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tv   News  Al Jazeera  December 2, 2013 6:00am-9:01am EST

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a deadly train accident in new york, four people killed and dozens injured when a train goes off the rails. investigators now want to know if it was going too fast. the white house says healthcare.gov is finally running more smoothly but now it faces a new test, last-minute users scramble to make this month's deadline. and the prime minister goes into hiding after antiprotesters storm the building. building a business in a bankrupt city. detroit opens its very first distillery in 100 years.
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♪ good morning and welcome to al jazeera america, i'm morgan live from new york. this morning 26,000 commuters in new york city suburbs have to find another way to get to work. this after a train derailed yesterday just outside of manhattan. the accident left four dead and dozens injured and ntsb investigators have now recovered the train's data recorder and trying to determine exactly what caused the crash. >> our mission is to understand not just what happened but why it happened with the intent of preventing it from happening again. >> reporter: the train jumped the tracks just as it was getting ready to leave the bronx and cross into manhattan and 7 cars derailed with the lead car feet away from the hudson river. it happened along a curved
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section of the track and trying to figure out the excessive speed played a role. an al jazeera's john is here live from the bronx, john? >> morgan good morning. the hudson line of metro north railroad is one of the busiest commuter rail routes in the world. 26,000 people a day ride the rails into new york city from upstate, many of them are being encouraged to stay at home today to keep away from the accident scene as we approach almost 24 hours since the rail crash that killed four people, injured 63 people, 11 of them seriously. >> we were going fast and as it hit the curb it was flying. >> reporter: the train was 20 minutes from the destination, the grand central station and in an instant it came off the tracks and down a hill and landing inches from the hudson river. >> there was screaming and people crying out god and asking
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for their families. >> reporter: they were lucky one, three of the four who died were ejected from the train and another 60 people were injured. >> we had evidence of people under a couple of cars, so we actually used airbags to lift the car. >> reporter: residents along the route there was no mistaking what was happening. >> it sounded like a plane crash that kept going on and on. that buckling sound of the train, cars hitting each other and going on. >> reporter: as police, fire and rescue crews converged to the scene of the derailment in the bronx north of the skyscrapers of manhattan and were shocked that the thanksgiving holiday ended in such a tragic way. >> the dead body they covered it with a white sheet and it is breathtaking. >> reporter: the search included dogs and divers all of the passengers and crew were eventually accounted for and injured, many of whom were flipped ands toed in the train cars, were taken to nearby hospitals. the national transportation
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safety board is piecing together what went wrong including weather or not speed was a factor when the train went off this curve section of track >> we don't know what the train speed was and we have recovered the reporter off the car. >> reporter: it will focus on the train's operator who was injured as well. they say the train was going too fast into the turn and performed a dumping maneuver and only used in catastrophic circumstances. but new york's governor andrew cuomo is not so quick to say that. >> they took the curve 365 days a year so it's not the fact there is a curve here so there has to be another factor. >> reporter: but night fall they had floodlights and began the process of removing the crippled trains and repairing the tracks and a job that will continue well into today,
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disrupting the commute for thousands of passengers while others come to grips of how an early morning train ride could go terribly wrong. >> there is no reason people coming home from a holiday should be dead, there is no reason for it. >> reporter: and morgan i think that is one of the greatest tragedies of this event here on the hudson line, that it happened just three days after the great american tradition of thanksgiving and you have got to believe that a fair number of the people on the train were returning to new york from having been with their families for thanksgiving. >> reporter: it's tragic this holiday season and on sunday they ruled out, terrorism but the train may have hit the curb too quickly. is there word whether speed was actually a factor? >> well, no official word.
