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tv   News  Al Jazeera  November 24, 2013 6:00am-9:01am EST

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. >> for the first time in nearly a decade we have halted the progress of the iranian nuclear program. finally a deal. iran agrees to scale back its nuclear program as it tries to repair relations with the west. another deal is accepted. afghan elders agree to let u.s. troops stay in the country beyond 2014. >> the pope reveals bones buried for a century - possibly belonging to the very first pope. >> a storm blasts the west killing eight people, threatening thanksgiving travel.
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. hello, welcome to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford from new york city. >> a diplomatic milestone, iran and six world powers agree to a deal on its nuclear program. they agreed to though enrichment above 5%, and they'll receive some economic sanctions. this deal only lasts for six months. if iran follows through there'll be a permanent agreement to ensure it doesn't build nuclear weapons. >> nothing will be agreed to unless everything is agreed to. the burden is on iran to prove to the world that its nuclear program will be exclusively for peaceful purposes. >> meanwhile the iranian president says the geneva pact seals iran's nuclear write and its spiritual leader says it
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paves the way for further steps. >> a result after a long night, described as complicated the p5+1 and iran struck an historic deal - the importance of which hinted by the u.s. president's sudden and unusual for a saturday-late-night address. >> that diplomacy opened up a path for world security. that iran's nuclear power is peaceful. today's announcement is a first step, but it achieves a great deal. for the first time in a decade we have halted the progress of the iranian nuclear program. >> in awkward timing the iranian foreign minister spoke in geneva at exactly the same time. >> i believe it is important to be all of us seize the opportunity to end an
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unnecessary crisis and open new horizons, based on respect for the rights of iranian people, and removal of any doubts about the exclusively peaceful nature of iran's nuclear program. >> under the deal iran agreed to halt all enrichment above 5%, and it would neutralize stockpiles of 20% enriched uranium, halt progress an enriched capacity and will not increase its stockpile of 3.5% low enriched uranium, and there would be no advancement of the iraq reactor. it will allow inspectors to the atomic agency to its nuclear sites. in return there'll be an easing of specific sanctions. the first step is about building
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trust. the agreement will last for six months and president obama made it clear if iran doesn't meet the commitments the pressure will be stepped up. >> that may be little consolation to israel which has always been opposed to any deal. it's a challenge or the u.s. to convince allies that a diplomatics negotiated settlement is the best way forward. >> with so much at stake for all nation, this was never going to be easy. it seems that 30 years of isolation for iran could finally be over. . some iranians believe the agreement is just a bad deal. so what does tehran get? sanctions can be lifted, sales of iranian oil will be heavily
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restricted. iranian students will be able to get tuition assistance from the government. meantime, iran's president hassan rouhani is calling the deal a victory for his country. >> world powers, they have recognised iran's nuclear rights. islamic republic of iran innately nonetheless the right. >> hassan rouhani added that iran's enrichment activities will continue similar to the past. joining us now to offer assistance is a freelance journalist for kayern international and iran daily. thank you for being with us. what are the iranian people saying about this. do they view this as a win?
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>> well, remember millions of people in the capital tehran and other cities and towns stayed up late to hear the news about the so-called nuclear deal between iranian and the p5+1 group of nations. this is welcome news and the deal brought a great deal of happiness for the iranian nation. why? they don't want so see further confrontation with the u.s., isolation and sanctions were the west. that's why they are welcoming the deal. remember, we had the previous government that didn't take the sanctions seriously, and we saw the consequences all across the board from the iranian economy. now we are seeing a different result. we have had three official statements by the parliament, by the president as you just mentioned and the leadership. they all thanked the iranian
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negotiating team for striking the deal and they voiced full support for the deal. it's a win/win situation. lest we forget the iranian negotiators and the western negotiators just dodged another unnecessary war in the middle east. remember, the further confrontation would have definitely lead to another war in the middle east, as raised also by the secretary of stastate john kerry. >> who is getting the credit for the happiness - hassan rouhani - since he's considered to be a more moderate president? >> that's a we good point. the hardliners, the conservative government of the previous administration did not make a deal with regards to iran's nuclear program the the government failed to strike a deal. now we have a moderate government in place that is
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backed by both the reformists, the conservatives, hard liners and citizens, this is what we saw. the president had promised to fix this kind of deal with the west, and he just delivered on his promise, now we have a moderation winning this - this round of talks between iran and the west. it's not the government that should take the credit, because it had the full support of everyone as far as the iranian politics is concerned. this credit goes to everyone in the society, and, of course, on the corridors of the power. >> considering those iranian politics looking ahead, what would it take for the u.s. to completely drop sanctions against iran and conversely how far is iran willing to go to make that happen? >> well, this is another interesting question. i think iran has a lot to do. the deal is just a first step.
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iran has to win the much-needed support and trust of the west, especially the united states. iran can only do that within a specific time frame - about six months. the best thing they have done is agreed to form a commission to follow up the necessary agreements enriched between iran and the west. the best thing iran can do is win the trust by giving greater access to its nuclear sites. it was unnecessary clashes for the past 10 years, there was nothing to hide. the best thing is for the inspectors to see everything they want to see, and this way they win the trust of the west. iran doesn't have anything to hide. the program has been peaceful until this point in time. some are not happy, including israel and saudi arabia. i think this wall of trust has been built upon further
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confrontation and disagreement that these two countries bought to the negotiation tables. we have to understand that the united states and iran have a lot to gain. it's a win/win situation. we shouldn't lose this opportunity. this is the best deal iranians could have got. they are happy about it. i hope both sides will be serious enough to stick to the deal, work around the clock to make it a full-sized agreement within the next six months. >> calling this a win/win situation. thank you so much for joining us live from tehran. >> most of the international community is calling the agreement a break through. a different reaction from israel who calls it a bad deal, saying iran will pose a throat to the county, and we bring in mike hanna with more reaction from jerusalem. >> the immediate reaction from the israel yea -- israeli
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cabinet has been one of the anger. benyamin netanyahu described the deal as a dangerous one. he said that israel would not be bound by any such deal and sthisted that israel had the right to defend itself, as he put it, his foreign minister described the deal as atoring the status quo -- as altering the status quo in the middle east. little discussions about the specifics of it which is something secretay of state john kerry has discussed with the prime minister, but made clear in the intensity of the israeli reaction that any deal falling short of complete construction of iran's nuclear capability was going to be described by israel as bad. >> speaking of israel we are waiting for a press conference in which israeli prime minister
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benyamin netanyahu will address the nation. we'll bring you that shortly. >> after four days of deliberations afghan elders endorsed a security deal with the united states. american security forces will remain in afghanistan beyond 2014, mainly to train security forces. the loya jirga is asking hamid karzai to sip -- sign the agreement before the end of the year. hamid karzai says he needs more time. >> rebels seize an oil field, cutting off nearly all of bashar al-assad's crude oil reserves. juan carlos molina has this report. >> opposition fighters say they have taken control of syria's largest feels. it's difficult to tell but it appears to show the entrance to
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al-omar. this man says the area was taken at dawn from government forces. he says it's in the hands of an al qaeda group. >> they introduce a field commander who scribed the defeat. >> translation: we are now on omar oil feeds. bashar al-assad's men ran away like rats. >> it's the second time opposition fighters took control of the facilities. the government withdrew from the omar oil field in november, only to get it back again. if it has changed hands most of syria's useable oil reserves are in the hands of the opposition. thanks to the e.u.'s position to relax an embargo, they are allowed to sell it abroad. the bashar al-assad government
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as access to oil. they have a willing provide in iran. >> a vaccination campaign aimed at protecting turkish children from getting polio ended after the disease re-emerged. turkish children under five from targeted amid fears of an outbreak. vaccinations were carried out inside refugee camps. turkey has more than 600,000 refugees. polio was eradicated in the country 15 years ago. . a massive storm system in the western united states left eight dead. it was so powerful winds uprooted a tree that fell on a parked car it and killed a woman. the storm brought freezing rain and snow.
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the cold snap caused hundreds of traffic accidents and delays. we turn to metrologist. good morning, it's going to be another day to bundle up and stay inside if you don't have critical travel plans. we are dealing with a slow-moving upper level low making its way east across arizona, and that will bring more rain and snow especially into the higher elevations. you can see it now. it's scattered. we'll see showery activity. it's the higher elevations that will see the bulk of it. there's a winter weather advisory until noon. storm warnings were upgraded. we are expecting rain and sleet, and, of course, that will make for some messy and treacherous travel conditions along the
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i-20. conditions will condition to deteriorate this year. temperatures cold, in the 30s. it will allow for the frozen precipitation to take shape and change into rain. in the south-east windy conditions will make it feel colder than it is. more than two weeks after typhoon haiyan hit the philippines aid agencies are struggling to reach remote areas. many are trying to provide relief from inside broken down buildings and makeshift tents. we have this report. >> there's barely a building left standing in this town, a quarter mile from the sea. inside town hall it is hot, dark and dirty. water pours from above as the sick and injured stream in. this shell of a structure is the best they could do here for a hospital. one bright spot here is the vice
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mayor flores is a peed electrician. he has been -- paediatrician, he has been working around the clock since the storm. >> no matter how tiring it is. i do not consider fatigue, i have to provide service for my people. >> people are coming from miles around with fever and ipp effected wounds. this man, whose home was destroyed told me it took him 10 days to get here, but getting medical attention was more important than building his house. >> they are finding bodies in the rubble. and the trenches and mounds of dirt are where they were burying hundreds of bodies. this is where medecins sans frontieres is putting up the new hospital, because city hall where they set up a temporary hospital is too damaged. >> there's water falling, no
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electricity. louise johnston is the field coordinator in tanauan. >> we'll have an emergency wound. we can refer to the hospital in tacloban for intensive care and have a paediatric word. there's no care here at all at the moment for pregnant women and child birth. msf can get a fully functioning hospital up and running in less than a day. in the courtyard of bethany hospital in downtown tacloban, about 12 miles up the coast from tanauan, msf will run an er and surgical intake center. >> we have been running all night. people need treatment and cannot wait. >> msf says they'll stay until tacloban rebuilds hospitals like bethany. given the scale of the destruction here, they probably won't leave any time soon.
