as the air masses change and spring is more violent but we had the cold air coming in from the north interacting with the warm moisture from the south with the strong boundary and a jet stream
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screaming across the country and the winds were over 100 miles per hour and as the storms developed it added a spin for the tornados and what is unique we can have tornados this time of year and this is the third time going back that they issued the high risk which is exactly what we saw. the different dots we are seeing are storm reports and 80 of them being tornados and 600 of them total and four, almost 500 of those were wind reports so that is something we see as they go in and assess the damage. obviously if a funnel was seen, then we know that was a tornado but the winds were so high, easily 70 miles per hour at sometimes, they will have to sort through some areas which is wind damage and which is tornado damage and then they will also assess how strong the tornados were. it looks like some of these could have been ef-4 and do they by seeing structures and how
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soundly they were built and how much they were destroyed to estimate what the winds were as everything went through. the storm system moved well off to the east and starting to see most of the rain subside and will be doing that throughout the course of the morning but in the meantime strong winds associated with that line so that is a lot of the warnings that we still have up this morning and back to you. >> reporter: thank you. the president of the philippines is visiting some of the islands devastate by typhoon haiyan and he says he will stay in the region until he is satisfied with relief efforts. more than 4 million people are displaced after the typhoon, in dire need of food, water and shelter. al jazeera paul joins us from g-1, one of the areas the president is visiting. i apologize, it looks like we just actually lost our live shot with paul. meanwhile prayers and vigils were held throughout the world for the victims of typhoon haiyan over the weekend,
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philippines gathered sunday in the financial district in hong kong for a prayer service and cried for lost loved ones and said they were outraged by the government's handling of the crisis. >> five days later the people are still looking for their dead relatives or missing relatives and five days later they still have not received any food. >> reporter: prayers also were offered during church services in beirut and in seoul and south koreans and philippines gathered at the embassy ton think about the dead and offer help for survivors. a boeing jet crash in russia, 44 passengers and 6 crew members were on board when the plane exploded sunday and among the victims a top local security official and son of the republic and the plane circled the airport at least once.
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>> pilot error and technical issues including possibility of equipment failure and the possibilities are all being looked into and investigated. >> it worsened the safety record and they blame the spike in plane crashes to cost cutting and insufficient training. two minors are hospitalized after a deadly under ground accident in colorado, that happened sunday at the silver mine 270 miles southwest of denver and two workers killed and 20 injuries and the accident was probably caused by a release of chemicals and not a cave in or collapse and 27 minors died across the country this year. navy investigators are trying to determine why a drone malfunctioned and struck a ship during a training exercise off the coast of southern california, two sailors suffered minor burns when the drone hit the uss chancellorville on saturday and it's docked in san diego to be checked for damage. the crew was using the drone to
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test the ship's radar system. workers in japan are moving highly radioactive fuel rods at the fukushima plant and as we explain the year-long process is extreme risk. >> number four of the plant and the crane is removing some of the 400 tons of spend nuclear fuel from the crippled complex. the unprecedented process has risk and the bristol, if they break or become exposed to air huge amounts of highly radioactive gas could escape in the atmosphere. >> translator: we hope this process will be conducted in a manner that will not disturb local residents and removal will be done on schedule, properly and safely. >> reporter: there are about 50-70 fuel rods stored in an assembly. it will take roughly a week to move 22 assemblies to a more
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stable pool that will keep the fuel cool. with more than 1500 fuel assemblies requiring removal, this is a year-long operation. >> i would assume the electric company has serious evacuation plans and not made public so as not to raise the fear but they must have very serious evacuation plans in case the worst happens in the same pool. but the workers, one must give them high respect that they are going there and they know how dangerous it is. >> reporter: the earthquake and tsunami damaged the reactors and tetco said the experience will help it deal with other three reactors where radiation is higher because of core meltdowns and they continued to face criticism for the handling of the nuclear crisis and public trust is low it will safely
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decommission the plants, a process that could last decades, joanna with al jazeera. >> one of the most critical tasks for workers determines which rods are likely to leak. the cleanup is expected to cost $50 billion. the top democratic in the house says her party won't back down from supporting president obama and healthcare reform. nancy pelosi said democrats have not lost confidence in the affordable care act and 39 voted with republicans for major changes in the law and senate democratic said there is more work to be done. >> he should have been more specific because the point is if you are being offered a terrible healthcare plan that the minute you get sick you are going to have to go into bankruptcy, those plans should never be offered. >> reporter: two states washington and vermont will not allow insurers to extend policies that don't measure to the healthcare law. a panel will consider if big
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coin is a force for good or a tool of criminals and testimony will be heard by the homeland security committee and bit coin say it gives people in developing countries easier access to the digital economy. federal agents say it's used to launder money and drive black market websites. the trial begins in a murder case that shocked britain, two muslims accused of killing a british soldier in broad daylight. in greece taking a page from history, tens of thousands hit the streets to mark an uprising 40 years ago. and taking obstacle courses to the extreme, a closer look at one tough mudder, 24 hours of pain and persistence. and taking a live look now at the new york city skyline this monday morning, it's still dark out there. ♪
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power of the people until we restore
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♪ good morning and welcome to al jazeera america, i'm stephanie
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si, straight ahead a murder trial gets underway in a case that stunned britain and involves the death of a british war veteran caught on camera and a live report from london in a minute but let's look at temperatures around the nation today and nicole is back. >> the storm system that caused the problems and the severe weather is still making its way through the east coast. a lot of rain is tapering off and we will show you that in a little bit but you see the contrast behind the front in the 40s this morning, ahead of it temperatures near 60 and as the clouds clear out and everything overnight the temperatures will plummet for morning lows. so look at this, new york 60s today, mostly dry by the time we get this morning stuff out and staying dry. look at the temperatures in the 30s in some cases and temperatures really dropping about 20 degrees over the next couple days as all the cold air soaks in and the rest of the country is seeing that as the
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front passed through. >> thank you, the trial of two men accused of hacking a british soldier to death on the streets of london opens today. the victim was lee rigby an afghan veteran and killed in daylight not far from the barracks and the suspects were caught on camera bragging about the killing and al jazeera phil joins us from london and good morning phil at the time, prime minister david cameron said it was a betrayal of islam because they are islam and attacked on the british way of live and emotions are running pretty high in london today. >> yeah, very much so stephanie. this shocked the nation when it happened this year in may. as you can probably see behind me an awful lot of british nationalist groups showed up here calling for a very severe sentence against the two accused who will begin the old bailey
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here today for the first day of the trial. they are accused of murdering lee rigby and also accused of planning to kill a couple policemen. this is a case that is being hotly watched here in britain. there are an awful lot of emotions running high and certainly as the case continues, the british publish will keep a close eye and so will people around the world. stephanie. >> suspects are british men of nigeria who converted to islam are members of the islamic community paying a price for their alleged crimes? >> well, there have been a number at attacks since the murder of lee rigby against mosques and individual attacks on the streets in britain and not just london. it has sparked a very serious
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debate here on how to deal with folks on both sides of the spectrum as they potentially clash over this hot point but this is far from the only incident that is causing tensions between the communities in britain but this is a big one, stephanie. >> al jazeera phil is reporting to us in london, thank you, phil. a huge demonstration in greece to make the anniversary of a student up rising against the former dictatorship and the march is a meeting point for antigovernment activists and talking about prosterity and handing out money for greece and sent joblessness soaring and forced thousands of businesses to close. boeing is doing business at the air show and netting $100 billion on the first day along and includes $55 1/2 billion
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deal to build 7, x aircraft of dubai and fly dubai and air bus did not fair as well, they got 142 orders worth about $40 billion. here is what is making business news this morning. investors are waiting to see if the stock market will begin a new week of record highs and futures are higher and signalling a high start and dow is all time how of 15962 on and watch for dow 16,000. s&p record 1798 and both markets have advanced for six straight weeks and a rise this year and s&p up 26% so far. overseas european stocks keeping pace with the u.s. market and stocks slightly higher now and asia and hong kong and shanghai up 3%.
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timothy geithner is taking a job in the private sector and joining the private equity firm war burg pinkus and he played a role in the response to the financial crisis in 2008. sony had scored big with the latest video game and it sold more than one million in the first 24 hours on the market. the video game industry is under intense pressure from smartphones and tablets and sony expects more than 5 million of the new consoles in five months to be sold. a heart-warming reunion in the philippines. a woman finds her family when she returns to her typhoon-battered town. air pollution is 20 times higher than the level deemed safe where the situation is so severe that going outside can put you at risk for cancer and a heart attack. >> it's definitely dangerous.
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a lot of times i ask myself why do i do this. >> reporter: al jazeera takes you through one of the hardest endurance courses in the world with those braving this tough mudder. manning assured the 72 dolphins they are still the only team unbeaten in the nfl at least for one more year, the mile-high victory of the chiefs coming up, in sports. and taking a live look at the new york city skyline this monday morning.
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>> al jazeera america brings you live coverage: typhoon haiyan. >> relief efforts are well underway here in cebu. >> we have a problem with no homes to go back to. >> clean water, food, medicine, all vitally required.
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>> the australian medical team arrived. >> this is a government warehouse that is preparing relief for the families most effected. >> al jazeera america is there with continuing live coverage. >> the water rose to half-way up to the second story. >> to find out how you can help, go to aljazeera.com. ♪ welcome back, i'm stephanie si and these are the top stories at this hour, six were killed as a rash of tornados tore through the midwest, the national weather service reported dozens
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of twisters across the states and dozens of homes were destroyed and leaving many with no where to go. >> i went back to that end of the house and i heard some blasts. we don't have any windows on that end of the house and my husband came back and i said i don't know what to do and we stood in the hallway where there were no windows and just held each other. >> reporter: record tie temperatures in the 80s were the culprit for the storms and it's moving east and will bring heavy rain, thunderstorms and strong winds. 8 workers face challenges in the aftermath of typhoon haiyan and it has been over 8 days and remote islands have yet to receive aid and the destruction in tacloban is so widespread they are telling them to raze it and build a new city and we are in the philippines and what can
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you tell us about relief efforts there where you are? >> nicole, we have two c 1 that is 100 yards away and it's very loud. >> it's going to be kicked up a notch because you have got everybody here arriving and arriving on mass now. the british are here, the french, the swiss, the germans, the -- and the americans who have one of the largest contingencies here, they have a fleet in the gulf and that is headed by the uss george washington which has 80 aircraft at its disposal able to give aid to remote areas who have not been getting it until now and the process of 400,000 gallons of water a day and that is important because the groundwater in the providence is contaminated and it's causing disease. what we are seeing now is from the u.s. is not only just a concerted relief effort but a military campaign here. that is what it is, a military
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exercise and that is important to the u.s. particularly in this region for strategic purposes and a good pr campaign for the united states as it repositions itself in the western pacific and so we are seeing that the u.s. is throwing almost everything it has in and china has not contributed anything and says it has relief to come if need be but china and philippines have a bit of a territorial dispute of waters in the south china sea and seems to be an issue that china holds close to its heart because it's yet to contribute to the aid effort. >> they received criticism from that even within their own country. but the u.n. said about 4 million people are displaced from typhoon haiyan in the philippines, where are all these people going? >> well, that is right, 13 million people are said to have
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been effected by this. and as you said stephanie 4 million displaced and many on the ground with no where to go, no homes, no shelter and they are still in the area. that is where a lot of the problem exists because they need shelter, they need sanitation and medical care and they need food and water. some of them are coming back through here in saboo at the airforce base where i am and being placed in gyms and sport centers and taken care of and hospitals there who are looking after the injured. but there is a tent city that is being erected by the red cross and will be able to take a lot more people as we see hundreds of them being brought in them on the transport planes, but not everybody wants to come back and many are searching for their families and who have been lost in the debris and lost in that wall of water that hit with the
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typhoon. so they want to remain to continue that search. >> reporter: okay, al jazeera's craig is reporting from saboo in the philippines and thank you and paul joins us from g-1, an area the president of the philippines have visited, there is an out kra of the pace of the government's response, what was reaction to the president's visit? >> what we are hearing here is that people are starting to see more aid arrive but of course so much more is needed. we are here at the airport in kiwan and as you can hear there is a c 130 transport plane taking off and filled we vacuum -- evacuees and there are soldiers from the philippines behind me and dividing up the
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aid and it's water, food, supplies, putting it into trucks and driving out to local -- to outlines villages in the morning but they have been going in and out all afternoon, all day long. and as craig mentioned a lot of the families here have been separated. we actually on a flight out to guan the other day caught a ride and met a woman who was coming back here looking for her family. we followed her to her hometown. there is not a second to lose as australia troops pack the c 130 with equipment and supplies and it's a plane of aid workers, police and a civilian, one woman holding back tears in the dim cargo area and as the plane dissents to the devastated landscape she is overwhelmed. her name is dalea pagapaton and hundreds are desperate to leave
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here. but to lia she is desperate to get in. she has not heard from her family in more than a week and she is terrified of what she might find in her hometown of ta-tay. what is your reaction seeing this? >> devastating. it's like my emotion is. >> reporter: heading east toward the ocean a panarama of total destruction scrolls by and there is a waste land and rubble and splinters, all that is left of ta-tay and once holding 500 families and it's hard to imagine that anyone lived through it and then a shout. it's her older brother boustow.