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yesterday when the accident was first unfolding before our eyes we didn't dare say that speed was a factor. we have to wait for someone to say that and it came from the governor of new york and said as early as 1:00 yesterday he thought speed was a factor and said the curb that runs in the station not approaching a very dangerous one and he also said that as you heard in my report there the trains take this curve every single day and clearly something went wrong. so the national transportation safety board is here and on scene since 1:00 yesterday afternoon and working throughout the night and today they will focus on if they can talking to the driver and multiple reports saying the driver told first responders when he applied the brakes nothing happened and are trying to talk to him and look at the equipment and the train and carriages and black box which you said has been recovered and it has been and they will talk to the train and signal people and come to a
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conclusion but we have to wait for the initial conclusion and the full report could take up to a year. >> reporter: you mentioned what happened yesterday but since yesterday has the area been cleared out and is the train sitting upright again? >> yes, overnight they righted the engine at the back, two or three, i can't see, i think you are looking at pictures now and have a better idea from where i am and that work will continue throughout the day as they continue to right those carriages and bringing the front one away from the river and back on the tracks. the carriages and engine will not be released to the authority until the ntsb say they can be released and commuter chaos is predicted today, 26,000 people can't get down this line like they normally would and coming off trains at yonkers and being bussed to the 242nd street subway station. >> that is al jazeera's john
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reporting life from the bronx. sunday's accident is the second metro derailment in months and one went out in bridge port, connecticut and hit by another train and 75 people were injured. we are learning more about the derailment from the passengers themselves. one survivor described the accident scene as something out of a movie. more than 100 passengers were on board when the train left the tracks killing four people including 54 lighting expert jaims -- james label and he was coming to work on the rockefeller tv show and he describes his friend. >> dignity and determination and being a wonderful father, friend and neighbor. >> reporter: also among those killed in the crash was 54-year-old donna smith who friends say smith was active in the girl scouts and with her
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church. for years the national transportation safety board wants technology to prevent derailments caused by excessive speed and in 2008 congress passed a law giving railroad until 2015 for positive control systems and they are designed to prevent human error which is the cause of 40% of train accidents. but since they are pretty expensive and a bit complicated to install, railroads want to push back the deadline by 5-7 years. but metro north is actually in the process of installing such a system and currently it does have an automatic train control system in place which allows the train to apply the brakes even if an engineer does not respond to an excessive speed alert. that train was headed to new york's grand central terminal where al jazeera's jennifer glass is covering the delays. jennifer do you have any idea when the trains will be backup
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and running? >> no, morgan, we don't. we know the transit authority will want to get them running as soon as possible because it's the second biggest line in the country and 26,000 on the hudson line which was effected but metropolitan are expecting large trains and finding other ways to get her and the train has to be cleared off the tracks and the tracks also have to be repaired and it's unclear how long it will take and for now people are expecting a difficult morning commute in manhattan. >> you mentioned they were looking for ways to get to where are they going and exactly how are they doing that, jennifer? >> well, they have shuttle buses from where the hudson line is in yonkers to the subway and extra subway trains as well to get people in the city and they are also accepting tickets from the hudson line on the other lines that come in, the harlem and new haven lines to bring people in
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the city but the trains are expected to be crowded and a busy commuter day and it's the first monday after the thanksgiving weekend so a lot of people who were out visiting families are coming into the city. the metropolitan transit authority has experience with it, it was closed in july when a cargo train went off not far from where the commuter train went off yesterday and they have dealt with this issue and getting commuters into the city a different way and shuttle buses to the subway and accepting tickets from other lines is the strategy and encouraging commuters to work from home if at all possible. >> thank you, jennifer glass at grand central terminal and thanks for joining us this morning. meanwhile metro north is the nation's fourth busiest commuter rail line and 26,000 passengers ride the hudson line every day and the tracks stretch 775 miles. after nearly two months of harsh
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criticism the obama administration said healthcare.gov website took a giant step forward and ready for the next big test and al jaze a jazeera's and erica is live. >> the obama administration met the deadline and the site works more than 90% of the time and up from 40% when it was launched two months ago. >> the bottom line healthcare.gov on december 1st is night and day from where it was on october 1st. >> reporter: that is president obama special advisor in charge of fixing the website that was originally bogged down with hundreds of bugs. the white house says dramatic progress has been made with the site performing with private sector velocity and a lower error rate and capacity to handle 50,000 visitors at once and if it's too busy there is a virtual waiting room that will e-mail you when it's less
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crowded. the new report shows administration hit the big benchmark. >> 50,000 at one time, 800,000 people a day. look this will take some time before it's up and kicking in full gear. i think what we have to look at is those states where you have well functioning websites like california, like new york, like kentucky, all of them are signing people up. >> reporter: republicans see it differently. >> here is the problem, you have 15% of the population didn't have health insurance when this started roughly and we think the number was high and think it was closer to 10. what they have done is disrupted it for 85% that had healthcare and their costs are going up significantly. so we have broken the system to help a few, nobody would fix a problem that way. >> reporter: and supporters of healthcare.gov admit there is room for improvement but say both sides of the aisle most come together to fix it. >> eric the republican whip