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>> the united nations has already released 25 million in emergency assistance, and has issued an appeal for 300 more. >> election day in honduras, one of the world's countries chooses its next president. choosing a small loan. u.n. investigators make efforts to combat global warming - is it too little, too late? .
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>>... within a few weeks and in return sanctions that took years to put in place... > good morning, welcome back to al jazeera america, right now you are watching live a press conference of prime minister benyamin netanyahu. let's listen in. >>... with the lifting of the pressure the first step could be the last
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step could be the last. without pressure why would it displant the its nuclear capabilities. why dismantle the centrifuges and the nuclear reactor. none of this is contained in the agreement. israel is not bound. we cannot and will not allow for a regime calling for the destruction of israel to obtain a means to achieve this goal. we will not allow iran to have a nuclear weapons capability. israel has many friends and allies, when they are many it is my obligation to speak openly and clearly and say so. it's my solemn responsibility to protect and defend the one and only jewish state.
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[ speaking foreign language ] . there you have strong words from israeli prime minister benyamin netanyahu saying this first step could be the last step, saying the international community is not putting enough pressure on iran, saying he will not allow iran to have nuclear weapons. we will continue to monitor the press conference and bring you the latest soon. >> now let's go to our metrologist to tell us what is happening across the country.
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we are feeling the chill in the air that was paying its way south across the great lakes. it's continuing to really outgrip the south-east. much of the textures are at or below the freezing point. we have 31 degrees all the way down. it feels colder, like minus for. in the north-east windy and cold. we are in the teens around the new york city. >> not ready for the cold. in a few short hours voters in honduras will elect a new president. this as corruption spirals out of the control. the electoral commission says the vote will be free and fair. there are reports that leftist reporters are intimidated at the polls. adam reynie reports from the capital. >> on the right juan orlando hernandez of the ruling national party and on the left xiomara
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castro del zelaya. these two have been locked in a battle. xiomara castro del zelaya is the wife of manuel zelaya, forced out of office in a coup in 2009. she promises to rewrite the constitution. a proposal contributed to her husband's removal. she wants to take the military police and army off the streets and put a community force in its place. >> translation: the government isn't seriously combatting security. we have to solve the problem with the justice system. justice is bought and sold here every day. >> her rival juan orlando hernandez is promising a soldier in every corner. the military police was his creation. where do you want the soldiers, on the barracks or in the streets? where? i want them on the streets. >> 20 people die in honduras, security is far from the only problem. two of three live in poverty,
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jobs and opportunities are hard to come by. unhappiness with their lives and politicians provoked the crisis. >> translation: many works are approved, but politicians split the money. >> elections will be watched closely. >> with people concerned over the transparency and freedom of elections military and police are spread out across the country. >> army and police chiefs and the head of the electoral commission have sought to assure voters. >> 12,000 members of the national police are working to secure the vote. >> in a country with little faith in institutions if the
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losing side cries foul. the divisions can get deeper. >> as adam said the elections will be watched closely. 16,000 election monitors will watch over the vote. >> thousands of ukrainians are out on the street, protesting a decision to scrap a trade treaty with the european union. they pulled back. ukraine baulkled under -- buckled under pressure from moss i don't remember the russian president threatened to retailiate if it went ahead with an e.u. deal. >> on tuesday, scotland's government will publish a white paper, making the case for independence from the u.k. the economy is the main reason, wanting to break a 300 rear
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rule. >> we are at the vatican this morning as the pope unveils what many believe are the bones of the first ever pope. raising inequality between workers and bosses. we tell you why some people say their pay should go up seeing executive salaries are soaring. call him willie wonger. we introduce you to this army vet using a government loan to open up a chocolate factory. >> i'm mark morgan, a team's dream of a national title goes up in smoke. details in sport.
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welcome back, i'm morgan radford in new york. making history in geneva. world leaders and iran say yes
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to an agreement that will limit the country's nuclear program in change for lifting of some sanctions. iran's president and spiritual leader responded positively to the deal. some iranians say they'd hoped for greater sanction release. we have this report from tehran. >> the reaction from tehran is a little different to what most expected. most iranians are a bit unhappy in terms of sanctions. they are very limited. it's a first step. the united states and the powers involved in the negotiations will offer, according to the agreement, somewhere around $7 billion in frozen iranian assets. if you consider iran has $$100
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billion, in oil revenue this, is a very, very small amount of money and small change according to iranians. the president is happy, the iranian government is pleased and the supreme leader gave his tick of approval. and that hay appeasing hardliners critical of the negotiations with the p5+1. it's a first-step deal, six months to see what will event ute. >> for the first time ever the vatican put the disputed remains of the world's first pope on display. pope francis blessed the pieces of bones said to belong to st. peter at a special ceremony in vatican city. what exactly is the controversy behind the relyics?
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>> well, the controversy is whether they are the genuine article. these were discovered in 1941. a professor from the university of rome came to a conclusion that they were the bones of st. peter. she made this judgment for a number of reasons. first of all, therm found in a tomb where st. peter's name was on the wall. they were wrapped in what had been a purple and gold cloth. it gave the impression that this was somebody of huge importance to the church. she took the knowledge, gave it to the vatican and in 1968 pope paul vi stopped short of saying it was the bones but said as far as the vatican was concerned, it was very likely. because of that few catholic scholars, even if they don't believe it, they won't say it, they don't want to contradict the pope.
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scientists will do that, often science and relijon were at ads. because they were wrapped in a cloth doesn't mean it's st. peter, it could have been anything. the feet were missing. this is important. according to the bible st. christopher was nailed to a cross by the feet. had they been found they would have been something for the scientists to work with, evidence of trauma. because they are missing they want make the call. scientists will tell you one thing, the faithful another. there are thousands of people there and the faith tells them they are the bones of st. peter. >> this is a matter of faith, where the bones belonged to st. peter. why put them on display now? >> you're right. it's a matter of faith. i have spoken to a few people
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and said what if these are not the bones of st. peter. they all said, "we believe." a vatican official said if scientists were able to prove they weren't the bones of st. peter, they wouldn't care. they spelt so long vennerating, coveting the bones. people believe it, it is totally why. the reasons why they are on display, the first time they've gone on public display, is we have reached the end of what we have called a year of faith. benedict the xvi as well. he is about to go past. phil lavelle reporting live from vatic vatican city. thank you for being with us. >> fewer americans are homeless according to the latest figures from the department of housing and urban development.
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610,000 were considered homeless, down 10% from 2007 and the third year in a row that homelessness has fallen. shelters are still full. an estimated 65% relied on homeless shelters, a third were found living in cars, abandoned buildings or under bridges. almost a quarter of homeless in america were under 18. >> a draw down in afghanistan will send thousands of troops home. many will be looking for work. skills on the battlefield don't always translate to the economy. that's why some veterans i taking advance of low-interest loans. >> with days before the start of the season, employees in chocolate works are in high gear, melting, decorating and packing goodies to send to
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customers. >> i worked since i was four, my entire life and have chocolate in my vince. >> jo took over the business from his father. a person who studied cocoa. both are veterans. >> i was in a second calvary in germany. >> joe spend west point and spent two years in iraq during bloody days of fighting. he knew he wanted to take over the family business. he didn't have the golder ticket. >> it costs $300,000 to open up a store with the inventory, liability, getting everything up and going. a lot of vets don't have that saved. >> he found a program called vet loan advantage, sponsored by the department of veterans and
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offers long term low rates, rates most commercial banks can't compete with. more than 7,000 loans worth $4.8 million were given. increasing lending to 5% every year for the next five years, because the unemployment rate for post-9/11 veterans is 10%, leaving 246,000 out of work, which is why beth solomon connects vets to the capital they need. >> leadership, understanding operational excellence. self discipline, adapting to changing circumstances quickly. they are learnt in the military and lead to success as a small business owner. >> the 20-year fixed rate low interest loans provide working capital that couldn't have been gotten from a bank. >> this machine that you are looking at is the machine that the $50,000 loan that i got for
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being a veteran. >> vets hire vets. with their $850,000 loan, chocolate works expanded to three retail stores with more than 23 employees. since june, they have sold 23 franchises and he plans to take a loan to keep expanding. that's what i call sweet success. >> to find out more about the program contact the small business loan administration. if you think you are due for a raise at work, you are not the only one, workers compensation has been inching up for the last 30 years, and ceo salaries soared to record numbers. randall pinkston tells you why. >> there's a saying in america that a rising tide lifts boats. corporations have grown and everyone work are for the companies reap the benefits.