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amazingly somehow everyone is here, and her entire family is alive. >> my brother, my youngest brother. >> reporter: tears of joy but the struggle is far from over, their house is barely standing and wants her sister in law who needs medicine to evacuate. >> i'm worrying because there is no hospital, no nothing, whatever happened to it. >> reporter: her family and the few other survivors here want to rebuild their town and lives but there are no jobs and no money and food and freshwater are running low and the aid won't last forever and in the aftermath of the typhoon what people really have in ta-tay is each other. paul with al jazeera ta-tay the philippines. >> reporter: and of course that was a happy reunion but
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unfortunately so many other families were not so lucky. the ocean came roaring through towns like ta-tay up and down the coastline what we are hearing for aid workers here aid has yet to arrive. towns like ta-tay further away have yet to see food or medical aid and we want to get out of here and see tomorrow morning, stephanie. >> reporter: we will continue that and paul thank you. there are 7,000 islands in the philippines to account for, many of them need help as paul said. more countries are joining the relief and singapore, australia and saudi arabia. and if they agree he will be the first person tried for high treason and accused of violating pakistan constitution by invoking emergency rule during his near decade in power. if convicted he could face the
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death penalty. france says it is standing firm with israel over iran's nuclear program and french president met sunday with israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu and they will keep pressure in iran when peace talks continue in geneva. i ran and u.s. and five others will meet for a third round of talks and the goal is to end a standoff over tehran's nuclear program and we have a guest from the primary report and benjamin netanyahu says what is on the table now is an extremely bad deal. in fact, there has been a lot of talk about what a good deal and a bad deal would look like. what do you think would be a good deal? >> a good deal is pretty close to what they already agreed to and they could agree to this week. >> reporter: what have they agreed to? >> they have not agreed to
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anything fully yet but what is on the table is iran halts construction at certain areas which they have already done, enhance inspections and other forms of international accountability on the program and relax sanctions and allowing the iran economy to kind of grow and get globally integrated again, that is on the table and where it needs to go. israel wants iran to capitulate completely. >> stop iranian completely and it will not happen most people say. >> it will not happen, that is right. >> there are u.s. lawmakers on both sides of the aisle and the slogan should not be trust and verify but do not trust, and this is from carl levin, be trusted? >> i don't think you have to like him but his job is to get the economy moving again and positioning them in the region
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because they are more of a regional power than a global one and he needs to normalize relations and get the deal done and his timeline is pretty short in terms of the amount of space he will be given to make a deal. so there is very pragmatic reasons to trust him and a repetition of not trusting iran is in some ways a political trope. >> based on history, the u.s. has in the past, not with jahad but the president before him made some headway in the relationship and it back fired in some ways and has not gone forward. >> reporter: you know, that is complex. i think there are two different parts to that, the bush administration didn't go fully forward with what the previous offered. the other aspect is the president, the last leader did not have the backing of the supreme leader does and has space to do this and i don't know how long he has space to do it and optimistic in the short
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term but pessimistic if they don't get something soon. >> the talks start wednesday in jaw -- geneva. >> aannounced that iran took steps that they were demanding and if their concerns are like that they will have less room to maneuver and the questions of what the french interests are here, their desire to position themselves at the gulf states and play a role in the middle east and things that may be motivating. >> seems like regional geo politics will still be a challenge and foreign rep. >> reporter: they may approve a vaccine not approved in the u.s. to stop meningitis and it was cleared by the food and drug
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administration last week and fights meningitis that puts 7 prinston students in the hospital and they recovered and they need to stop sharing drinks and avoid kissing. mud runs are a booming business and two million people will punish themselves in extreme challenges but there are risks and al jazeera emily reports from the toughest mudder. >> marc will run for 24 hours straight competing against hundreds of other people. he will climb these walls, make these jumps, and get electrocuted. he is at the toughest mudder event in new york, one of the hardest obstacle courses in the world. the race would test anyone but just being here is an achievement, until this year he had no use of his right arm. >> and i fatigue quicker but i
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have a heart and will push through. >> reporter: he was wound this an explosion in afghanistan where he served with the brittsh army and after months of recovery he is running for charity. >> a lot more wounded people than myself. >> reporter: it has a target customer and it's a great business. the competitors spend hundreds of dollars to run in the mud and it started a few years ago with only $20,000 and last year it made more than $75 million in revenue despite the growing popularity and almost cult like following safety remains a major concern. the biggest test was in june in west virginia, a 28-year-old died after jumping from oobstacle called walk the plank. the american college of emergency physicians just published a report on that tough mudder event and calls for research in volume and unique injuries that happen in these
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events and tough mud der and spartan dash and warrior race face the same issues and no standards for medical preparedness and tough mudder takes every precaution within the control. >> we design safety first and we think about how is it going to impact participants and what is the intent of the obstacle and what risks are we facing when we do it. >> reporter: danger is part of the draw. >> like a drug to be honest. >> definitely dangerous, a lot of times i ask myself why do i do this. >> reporter: after 24 hours of this about 20% of the participants have dropped off. halloway wasn't one of them. >> complete 50 miles and i ended up doing 60. >> reporter: he can't wait until the next mud run so he can do this, this and this all over again. emily drew al jazeera english town, new jersey.
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>> reporter: the authors of the american college of emergency physicians says that the races are impossible to prepare for and preventing injuries is difficult. let's check in with sports especially the nfl show down between the chiefs and broncos, here is jessica and i can see you doing some of those races. >> i will discuss the mud. >> i didn't see women in there, maybe that is what it was. >> maybe she is smarter than i give credit for and i will talk about the chiefs and they came in the game as the only unbeaten team in nfl and there were none of case and kansas city barely got a snip of peyton manning and offensive line protecting him after nursing the sprain and he is planning and firing to thomas for 9 yard score and denver old school and ground and pound at the gut and home team up by ten. here we go. another score here.
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that was monty ball and do it again this time, a little ways out and in the end zone and final 24-10 and 2 are tied, afc west and manning 223 yards and touchdown but not sacked and barely even touched actually against one of the league's best defenses. >> protection was great, running game was solid, we had a good mix but really the guys up front did a great job and answered the bell with a great challenge. i guess the defense and pass rush and those guys did an outstanding job and critical to the game. >> we played a good football team and they got us today. and we will bounce back. we will learn from our mistakes and there are plenty of things we can learn from here. >> reporter: it's that time of the season where teams are fighting for home team advantage on playoffs and two losses on the season and still perfect at home, all the more incentive to
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ensure they can play as many games at the superdome as possible. yesterday hosting the suddenly struggling 49ers and harbaugh is frustrated and drew brees was locked on and josh field for 3-year score and a 97-year-old drive for says and minors and the team imemployeding and that would lead to this brooks coming up, and he was sacking brees there, a fumble and hit and personal foul and this play, another turn over and calls for a free kick and lead to a game-tying field goal and in the fourth there it is, darren with the catch and that is good, and tackling and there is the field goal there. garret heartily and 31 yarder and 31-20 and saints perfect at home. elsewhere, and something you don't see often how about this, bears raven suspended in chicago
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under two hours thanks to high winds and rain and a threat of tornados. we told you about it yesterday and actually they cleared the stadium until the first end of the quarter but allowed back in and the play resumes and here is how it finished, fourth quarter to matt for the 14-yard and bears up 20-17 and 83 rushing and 5 catch notice the game and 6 seconds left and ravnes and tucker 21 yards to tie it up and if the game wasn't long enough how about this, extra period and rob by goal with the 38-yard and bears win 23-20 and bears fans fine with the long, long day, that is morning sports and back to you. >> talk about an mudder there, a breath of fresh air is hard to come by in one of the world's most densely populated countries. ♪
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and looking at the storm system finally clear out but what is it leaving in its wake? i will have the forecast coming up. a live look at our nation's capitol on this monday morning and a live look at the hudson river here in new york city. ♪
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>> audiences are intelligent and they know that their
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♪ welcome back to al jazeera america, ahead we will focus on one of the world's most densely populated countries, india is dealing with a deadly pollution issue that is so bad and some fear it is only getting worse. but first let's get a look at what potential precipitation we are looking at and nicole is back. >> improvement from what we saw yesterday and the storm system moved well off the east coast and good news and we have rain lingering in new england and behind it it has areas of high wind. as it went through at the peak they were over 70 miles per hour and not that potent this morning and clearing out of the great
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lakes region and vermont and new hampshire getting rain but on the move quickly so a lot of these places by the time the morning is over and we get into the afternoon there is a little bit of sunshine behind this and advisories we have up are for the winds, one area we have a watch is set to expire shortly and looking better. as we head southward this is an area where we have a little lingering moisture but still changes in terms of temperature coming because of all this. i will have more on that coming up. stephanie. >> environmentalists say air quality in india is reaching critical levels and more than half of the cities are shrowded in toxic pollution and raising questions about health effects and we report from new deli. >> reporter: members of a cycling club pedalled through the smog to get exercise and fresh air but with pollution hitting dangerous levels this
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time of year the health benefits are questionable. >> it does worry you, worry you for your own self and the next generation and not only you but generations to come. >> reporter: the air in new deli is thick with pollutions known as particulate matter and include toxic heavy metals like nickel and lead and the pollution is so severe it reaches 20 times the levels considered safe. every year at around this time people in new deli are literally choking on fumes. and it's mostly stagnant air and the pollutants from cars cover the atmosphere and the local government is also blaming neighboring states for the poor quality of air here. the situation has become so bad that people are actually being
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hospitalized. doctors at the government-run all india institute of medical sciences says emergency cases rise but up to 25% when pollution is high. patients commonly suffer from asthma and bronchitis but there are other health risks too including cancer and heart attacks. >> exposure to pollution can cause chronic bronchitis and lead to lung cancer. and exposure for more than that. >> reporter: with more than 1400 new cars hitting new deli's roads everyday, environmentalists say pollution will only increase. >> the fundamental solution is going to emerge. if this city can't scale up, modernize, the alternatives are two-person vehicles. you need to scale up public transportation options.