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issued this play book against obamacare the other day. they are not trying to work with us and try to address the issues. yes, there are problems. there is no denying that. let's work to fix them. we know what it looks like when they are fixed and looks like colorado and -- california and new york. >> reporter: kentucky, california, north carolina have their own state exchange websites which were also pretty slow when they first launched. as for the federal site the white house says enrollment jumped from 30-80%. white house still calling the site a work in progress. >> but you actually visited the site this morning, didn't you, what did you find? was it different and faster? >> it was faster because i logged on october 1st and that was pretty rough going that day and today it was definitely pretty quick. in fact, the true test i think that will happen here is for this repaired website is when there is maybe an on slot of people trying to enroll come before the december 23rd
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deadline so coverage can kick in on the 1st. >> thanks for joining us erica. parts of the country are getting hit with super cold air and temperatures they have not seen in years, for that let's bring in metrologist nicole mitchell. >> this is a potent storm system and the arctic air will be one of the biggest trouble spots and we are also talking snow, freezing rain to areas of rain as well. so here is a look at the system as it's pushing to the coastline in the west coast, low pressure with the cold front and as that moves through we have high winds, very cold air and enough moisture to cause problems. so all of those elements that we will be dealing with. already this morning some of the mountain passes, places like montana getting some of the freezing rain and that could spread to other parts of north dakota for example and watch those roads very carefully as we get in the next couple days. as all of this moves in we have seen heavy precipitation like idaho and an inch in a couple
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isolated spots and as this continues more of this, once we get the cold air coming in as well, that is going to be more areas of snow. the driving will be very slick. what i'm most concerned about are those temperatures because they are going to drop 20-30 degrees. in fact, some places falling through the day today. so this puts it in today and tomorrow and you can see the cold air settling in overnight tonight and sticks during the day tomorrow. by the time we get to tuesday and wednesday some places might not make it for highs above zero, add in the wind, we could see wind chills 20-30 below. one tip out there people have live stock animals outside and get dehydrated this time of year and make sure they have water and back to you. >> meanwhile antigovernment demonstrations take a violent turn in thailand. police fired water canons and rubber bullets as antigovernment
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protesters tried to force their way into ministry buildings right there near bangkok and the prime minister is rejecting calls saying demonstrations are actually unconstitutional and scott is live from bangkok where protests are stretching into their 9th day. scott, good morning. how is the prime minister responding to this unrest? >> well, she has repeatedly said, as she has come out a couple times during the nine days of protesting, she has said that she wanted to negotiate with the antigovernment protest leaders and sit down with them and talk with them and work through this unfolding crisis. they refused to. they said that they will not negotiate with her because they don't view her as the proper leader of this nation. they call her the illegitimate of the nation and she said she
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is running the government. they sat down and the army oversaw the meeting and no negotiation and they stuck to the proverbial guns saying, yes, this is not constitutional, the prime minister was saying what the protesters want and that is the government to resign and appointed people's council. we are at a logger head to tell you the truth and no negotiation and offers by the government and refus refusals by protesters and the protesters doing what we saw today going into and break into government installations and occupy them and have been successful over the last week but what they have not been able to do is go through the houses and they are pushed back by water canons and two highly sensitive and high-profile targets they are not allowed into and saw the violence and today and monday and also yesterday on sunday. morgan. >> reporter: and scott you mentioned this question of
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legitimacy and we know that perception is a lot more difficult to change than reality. so if she does, in fact, stay in power will her power be legitimate? >> well, yeah, it's a very good question and it's one thing and perception is the reason for this and why we should focus on this. absolutely. when you see this many people out the street protesting that the government should change. one thing we really need to note is the ruing party was democratically elected and say the protesters that it was fraudulent but still to this day and now with the people on the streets of bangkok the ruling party has most favor and most ties behind them. because you see these tens of thousands of people on the streets of bangkok and what they do is that perception but if there were an election again tomorrow the same party would be ruling the country. >> same party in power and scott is live in bangkok and thanks
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for being with us this morning. coming up, how many shopping in your slippers? millions of americans are gearing up for cyber monday and plus dealing with diabetes a small country where one in four people have the disease. exploring an under ground treasure in italy, a water supply system created almost 2000 years ago. ♪
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power of the people until we restore our freedo
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♪ despite deep discounts and longer store hours, holiday shopping slumped during thanksgiving weekend. the decline is the first since the recession in 2009. spending in stores and online fell back 4% compared to last year and that is according to the national retail federation. purchases in stores fell by 9%. and about 141 million americans shopped in stores or online in the four-day span. meanwhile spending online today is expected to smash records even though many americans will still be on the job.