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right? not exactly. the leaders, ceo's salaries ski rocket from 1978 to 2011, the average america's workers compensation fairly moved, inching up 5%. rick, an expert on xi compensation says widening pay disparities hurt employee moral. they are appingry when they see those at the top making a disproportionate amount of wealth, taking an amount of the company's profitabilitiy in their profits, not distributing it to all of those that help the company achieve its goals. >> in switzerland a referendum proposes limiting corporate pay. if someone tries that idea in america they'd have to close an ocean of difference. here is an xomp of ceo salaries from last year. jc penny's executive offer raked
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in there 50 million, a $1,796 more than the average wage of jc pepy's workers. walmart received $2300. a ratio of 134:1. mcdonald's received 13.8 million, the average employee $22,000 a year. a retainerio of 627:1. at general electrics the ceo made more than 100 times his workers. some justify ceo examination as a reward for boosting stock. >> there was an effort to tie compensation to stock options and other means to the corporations financial performance, but this also,
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unfortunately has created a short-term mind-set where american managers have come to manage for the short term as opposed to for the long-term health of the enterprise. >> the gap between corporate executive pay and worker's wages was not last the for much the century the ratio was consistent. work fell farther and farther behind. in 19 it 15 corporate ceos earned 20 times more than workers, in 1980 40 ment: 1. and today, 204 times more than workers. there's no sign the ratio will improve. it may become transparent when the federal government orders corporations to report the difference between what bosses
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earn and what they may their workers. >> some say wage disparity a higher. the ceo to worker pay ratio is 354:1, doubt that of switzerland. . now, it was a difficult day for one of the nation's top college football teams. mark morgan is here in sports to tell us about it. >> seems like this happens, last two or three weeks we have surprises. teams jockey for positions. unbeaten baler intend a game with oklahoma state averaging 61 a game. the bears hoping to take offensive prowess on the road and climb higher in the b.c. s standard. this one, specting to be close wasn't. the cowboys had other ideas. first quarter ky staily breaks
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the ice. ok state up 7-0. bailey shut out. charlie moore 12 others. 56 yards for a score. 19-25, 370 yards. oklahoma state wins going away 49-17, handing baler its first loss. >> elsewhere tiger on a rainy day looking to knock off texas a&n. 10 yards for the touchdown. lsu up 14-0. johnny manziel with an afternoon to forget. he had two picks, his hiz took a hit. >> landry makes a move. 21:3, lsu 34-10. it's week 10 of the nsl season
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after staggering out of the gait the new york giants in the thick of the nsc race. after four staght winning the play -- straight wince the play offs hanging in the balance. >> from the chatter the cowboys and giants are buying into the hype surrounding the meeting in new jersey. >> we need it badly. >> this giant's team is a good team. it's playing really good. they'll be ready to go. we hear about the stuff they were saying. we think it will be a great test. we'll be ready to go. >> this will be the outcome of our season. they've already been there once. this is a game that we can't walk away from. >> we know the challenge, we have great respect for the team. we have to play our best on
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sunday. >> should have a great crowd. an important game. >> despite the 5-5 record, jason garrett is on the hot seat because the cowboys are struggling. they are giving up the most yards per game in the nfl. their last game ended in a 49-17 drugging at the hands of the saints. >> i'm disappointed we don't have a better record. we have got a team here that i firmly believe has the ability to be one the better playing teams at the end. >> that will go out the window. you look at those guys. romo. running game. they are coming full head of steam. >> the giant won four in a row starting o and 6. no team started that slow and made the play-offs. he pulled off a miracle.
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>> we won the super bowl, it was do or die. it was late november when we made a push for the playoffs, needing the jetts' game the the core guys are around. >> cowboys won 36-31. they know what needs to change. giant have got the turnovers from an average of four per game to just over one per game in the wind stroke. the health of cowboys' marcus d ejs rare tests his ability to hold on to the ball. >> he'll go out and play. he'll be on both sides of the ball. whoever is out there, we'll do our job, protect eli. >> the basesay they expect leading tackler sean lee to miss
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a second-straight game with a hamstring. the giants leading past russia, according to the team, will play sunday despite missing wednesday practice. both the teams will be relatively healthy going into what promises to be a pivotal nsc match up. >> thank you so much. i'm mark morgan, that's sport. >> you know you left out another important college football game. >> i did. >> it was the long-standing rivalry between harvard and yale. >> you have a special interest. >> yes, one of the longest standarding and harvard won. >> no bias. >> no, i'm a journalist. the olympic torch has been taken to new depths. it was taken to russia's lake baikal, a deep body of fresh
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water. it managed to stay lit thanks to a water resistant player. it continues on a journey to yooup eke places before it's used to light the olympic cauldron in 2014 in socchi. >> next up - a living laboratory. a neighbourhood that is not only saving money, but saving the planet.
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. welcome back to al jazeera america. ahead - the pekin project that not only has residents living green, but saving it as well. first the precipitation with metrologist ebony dion. we had our eyes focused on a storm across the south-west bringing rain, snow and sleet. cold air is in place, with a persistent north-westerly flow it's bringing in showers.
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snow is expected, up to a foot in spots. >> speaking of the world's natural elements, europe's most active volcano erupted. volcanic ash plangt said nearby towns. mt etna is 11,000 feet high and the last major eruption was in 1992. >> u.n. negotiators cobbled together a last-minute deal to fight global forming. >> it is so decided. in the end a day late, agreement. with a deadline looming to adopt a legally binding carbon-cutting deal in paris delegates have no time to waste. >> if you asked me 12 hours ago i would have been concerned that we wouldn't have achieved much,
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maybe backtracked. they be i think all good forces came together in the end and we had a good outcome. we have a clear timeline, people - countries would have to go home and do their homework prior to paris. >> that homework consists on working out what cuts each country is willing to make. india and china managed to negotiate a breakthrough. the warsaw text replaces the word commitment with the left demanding contributions. what is unchanged it the fact that industrialized countries with a larger historical responsibility must take the lead. that doesn't mean everyone else is off the hook. >> there was little other good new, after two weeks in warsaw. knew rules to protect tropical for efforts were agreed.
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$100 million was promised by european countries to help poor nations adapt to climate change. and an agreement on funds for rich countries. what negotiators want is a deal to replace the kyoto protocol. it's hoped negotiations and the charms of paris in 2015 cap woo others to contribute to carbon cuts. >> just under 200 countries took part in the negotiations. how many times have you seen a barr acknowledge of electric cars, for a neighbourhood in texas, it's not uncommon. andy gallagher tells us about one of the most efficient energy grids in the world. >> this doesn't look like a revolutionary neighbourhood. the pekin street neighbourhood
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is changing the way we live. >> basically half of our energy costs are covered by the solar panels. >> he moved here years ago and says his commitment to the environment is behind the financial. >> i tell people it's not about saving money, but the planet. we like the fact that we are less of a burden on the infrastructure of the world than we need to be. >> pekin's street is a living laboratory. information from the homes is gathered in minute detail. it has the potential to change the way we use energy. they call it big data, and here terabytes of information to understand the use and abuse of energy. it's that push that makes it a smart grid. it's little more than an academic exercise.
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if you have a revolution, you may want to change the future. if we change the way energy is used in this country we have to make it enjoyable. pekin treat has found plenty of volunteers, for some it's a change that can't come soon enough. >> sometimes you are accused of being the tree hugger. it's like, "well, it's nice to have a tree to hug. join us." it's kind of frustrating that you have to buck the system to do the right thing. >> for now pekin street is an experiment, a large-scale study of how things could look in years to cox. those behind the project firmly believe they are building a foundation for the future. >> at the end of our first hour, here is what we are following this morning. an historic deal has been reached on iran's nuclear
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program, ensuring iran won't build nuclear weapons in change for economic sanctions. a tribe of elders voted to keep american troops past 2014. av gan's president hamid karzai won't sign the agreement until after april. in the vatican the pope unveils what many believe to be the bones of the pope. >> the greatest quarterbacks in nfl history go knows to knows again. a preview in sport. >> and it's gold in the east. i'll tell you how cold it is. >> i'm morgan radford. i look forward to seeing you in 2.5 minutes.
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. for the first time in nearly a decade we have halted the progress of iranian's nuclear program. joo an historic deal, rain to scale back its nuclear plants. election day in honduras. one of the world's most violent countries will pick its next president. hello, welcome to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford, live from
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new york city. a deal on iran's nuclear program now finalized. six major world leaders and iran said yes to an agreement in geneva. the pact limits iran's nuclear activities in exchange for relief. al jazeera's phil ittner was in geneva as the development unfolded. >> a result after a long night. p5+1 and iran struck an historic deal. the importance of which hinted by the u.s. president's unusual for a saturday late night address. >> today that diplomacy opened a new path to a world that is more secure. a future in which we can verify that iran's nuclear program is peaceful, and that it cannot build a nuclear weapons. today's announcement is a first step. it achieves a great deal.
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>> we have halted the progress. iranian nuclear program. >> in awkward timing the iranian prime minister spoke in geneva at exactly the same time. >> i believe it is important that we all of us seat the opportunity to end an unnecessary crisis and open new horizons, based on respect for the rights of the iranian people and removal of any doubts about the exclusively peaceful nature of iran's nuclear program. >> under the deal iran agreed to halt you'll enrichment and will neutralize its stockpile. it will halt progress on its enrichment capacity, meaning it won't install centrifuges.
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it won't increase stockpiles, there'll be no advancement at the iraq reactor. and iran will allow access to inspectors from the international atomic energy agency to its nuclear sites. in return there'll be a limited easing of specific economic sanctions. this first step is all about building trust. the agreement will last for six months and president obama made it cheer that if iran doesn't meet the commitments the pressure will be stepped up. that may be little consolation for israel opposed to any deal. it's the challenge for the u.s. to convince its ally that a diplomatic settlement is the best way forward, with so much at stake with all nations, this was never going to be easy. it does seem that 30 years offize laying for iran could finally be over. >> for a closer look at the deal
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let's bring in white house correspondent mike viqueira. good morning. there are reports that the barack obama administration went out on a limb to make this happen, engaging in secret meetings with iran. what can you tell us? >> good morning to you. it really is extraordinary. the associated press reporting that the meetings that began in ernst of march this year, accelerating over the course of the last two months, and phil ittner said the administration was out o n -- on a limb because of these talks. these talks were secret. america's closest allies were not informed, neither were known in washington, including those on capitol hill pushing for tougher sanctions. it is something that the president initiated on his first inaugural. he had an opening to iran.