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>> reporter: the world health organization estimates that illnesses are the 5th leading cause of death in india. environmentalists here argue that there are few measures in place to improve air quality and that without them the city faces a bleak future. al jazeera, new deli. >> reporter: up to 80,000 new cases of lung cancer are diagnosed in india every year. time to straighten this out with a look at what we are following this morning. >> tornados tore through the midwest and pounding the region with strong winds and hail and six people were killed. rescue crews are looking for survivors in levelled neighborhoods. corruption is a major concern in the philippines and donations are pouring in from around the world the government says full transparency to show where the aid is going. they are searching the wreckage of a jet liner to find out why
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it crashed trying to land and all 50 on board were killed. in the next hour we will be talking about a new hurdle in aid to philippines and some of the necessities being handed out are unusable. and in sports drew brees takes a hit and the saints manage to keep marching at home, more on the dramatic win over the 9ers coming up. >> nicole mitchell and the system that brought storms has high winds and cold air in the wake and i will have the national forecast. al jazeera continues and we are back with you in 2 1/2 minutes.
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(vo) al jazeera america we understand that every news story begins and ends with people. >> the efforts are focused on rescuing stranded residents. (vo) we pursue that story beyond the headline, past the spokesperson, to the streets. >> thousands of riot police deployed across the capitol. (vo) we put all of our global resources behind every story. >> it is a scene of utter devastation. (vo) and follow it no matter where it leads, all the way to you. al jazeera america. take a new look at news.
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>> mayhem in the midwest. >> it looks like basically a bomb went off there. >> severe thunderstorms spawned dozens of tornadoes in illinois, one of the hardest hit states. an entire neighborhood is leveled and at least six lives lost. >> a deadly plane crash in russia, all people aboard are killed. investigators are trying to determine what brought the plane down. >> prayers in the philippines as the country seeks comfort in faith. the massive international relief effort there is beginning to pick up speed. >> using art to pay for health care. >> it's direct exchange, then the community gives back by
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saying we value you. >> a san francisco groups new plan to let artists pay for the care they need with creativity. ♪ theme >> a november tornado outbreak rips across the midwest. good to have you with us, welcome to aljazeera america. i'm thomas drayton. >> i'm stephanie sy. this is normally snow season, but thunderstorms, hail and tornadoes were triggered. twisters tore through the region unleashing powerful winds that demolished entire neighborhoods. >> the brunt of the devastation was felt in central illinois. officials say at least six people are dead. >> the storms later passed south of chicago before moving into michigan and indiana. when it was over, the storm had left an expansive trail of wreckage across the region.
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>> aljazeera's diane esther brook joins us now from hard hit washington, illinois. you're standing in one of the worst-hit areas. what are people doing this morning? >> well, at this point, there is still a curfew in effect and it will be for another hour. most are at temp rather shelters or staying with friends and families. this area is used to getting tornadoes, but they don't usually see them this time of year. usually you see tornadoes of this magnitude in the spring or summer, and that took a lot of people by surprise. we talked you to a resident of an apartment complex yesterday who said she heard the sirens go off. but she had literally seconds to reach safety. here's what she had to say. >> i look at the outside, it was debris flying, hitting everything around the building and the trees.
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i just went to my room and i told my son, let's go, it's here, let's go. we went running to the bathtub and just went and say jesus, here i am. >> united methodist church is one of several churches acting as a shelter, providing food, clothing and a place for people to sleep. the pastor of the church says some of the people staying there, in fact, members of the this congregation were in church yesterday when the storm struck. >> many families were here when the storm struck, went home after church to find that their holes are no longer there. it's just devastating. >> governor pat quinn has declared seven counties state disaster areas, so they will be getting some assistance from the state, and they're definitely going to need it p.m. >> it's good to see neighbors
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helping nation. we understand there were still people trapped in their homes. what's the latest on the recovery effort? >> as we understand it, everybody at least here in this town of washington has been accounted for, so this morning, they're going to basically just be cleaning up. >> it is encouraging and great news to hear. reporting from washington, illinois, diane, thank you. since 1986, there have been 194 november tornado warnings in illinois. of the 194, 101 of them were issued during sunday storm. >> washington, illinois was only one of many cities affected by the midwest tornadoes, joining us from cole city illinois, another town cleaning up after the storm is nick, the spokes person for the city's fire protection district. thanks for being with us. what do things look like in cole city this morning and what are the priorities right now? >> good morning. as the sun comes up, we are able
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to get a better damage assessment, a fresh set of eyes on everything. with the priorities always is the safety of our residents. we're going to begin the cleanup operation, which was going on overnight, working with com received and the utility companies. mother focus on the village, as well as the police and fire. continuing once again to monitor the safety of our residents, as well. >> were you -- did you get the impression that most people were given enough warning to get into basement shelters? i know you had just a few injuries in that town, which is pretty extraordinary given the pictures i have seen. >> that is correct. we were very lucky, only four transported to the hospital due to injuries sustained by this. i attribute that to the early warning systems. we had tornado sirens that went off in the area that are an outdoor warning.
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they were able to notify the residents approximately 20 minutes before the storm actually hit and then we were warned by those sirens once again right before the storm hit, which also included warnings from our local media about the storm and then the meteorologist warnings several days before. >> do you have any idea how many homes or structures were affected in cole city? >> rough sometime yesterday were approximately right around 100, if not more. between home and businesses, we did have some businesses and homes that were collapsed due to the storms and obviously some minor damage throughout the area, as well. >> all right. nick of the cole city illinois fire protection district. thanks for joining us this morning, sir. >> thanks very much. >> let's bring in meteorologist nicole mitchell for a closer look at the system that sparked
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this deadly weapon. >> obviously, not unusual to get some of the severe weather this time of year, but storms that are so strong, we usually have more of that activity in the spring. here's a capture from yesterday when the heat of all of this was going on. we had the strong frontal boundary, enough moisture from the south. this time of year, a lot of times, we won't have the stronger systems like this. for example, we don't have as much daylight in day time heatings as the systems in the spring, but this had an impressive, you can see the different lines, those are pressure changes and the tighter the lines are together, the more those winds are kicking. we had a strong jetstream above all this, so upper level winds. this is what it looks like when all those elements came together and you can see that impressive line, but those different elements, for example, the jetstream helping that get some of that rotation needed created what we saw yesterday. of course, they'll go back in today, see the damage, what was wind damage.
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we had multiple reports just of straight line winds that was hurricane force, separate the wind damage from the tornado damage and then also grade how strong the tornadoes were, based on the type of damage that was seen. here were all those different reports of wind, hail and tornadoes we saw yesterday. this is clearing out quickly in places like the northeast. you can see this moving through the area, behind it still areas of high wind and then those temperatures, they'll definitely be falling. i'll have that in just a moment. >> investigators are searching for clues after an airliner crashed and burst into flames while landing at an airport in central russia. all 50 people aboard were killed. the accident worsens the nation's dismal aviation safety record. >> not much is left of the bowing 737 flight, which crashed on landing. not one of the 44 passengers and six crew members survived.
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reports suggest the plane aborted its first landing and attempting a second one when it quickly lost altitude, it's fuel tank explode inge on impact. >> we are looking into all possible reasons for the crash. the main ones are a failure of machinery, fault of crew, weather conditions and bad quality fuel. >> russia has one of the worst airline safety records in the world. in 2008, all 88 passengers and crew were killed when a plane crashed near the mountains. 44 people were killed in september, 2011 when a passenger plane went down shortly after takeoff. at least 31 died in april of last year after a passenger plane crashed shortly after takeoff in siberia. investigators have been deployed from moscow to determine what exactly went wrong. the plane had taken off from the capitol ruffle an our before it exploded at its final destination.
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>> almost a year ago, the same aircraft had been forced to make an emergency landing after problems with cabin depressurization. on that occasion, no one was hurt. >> among the victims of that crash, top local security official, as well as the son of the public republic president. >> a bomb killed 31 soldiers according to the syrian observe atory for human rights on the outskirts of damascus. the type of bomb used is not known. >> a new round of attacks killed 21 people in iraq. the deadliest strike was a car bombing killing 11, aimed at government forces fighting al-qaeda. it raises the nation's death toll this month to 67. 5500 have been killed since april. >> a train slammed into a bus early this morning in egypt. 26 people are dead and several others injured in cairo. the mini bus was carrying a wedding party. authorities say the driver
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ignored warning lights and chains blocking the railway crossing. >> at least 28 people are dead after heavy rains triggered flooding and land slides in central vietnam. officials fear it could get worse. floodwaters rose quickly after reservoir gates released pass water. 80,000 people were displaced. >> the president of the philippines is visiting islands that were did he have tated by typhoon haiyan. it stay in the region until he's satisfied with relief efforts. the u.n. said more than 2.5 million people are in need of food. aljazeera's paul beban joins us now. how are people reacting to the president's visit? >> the reaction here was mixed. he spent part of the day here yesterday, he landed here at the
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airport and flew by helicopter to a town where he held some kind of impromptu press conference at a damaged school. people were happy to see him, but what we understand is they were kept at a distance. there was a large security perimeter keeping local citizens away from the president. i think they'd be more happy to see aid and more assistance. >> that was one of the hardest hit cities. what are the challenges? >> this entire area was hit very, very hard, and smaller towns to the east closer to the pacific ocean. we're hearing that while -- >> we lost paul beban, obviously the technology still a little
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sketchy. we apologize. coming up, we're going to look at yet another challenge facing relief crews in the philippines, aid supplies going bad. that's coming up in justify a moment. >> japanese workers are moving highly radioactive fuel rods at the crippled fukushima nuclear plant. it's a risky procedure. the fuel rods are brittle. if they break or become exposed to air, highly radioactive gas could escape. the cleanup is expected to take a year and cost $80 billion. >> demonstrators are pushing for action on climate change. the conference in warsaw is entering its second week. workers are working toward a long term solution for global warming, but hopes for a quick fix of low. amid fierce debates about funding to help developing countries. japan is having trouble meeting emission caps, blaming the fukushima in a nuclear accident. the deadline for a global
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agreement is 2015. >> relief efforts in the philippines finally gaining traction. >> some of finding their supplies are no good before they use them. >> we'll talk with the senior director for humanitarian affairs for word vision about the challenges. >> some of wal-marts factories in bangladesh getting a failing grade for safety. how the world's largest retailer plans to correct those problems that have led to deadly accidents. >> lawmakers take on a virtual currency connected to the on line black market for drugs. the case bit point will make to congress and the battle over this new finance frontier. >> you are looking live at new york city, a rainy start to the work week. more coming up in just a moment. you're watching aljazeera america.
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>> good monday morning, welcome back to aljazeera america. >> up next, efforts in the philippines to get aid to those affected by typhoon haiyan are getting traction. plenty of work needs to be done.