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because it's cyber monday. a survey said half of workers plan to holiday shop while they are on the clock, not me. they will spend an hour or so shopping at work but be aware 7% of the human resource managers say they fired an employee for holiday shopping so online shoppers be aware. few places will be busy as amazon.com fulfillment centers and sarah is at a center in phoenix and live with more on cyber shopping, sarah, tell us what is happening? >> well, morgan, imagine getting 300 orders per second is what happened on amazon.com last year and this year they and other online retailers are expecting an even bigger cyber monday. forget shop until you drop, today it's click until you quit. cyber monday will bring in $2 billion in sales. >> we think this holiday will be
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our best ever. >> reporter: at the amazon.com fulfillment center it's boxes as far as the eye can see and people and machines working in tandem to get them all packed, addressed and out the door. >> we are hiring 20,000 more seasonal workers than last year. announcer: santa may not be able to handle cyber monday deliverers and fedex can and will send out 22 million packages. >> we have to plan for it year round but we are ready. >> reporter: sales were not impressive in 2005 when it was coined by the national retail federation and it was the 10th on line sales day but fast forward to today it is expected to be number one. >> no lines. >> reporter: advantages of knocking off the holiday shopping list with a few key strokes. this is the floor at the
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amazon.com fulfillment center, amazon.com has about 200 million customers worldwide and expect to see these ramps very, very full and turns out the early bird gets the worm and majority of people who will shop this monday will do so first thing when they wake up. >> thanks for being with us this morning, sarah. and speaking of amazon the e commerce pioneer who founded amazon wants to get purchases to customers in just half an hour and the company is testing drones which you see right here that would actually air lift packages to buyers and calling it primary and use the aircraft he called octo-copters and could happen in four years. the first full session since thanksgiving and stock futures are flat after friday. the dow jones opened 16086 and s
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f and p 1805 and nasdaq above the key 4,000 market and european markets are lowerer and in asia markets closed lower after chinese mafging barely expanding in november. and comcast is looking for a way to unlock ad dollars. the largest u.s. cable operator is testing technology that inserts new commercials into past episodes of on-demand tv shows and it's being developed with nielson and could help generate more advertising revenue. what temperatures will we see across the nation today with nicole mitchell. >> we are going to see some of our warmest temperatures of the whole week is what you have this morning if you are walking out the door in billings, 40 is not bad and said the bottom was
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going to fall out and it will be going down today and tomorrow and eventually sub zero and enjoy the 40s while we have them and mild in the south and 50s and 60s and the rest of the day the south is going to be the warm spot of the country with temperatures 10-15 degrees above average, 77 degrees in houston, 61 all the way up into memphis. we have a couple days of this before we get more back to reality. i mention the temperatures contrast as we get in the northwest and already by tomorrow 40 degrees this morning in billings, tomorrow the high of 17, that might be after midnight with the temperatures continuing to fall. back to you. >> thanks, nicole. walking a diplomatic tightrope, biden on a delicate mission to the far east and shrelanka, a small country with a big problem, one fourth of the people are suffering from diabetes and we will tell you what is being done about the health crisis.
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raising a glass to a new business detroit. the first distillery in more than 100 years. >> i'm mark morgan, the college playoff system starts next system and the final year of bcs could provide more than its share of controversy and i will explain later in sports. right now you are looking at a live picture of the train derailment that happened yesterday effecting 26,000 commuters there in the new york city area. ♪
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>> al jazeera america is a straight-forward news channel. >> its the most exciting thing to happen to american journalism in decades. >> we believe in digging deep. >> its unbiased, fact-based, in-depth journalism.