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he was criticised as being too soft. circumstances fell into space. the sanctions imposed are what brought iran to the table. negotiations over the course of the last eight months or so threw the country of oman, just across the streets they, themselves having a lot at stake, that provided a framework for the agreement in geneva. >> mike, you said that a lot is at stake. this 6-month deal is essentially a chance for iran to prove itself. what are world leaders hoping iran will do in the next six months. >> time and time again president obama stressed it was temporary and easing of sanctions could be reversed. there's no question that the administration has a lot at stake. here is more of what president obama said in the state dining
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room last nite. >> ultimately diplomacy can bring about a durable solution. president and commander in chief, i will do what is necessary to abtoin a nuclear weapon. i have a responsibility to resolve our differences peacefully. rather than rush to conflict. >> he'll do what is necessary. united states has held out the prospect of military action to stop the military program if this does not work out. >> despite the veiled threat of military action, does the agreement leave room at all for iran to enrich rain youm as long as it's for nuclear energy. >> you heard phil ittner describe the parameters, iran cannot enrich uranium above 5%. over that you get into weapons
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grade uranium. left alone, a touchy issue of weather rain was the right to enrich uranium. the united states leaves that question alone. the implicit agreement is that iran will continue to enrich uranium, but on the purposes that involve civilian energy work. >> thank you mike viqueira reporting from the white house. while the military option is on the table, should the 6-month trial period fail, president obama emphasised that dialogue is the path forward in dealing with iran and its nuclear program. >> world powers have recognised iran's nuclear rights. the islamic republic of iran
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innately enjoys this right and this right has been granted to all the signatories by the mtp. >> some iranians believe the agreement is a bad deal. here is a look at what tehran gets. the sanctions held against it lighten up on gold and metal exports and car industry. that will potentially provide rain with $1.5 billion. sales of iranian oil will be heavily restricted. iranian students - they'll get tew irn assistance from their government. hassan rouhani is calling the deal a victory. he added that iran's enrichment activities will continue same as the past. >> israel calls it a mistake. officials say rain pose as
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threat. let's bring in our correspondent mike hanna. good morninging. israel is describing the deal as an historic mistake. why is that? >> well israel has been fundamentally opposed to the deal, despite promises from its allies, and john kerry in the cabinet meeting. it was an angry benyamin netanyahu speaking to the cabinet, describing the deal as a mistake, insisting that in no way would israel be bound by it. later in the course of the day he held a news conference, speaking in english on this occasion, and there the top was perhaps a little more of regret than anger. this is it what he had to say. >> israel has many friends and
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allies. when they are mistaken it's my obligation to speak clearly and openly and say so. it's my solemn responsibility to protect and defend the one and only jewish state. >> with the, the issue here is the -- well, the issue here is the secretary of state john kerry has spent a lot of time keeping benyamin netanyahu informed about the negotiations. john kerry's position as we had repeated earlier, that far from being a threat to israel the deal in fact guarantees its security. well, this is a position that israel vehemently opposes and the question is the nature of its relationship with the u.s. as this pans out. >> we heard strong words from benyamin netanyahu, saying "the
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first step could be the last step" and israel wouldn't allow iran to develop a nuclear capability. what does that mean? >> with the, at the moment it is words. we did hear something stronger from the israeli foreign minister. he was asked by israel radio - would israel contemplate a military trike. >> he said israel has to look at things differently. benyamin netanyahu continued to say that an iran that is nuclear camable poses an existential threat to israel. this despite the guarantees that have importantly been given in terms of the deal which keep iran a long distance away from any form of weaponized nuclear capability. once again some observers seeing this as words, a veiled threat,
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not so subtle. many observers, including military advisors who say there's no way that israel can take unilateral action against iran unless it has covert or overt backing from its allies, in particular from the united states - and that is not likely to happen within the coming months. mike hanna keeping us up to date with israel's reaction. >> iran's key ally syria spoke out about the deal on state television. the government of bashar al-assad welcomed the news. how it will affect the war in syria remains to be seen. a now report says more than 1 is,000 children -- 11,000 children have been killed. more than 400 by snipers and more than 700 executed.
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>> afghan elders agree to united states remaining. the loya jirga is asking african president hamid karzai to sign the agreement by the end of the year. hamid karzai says no can do, he needs more time, waiting for the election. appear. it's starting to feel like winter, let's bring in metrologist eboni deon. it will be a blustery day. we had a cold front move through. the pressure tracking north wards. now in its wake we have gusty winds picking up from the north and west. anywhere from 20 to 30 miles per hour. winds are gusting 36 miles per
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hour. gusting as high as 45 miles per hour. that wind driven air off the lakes - that causes lake-affect snow, making it feel colder as you step outside. now we've had a 20 degree stop. it feels like we are sitting in the single digits. even phil tellifia where -- philadelphia. no snow in the cities, but we'll have the wind up and down. wind advisees posted up until this evening when the winds will wind down. we talk about the winds off the lake. snow warnings are in place. with snow around and inland, we can see upwards to a foot of snow. already some places are reported up to four inches of snow. we'll watch throughout the day. definitely cold. make sure you bundle up.
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temperatures of 30 degrees. it will be a cold start to the work week. as we get to the middle of the week temperatures returning. it's been two weeks since typhoon haiyan swept through the philippines where the number of casualties now reached more than 5200. countless families have been torn part and children have lost their parents. . >> it is rare to see ceasar smiling. the 7-year-old misses his family. his parents and three siblings died. he swam for hours before he was rescued. ceasar is an orphan. his grandmother is inconsolable. it's hard. i should have died out there, not by grandchildren, not them. they had their whole lives ahead of them.
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>> the destruction is unprecedent unprecedented. more than 90% of the people are homeless. as the philippine government focuses on families in need, the united nations says children are vulnerable. more than 4 million have been directly affected. most of them are living in disaster zones at the risk of exploitation, and trafficking. >> recovery will not come easy. all of the schools have been destroyed or like this one, used at evacuation centres. aid organizations are setting up learning and play centres. it's crucial, providing normalcy for millions of children. >> it has been a reference for some of them. here they are tought songs about living in a happy home. a break from a handwrittening
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life in evacuation centres. many children witnessed the demonstration first hand. >> we have to get the bake things - good sanitation, protection, get the schools up and running because children are the future of the philippines, we need to take care of these children now so they can be resill yent. building may take time. social workers say these are children forced to deal with grief. they need to be protected before their childhood is lost too. the united nations has released $25 million in emergency assistance and issued an appeal for $300 million more. the bones possibly belonging to the world's first pope on display for the very first time.
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the united nations has
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good morning. welcome back to al jazeera
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america. i'm morgan radford. just ahead one of the most violent countries in the world is holding elections. first a look at what temperatures will see across the nation with metrologist eboni deon. it will be a cold one. get the heaters going. temperatures will not warm up much. we are seeing a number of areas in the single digits and low teens. chicago - we are at 12. it's nine in minnesota. atlanta 30. 24 in memphis. to the north-east it was milder earlier in the day. temperatures took a dive as much as 20 degrees. it's a colder feel to the air as we get the wind going, making the teens feel like single digits. wind chill 70 degrees. make sure you dress in layers. it will continue to stay cold in the upper midwest. >> in scotland people have been asking for months what their
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country would look like if it was indemept from the youk. scotland's government will public a so-called white paper. a legal blue print making a case for independs why the u.k. >> britainia rules the waves, the patriotic song said. the british empire was built in port smith. with britain's imperial star fading, the government announced shipp building will be stopped in port smith, but scotland jobs may transfer to portland if the scots photo for independence. fewers being determined by a decision not by them, but the scots. >> i think what the government is doing is saying to people in scotland look, we can put money your way. if you vote for independence we'll take it out. i don't think it's a fib. we think it's blackmail.
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up to now there's not been much complaining. all the same there are plenty who think scotland does very nice indeed. the news of ship-building jobs lost and staying in scotland brought to the surface a surprising aspect. while the scottish nationalists are yet to convince a majority of scots the benefits of going it alone. a large number of english people are supportive, that the english economy would be better off without them. >> many think the country would be damned by scottish independence. port smith is not the only place, this is a border down of englands most northern outpost. it changed hands 14 times between the english and the scots. people cross the border, live on
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one side and work on the other. the unanswered questions about an independent scotland leave a lot feeling nervous. >> people in beric know how important scotland is, with employment opportunities. as i mentioned, there are businesses operating. there's a depends on each other. >> beric worries it may be less well off. >> people do worry about that, absolutely. >> up to this point the overwhelming opinion in england is indifference. port smith and beric will not be the only place whose future will be shaped by a vote with no say. >> if voters agree to leave the u.k. the country could be dependent by march 2016. >> for the first time ever the
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vatican will put bones believed to be though those of st. peter on display. they were discovered in the basilica. until now they've been kept in an urn in the pope's private chapel. there's no dna sample. the remains will be put on it display to mark the end of the year of faith, ending today. >> in a few short hours voters will elect a new president. juan orlando hernandez is in a tight race with xiomara castro del zelaya. the wife of the ousted president manuel zelaya. amidthe back drop much spiralling crime. the leftist supporters are being intimidated at the polls.
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6,000 honduras live in the u.s. many watch the election closely. we caught up with some of them. alex ran the restaurant for two years. serving up a taste of home that the hondurans living in new york longed for. alex doesn't go home as often as he used to. it makes me sad being hon duran and a resident the united states. when i think about going back to visit my family, i think of the worst thing that can happen to me. >> alex is talking about murder. honduras has the highest murder rate. crime is an issue many hon duras say is important. >> translation: my father has been assaulted two times, when we send our family money they often get robbed. >> for hondurens living in the
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u.s. 20% is made up of remittances, money sent home to their family. and it ranks eighth highest in terms of remittances as a personnel of its gdp. manuel zelaya was deposed in a milt coup in 2009. his wife represents l. >> bre, a -- libre, a third party. >> translation: the liberal and national parties had their chance. now there needs to be change. libre is part of that change. a win by castro could give honduras its first female president. >> in ukraine thousands are marching protesting a trade treaty.