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we'll speak with the human director for word vision. he joined us after the storm's initial impact and will update us. >> first, let's get a look at the temperatures, what we can expect across the nation today, meteorologist nicole mitchell joining us again. >> we had that cold front come through causing the other problems we talked about. it's going to drop the temperatures for us. midsection of the country, chicago 43, ahead of it is where we have the mild air, still temperatures in the 60's, but that will drop fast as the front comes through. atlanta will see temperatures drop by about 10 degrees as we get into the day tomorrow. chicago, we're on the backside of this now, temperatures will stay persistently in the 40's for the next couple days. once we have the cold air settling in and the cloud cover moves out, which doesn't insulate us overnight, temperatures get down into the 20s. overnight temperatures something we'll have to watch. a lot of these east coast go down into the day you tomorrow. back to you guys.
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>> nicole can be thank you. officials at princeton university might issue a vaccine not approved for use in the u.s. to stop a meningitis outbreak. it was cleared for use at princeton by the f.d.a. next week. it might as anyone. >> it's that put several students in the hospital. >> a top cardiologist is questions new guidelines for prescribing cholesterol fightings drug. millions more americans were told it should take them. the doctor said those guidelines greatly overestimate risks and might lead to people taking drugs they do not need. >> paul beban is joining us from one of the hardest hit areas in the philippines. good morning to you, once again, paul. we know international efforts
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are gaining steam, how are things looking on the medical front? >> of course the need is simply enormous. what we saw at the airport today was a tremendous capacity for lift and delivery. we saw doctors without borders bring in mobile medical clinics that they're setting up. we heard they've got one set up in guiuan. they are hoping to do field triage in a lot of these areas where people have seen no medical care really since the storm. >> paul, can you tell us more about what's going on in the area you are, some of the trucks behind you?
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>> behind me, these are philippine army trucks and all day long, aid is coming in from the runway and flowing in through here. it's being divided up and put into these trucks. the trucks have been going in and out all afternoon. they're here for the evening now, take thissed to go out at first light tomorrow. when the flights will resume, the last c130 left a little while ago, another 100 or so evacuees going out and aid coming in. it's almost constant here. there are still people here waiting for flights out in the morning. they'll spend the night in the fields nearby. there's a company of marines stationed nearby. they're going to be here as long as it takes. >> they certainly need more aid. paul, thank you. >> new details are emerging about the extent of damage from typhoon haiyan. few philippine hospitals remain standing to help the injured and for many children, schools are
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now nothing but rubble. we report from tacloban. >> this is the elementary school, or what remains of it. there used to be 300 pupils who attended this school, just down the road from tacloban where most of the media coverage has been concentrated so far. you can see the extent of the devastation. this area saw the worst of the storm surge, some say as high as 15 meters. there was a pause for about a half an hour after two hours of those strong winds and another two to three hours of winds going the opposite direction. you can see what kind of devastation that wreaks. just beyond the walls you're seeing is the coastline where dozens of bodies washed up immediately after the storm according to the people here.
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the 300 or so students who used to come here obviously won't be able to go to school for sometime. the department of education is saying that they will be able to go to school by january 15. given that every school in this province is facing a situation like this, only varying by degrees, it's difficult to see how that's going to happen. >> aljazeera's veronica pedestrian degrees is a reporting from tacloban. relief organizations around the world are pouring supplies and workers into the philippines. here to update us now is the senior director for humanitarian and emergency affairs for word vision, he joins us from washington this morning. what is the latest status with world visions relief efforts? >> the distributions have started. they've been going on for about a week now. we actually did a distribution yesterday for 6,000 people. the work's starting, going on, it's definitely going to be a
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marathon and not just a sprint. >> let me show you pictures your organization has provided us with the first distribution of aid. i know it took some time to get aid to the isolated areas, but what challenges does your staff continue to face there on the ground? >> you know, the roads are still shut in many places, communications are still down in many places, so i would say logistics, communications, roads, it's still difficult, so we're starting to get stuff out there. we're starting to get food, we're starting to get water. sanitation kids. we're flying in many things to the airports, which are functioning now in many places, but it's hard to reach the farther out areas. it's an area of 6,000 islands in the philippines, so many are just difficult to get to. >> what role will your organization take once we start talking about rebuilding? >> world visions been in the philippines since the 1950's doing development programs for a long time. we have 600 staff in the
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country, flown in an additional 50. we'll meet the life-saving needs for the short term and we're flying in intermediate kits right now. we'll do psychosocial to meet children's needs in additional to food and shelter. >> when we spoke last week, there was a concern about security, there were sporadic supports of violence and looting. have your teams on the ground faced any of those security risks? >> there have been some challenges in areas. we've partnered with local police. they've been present at our distribution sites, helping to give security. up until this stage, we've been able to really work without too much interference. i would say it's a great partnership between world partnership and the government. >> such important work you and your colleagues are doing, thank you so much from world vision. >> thank you. >> wal-mart has found safety problems at some of its
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factories in bangladesh. more than 1,000 workers were killed in april in the collapse of a garment plant. wal-mart inspected 200 factories there and said 32 failed. wal-mart said most of those factories have since made improvements. >> time for a look at business news now. we're talking about bit coin. it's become a boon for early investors but now congress wants to know if it needs to regulate bit coin. a senate committee will hear the arguments that the currency is safe. law enforcement officials will testify that criminals use it to launder money and create an internet black market. >> former secretary timothy geithner is taking a lucrative job in the private sector. he played a role in the government's response to the financial crisis in 2008. >> sony scored it with its play station four. it sold more than 1 million during the first 24 hours on the
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market. the video game industry is under intense pressure from smart phones. sonying expects to sell 5 million in five months. >> a big holiday item. >> investors are waiting to see what the stock market will do with record who is. futures are edging higher signaling a positive start. this morning, the dow jones industrial average at an all time high of 15,962. we are now on watch for a record 16,000. the s&p 500 a the a record 1798, both have advanced for six straight weeks, part of an impressive rise this year. the s&p is up 26% so far. over seas, stocks there slightly higher right now. asia, hong kong and shane high up 3%. >> bowing is doing business, at dubai air show, netting
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$100 million on the first day. including a $55.5 billion deal to build 150 of its new 777x aircraft for emirates airlines in dubai. bowing took orders from qatar airways and fly dubai. airbus didn't do quite as well. bowing's european rival got 142 orders, worth about $40 billion. >> working to rare the problem-plagued health care website. >> what they did this weekend to get it on track. >> republicans and democrats facing off over the health care plan. >> keeping the pressure on iran, tough talk to an audience in israel. >> plus the spy scandal that just won't go away. why germany is still upset for the u.s. listening in on its leader. >> peyton manning and company, the only team to go unbeaten in the nfl, more on the mile high victory over the chiefs coming
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up later on. with continuing live coverage. >> the water rose to half-way up to the second story. >> to find out how you can help, go to aljazeera.com. determining using some sort of subjective interpretation of their policy as to whether or not your particular report was actually abusive, because if it doesn't contain language that specifically threatens you directly or is targeted towards you specifically, they may not consider it abuse. they may consider it offensive. and in that case they just recommend that you block that person. >> i don't want to minimise
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this, because i mean, there's some really horrible things that are on line, and it's not - it's not just twitter, what has happened through social media and the anonymity of the net is that you see websites, hate-filled websites targetting all sorts of groups, popping up. there has been a huge number of those that exist as well. on august 20th, al jazeera america introduced a new voice in journalism. >> good evening everyone, welcome to al jazeera. >> usa today says: >> ...writes the columbia journalism review. and the daily beast says: >> quality journalists once again on the air is a beautiful thing to behold. >> al jazeera america,
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there's more to it. >> you're looking at a live shot of the capitol building on a gray monday morning in washington, d.c. >> it has been a rainy start for much of the east. >> good morning, welcome back to aljazeera america. i'm stephanie sy. >> time thomas drayton. good to have you with us. congressional leadings from both sides of the aisle discussing obama care on the sunday shows. >> the n.s.a. spying scandal is taking center stage in germany. lawmakers are holding a special session today to decide whether to delve deeper into the spying. one of the questions they're asking is how much german intelligence knew. >> not too happy about that one.
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france's president is meeting with prime minister benjamin netanyahu talking about the push to secure a deal on iran's nuclear program. we're going to look deeper and go to israel to find out more about that important visit. >> first, two weeks before the crucial deadline to finish healthcare.gov, the website underwent a change over the weekend. >> the pushback from some in the president's own party. >> we'll talk more about that. an even bigger deadline here, december 15, that is looming. several cities across the country are offering workshops today, tomorrow and the rest of the week in response to many citizens wanting to learn more about the affordable care act. this comes as work got underway this weekend to bring additional servers on line for the troubled website.
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>> as problems persist with healthcare.gov, cities around the country are holding forums to help people understand obamacare. while americans are learning what health care plans work for them. the white house is doing its part just to get the website to work. crisis manager jeffery liance is working to get the website working. he has contractors working around the clock. he cites measurable progress in allowing more visitors to enter the website. the system can process 17,000 registrations per hour. not good enough say some republicans, who keep blaming the way obamacare became law two years ago as a way to say i told you so. >> no input from represents. that's what you get when you try to push it through. my constituents are very unhappy with the notices they're receiving and higher premiums. >> democrats are also hearing from unhappy constituents.
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more than a million americans had their current policies canceled because the plans into not comply with the affordable health care allow. friday, 39 democrats joined with republicans to pass a bill in the house that would allow insurers to keep selling older policies for the next year. on sunday, u.s. senator jillebran explained her fellow democrats are just worried about constituents. she expressed concerns about the president saying you could keep your policy if you want. >> if you're being offered a terrible health care plan that the minute you get sick, you're going into bankruptcy, those plans should never be offered. >> top house democratic nancy pell denied democrats have lost faith in the president. >> i will tell you this,
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democrats stand tall in support of the affordable care act. >> as for the website, the emergency team has crossed more than 200 fixes off its punch list of problems and is pushing for 50 more improvements this week. a white house advisor said one in five users who try to access the site in the next couple of weeks will still be unable to sign up, so still dealing with problems here. >> the white house says that the site will be completely operational by november 30, not giving a lot of time for the september 15 deadline. >> you've got a couple of back-to-back deadlines here. that september deadline is really for folks who want coverage by january 1, but under the law, all americans have to have coverage, whether it's under obamacare or not by the end of march, so still a little bit more time there. >> a little bit more wiggle room, unless you need insurance by january 1. thank you. let's go to thomas with more. >> health care has become the hot button issue in washington.
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joining us to discuss the state of health care, the law and president obama's handling of it from the manhattan institute. good to have you with us. 39 democrats joined the house republicans undermining obamacare. are we seeing a retreat from the democrats? >> i think democrats are responding to the constituents' issues, recognizing that the law isn't perfect. they're willing to make changes to the law. they're not abandoning it, but this is an opportunity to compromise. >> we have the mid term elections coming up. >> it's a political issue for republicans and democrats, republicans certainly want to stand against the law, but make sure their constituents have good health care. democrats are still keeping the policies they want to have. >> the president last week apologized to the american people and democrats. he said if you have existing health care insurance, you can
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keep it for another year. was that enough moving ahead? >> absolutely not. it was a political move, doesn't do anything positive. those canceled already will not be the same policy. it's abusing executive power. he didn't wait for congress to pass a bill before saying that. people are losing policies. if they want them back, the premiums are going to be higher. >> this republican fix, keep your health plan act is never going to pass. >>? approximate even if it does, it's still purely political, doesn't change anything. there are much better fixes than just saying you can keep your plan. >> are you going to see these fixes work? >> i hope so. this is an opportunity for republicans. they just have to take it. >> here you have four republicans who voted against this act. they feel that look, you know, this is going to hurt us down the road. we're siding, if you will, with obamacare and not rejecting it.