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>> you give them the facts, dispense with the fluff and get straight to the point. >> i'm on the ground every day finding stories that matter to you. >> in new orleans... >> seattle bureau... >> washington... >> detroit... >> chicago... >> nashville... >> los angeles... >> san francisco... >> al jazeera america, take a new look at news. >> primetime news. >> welcome to al jazeera america. >> stories that impact the world, affect the nation and touch your life. >> i'm back. i'm not going anywhere this time. >> primetime news: weeknights at 8 and 11 eastern. only on al jazeera america. ♪ welcome back to al jazeera america, i'm morgan live from new york city and these are some of the top stories we are following for you at this hour. federal investigators are trying to figure out why a train derailed in new york city
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killing four passengers and looking attack conditions, speed and why the engineer may have triggered the emergency brakes. plus the white house says the obamacare website is finally running more smoothly. healthcare.gov can now handle 50,000 users all at the same time. with a sign up deadline just ahead this month it will face a very big check up coming soon. and a political crisis is growing in thailand. protesters in bangkok were hit with tear gas and water canons and calling for the prime minister to step down. a series of explosions at a funeral kills at least ten people in iraq. the bombs went off while they were burying the body of their son and no claim of responsibility in the attack. november was a very violent month in iraq and hundreds were killed and the u.n. says there has been a surge in
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execution-style attacks. more than 8,000 people have been killed since the beginning of this year and in november alone more than 500 civilians and 100 security forces were killed. chance of any friend of america is a traitor and hundreds of protesters called for a stop to u.s. drone strikes and demonstrators burned a likeness of president obama and the protest was staged by the defense of pakistan council and alliance of religious and political parties. meanwhile vice president joe biden begins a delicate diplomatic mission today and due to arrive in japan hoping to ease tensions in the bitter dispute with china and we report. >> they look like an army, they even act like an army but they are not a real army. these troops are from japan's self-defense force on training
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exercise earlier this year. but under japan's constitution they can only fire to defend themselves. with japan's larger neighbor china asserting itself internationally questions are being asked whether japan should rethink the role of the armed forces and china's declaration this week of a defense zone over the east china sea is making it all the more urgent. the prime minister has been pushing mps all year to change the path of his constitution. long-term defense guide lynn also be introduced in december and a national security council will meet for the first time after joe biden's visit. some hope biden's visit will harold a new relationship with the u.s. especially since china's announcement of the defense zone. >> translator: the united states took firm action against china's reckless behavior and
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could make our relationship even closer and may help establish the kind of relationship fit for true allies. >> reporter: the timing of biden's visit couldn't have come at a better time for tokyo. some observers say china is forcing a major transition in the region's power, balance and existed since world war ii. >> they could not challenge status quo but in resent years the military has grown in power and i think that is why china has began to challenge the regional order, the problems in the east and south china seas are such examples. >> reporter: the challenge is how to play their hand as china gives out mixed signals over the air defense zone and china said on friday japan was the main target of the new zone but defense ministers also stated it's neither a no fly zone nor
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territorial air space and can biden discover the reasons behind china's power play? only a gambling man would lay money on what china is thinking and no one is taking any bets, stephanie with al jazeera. >> reporter: the vice president's next step also be china and then he heads to south korea. the 85-year-old american being held in north korea is in good condition and a diplomate was allowed to see him and he was taken off an airliner a month ago after visiting the country as a tourist and served in the korean war and authorities are holding him to investigate war crimes and he was shown on television reading what north korean officials said was an apology but the u.s. is calling for his immediate release. a 9th body found in the wreckage
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and more may be found and estimate 120 people were at a pub on friday when a chopper went through the roof. freezing rain is blamed for a pile up on a massachusetts interstate and 65 cars and 3 tractor-trailers crashed on i-290 and 35 people needed hospital treat treatment and the highway is finally open again. strikes are going to be taken across the country and they are demanding higher pay and calling for one day strikes in 100 cities including pittsburgh, charleston, south carolina and new york and want hourly wages raised from the minimum which is $7.25 to $15. they say wage hikes would force lay offs. the world diabetes congress convenes tuesday in australia and will focus on the surge in type two diabetes and one