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kiev pulled back last week. some say ukraine buckled. the kremlin wants ukraine to join a russian led reunion, threatening to retaliate. in scotland people have been asking what their country would look like if it was independent from the u.k. scotland's government will publish a white paper, a legal blue print making the case for independence from the u.k.ment the economy is the main reason for wanting to break up a 300 year union. voters could be independent askery as march 2016. >> hundreds in myanmar fled their homes because fighting between the military and rebel fighters will intensify. there has been a build-up of soldiers as government representatives tried to
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negotiate a ceasefire. this woman and her family left her village with nothing. home is a camp. she is an ethnic group represented by the cachin organization. this time the shooting was too close. >>. >> we were getting worried about getting caught in the crossfire. we decided to get out of the jungle. we could take gunfire from the right, left and behind us. >> she ended up here, housing is being expanded to take new arrivals like they are. this is one of several. a town close to where recent fighting took place. 85 thoz people who have been internally displaced since
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fighting broke out between the independent army. the fighting started after a 17-year low when the kachin army refused to be incorporated in the army force. the k ash chin says the fighting causes them to doubt the government's sin seatery. >> the government wants to pursue military interests and goals. flexibility is a negotiation strategy. that's our observation. there's a gap between what is happening on the battlefield and the policy feel. >> still the talks are called on important process to achieving peace in myanmar. >> it's a very complicated issue. in peace process being in the peace process, we cannot blame anyone. this fighting - the violation of ceasefire occurs all the times.
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especially because this ceasefire agreements are not properly cemented, and the de-marr occasions are not properly defined. >> the ceasefires are good news. they are clear what they want. >> i want the war to end. it created so much misery. >> she and tens of thousands share the same dream. . helping the homeless. keep what little they have, how a back pack could mike life for tolerable.
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. welcome back, you are watching aljazeera.com, i'm morgan radford. making history in geneva, world leaders in rain say yes to an agreement that will limit the nuclear program, in exchanges for relief from economic sanctions. after days of debates 2,000 afghanistan elders vote to keep drops on the ground after 2015. the president says he needs more time before sealing the deal.
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rebels secure an oil field in syria. the loss offal-omar means the government's ability to get-cruz oil has been hid. >> one out of every four women with cervical cancer is indian. it's this shocking government figure that pushed the indian community trying to find a way to combad the disease. doctors followed 150 women, they battled cost, stigma. >> women in india have no concept of screening.
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it will be a crying shame if a disease will give you early warnings for 12-18 years, and we did nothing about it. >> cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths amongst women in india. mortality rates can be reduced by screening. deaths have been cut. the research also discovered that a common every day product was just as effective in detecting the onset of cervical cancer. >> he's as sensitive as a pap near. you have to collect the smear. you have to take it to the laboratory. it is read by a pathologist, and then it comes back to that person, the result.
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>> the main benefit of vinegar is it's fast, cheep and can be carried out by a trained community health worker. >> it could have spared this woman pain. it took her five years to get tested after abnormal cells were detected. she needed a hysterectomy. >> i tried. that's why i got rid of the disease. on the during can treat you. doctors believe the vinegar test will make it easier to reach women in india. it's up to the women to believe in the power of prevention. >> global olth officials say regions in india have the worst
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rates. >> each year 10% of births have serious complications. on average it 260,000 women die in child birth annually. roughly 27 out of every 1,000 u.s. births results in a birth injury to the infant. a mechanic found his inspiration from watching a youtube video. he won the world health organization's saving life at birth award. >> joining us the chief coordinator for improving maternal or paternal health. he's in geneva. how did you become aware of this invention. how did it catch your attention. >> i remember very well. it was in 2008. i was preparing to travel to argentina, i received a call from a senior advisor from the department. the director of a hospital.
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he told me that he wanted me to meet with some at the hospital. we were experimenting on a new device. and i agreed to have a 10-minute meeting during a coffee grak. the meeting ended up lasting for two hours because their invention was so interesting and promising. from there we received support from the university in the u.s. to test the device in a simulator lab. after that we could put together the preliminary data allowing us to study it in human. >> when can we expect the device to be available to us in the general public. >> i think if we take approximately three years from now, considering that we are at the stage of the prototype and we need careful testing for proving the safety and eff case
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of the device. >> in your time how unusual is it for someone not from the medical field to come up with a brilliant medical solution. >> it is unusual, imagination is more important than knowledge sometimes. so solve the problem i would have sold how to improve solutions available. it to find something promising you need someone from outside the field. >> imagination more important than knowledge. thank you doctor, chief coordinator for improving maternal and paternal health. >> for the country's 600,000 homeless people fighting to
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survive. a major worry is holding on to what little possessions they do have diane eastabrook highlights a solution. >> as night falls an chicago, the city's homeless find shelter, there's fear the few possessions could be stolen. bryan solorzano is among 2,000 chicagoans getting free back packs holding everything. >> there's a punch of compartments. it's waterproof. >> it looks the aim. >> citipaks are is the brain child of business man ron kaplan. >> we'll give everyone one. >> using money he partnered with high sierra to provide the packs. he gave them away last year, expanding it this year at boulder colorado. >> living and seeing people on the streets and an inadequate
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means to carry the stock safe, i said wait a minute shouldn't there be a back pack for these people. >> the packs from designed for the homeless. they are extra large and weather resistant. in here is a rain porscho that is detachable. this is a strap that can be worn around the owner's wrist so no one can steal it while the person is sleeping. >> the designers used input from the homeless to design the packs. this version for maui is in a lighter colour to deflect heat and comesway larger rain poncho. >> hawaiians have a larger bill. making the neck bigger was critical for us. >> by the end of the year citipak hopes to have 5,000 packs on the backs of homeless. the program extends to maui next
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month and poston and austin, temaze next year. >> bryan solorzano says he now no longer has to hide belongings. >> this way i can take it with me. >> for bryan solorzano that's security at a time when he has little. >> the rain porchos diane described have straps to be fast eped to wrists or ankles to keep them from being stolen. >> and mark morgan is here with a look at the big quarterback battle. >> that's right. it should be something. in fact, i think i'll watch this one. that shows how important it is. the nfl showcase the great rivalries over the years.
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tonight the spotlight will shan once again on peyton manning and tom brady as the broncos visit the patriots. >> ross shimabuku has more on the rivalry renewed. >> they are two living legends, numbers speak for them, peyton manning and braid where are throw for over 110,000 yards, is 818 touchdowns, won four super bowl titles, braiding three to peyton manning's one. and captured six mpv awards. >> we'll have to be on our came offensively because their offence is capable of scoring points quickly. if you have a lead, how quickly they come back because of time and the offence. >> sunday night will be the 14th meeting. the 36-year-old brady has the edge with victories.
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peyton manning has better numbersism. >> it's a good financial team lead by a great quarterback. i'm excited to see how we do. the two icons had epic battles over the years, including the 2006 afc championship game. peyton manning engineered one of the greatest combacks as they rallied back from an 18-point deficit securing the signaturely. the rest is history as peyton manning wins his one and only super bowl. >> tom brady broke peyton manning's record. with this season with the broncos at 37 years young. peyton manning is having a career year, op on pace to shatter that.
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>> the way he prepares, and is better each seen than the way before. it tells you how he obviously approaches the off-season, takes care of his body. challenges himself. >> with peyton manning at 37 and tom brady 36. enjoy saturday night, we may not have more of these meetings between to two legends. the patriots and bonkos appear to be on a collision course. >> all right. thank you so much. the showdown has play-off implications. the broncos at 9-1. a new england win will tighten things up. officials in buicka rest have a problem. they are trying to get a handle on 50,000 stray dogs. shedding light on the need for global education. the story of two teachers on a worldwide journey.
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. welcome back to al jazeera america. ahead a simple solution to help
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america's homeless. first, more snow and ice in the southern plains, and metrologist eboni deon is here with more. we are seeing a lot of moisture funnelling in from new mexico into texas moving towards the north and east. we are watching the upper level. it's a slow mover and it will make its way across the four corners on into texas before it drops along the gulf of mexico. the rain, snow and a mexican continues into parts of texas. dallas was quiet, but we are expecting freezing rain. notice how we see green stretching north. that is all rain. >> stray dogs pose a major threat to health in romania. al jazeera's correspondent reports on extreme measures city
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officials are taking to get rid of the problem. this is a graphic and may be difficult to watch. >> bucharest do not let sleeping dogs lie. dog catchers are out netting strays. this woman rescued her dog. another tries to set them free. it's a little one. many residents disapprove and argue with the catchers, but the city is determined to step up the efforts. it's doubled catch and capacity in two months and aims to raise it to 250 dogs a day for an 18 month period. >> translation: the program has been effective. dog attacks are down 43% in two months. last month we had the fewest attacks in seven years. a definition of success is reduce the stray dogs population by 80%. it's in reaction to the outwry following the fatal mauling of a
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4-year-old at the jaws of stray dog. >> dog attacks caused five deaths. that is only the tip of the iceberg. people of buckarest are being bitten at a rate of more than 1,000 times a month. those are known incidents. >> the dogs end up here at the city pound where anyone may adopt them. this woman claimed a stray she's been caring for since 2005. city officials claim they are only catching as many as they can re home. but at the end of the year they'll be able to put them to death two weeks after they've been caught. >> animal rights groups say it's been tried before and failed. they culled 140,000 dogs. >> our program is to have a good and powerful sterilisation program and adoption program. it's the only solution to reduce
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and control it. killing is not the solution. the stray on the street, we'll have more on the streets. >> public opinion wants the government to take action to keep children safe so the death penalty is replacing a sterilisation and release policy. over time public opinion could judge it immoral. >> american actor steven seggal is one of the people opposed to how bucharest is handling the stray dog problem. he adopted a city street dog to raise awareness. >> it's tough to stay undefeated in college football. another team found that out the hard way last night. mark morgan is here in sport to tell us about t. >> every season seems like it
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works out where there's only two unbeatens. so far so good. still some work to do. baler entered the showdown with oklahoma state averaging 61 a game, the bears, hoping to take the offensive prowess on the road and climb higher in the b.c. s standing, this one, intected to be close, was -- expected to be close was not. we pick it up second charter. charlie moore for 12 yards and a dutch council. >> tracy moore 56 yards. 19 for 25. 3 tds k oklahoma state wins handing bailor its first lose. >> the tigers, johnny men'sel
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having an after noon to forget. his heisman trophy taking a hip. the tigers poured it on. jack to jarvis. great hough. 40 yards later 21-3. 34-10. jamesin winston showed no effects from the off the field issues that he's dealing with now. through for 225 yards and four touchdowns. winston played sparingly and one series in the third. this was a blow-out. fsu put up 80 points beating the vandals. number one alabama laid the wood. blake slithering in, putting alabama up 7-0. the mokker son's - the teams stellar all season long, helping out the offence and defense.