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>> right. it's a mistake for republicans to view any kind of compromise as siding with obamacare. they need to view it as an opportunity to inject values into health care reform. >> where do you think we'll be in a year? >> it's hard to say. i hope republicans pick up the slack, start going forward with proposals like the one that came out recently and start making actual fixes to the law and injecting conservative reform. >> who comes out ahead? >> i think republicans certainly can. >> certainly appreciate your time. fellow from the manhattan institute, appreciate your time. >> devastating twisters tore through the midwest unleashing powerful winds that demolished entire neighborhoods. the brunt was felt in illinois. for more, we're joined by jonathan martin in illinois. what is the damage like in the inquire where you are? >> we justify arrived not too long ago and it's press extensive. i just talked to the chief of
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police here and he confirms three people have died as a result of the storms that came through around 3:00 yesterday. he told me 25 people, at least 25, have been injured badly enough where they actually had to go to the hospital. there are a number of other injuries to the point they had to set up a makeshift hospital, if you will, at one of the elementary schools, but the damage is significant. it's really hard to tell how many homes have been destroyed, because we are just getting daylight here. the priority at this point is to go door to door, home to home to make sure that they are not missing anyone. he said there were a few people reported missing last night, but they were able to account for them. now that the daylight is coming, officials will get a better idea of the damage. certainly what we've seen coming in, it is extensive. >> jonathan, you know, this area of the country is -- tornadoes are not new to this area, but i'm told november is rare for
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such a powerful storm. are you getting stories from residents? >> it certainly was surprising. this wasn't something you typically see this time of year, also, it is warmer than it typically is this time of year, residents from people we have spoken to do seem to be caught off guard. no one expects something like this to happen. this particular area of illinois is right on the kentucky border, so really, this has been a dual effort from kentucky officials and illinois officials, because really, getting all these people help, these two states, these two state police departments to help, so again, we're going to stay, talk to more people, look at the damage and hopefully bring you live pictures in our next hour. >> we'll continue to look for reports from you. janet martin joining us by phone, thanks jonathan. >> the trial of two men accused of hacking a british soldier to
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death on the streets of london opens today. the victim was 25-year-old lee rig by, an afghan war veteran. he served as a machine gunner and was a drummer in an elite military unit. he was killed in broad daylight not far from his barracks. the suspects were caught on camera bragging about the killing. >> a special prosecutor is expected to be named today to prosecute the egypt former president. he is accused of invoking military rule. if convicted, musharraf could face the death penalty. >> the french president began meeting with palestinian leaders today to discuss the faltering middle east peace process. this follows a day of talks with israeli focusing mainly on iran.
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we have more from jerusalem. >> the french president began his visit to ramallah laying a wreath on the tomb of arafat, and a reminder that fraps was among the nations that recognized the right of palestinian statehood during a vote in the u.n. general assembly last year, france also supporter of new european guidelines on the settlements. the french president very strong on the issue of settlements, saying that construction undermind the peace process, but called for gestures to be made from both sides. he stressed that israeli security along with palestinian statehood of viable. when side by side, one of the occasions he made that what the palestinians could deliver as a gesture, the issue of refugees, suggesting that there should be further negotiation on the matter of the right of return.
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basically, the french president presenting himself as fair, making clear if peace is to be achieved, it is between the parties themselves. he can only encourage the negotiation process. he has no magic wanted or words to bring to bear to push it forward and push it to true i guess. this is the middle part of his visit to the region. he will return for talks with the israeli prime minister later in the day. the negotiation process probably will be pushed to the sidelines again, the talks there once again likely to focus on iran. aljazeera reporting from jerusalem. >> americans are demanding answers from the n.s.a., requests for records have skyrocketed since documents about surveillance programs were leaked. between june and september, there were more than 3300 requests. that's up from fewer than 300 the year before. the agency says it's the largest spike in public requests they've
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ever seen. former n.s.a. contractor edward snowden revealed the agency spying last summer. >> american officials offered to negotiate a mutual no spying agreement with germany. as we report from berlin, the scandal awakened painful memories in germany. >> the museum in berlin, a grime reminder of how the east german regime spied on its citizens for decades. the technology seems quaint by today's standards, where governments now use computers. the big evident shock about the n.s.a. spying scandal is that washington was almost certainly listening in on chancellor's cell phone. in communist times, they did it to repress people. today, they say they're
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protecting us from terrorism. >> with public affection for the u.s. dropping, this moment last summer feels like it happened years ago. >> during that trip, obama said that american surveillance had stopped terror plots against this country. what he didn't say was that the american embassy right over here has, according to the german media, a sweet of rooftop rooms filled with surveillance equipment. the assumption here is had chancellor merkel used her cell phone on that summery day, the americans would have been able to record every single word she said. >> the session will no doubt express outrage at american actions, but also for the opposition, at least for those of the chancellor. >> it's hippo critic. >> she had contracts with the spy services that were allowed
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to do this stuff in germany. we want to know everything. we are really asking for a special investigation committee here at the german parliament. >> that could be risky for merkel. whatever the outrage about the phone hacking and spying in germany, any revelations about german spy agencies benefiting from u.s. surveillance could cause an even bigger scandal. aljazeera, berlin. >> german lawmakers want edward snowden to testify about what he knows about spying on their political leaders. >> let's check in with sports now, especially the snow down between the chiefs and broncos. that good morning. >> that was a good one. the chiefs came into the game as the only unbeaten team in the nfl and there are now none. barely got a sniff of peyton manning at mile high. he had been nursing an ankle and tossed the touchdown for the nine-yard score. the broncos had an early 10-0 lead and denver goes old school, ground and pound.
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punches it in from one yard out, the home team up 10 and ball wasn't done. he would add another rushing score in the third inning. here he is handing off and gets to the end zone there. it was 24-10 final. the two of now tied in the a.f.c. west. 323 yards and a touchdown for manning, he was barely touched by one of the league's best defenses. >> protection was great, the running game was solid. we had a good mix, but really, guys up front did a great job, answered the bell. they had a great challenge against an excellent defense and excellent pass rush, so those guys did an outstanding job that was critical to the game. >> we played a good football team and they got us today, and you know, we'll bounce back. we'll learn from our mistakes. there are many things we can learn from here. >> of course it is that time of the season where the teams are fighting for home field
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advantage come playoff time. while the saints have two losses on the season, they're perfect at home. all the more incentive to insure they can play as many games as they can at the superdome. they host the 49ers, jim harbaugh not happy watching drew brees locked in early on. josh hill capping off a 97-yard drive with the touchdown there. niners would have the lead late, but again, imploded with turnovers first on this. that was brooks coming in hot. the penalty there, gives the home team there the first down and of course, that would lead to a game-tying field goal. sproles gets the fair catch here. that's another 15-yard penalty, leading hartley to a game-winning 31-yard field goal. 23-20 your final. the saints still perfect at home. >> well, yesterday's game between the jets and bills proved to be a full contact sport for fans.
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check out your screen, third deck. for some reason, one fan decided to slide down the railing, forget about the laws of gravity and fell on the deck below on top of of another man. the guy who fell came away with a shoulder injury, the man he fell on suffered a head injury. i'm guessing they're going to want to check both of their heads after that move. simply a matter of dotting the i.'s and crossing the at the's, all he had to do was stay out of trouble and finish no worse than 23rd. that's always easier said than done with all that can happen on a nascar track. the most dominant driver of his generation, the miami speedway, he's in the 48th car, just needs to be aggressive, but not too aggressive. scary moment, right back tire on fire. he pulse into the pit. finally blew as the crew came out to change the tires and
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hamlin would go on to win the race. later, you still see the tire there, everybody was ok, though, jimmie johnson managed to avoid all the accidents, finishing ninth. he takes his sixth title. >> i don't even know where to start. i am at a loss for words, but proud and thankful for this opportunity. i want to say hi to all the employees owners that are watching. this sport's about people and our people, got the job done this year. i am so thankful to drive for this race team and honored and excited to have the six pack. >> that's a look at sports this morning. great company to be in, just one away. >> he's probably just beginning. thank you. >> a major on line crackdown.
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>> google and microsoft are teaming up. >> the big step the web giants are taking to block child pornography. >> toronto's scandalous mayor, what cities are trying to do to make sure he can do no more damage. >> artists trading their talents for medical services.
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>> audiences are intelligent and they know that their
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>> good morning, welcome to aljazeera america. i'm stephanie sy. >> i'm thomas drayton. coming up, as the battle over the rollout of president obama's health care website intensifies in washington, some folks on the other side of the country are taking a unique approach to making sure their health is ok. we're going to find on you artists are using their skills to get the care they need, coming up in a moment. >> first, lets look at potential precipitation across the midwest today. nicole mitchell is back. >> obviously we have the big player we've been watching. while we're on the broad view,
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the northwest is starting to get more moisture, as well. of course, the big atory out here that been the storm system causing all the severe weather especially around the great lakes region yesterday. it's clearing out more with the moisture. you're going to see a lot of this combined to new england. mid-day, moisture will be moved out, still high winds and cooler temperatures. i'll have more on that coming up, back to you. >> google is taking steps to block child pornography. ththe internet giant i will expd the ban. it has technology that would flag child pornography videos. >> another possible set back for the toronto mayor. the city council is set to vote on stripping him of his budget and powers. he admits he smoked crack cocaine and bought illegal drugs
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while in office. the council cannot remove him from office and ford refuses to step down, insisting he will seek reelection next year. >> artists and musicians are now working with pop up clinics in exchange for health care. >> this artist is creating a mural at san francisco's festival and i also not getting money for his work. instead, he's getting access to health care. >> going to the doctor is like in the same category as buying a new car or something. it's just something that i'm like wow, wouldn't it be cool if i got to go to the doctor, but i guess i don't. >> a survey found 43% of artists and 53% of musicians have no health insurance. a traditional barter system is underway here at a community-run
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healing arts organization. joe, himself an artist dreamed up the idea in kingston, new york four years ago. he says the concept is hundreds of years old. >> my tooth hurts, here's a chicken. it's direct exchange. what we're doing is showing the value of culture to the community. that gives back, then the community gives back by saying we value you. >> doctors and nurses have volunteered to help 12 artists, 15 bands and seven d.j.'s during the seven day festival. more than $50,000 worth of music, art, health and wellness services of being exchanged as a result of the event. >> are you in any pain right now? >> lower back pain, yeah. ♪ >> maria performed at the festival in exchange for treatment. she says touring is tough. she is grateful for the help she got here. >> we've been in car accidents. i have a physical injury from that, which was treated yesterday. >> it's not just traditional western medicine being offered,
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but also acupuncture, chiropractic justs, massage and more. there are yoga classes and body work, and an optometrist is helping and artist. the artists feel their work also contributes to the well being of their communities. >> when you look at a huge mural or you see a performance, you're uplifted. that helps keep you healthy. >> the programs are working. >> what treatment did you get? >> just got a chiropractic adjustment. >> how do you feel? >> great. it does feel a lot better. my neck was real messed up. >> now he can return to work. aljazeera, san francisco. >> the bartering wasn't just for artists and musicians. 23 clinic visits were given for working at the festival. >> del walters joins us now with a look at what we're following this morning. >> good morning.