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they struggled christian jones weaving for the touchdown. later aj mccarron fires at 28 yards to kevin norwood. next up bama squaring up in the ian bowl. we'll be there with the coverage. >> turning to baseball. brian mccann is an off-season priority. he agreed to don pinstripes, five years or $85 million, mccann 257, 20 home runs and 56 rbi last season. back in the ring, manny pacquiao made it count. he won a unanimous 12-round decision against brandon rios. bouncing back from the knock out. >> that was a rebound. i've never seen a boxer come up in that many weight classes that
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quickly. >> meanwhile most takers try to enrich the lives of every student in their class. we tell you about two teachers setting out on a worldwide journey with the aim of helping millions. all by way of tuk tuk. >> take two teachers, three wheels, and a goal to help 61 million children and you have one record-breaking adventure. >> i'm rich. ishesz i'm nick. >> meet richard sears, nick gough and tommy tempo, a motorized rickshaw known as a tuk tuk. >> these vehicles are great. we talked about going on a long expedition in one of these vehicles, in a tuk tuk. then we became teachers, we got interested in development and the role education can play. they made it a mission to visit
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rural areas where education is lacking. using social media they tried to raise awareness of how people can help and donate to education charities. >> the journey began in britain. after driving through europe the pair travelled the length of the african continent. it reached asia by may, spending half a year there, heading to the americas. they are in peru, crossing 37 countries and clocking in some 37.5,000 kilometres. in doing so they are believed to have broken the record for the longest trip in a tuk tuk. >> our journey through peru is depressing. we had to get it fixed. we got to the stage where it kept on breaking. >> that's meant they had to walk for some of the distance.
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they say it was worth it in the name of education. their motto - every child matters everywhere. >> you can follow the teachers' trip on the website tuk tuk. it charts their progress every step of the way. >> at the end of the second hour, here is what we are following. iran says yes to an agreement limiting the country's nuclear program in exchange for relief from economic sanctions. after four days of deliberations afghan elders vote to keep american boots on the ground beyond 2014, asking hamid karzai to sign the agreement by the end of the year. he's saying no deal. he wants to wait until after the presidential elections in april. >> in a few hours honduras will elect its new president as the country's corruption spirals out
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of control against the backdrop of economic crisis. >> i'm mark morgan. two of the greatest quarter backs in nfl go knows to knows again. >> temperatures dropped 20-30 degrees in the last 24 hours. i'll show you how cold it will be. i'm tracking an upper level low bringing rain and snow across the south-west. >> i'm morgan radford. thank you for watching, remember you can follow us online or on twitter or facebook. more news and 2.5 minutes with richelle carey.
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. for the first time in a decade we have halted the progress. iranian nuclear program. >> finally a deal, iran agrees to scale back its nuclear program as it tries to repair relations with the west. african leaders agree to lat american troops stay in the country behind 2014. >> the pope reveals bones buried for a century, possibly belonging to a pope. >> storms affecting thanksgiving travel, lashing the south-west.
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>> hello, welcome to al jazeera america. i'm richelle carey in new york. >> a diplomatic milestone, iran and six major world powers agreed to a deal on the country's program. the agreement requiring iran to stop iranian enrichment above 5%. iran overseas relief from economic sanctions. the deal lasts six months if it follow said through on its requirements. there'll be an agreement to ensure it doesn't build nuclear weapons. >> nothing will be agreed to unless everything is agreed to. the burden is on iran to prove to the world that its nuclear program will be exclusively for peaceful purposes. >> the iranian president says it seals iran's nuclear rights and iran's nuclear leader says it paves the way for nuclear steps.
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>> a result after a long night. described as intensive and complicated the people of iran and p5+1 struck an historic deal. hinted at by the president's unusual saturday night deal. >> the deal makes for a future in which we can verify iran's nuclear program is peaceful and it can't build a nuclear weapon. >> for the first time in a decade we a halted the progress of the nuclear program. in awkward timing the iranian foreign minister spoke in geneva at exactly the same time. >> i believe it is important that all of us see the opportunity to end a crisis and
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open new horizons based on respect for the rights of iranian people. and removal of any doubts about the exclusively peaceful nature of iran's nuclear program. >> under the deal iran has agreed to halt all enrichment above 5% and neutralize its stockpile of 20%. it will halt progress on its enrichment capacity. it won't increase its stockpile of 3.5% low enriched uranium. there'll be no advancement at the iraq reactor. iran will allow inspectors from the atomic agency to its nuclear site. there'll be a limited easing of specific economic sanctions. the first step is about building
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trust. the agreement will last 3-6 months. president obama made it clear if iran doesn't meet the commitments, the pressure may be stepped up. >> israel has calls been opposed to any deal. the challenge for the u.s. is to convince the ally that a diplomatic settlement is the best way forward. with so much at stake for all nations this was never going to be easy. now it seems that 30 years of isolation for iran could be over. >> some rainions believe the -- iranians believe it's a bad deal. here is what they get. sanctions lighten up on the gold and metal and car industry, privating $1.5 billion in revenue. sales of oil will be heavily
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restrict. iranian students will get tuition substance from the government. iran's president hassan rouhani is calling the deal a victory for his country. >> world powers have recognised iran's nuclear rights. islamic republic of iran innately enjoys this right and this right has been granted to all the signatories by the ntp. >> hassan rouhani added iran's enrichment activities will continue for the past. for a closer look let's bring in mike viqueira. a 6-month deal is a chance for iran to prove itself to the world. what is the international community, world leaders - what do they hope they'll do during the six months.
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>> they hope they'll validate the decision. obviously iran has agreed to curtail its enrichment production and not produce plutonium from a separate plant there. the united states and the obama administration face criticism from israel and saudi arabia, on the same side in this controversy, this issue. from congress the democratic leader saying he was going to move forward strengthening sanctions. president obama appeared late at night saturday in the state dining room to talk about the deal. >> as president and commander-in-chief i will do what is yeses are to prevent iran from obtaining a nuclear
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weapon. i have a responsibility to resolve our differences peacefully rather than rush to conflict. >> the president leaving no doubt as the criticism is mounteds if it does not work out all options on the table. >> tell us about the limb that the obama administration is on about. more about the secret meetingsism. >> it was interesting. president obama stuck his neck out in his inaugural address with an opening towards rain, trying to extend an olive branch of sort, faf ouring diplomacy over confront face, it wasn't until march this year when we learnt there were overtures from barack obama's administration, meetings that intensified when president hassan rouhani became
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the president of the new administration in iran. that's behind closed doors. not even america's closest allies, and confirmed by administrative officials - not even allies or members of capitol hill were informed of the meetings through the officers of oman, used as an intermeed air yea to hopt the talks with have been something of a framework for what was agreed on last night in geneva. administration officials are downplaying this saying it's a supplement and allies were brought in and brought up to speed on what was discussed between bilaterally in those secret talks. >> if you could make it clear for us, this has been the red line, this right that iran says they have to enrich uranium, the red line in negotiations. where do things stand on that in this agreement? >> it doesn't address it.
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it does not address the issue of whether iran has the right to enrich uranium. when you dodge an issue, you ignore it. rain will be able to enrich uranium, but to a 5% degree, commercially below weapons grade uranium. they will not activate the second plank we were talking about that has the participation to produce plutonium, a material that can be used for nepans. the big concern is how could iran break out - turn from a civilian usage for energy to power iranian homes and businesses to a military application. there's obviously still sharp disagreement among allies, including israel on that question. >> mike viqueira reporting from the white house. good to see you. thank you so much. >> joining us to discuss how the
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deal affect iran's ability to produce a bomb is kelsey davenport with the arms control association. what does the deal mean in terms of curbing enrichment? >> this deal is a huge win for theiates national security interests. what it does is it reduces iran's stockpile of iranian enriched to 20%. uranium enriched to this level is enriched to weapons grade, stopping iran from producing more uranium enriched to this level over six months, giving the united states and allies time to negotiate a deal with iran, setting limits on the nuclear program. >> was that the point of this, to buy more time.
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>> it certainly does help. one of the important elements of the deal is the spread monitoring that the international community will have over rain jned nuclear program. inspectors will be allowed into the facilities on a daily basis if necessary and will have access to sites they haven't had access to in the past. >> let's talk about the state of iran's nuclear program, how easy is it to know how close they are to making a bomb? >> well, we have a clear picture of where they are in terms of their enrichment capabilities because the international atomic energy agency monitors the activities closely. it's a little harder to tell where they are in terms of actually weaponizing a device. that is being able to explode.