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dozens of tornadoes tearing through the midwest, pounding that region with strong winds and hail. six people were killed and crews now searching neighborhoods leveled, looking for survivors. >> corruption a major concern in the philippines as donations pour in from around the world. the government now promising to be transparent to show where the money is going. >> russian investigators looking at the records of a jet liner trying to find why it crashed trying to land. all 50 onboard were killed. >> the aljazeera morning news continues. del walters is back with you in two and a half minutes. >> we leave you with a live look at the new york city skyline.
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>> tonight, live coverage from the philippines continues, as diseases run rampant medicine is in short supply. joie chen reports live typhoon haiyan: a special edition of america tonight 9 eastern / 6 pacific on al jazeera america >> mayhem across the midwest as severe thunderstorms spawn dozens of tornadoes. in illinois, one of the hard-hit states, an entire neighborhood is leveled, at least six lives were lost. >> prayers in the philippines as the typhoon-ravaged country seeks comfort in faith. the massive international relief effort there is picking up speed. >> a delicate and dangerous operation in japan at the crippled fukushima in a nuclear power plant, workers removing fuel rods to stabilize the site. >> a beloved character of the holidays coming under fire. why st. nick's faithful servant
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black peter have some crying foul. ♪ theme >> these are the images as tornadoes turned deadly in november across the midwest. dozens of the twisters ripping through the region sunday unleashed powerful winds that demolished entire neighborhoods. good morning and welcome to aljazeera america. i'm bell walters. usually it is snowing this time of year but a deadly cell triggering thunderstorms and tornadoes, at least six are dead in illinois, most in the center of the state. storms passed south of chicago before moving into michigan and indiana. in its wake, a trail of deadly devastation across the region. we are joined now live from the hard hit city of washington, illinois. what are people saying where you are? >> well, del, now that the sun
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is up, you can probably see behind me the extent of the damage. the town of washington is estimating between 250 and 500 homes have been destroyed. the occur fee was lifted so residents can go back, survey their homes if they have homes to go back to. >> our father who art in hemp -- >> with a massive tornado bearing down, terrified residents pray to a higher power to keep them safe. it was a scene that played out across the midwest on sunday with dozens of twisters tearing through the region. cars were crushed, homes were flattened and in hard-hit towns, entire neighborhoods were blown away in a matter of minutes. >> we were you are not the basement, and it was gone within three or four minutes. just as you can see what it has done here, everything. >> our two vehicles are sitting in the immediately over there, one of which was inside our
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garage. >> twitters cut through indiana, leaving a path of destruction in its wake, including flipping this car, not sparing the starbucks in front of it or the dozens of homes in areas like boon county. >> i saw debris coming towards us. i went inside and shut the door and seconds later, my dad's friend yelled get down. the roof caved in. >> the severe thunderstorm system which fueled the tornadoes spread across seven states, affecting more than 50 million people. >> we may need to take shelter right gnarringselves. >> yes, we do. >> not even those covering the storms were immune from its impact. with many roads impassable as night fell, search and rescue efforts were difficult. this morning, they will get a closer look at the damage. in hard-hit washington, illinois, a curfew was put in place. the illinois national guard dispatched firefighters to assist communities. >> i went back to that end of
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the house and heard some blasts. we don't have any windows on that end of the house and my husband came back. i said i don't know what to do. we justify stood in the hallway where there were no windows and just held each other. >> the white house issued a statement saying president obama has been briefed about the damage and was in touch with federal, state and local officials. fema has dispatched a team, standing it says at the ready to assist the thousands have victims waking up today to devastation and the difficult task of rebuilding. >> there's been some progress since last night. we have been told by the utility in the area that 30,000 people are still without power. that's an improvement over last night when about 100,000 people were without power. del. >> as we mentioned, they are used to tornadoes, but not this time of year. they must be scratching their heads. >> they are. i think that's what caught a lot of people by surprise. they're used to storms like this
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in the spring and summer, not november. a lot of people were taken off guard when they heard sirens. fortunately, people did get to safety and it's really miraculous when you think about it. in this area, there was only one fatality, several injuries, but only one fatality. >> joining us live from illinois in washington. thank you. there have been 192 tornado warnings in illinois, 101 were issued during sunday storm alone. that storm forced thousands of football fans to take cover in chicago. the bears-ravens game was suspended for nearly two hours. severe thunderstorm warnings issued for the chicago area, as you can see, heavy rain began to fall shortly after kickoff. this message on the video board telling fans to take shelter. no injuries were reported. amy paul is a spokeswoman with the a.s.f. st. francis medical center and has an update on the
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injured. what are the numbers that you are hearing? >> i just talked to our emergency response team that is still located out in washington with medical supplies. the hospitals we believe have seen the three that are taking major injuries about ate five tornado victims at the largest in level one trauma center in central illinois. we have 55 people come through our emergency room yesterday. eight were trauma and 16 now total have been admitted. >> you brace for things like this during tornado season, but this is november. what was it like at your hospital when the tornado struck? >> we have had these things happen all the time and we always plan for crises, so it actual went very smoothly yesterday. i think we were bracing for many worse injuries and many more people. >> now as far as the injured are concerned, are you starting to see those numbers go down? >> yes, the ones that are
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trickling in, they went down yesterday afternoon, and it stopped, actually, anyone coming to our emergency department, but i think what happened is that people were just devastated and trying to find family members and probably injured and didn't know it or didn't care at the time. then they started last night trickling back in to our emergency democratic, but nothing in the large numbers that we saw at the beginning of the storm. >> because of the devastation that we're seeing, were members of your staff having difficulty getting just to work? >> we had, because of the time of the storm, it was not during a shove change, so we had whole staffing. yes, we did have some people who were trying to get out of washington, but we did not have problems with staffing. we have an emergency department that can handle more than double what we did yesterday, and so it was when i went down stairs at night, it was actually quiet. >> amy paul from st. francis medical center in peoria, thank you very much for being with us this morning. those storms now headed east and
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for the latest, we turn to nicole mitchell. nicole, why was this system so intense? >> it's not that unusual that we can have tornadoes in november. we have a mini second season in the fall, because spring and fall are when we get temperature contrasts. what was so impressive about this one is that they were so strong. let's get into that. we had the strong cold front intersecting with the warm air, that's our initial set up like we look at during the spring. the spring we have more daytime in general, more daytime heating adding to the storms. to kind of balance out getting strong storms, we also had a strong jetstream. not only did we have the warm and cold air, but at the upper levels, a strong wind flow that as the storms built up helped give them a little bit of spin. that's part of the reason we saw this. even the lines that are yellow, those are pressure gradient. you can see that forming up, so
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not just the areas that the tornadoes and the hail, but just high winds in general, what we call straight line winds, moved through. those were about almost 500 of the reports that we saw having over 600 reports of severe weather. you'll have to go back and actually look at first of all what is tornado versus straight line winds with all these reports that go through and then for the tornadoes themselves, looking at how much damage there was, like damage to roofs and homes to see what category, wouldn't be out of the question that possibly some of these are e.f.4s. the systems are still moving behind it, areas of wind. >> nicole, mitchell, thank you very much. the president of the philippines is going to islands devastated by typhoon haiyan. he will stay in the region until he is satisfied with the relief efforts there. >> friends and family members are remembering the victims of a bowing that crashed in russia. all 44 passengers onboard and six crew members were killed when the plane exploded on
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sunday. among the victims, a top local security official and the president's son. officials believe the plane circled the airport once before it crashed. >> the likely reasons for the accident are pilot error and technical issues, including the possibility of equipment failure. those possibilities are being looked into and investigated. >> russia has a did i see malaviation safety records, some blaming a cost cutting measure and poor training. >> workers in japan removing radioactive fuel rods at the fukushima nuclear power plant. >> a delicate, dangerous operation begins at reactor number four at the fukushima nuclear plant, removing some of the 400 tons of spent nuclear fuel in the crippled complex. the unprecedented process is
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fraught with risk. huge amounts of highly radioactive gas could escape into the atmosphere. >> we hope that this process will be conducted in a manner that will not disturb role residents and that the removal will be done on schedule properly and safely. >> there are about 50-70 fuel rods stored inside an assembly. it will take a week to move 22 to a more stable core to keep the fuel cool. with more than 500 requiring removal, this is a year o. long operation. >> i would assume that the electric company, they have serious evacuation plans, but they're not made public so as not to raise the fear, but they muff serious evacuation plans in case something happens, but the workers, one must give them rye respect that they are going there and they know how
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dangerous that is. >> the earthquake and tsunami of march 2011 badly damaged all four reactors. unit four avoided a meltdown. the power company said the current experience will help it deal with the other three reactors where radiation levels of much higher because of meltdowns. the company continues to face criticism for its handling of the cries. aljazeera. >> that cleanup is expected to take about a year. those fuel rods will be removed in batches of 22. they will be ensealed cavs filled with water. it will take between seven and 10 days to carefully remove each of the rods with a crane. those rods cannot be exposed to air or highly radioactive gas will be reds. the president of the philippines is going to the islands
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devastated by typhoon haiyan. he is going to stay in the region until he is satisfied with all of the relief efforts. one of those islands is where aljazeera is live. paul, the residents said they felt lucky to be alive but are worried that most of the aid is going someplace. are they starting to see it trickle in? >> well, del, the aid is certainly flowing in here around the clock. we're at the airport here. aid is arriving on swede issue, american, new zealand and australian c130's all day long, being loaded up, divided up into these trucks which will then go out into these outlying areas. the philippines are an archipelago, thousands of islands, very mountainous with difficult to reach remote areas.
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the continuing problem here is getting the aid from place guiuan. >> besides the injured, besides the dead, there are 25,000 women who are pregnant who need aid. how do you get aid to them? pregnant each month in the philippines. >> that's right. we were actually speaking to an official from the international community of the red cross about this specific issue. what they said is they're going to be rolling in mobile medical units that can do a number of things. they hope they can set them up to address the needs of women and newborns. of course, both very vulnerable,
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needing fresh water, needing clean conditions and medications, as well. that is one thing they are very aware of. they hope to bring in those splice as quickly as possible. there is a trauma center set up by doctors without borders in guyian. those efforts are ongoing, but the need is so vast and spread out over such an enormous area, dell. >> paul, for days, there was a sense that the supplies might not get there in time, that the aid, when it reached the philippines might be too much, too late. is there a sense where you are that it made it just in time or was it too late? >> what we learned here today, del, speaking to u.s. military officials here on the ground was that they are going full tilt now. we spoke to one here who said he's just lost count of how many flights came in and out of guyian's airport even just today. it really was non-stop.
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this is a small, this is a single air script that was built in world war ii. it's probably never been this busy since then. it's a non-stop flow of aid. the question is getting it to the outlying areas. there wasn't the sense of panic that there was here really just a few days ago. still a sense of urgency and a sense that there's no time to lose. >> paul, thank you very much. paul beban in guyian in the philippines. paul, thank you very much. >> prayers and vigils held for the victims of haiyan. hong kongs financial district prayed. many cried. >> people are still looking for their dead relatives, for their missing relatives that. five days later, they still haven't received any food. >> prayer services being offered
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in church services in beirut and in seoul, south korea and filipinos gathered to remember those who died and offer support for the survivors. >> two minors are still in the hospital after a deadly underground accident in colorado at a silver mine. it is 270 miles southwest of denver. two workers killed, others injured. this accident was probably caused by that the release of chemicals, not a cave in or collapse. 27 miners have died in accidents across that county this year. >> working to rare the problem-plagued healthcare.gov website. what was done this weekend trying to get it back on track. >> a trial underway in a murder case that shocked britain. two men are accused of killing a soldier in broad daylight. >> a christmas character in black face that has some people seeing red.
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power of the people until we restore our
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>> good morning, welcome back to aljazeera america. i'm del walters. healthcare.gov gets an upgrade. we'll tell you what that means trying to log on. first, let's check the weather across the nation. >> our big story has been that cold front and severe weather caused right along with it. on the backside that have, we have the cooler air, as they try to do storm reconstruction, like in chicago, temperatures will be in the 40's. one area in the mild side up and down the east coast with the front continuing through this morning, so some sick's that will soon be replaced. new york, temperatures in the 60's will go down quickly into the 50's and 40s. overnight temperatures tart i go to get cool once again. into the day tomorrow, we see that not only up and down the east coast, but some of these southern temperatures, like atlanta go down 10 degrees by the day tomorrow.
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we'll talk more about where the rain is coming up. >> navy investigators are trying to figure out why a drone malfunctioned, striking a ship during a training exercise off the coast of southern california. two sailors suffered minor burns when it hit the ship on saturday. that is now docked to be checked for damage. the crew was using the drones to test the ship's radar. >> just two weeks before the crucial deadline to fix healthcare.gov, that website now undergoing an upgrade over the weekend. we have the latest fixes, as well as reports of pushback from democrats, the president's own party, because of the rollout. >> yes, that happening throughout the weekend. there are deadlines looming, november 30 and then december 15. several cities across the country are offering workshops today, to really, the rest of the week in response to many citizens wanting to learn more about the affordable care act. this comes as work got underway to bring additional servers on
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line for the troubled website. >> as problems persist, cities are holding forums to help people understand obamacare. >> go ahead with any questions. >> while americans are learning what health care plans fork war them, the whites house is doing its part to get the website to work. crisis manager jeffery is leading the emergency effort to get the site running smoothly by november 30. he has hundreds of contractors working around the clock to fix the problems. he sites measurable progress in allowing more visitors to enter the website. the system can now process nearly 7,000 registrations per hour. not good enough say republicans, who keep blaming the way obamacare became law two years ago as a way to say i told you so. >> it was passed on purely partisan lines, no input from republicans. that's what you get when you try to push it through. my constituents are very unhappy with the notices they are receiving and higher premiums.
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>> democrats are hearing from unhappy constituents. more than a million americans had their current policies canceled because the plans into not comply with the affordable care act. on friday, 39 democrats joined with republicans to pass a bill in the house that would allow insurers to keep selling older policies for the next year. on sunday, u.s. senator gillibrand said her fellow democrats are responding to the worries of constituents. she expressed frustration about the president promises americans could keep their plans. >> if you're offered a terrible health care plan that the minute you get sick, you're going to have to go in bankruptcy, those plans should never be offered. >> some see this as a problem for the president, top house democratic nancy pelosi denied democrats have lost confidence in obamas ability to overcome the rough rollout of his signature law. >> i don't think you can tell
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what will happen next year, but i will tell you this, democrats stand tall in support of the affordable care act. >> as for healthcare.gov, the emergency team has crossed more than 200 fixes off its punch list of problems and is pushing for 50 more improvements this would go. a white house advisor said one in five users who try to access the site in the next couple of weeks will still be unable to sign up. >> the white house gave itself that november 31 deadline to get the website fix, but have another deadline, are they cutting it close? >> just a reminder, the december 15 deadline is to have coverage by january 1. under the law one have until march to get coverage or else face a fine. >> wal-mart says it found safety problems that some of the factories it uses in bangladesh. workers there have demanded
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safety improvements since april when more than a thousand workers were killed in the collapse of a garment plans. more than 200 factories were inspected. 32 of them failed. wal-mart says most of since made improvements. here's what's making business news this morning. investors are waiting to see if the stock market will continue its winning ways, of a posting records in three straight sessions, futures are up. the dough jones at 15,962. that means we are now on watch for d dow, 16,000. the s&p up 26% so far this year. overseas, european markets in the green at this hour. asia, hong kong and shanghai rising 3%. >> google wants to remind you it's a retailer, as well. the outlets will be called
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winter wonder labs and will display tablets and computers. stores will feature a large snow globe. >> sony has scored big with its play station four. it sold more than a million copies of the consoles on the first day they were on the market. the video game industry facing pressure from smart phones and cab lets. sony expects to sell more than 5 million of the consoles in just five months. >> women bouncing back from job losses created by the great recession. labor department data analyzed by the wall street journal shows 67.5 million women are now in the workforce and that is a record. it tops the previous mark that was set in early 2008. the story different from men. there are nearly 2 million fewer men working now than before the financial crisis. >> two muslims accused of killing a british soldier in broad daylight, their murder trial getting underway in london. we'll be live at a preview.
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>> a photographer provides a beautiful glimpse into cultures around the world that are rarelile seen. he takes us to his incredible journey. we're right back. >> in sports, a bum ankle and all, peyton manning comes up big as did his offensive line against one of the toughest defense was in the league, i'll show you how the broncos denied the chiefs perfection at mile high stadium last night. >> you're looking at the sunrise over the capitol building on this monday manager, as it is time for them to get back to work. >> detroit... >> chicago... >> nashville... >> los angeles... >> san francisco... >> al jazeera america, take a new look at news.
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determining using some sort of subjective interpretation of their policy as to whether or not your particular report was actually abusive, because if it doesn't contain language that specifically threatens you directly or is targeted towards you specifically, they may not consider it abuse. they may consider it offensive. and in that case they just recommend that you block that person. >> i don't want to minimise this, because i mean, there's some really horrible things that are on line, and it's not - it's not just twitter, what has happened through social media and the anonymity of the net is that you see websites, hate-filled websites targetting all sorts of groups, popping up. there has been a huge number of those that exist as well.
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>> al jazeera america brings you live coverage: typhoon haiyan. >> relief efforts are well underway here in cebu. >> we have a problem with no homes to go back to. >> clean water, food, medicine, all vitally required. >> the australian medical team arrived. >> this is a government warehouse that is preparing relief for the families most effected. >> al jazeera america is there with continuing live coverage. >> the water rose to half-way up to the second story. >> to find out how you can help, go to aljazeera.com. >> welcome back. the midwest is facing a massive clean up, tornadoes tearing through to region, bringing strong winds and hail. at least six people were killed. rescue crews are looking for
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survivors in leveled neighborhoods. >> hundreds of radioactive fuel rods are being lifted from fukushima nuclear power plant. >> more than 4 million filipinos have been displaced by typhoon haiyan. that countries president is visiting the devastated islands. the government promises to be transparent about where all the money is going too. >> aljazeera's jonathan martin has been trying to get in to check the extent of the damage. has sunrise revealed for damage? >> having trouble hearing you. we're in brook point, illinois, right in front of this warehouse. it was a warehouse. it's completely destroyed right how to. we just spoke to the police chief this morning. he tells us they have confirmed three fatalities in this area, really this area of illinois, and they also have told us at
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least 25 people have been injured as a result of the storm. those are people injured badly enough to go to the hospital. they've had a number of other injuries where they set up a make-shift hospital at one of the elementary schools. this storm came through around 3:00 yesterday. the first priority for authorities was just to make sure everyone was safe. they also put up a curfew that was just lifted at 6:00 this morning, so now the priority is to go back over the work they've done and make sure they haven't missed anyone. there were people reported missing last night, but they believe they've accounted for everyone. they are going to come out with about a dozen teams with their canine units to double check these areas. right now, extensive damage again, three people killed in this area. just to give you an idea where this is, this is really on the kentucky border, so just a couple of miles down the road, you can into kentucky. this is on the illinois-kentucky border right here. >> whatever that is behind you
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is no more. can you tell us exactly what it is we are looking at the in the background behind you? >> well, i was told by some of the local officials here that this used to be a warehouse. it was at least the one in the back is some sort of carpet warehouse. you can see cars behind me that are completely smashed down by the building. the roof is completely gone. at this point, it's hard to put a number on the homes that have been destroyed or leveled, because crews say they don't even know. that's one of their even really priorities this morning to go do a damage assessment. i think just by driving through the community this morning for the hour that we did, dozens of homes have been destroyed or at least a couple dozen in addition to some of the areas here in the i'd say the kind of town square right here. >> jonathan, as we mentioned earlier, they usually expect snow this time of year in parts of illinois, but this time, we're seeing tornadoes. was anyone there caught off guard by everything that
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happened weather-wise? >> well, certainly caught off guard. i talked to the police chief has said he was here in the middle of this storm. i think people knew that the weather could turn fear, but i don't think anyone expected it to be this bad. the police chief said he was here in the middle of this. he actually saw the tornado come through, pick up things, toss it aside. while i think everyone knew that it could get bad in november, this time of year, i don't think anyone expected it to be this severe. >> jonathan martin joining us live from brookport, illinois. thank you very much. >> elsewhere, relief is slowly reaching areas hard hit by typhoon haiyan. large shipments of food and aid are reaching areas, several new mobile surgical units also up and running. >> from the perspective of people who have lost everything, aid never gets there fast enough, but things moved pretty quickly here. we had people, supplies,
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prepositioned in front of the storm, working with the government, things started flowing on sunday and monday. >> the u.s. military has delivered 118 tons of food, water and shelter to tacloban and other regions since thursday. millions of people are still in urgent need of food. >> pakistan plans to try its former president for high treason. a special prosecutor expected to be named today if judges agree. president musharraf would be the first person have tried for high mistaken in pakistan. he is excused of vitalling that countries constitution by invoking emergency rule while in power. he could face the death penalty if convicted. >> the trial of two men accused of hacking a british soldier to dealt on the streets of london opens today. that victim was an afghan war veteran. he was killed in broad daylight not far from his barracks. police say the suspects were
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caught on camera bragging about that particular killing. >> phil ittner life in london. everyone horrified by this, they must be on pins and needles in london. >> del, this is a highly anticipated court case. that killing of lee rig by on the streets of london back in may of this year shocked the country. while this is a high profile case, it is far from the only incident causing concern. this is not why 22-year-old florida student came to london, but three days after arriving to study abroad, a gang of young men attacked him for drinking an open bottle of beer in a predominantly muslim area, leaving him with facial scars he will carry for life. the crime echos the muslim
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patrols where self appointed patrollers attempted to enforce muslim you. >> this is a muslim area. >> their vision would ban drinking, gambling, homosexuals or women dressed inappropriately. the organize nicers have now halted the patrols but not before self arrests for a variety of crimes. >> a cofounder of the patrols said they offer a solution to the vices of the west. >> pornography, abortion, and this is clearly something democracy can't solve. sharia is the solution or all of man kind. >> most before its disagree, some violently. that a rise of nationist movements like the english defense league is a reaction to groups pushing for islamic law. the killing of the soldier in broad daylight only that added to growing tensions and there is now a very public debate in
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england on how to deradicallize both sides. this man spoke out begins the killers. he said the attempt to create a separate state in britain is impossible. >> they are dreaming of imposing their investigation of sharia. they will fail, because british society knows all about this and simply will not let this happen. >> britain, one of the most ethnicically diverse. >> there is a turnout here today of british nationalist groups, some calling for a restoration of the death penalty over this case. there's a large presence of police officers on the street as london authorities are very conscious that with this case
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being such a flash point, this is the potential for tempers to flair. >> we saw those signs. phil, thank you very much joining us live from london. >> france says it is standing firm with israel over iran's nuclear power program. the french president meets sunday with the israeli prime minister, assuring france will keep pressure on iran at talks this week. >> an escape from militants in africa. a french engineer held hastage for nearly a year slipped out of the cell, then held a taxi and went to a police station. the 53-year-old was kidnapped by gunman. he is now back in his homeland. he lost 60 pounds, but is ok. earlier this month, two french journalists were abducted and killed in mali. >> to sports now, the big sunday showdown between the chiefs and broncos, all good things i guess
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must come to an end. >> thus far into the season, nobody has had an answer to the chiefs, who surprised everyone going worst to first, came into mile high with a perfect record, but enter peyton manning and the broncos. payton with a bum ankle. he completely picked them apart. what high ankle sprain, you ask. finding thomas for a nine-yard score and an early bronco lead. they didn't stop there. manning then would surgeon to his source. a 10-point denver lead. he wasn't done. manning giving ball the ball again. he flings around the right side, finds a hole in the third. they hand the chiefs their first loss in the season to grab the afc west lead. the best news, the broncos q.b. was barely touched against one of the league's best defenses.