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but iran has recently signed an agreement with the international atomic energy agency on november 11th, where it pledged to start cooperating with the agency to answer unresolved questions about its activities in the past that are related to military dimensions. in terms of time frame, if iran were to try to make a weapon now, the u.s. intelligence community assesses it would be over a year before they do that. >> mike mike viqueira report that it was vague whether or not it was acknowledged that iran has the right to enrich uranium. where do you think the agreement will go. >> looking at the introductory language of the agreement i think we'd see something similar to that in a final agreement.
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basically what the language says is it gives raip and the united states an ability to agree to disagree. recognising that rain has the right to access technology for peaceful purposes. rain interprets that to mean the right to enrich. the u.s. does not interpret that to be the right to enrich. >> we'll see something similar where the parties agree to disagree about what iran is required to do under an international treaty. >> kelsey davenport thank you for joining us. we appreciate it. joining us from washington d.c. iran's key alley syria is praising the nuclear agreement, calling it historic. the government a initials say it guarantees the interests of the brotherly iranian people, acknowledging the right to peaceful use of nuclear energy. rebels seize an oil field, it's
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a blow to the bashar al-assad regime. cutting off the crude reserves. >> opposition fighters say they have taken control of syria's largest fields, it's difficult to prove but the video shows the entrance to al-omar. it was posted, mages over the area for the last two months. it was tape at dawn from government forces. he says it's in the hands of the al-nusra front, an al qaeda-linked grout. the army. he introduces a man, a field commander who describes the defeat. >> translation: we are now in omar oil field, here are bashar al-assad's vehicles and tanks. his men ran away.
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>> it's the second time opposition fightersar taking control of facility the government withdrew only to get it back again. if it has changed hands again that means most of syria's reservation are in the hands of the opposition and thanks to the e.u.'s decision to relax on embargo they are allowed to sell it abroad. the bashar al-assad government has access to oil, there are other pipes in the county and a provider in iran. >> after four days of deliberations afghan leaders endorsed a deal with the united states. american forces remained beyond 2014, mainly to train security forces. the afghan president has been asked to sign the agreement by the end of the year. hamid karzai says he needs more time before signing on the bottom line.
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a massive snow storm in the united states left eight people dead. the storm was so strong it uprooted a tree that fell on a parked car and killed a woman. >> the snow caused crashes and traffic delays. for more on that in the informational forecast we return to the geologist. >> i'm tracking an upper level low that's been slow-moving across parts of the south-west. it will push off to the east and north-east before paying its away long the state. watching out for rain and snow back into arizona. we are only expecting isolated
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showers. expect more to accumulate around black staff. winter storm warning is in effect mainly across new mexico into texas, into the dallas, fort worth area. things are quiet. moisture is on the move. we'll deal with a mix bag before it settles into a breezing rain. expect conditions to deteriorate. right now it's cloudy skies for you. there is rain to the west. in the north-east it's colder. strong north-west fetch coming in off the lake. they fear for parts of the new york into north-western pennsylvania. some areas seeing up to four inches. we could see a few extra inches adding up to a few inches of
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snow. winds will be the bigger story. winds gusting as high as 45 miles per hour, making it feel colder. >> thank you. more than two weeks after typhoon haiyan hit the philippines aid agencies are struggling to reach remote areas. many workers are trying to provide relief from inside broken down buildings, makeshift tents. we have this report from tacloban. >> there's barely a building left standing in this town a quarter mile from the sea. inside town hall it is hot, dark and dirty. water pours from above. this shell of a structure is the best they could do for a hospital. one bright spot here is that the vice mayor ronald flores is a
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paediatrician and he's been working around the clock. >> no matter how tiring it is i don't consider fatigue because i have to provide service for my people. >> people have fevers, diarrhoea and infected wounds. >> this man whose home was destroyed told me it took him 10 days to get here. getting medical attention was more important than his house. >> they are still finding bodies and trenches and mounds of dirts are wear they were burying hundreds of bodies but they'll stop. this is where medecins sans frontieres is putting up a new hospital. city hall is too damaged. >> there's water falling, no electricity. we had the roof collapse. >> louise johnston is mfs's
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field coordinator. we will refer cases to our hospital in tacloban, and a paediatric word, kids and a maternity section. there's no care here at all. using tents that inflate in minutes mfs get a fully finking hospital up in less than a day. >> in the court yart in downtown tacloban. about 12 miles up the coast msf run an er and surgical intake center. >> we have been running all night. people need treatment. it can't wait. >> msf says they'll stay here until they rebuild hospitals like bethany. >> given the scale of destruction, they won't leave son. >> the united nations issued an
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appeal for 300 million. they have released $25 million. >> election day in honduras, a violent country chooses its next president. no country to call their own. courts issue a ruling that could send hundreds of thous ants back to a place they called home. a living laboratory. saving the planet.
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. good morning, welcome back to al jazeera america. next election day one of the most violent countries, honduras, we take you there first. temperatures across the country where metrologist ebony. >> we'll start in the north-east. it's cold and feels chillier. thanks to the wind chills. winds whipping throughout the day. within the last 24 hours
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temperatures fell 20 degrees colder. goodnight the cold front temperatures down to the teens. 10 in toronto, 21 in cleveland, 26 in philadelphia. snow flying through the day. only flurries. >> here is the real deal. this is how it feels, as you step outside. wind chill down to sex. it feels like minus 6. >> in a few short hours voters in honduras will elect a new president as violence and corruption spirals out of control the electoral commission says the vote will be free and fair. already there are reports it's out of control. >> juan orlando hernandez, on the right, and xiomara castro del zelaya of the libre party. they've been locked in a tight
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battle. castro is the wife of manuel zelaya, a former president forced out of office. she promises to rewrite the constitution, a proposal contributing to her husband's removal, taking the army off the streets. >> the government isn't seriously combatting the security crisis. justice is bought and sold every day. juan orlando hernandez is promising a soldier on every corner. the military police was his creation. >> translation: where do you want the soldiers, on the barracks or in the streets. i want them on the streets too. 20 people are dies every day in honduras. ipp security is far from the only problem. two in three live in poverty. jobs and opportunity are hard to
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come by. a deep financial crisis is hard to come by. unhappiness with lives and politician prove ebbed the most open race in years. a battle to combat corruption we aries the electorate. >> translation: many works are approved. politicians split the money. >> the election will be watched closely. people are concerned over traps personsy. the military and the national police are spread out across the country. >> army and police chiefs and the head of the country's tribunal sought to reassure voters. >> 12,000 members are working throughout the country to secure the vote. >> in a country with little faith in institutions, if the losing side calls foul,
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divisions can get deeper. >> nearly 16,000 election monitors will watch over today's vote. >> thousands of ukrainions are on the treat protesting a decision to scrap a trade treaty. >> some say the ukraine bubblingled under pressure from moscow who wants them to join a customised union. >> in scotland people have been asked what would their country look like if it was independent if from the u.k. scotland's government will public a white paper making the case for independence from the yooub. the economy is the -- from the yooub. the economy is the main reason. the country could be as independent as march 2016 if
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voters agree. >> the pope unveils what many believe are the bones of the first ever pope. >> it makes you feel like you are nothing. >> a potential humans rights crisis, hundreds of thousands in the dominic an republic could be forced to return somewhere they don't call home.
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>> welcome back. making history in geneva, world leaders say yes to an agreement that limits the country's program in exchange for some
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sanctions. this is a development between russia and tehran. iran's president if and spiritual leader responds positively. some hoped for greater anxious relief. the geneva agreement will make the world a dangerous place to live in say israel. >> world leaders call it a braeg through. benyamin netanyahu says the deal is based on deceept. this rift between the united states and israel on something this significant, what does it many, mike hanna? >> well, certainly there was nothing but anger in the israeli corridors of power. benyamin netanyahu stormed into a cabinet meeting with a stoney face saying it was an historic mistake and insisted that the -
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that israel would not be bound by a deal reached in geneva. later he was slightly less angry, histone one of regret -- his tone one of regret more than the fury he showed earlier. this is what he said. >> israel has many friends and allies. when they are mistaken, it's my obligation to speak out clearly and say so. it's my responsibility to protect and defend the one and only jewish state. >> looming now is a diplomatic fall-out between the u.s. and israel. u.s. secretary of state john kerry spent weeks in this region briefing benyamin netanyahu on the deal. what has become clear in the israeli prime minister's reaction, his angry reaction in the course of the day is that israel was not interested in any
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deal that did not involve the total destruction of iran's nuclear capacity. that was never a matter discussed between the u.s. secretary of state and the israeli prime minister or the u.s. president on a number of cak occasions when he phoned him the the u.s. was under a false assumption that there was a deal that israel could be interested in - that proved to be false, and will have implications on the u.s. and israel. >> let's pick up on what benyamin netanyahu says much it's his responsibility to defend israel. does iran pose a threat to his country, are there segments of his country that don't agree with him about the deal. >> benyamin netanyahu is insisting and continues to insist that iran with a nuclear
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capacity poses an existential threat, threatens its existence, that ignoring the deal in geneva makes clear that the uranium levels in iran remain below weaponized nuclear capacity. what can israel do. there has been speculation about military action. some officers raised the possibility others within the establishment made clear that israel is unable to act unilaterally in this. it is isolated from western allies on this issue, particularly from the united states. for israel to take a form of military action would require the overt or covert backing of allies. for the next six months at least this will not be forthcoming.
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>> mike hanna live from jerusalem. >> history was made in the senate this past book as lawmakers voted to lower the barsiers for president -- barriers for presidential nomination. it could help president obama fill vacancies. it can create. we are joined by a professor at columbia university. >> some people were surprised about this particular option that harry reid and the democrats went for. give us a context, perspective for this. >> well, the filibuster is something that is a creature of the united states senate. the united states senate doesn't have the option. it's something the senate uses to block important legislation,
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and what i found particularly interesting is that this is an option that is not used for budget builds, you can filibuster pretty m anything else. what happened this week is harry reid and the democrats said we are tired of the republicans in the chamber blocking the presidential nom nis. not secretary level. what that does is it hinders the president's opportunity to put in place his vision for how he wants to run government and the fact that the republicans used the filibuster to block his nominees and govern in certain ways through certain agency. the senate agencies said, "enough is enough. we don't have time in this administration. we are coming up against 2014 midterm elections, and we need
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to start getting things down." there's dozens of availablingan says that -- vaguan sis that president obama has not been able to fill. >> we are talking executive branch agencies and judicial nominees. if you look back in the past. this time in george w. bush's presidency, there were a few open appointments. a lot had been filled. if you compare it to where president obama is now. there are dozens of vacancies. >> having said that. why the reaction from mitch ocon 'em. it says democrats were hesitant to do this. will there be a moment when she say why did i do this? ". >> the dem crass were hesitant.
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mitch mcconnell talked about what this will do is embolden. "we'll find other ways to block legislation." i'm not sure how they are going to be able to do that. they dug in their heels and said, "there are ways we have left to keep the president from implementing some of his vision", and they'll be a lot more involved now. that thank you joining us from new orleans this morning. >> for the first time ever the vatican plans to put bones, believed to be the remains of st. peter, the first pontiff, on display. the relics were discovered in the 1940s. they have been kept in an urn in the pope's chapel. there's controversy since
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there's no dna sample, and no way of proving who they belong to. >> it marks the end of the year of faith. >> fewer americans are homeless, according to figures from the department of housing and urban development. in 2013 the agency reported 6,000 were considered homeless, down 10% from 2006. it's the third year in a row that homelessness has fallen. shelters are full, 65% relied on the shelters, and a third living in cars. abandoned buildings or under bridges. a carter of homeless in america are under 18. >> the dominican republic ruled that being born in that country doesn't automatically grant citizenship. voter roles have been purged, including people born to
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nonresidents. the majority of haitian or descendants coming to the island to work. the ruling sparked outrage, amnesty international condemned it. >> this demonstration in new york square was fuelled by anger from haitian's highest court. families and friends in inter-dominican had nowhere to call home. this man is one who was born in the dominican republic to haitian parents. people of haitian decent were only welcomed if they were worthy. he was offered citizenship because he was a journalist. >> i said, "thank you, sir, but
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no thank you." i had chosen to become haitian. had i accepted, the offer of the dominican console general, i would be in limbo. that's where hatians find themselves. the ruling of the highest court strips zit zenship from anyone considered illegal and who was born or entered the country after 1929. >> that's about 200,000 people. the dominican government said it's close to 13 shuns. >> the commin can government to the u.s. defend the ruling. he said:
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>> critics reject the notion that the ruling is about immigration policy. a history professor at john jay college says it's rooted in a history of fear and racism. being dominican means you can be arab, jewish, european, black-west indian descent. hatians were excluded because of the way elite defines dominicans which historically has been an exclusion. >> that's because the dominican republic considers these people to be in transit. despite the fact generations of them call the dominicans home. >> it's hard to work with the
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government that has a history of undermining hatians or dominicans of haitian descent, segregating or doing anything. >> advocates hope if there's international pressure the dominican republic will overturn the ruling. >> we have the director. robert f kennedy for justice joining us. mr kanton - tell us about the case that led to the rule. >> it's important to understand what the case is about. it is about a woman born in 1994. she received a birth certificate from the dominican republic. and registered as a dom jin can. in 2008 she decided to get a national id. they went to get the national
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id. they took away the original certificate, not gig it back to her. it was in order to get her birth certificate back. it came to the decision of the constitutional tribunal saying she's not dominican, and it affects hundreds of thousands of people, basically what is going on now. the commin can republic needs to stop this. >> they considered herself dominican and they told her she was not. >> there's many thousands of people. >> the dominican government say it's about immigration policy - nothing more, nothing less. do you agree with that? . >> absolutely not. it's not about immigration. it's about giving away citizenship of hundreds of
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thousands of people. went the dominican republic reforms the constitution. it's a clear rule on who is the dominican and who is not. it's a constitutional tribunal. it's not about immigration, it's about stripping away the citizenship of thousands of people. just like tomorrow in this co t country u.s. supreme court changes the terms of who is an american and many people's nationalities stripped away. >> what do you think the ramification will be. government said there's people reacting. there's a lot of fear. what do you think the ramifications will be. >> you have hundred thousand
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people in legal limbo. they have taken away the nationality. if the dominican government doesn't stop this. it could be a potential consequence like people being deported. it's not happening. and a lot has to do with the fact that the international community is pressuring the dominican republic. they also have to decide the action. let's hope the dominican republic will change the policy. >> keep us posted on this and we'll follow it. director of the robert f kennedy center. thank you for joining us. is >> another college football team falls from the ranks of the unbeaten.
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you made me say that about my team. >> are you good with this. >> i had to be, i'm a journalist. i'm trying to be. >> i'm guessing last night you weren't. >> we'll go ahead. baler entered saturday night's showdown with oklahoma averaging 61 point a game. the bears heaped to take their prowess on the road. this one expected to be close. it wasn't. art and bales shut out in the first quarter. we pick it up from the second. charlie moore, 12 yards and a touch down, 14-zip. first possession of the third up to moore. oklahoma wins 49-17 handing baler its first lose. >> lsu tigers looking to knock off texas.
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johnny manziel an afternoon to forget. his heisman trophy taking a hit. the tigers pureeing it on. alandry makes a great move. 21-3. jamesin winston in florida showed no effect from the off-the-field issues he's dealing with. very efficient. four touch downs. wips played the first half and one series in the third. 80 points, beating vandals, 80-14. number one alabama lead chattanooga. drakes slithering in putting them up. alexander helping the offence and defense. watch citian jones. alabama in control of 21-0.
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aj mccarron looks for an open man. alabama shuts out chattanooga. >> al jazeera will be there at the iron bowl for the complete coverage. >> the nfl showcased great quarterback rivalry over the years. tonight the spotlight shines on peyton manning and tom brady. ross shimabuku has more on the rivalry renewed. >> they are two living legends. the numbers speak for themselves. peyton manning and tom brady threw over 110,000, 818 touchdowns, won four super bowl titles. they've captured six mvp awards. >> we know we'll have to be on our game offensively because their offence is capable of
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scoring points quickly. if you have a lead, how quickly they come back. >> sunday night will be the 14th meeting two the future hall-of-famers. tom brady with the victory, but peyton manning with better numbers throwing more passes and touchdowns. >> it's a good team. led by a great quarterback. i'm excited to see how we do. >> these two icons had epic battles including the 2006 game. peyton manning engineered a comeback in post season history. colts rallying from an 18-point deficit securing history. peyton manning won his one and only super bowl. >> in twoir peyton manning set a record throwing 49 touch towns,
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a record many thought wouldn't be blown. tom brady tossed 50. with the broncos at 37 years young peyton manning is having a career best year and is on track to surpass that. >> the way he's better each season than the one before. it tells you how he approaches the off-season, takes care of his bodiment challenges himself. >> with peyton manning at 37 and tom brady at 36. we may not have many meetings. the patriots and broncos appear to be on a collision course to meet in the play-offs. >> all right. one final note. the new york yankees and brian mccann have agreed to a five year $85 million deal. the 29-year-old hitting 257, 20
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home runs, 56 rbi last season. >> good stuff, except for the baler stuff. >> it's a big story. >> a neighbourhood whose residents are saving green after going green.
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. welcome back to al jazeera america. ahead the peckan project that not only has residents living green, but saving it. looking first at the precipitation. it's been ongoing into parts of texas. we dealt with this yesterday, and western areas, that precipitation has been on the move. watching you closely we have the winter storm warping. it's starting as rain. light sleet off to your west. moving north into oklahoma.
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snow showers persistent. >> europe's most active volcano erupted. volcanic ash blanctds nearby towns -- blanketed nearby towns. mt etba is 1100 feet high. the last maker eruption was 1992. >> how often do you see a barrage of cars? we look at one of the most efficient energy grids in the world. >> this does not look like a revolutionary project. pekin street is aiming to change the way we live. onces that this resident is aware of. he moved here and says his
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commitment to the environment goes beyond the financial. >> it's not about saving money, but saving the planet. we like the fact that we are less of a burden on the infrastructure of the world than we used to be. >> pekin street is about more than cheaper utility bills, it's a laboratory where information is gather from each home. it's a picture that emerges from information that has the potential to shaken the way we use energy. >> they call it big data. terabytes of information are processed to understand how residents use and abuse energy. it's the mush that thicks this a smart grid. it's little more than an exercise without participants. >> if you are going to have a revolution, i joke that you might need to invite the people. if we change the way energy is used and abused in this country you have to make it enjoyable.
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>> pekin street had to find volunteers. for some it's changed. >> sometimes you are accused of being a tree hugger. it's like, "well, it's nice to have a tree to hug. come and join us.". >> it's frustrating that you have to buck the system to do the right thing. >> for now pekin street is an experiment, a large-scale study of how things can look to years to come. >> those behind the project believe they are building a foundation for the future. >> another news update after the break. into a tiny house is to get rid
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of all this "stuff"... >> what you gain by having less... >> let's think about giving up mcmasions... >> a tiny american dream, al jazeera america presents... tiny: a story about living small premiers tonight 9 eastern. >> al jazeera america is the only news channel that brings you live news at the top of every hour. >> here are the headlines at this hour. >> only on al jazeera america.
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