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>> protection was great, the running game was solid. we had a good mix, but really, guys up front did a great job, answered the bell. they had a great challenge against an excellent defense and pass rush. those guys did an outstanding job, critical to the game. >> we played a great football team and they got us today. we'll bounce back. we'll learn from our mistakes. there are plenty of things we can learn from here. >> out west, the seahawks host the vacationings. the four-yard touchdown, 10-3, seahawks. early on object vikings tie things up. this time, a one yard score to put seattle up 17-10 and then pete carol's crew would neve look back. lynch with his foot on the gas takes the shuffle pass from wilson and this time scores from six yards out. the seahawks roll the
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vacationings 41-20 and improve to 10-1 on the season, heading into their bye week. >> in nascar, jim. >> i johnson had a dot the i's and cross the t's, finish no worse than 23. easier said than done with a field of stock cars flying by at 200 miles per hour. johnson going strong at miami speedway for the last race of the season. johnson just needing to be aggressive, but not too aggressive. scary moment here. paul menard's right back tire on fire as he pulls into pit row. he finally was able to blow it out. his crew came out to change the other tires. he would be ok. hamlin would win the race. johnson stayed out of trouble, avoided accidents to finish ninth, johnson knocking on the door of history takes his sixth title trailing only petty and earnhardt who have seven.
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>> in college hoops, not many teams can do what one player managed to do, score over 100 points. jack taylor was a scoring machine this weekend, scored 109 points that in his team's win over their division three foe crossroads. the 5'10" guard hit 10 three-pointers. this isn't the first time taylor has hit the century mark. last november, he set the all time sickle game scoring record for all divisions in the ncaa when he chalked up 137. del, i got to ask, where is the defense? it's like a track meet in that one. >> i called him and gave him congratulations, to sell you the truth. >> just like the president. >> well, you're in for a treat. they're little known but do exist. ancient tribes around the world from argentina to serbia. one man offered a rare glimpse
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when he spent three and a half years photographing dozens of these remote cultures. the photographer is with us this morning. his landmark project, before they pass away, 31 countries, three and a half years, what a treat. you had a blast. >> extraordinary but an amazing privilege to experience seeing things which people will never see again. >> why? >> good question. >> don't give me the sir edmund hillary answer. >> very good question. i grew up with a child in the third world, traveled extensively. i lost my hair in one day. from a very early age i was busy with who am i, where do i sit. from the age of 18, i didn't study, i disappeared where other people have no hair, tibet. i accidental walked from one length to the other and took
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some pictures and that was the beginning of my career. >> most of these tribes have had no contact. you don't mind if we watch the images and talk under them. >> please, it's about them, not necessarily about me. >> did you feel as if you were intruding on their privacy? >> very, very good question. i don't think i was the first person to go there and won't be the last. i'm not an explorer, a discoverer. i'm a communicator, visual artist. what i try to do with these tribes i visited is make them into eye consist, to give them the aesthetic attention i believe they deserve. they have been photographed and filmed before, but i feel in a pat ronizing and derogatory way. >> tell us what happened that time with frostbite, bleeding. >> there were two particular journeys, one to the tribe in eye about her i can't in far northeastern russia, 13 hour flight from moscow, one month in
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a tank across the tundra. we didn't know if we would find them. there are only 60 left. minus 50 degrees centigrade. within seconds, they brought us into their community. they said if you don't listen to us and do what we say, you will die. we lived with them for two weeks. we became a very integrate part of that you are community. they protected us in a way that is extraordinary. >> you had frostbite, you said the woman took your hands. >> that was in another place in northwestern mongolia high on the mountains very early in the morning, minus 30 degrees centigrade. as you can see, i'm using this old technical plate camera. it gives stillness where you can actually communicate with the people, it's very come about hersome, tiresome. on that particular morning, i took my gloves off and went for the camera, sheet metal to change the lens, my finger stuck to it. i tore them off, broke the skin,
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they froze. i started crying, ran around. behind me, two women opened their jackets, put my hands on their chest and cuddled me. they stopped me from crying. i was able to turn around and rephotograph them. that this was a very, very traditional islamic culture. because of my vulnerability, they went to enormous length to help me, give me the dignity. >> you have seen people that have not been influenced by outside society. are they better off? >> probably the most important question, there's a balance. we are extremely rich in the developed world, but it's a different kind of world. they are phenomenally rich with emotional wealth. they have an authentic wealth. i genuinely believe they have something we don't have anymore and lost a long time ago. we still have very big and
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profound lessons that we can learn from them. next to that, when they develop, we have to teach them what they should not lose, which we've lost and are now still looking for. >> did it change you? >> another very good question, del. it's a continual change, a continual balance. i live in amsterdam, i've got three teenage children. i spend half my life doing this, the other half with my family. it's something you have to be very, very focused. >> a negative in your life, losing your hair turns into the teaching experience of your life. do you wish this on that other people, as well. >> to lose their hair? >> to have something negative. >> i had two negatives, 16 losing my hair, seven years ago, the john set of crisis. i was a commercial photographer,
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earned far too much money for very little work. from one day into the next, my profession virtually disappeared. i felt like a chef, spending the whole of my life learning to cook and wanted to make a five course meal and hearing we only want ham burgers. my wife said this is your time, your test. you've got to go back to your passion, your interest, go back to the tribes and photograph them as you spent the whole of your life wanting to do since you were a child. by pressure, by economics, by being confronted, you're pushed into your real destiny. >> the real problem you say is teenage girls. we both have them. good luck with that. >> thank you very much. >> author and photographer of before they went away. the images are stunning. >> still ahead, why some say it's high time to get rid of st. nick's servant, black pete.
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>> a prestigious ivy league school battling a disease on campus. >> the system at a created the severe weather. we have more rain moving in to the northwest. i'll have your national forecast. >> you're looking live right now at the gray skies over new york as we look across the hudson. it looks like there might be some sun, though, in the forecast.
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>> audiences are intelligent and they know that their
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>> welcome back to aljazeera america, we'll take you to the netherlands where a beloved christmas caricature is under fire. some say black pete is blatantly racist because he appears in black face. a lot of people disagree. we're going to see if it's going to rain on your parade. we turn to nicole mitchell for the answer to that. >> after yesterday, people just want it quieter. before i get to the big system, into the northwest, we have another front coming in. you can clearly see in the clouds picking up, anywhere from northern california northward, ample amounts of rain in the
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higher elevations, snow. the big system around the area of the great lakes causing over 600 reports of damage, those will be checked into today to see if reports overlap, and then also, see if they can piece together the intensity of the tornadoes that went through. in the meantime, most of the rain has moved out. even for new england, a lot of this will be over by noon. behind that, cooler air will funnel in and also the winds that we're seeing with that will be diminishing through the day. most of the rain in the south is spotty with that front, as well. >> italy's mount aetna erupting again, sending fire and ash into the night sky in sicily. airlines were forced to steer clear of the area. aetna is europe's most active volcano. >> officials in princeton say it's an issue that a vaccine
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could solve, but this vaccine is not approved for use in the u.s. to stop a me meningitis outbrea. the vaccine fights a strain of meningitis that put seven students into the hot. students are told to stop sharing drinks and to avoid kissing. >> not so fast, that's from one of america's top heart doctors, a past president of the american department of cardiology. the nation's leading heart organization says that millions more americans should take statins, but dr. steven nisan said guidelines overestimate the risk and might lead people to take drugs they don't need to. >> it is considered racist in the u.s., but in the netherlands it is a 200-year-old christmas tradition. it centerses around a character in black face named black pete. he has critics seeing red.
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we have more from amsterdam. >> black pete may be controversial but is still a crowd pleaser. thousands of families lined the streets for the santa claus parade, the dutch festival that comes before and is bigger than christmas here. black pete, st. nicholas naughty helper is the big draw for the children, which is why they paint their faces to look like him. it keeps the youngsters happy, but not campaigners who claim this is a symbol of racism, a throw back to the slave trade. this community is very much divided. the number of protestors out sunday was relatively small, swallowed up by the crowds, but on line, 13,000 of them are back to court for black pete and his current guise to be demolished almost compare that to the 2 million who want him to say. there is little chance black pete will be going anywhere. >> we want to keep it.
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>> ask somebody not from this country do you think this is racist. >> no absolutely. no question. it seems obvious that it is racist. >> you don't find it offensive? >> no, no. i like it and i will do it all year, my children like it. they do it at school. santa claus and black pete have been part of dutch life since the 1820s. generations have grown up painting their faces black to look like black pete. this year, there is as noticeable reduction in the number of faces that have been painted black. people here want to keep this tradition but don't want to be accused of racism. >> compared to last year, much less children are painted black. you see instead of children dressed up like pete, they are dressed up like santa claus. you have a sort of restraint within am at her dam sow it. >> >> black pete is approaching 200 years old.
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if these crowds have their way, he'll have a lot of life in him yet. >> dutch legend says that black pete would carry naughty children away to spain while apartment clause would give them presents. >> a congressional panel is going to be considering whether bit coin is a tool of criminals. testimony about the virtual currency will be heard today by the senate homeland security committee. bit coin officials are expected to say that it gives people in developing nations easier access to the digital economy. federal agents say uitlanders money and drives black market websites. >> google is taking steps to block child pornography worldwide. the internet giant already has barriers in english. it will expand to 158 other languages in the next six months. google was looking at technology that would flag child porn videos. >> nasa hopes to solve a
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puzzling i would, what happened to the atmosphere on mars. the launch of the probe to the red planet is set this afternoon. it is going to orbit mars to study what's left of the atmosphere. scientists want to know why it changed from a warm and wet place to the freezing desert it is now. aljazeera continues in two and a half minutes with your headlines. you can check us out all day on aljazeera.com. we need you with a look at the new york city skyline this morning, starting to see peeks of blue. things may be starting to look up. stay with us.
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(vo) al jazeera america we understand that every news story begins and ends with people. >> the efforts are focused on rescuing stranded residents. (vo) we pursue that story beyond the headline, past the spokesperson, to the streets. >> thousands of riot police deployed across the capitol. (vo) we put all of our global resources behind every story. >> it is a scene of utter devastation. (vo) and follow it no matter where it leads, all the way to you. al jazeera america. take a new look at news.
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consider this: the news of the day plus so much more. >> we begin with the government shutdown. >> answers to the questions no one else will ask. >> it seems like they can't agree to anything in washington no matter what. >> antonio mora, award winning and hard hitting. >> we've heard you talk about the history of suicide in your family. >> there's no status quo, just the bottom line. >> but, what about buying shares in a professional athlete?
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