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country is facing a crisis level number of cases and that is shelanka and we have the story. >> reporter: and he looks like any 15-year-old but diabetes changed her life. after being diagnosed at 11 she has to check her blood and take injections before every meal to control her sugar levels. >> translator: i get bad headaches, breakout into a sweat and mostly feel lifeless, going to school is difficult sometimes. i missed the last term test because my sugar levels dropped. >> reporter: and she is one of two million diabetics and glucose is the main energy source for the body and absorbed from the blood using insulin and it doesn't happen effectively and the result, there is too much sugar left in the blood. the exact cause of diabetes is not yet known but the risk
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factors include being overweight, lack of exercise, family history, stress and an unhealthy diet. diet risks, a study by the national diabetes and kings college in london say 20% of people have abnormal blood sugar levels and said the population cannot afford to get ill as there is no cure. >> the expense factor and hospitalization factor and amputations and blindness, all of that will just overtake us and our people will not be able to cope. >> reporter: complications caused by diabetes can effect the eyes, the brain, the kidneys, the heart, the feet and the nervous system. health authorities say prevention is the best way to fight the disease. >> we will bring legislation on that as a regulation so once we
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get that food items cannot have more salt, more sugar, that is being restricted. >> reporter: the study has found the chances of developing diabetes can be cut by 39% if people change their lifestyles. health professionals say such lifestyle changes and hundreds of thousands of people face everyday, al jazeera columbo. >> the american diabetes association says the disease reached epidemic levels right here in the u.s. there are 25.8 million americans living with diabetes. and only 18.8 million have been diagnosed. that means that 7 million people in the u.s. have diabetes and they don't even know it. researchers say energy drinks can change the way your heartbeats, one hour after downing an energy drink 18 people were monitored by
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scientists at german university and there was a problem with returning oxygen back to the body because of the high caffeine content in the drinks. and speaking of high energy the dust is settling after a very wild weekend in football and our mark morgan is here in sports to tell us about it. >> high energy referring to me or what happened in college football? >> let's bring you in. >> in the last few weeks of the season we have a curve ball and interesting to see how it shakes out. number one alabama falling to auburn in the amazing finish in the iron ball saturday there is a new number one and two and florida top and they were high and they squeaked by michigan needing to stop a two-point conversion and auburn has the tigers third and the tie goes to
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fourt and missouri is now fifth. and chris davis returned the missed field goal attempt 100 yards against alabama it kept a crazy college football weekend and set the stage for discussion about which two teams should be in the national title game. auburn faces missouri in the sec championship game this womaning weekend and seems the winner of the weekend will need a loss by florida or ohio state and they play duke in the acc championship and buckeyes go against michigan and the question may become this, does a one loss sec team deserve to jump over an undefeated team from another conference, let the arguing begin. turning to nfl and by peyton manning in front of a crowd in kansas city and they were leading and manning heated up
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and got a receiver involved and decker caught four td tosses on the day and four catch force the season entering the game and 8 grabs for and the totals 22 for 35 and 403 and 5 touchdowns and picked off twice and 41 td for the season and nfl record is 50 by tom brady setback in 2007, broncos win the game 35-28. meanti meantime texas and 22 carries and 20 yards for one of three touchdowns and up and taking notes. this goes back and forth on quarterback keeper and houston 24-21 lead and patriots answer fourth quarter and still taking notes and blunt powers in from 7 yards out and 28-24 ekland and tate puts houston up, ebb and
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flow but patriots tie it with a field goal and with three minutes left, 53 a gain, new england wins 43-31 handing the texas the 10th straight loss. remember in june the indiana pacers lost game 7 on the road to the miami heat and this season the pacers want to host a game 7 in the early season play says they are serious of the east best record. indiana facing the clippers in la and watch a move without the ball and drains and led by 7 and george knocks it down and 4-10 and george finished with 27 points, 6 rebounds and 5 assists and less than five minutes to go and down two and crawford and dow son for the finish and tied it 94. pacers up 102-100 and drives the base line and misses a couple
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tips and stevenson and he is fouled and seals it 105-100 is the end and best 16-1. i'm mark morgan for the here. >> peyton manning can't be beat. >> it's like a video game but it's interesting if they go on the road to maintain that performance. >> can he beat brady's record. >> i think he will and he is nine short with four games to play. >> we will have it to see and thanks for sports. same sex couples are marrying today in hawaii and ceremonies started at midnight and hope the change will boost annual tourism revenues but as much as $200 million. hawaii was the 7th state to legalize same sex marriages just this year. a fallen star of the fast and furious movies is remembered as a pop icon. . >> your chance to make the family whole again and give us
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full pardons all the way around. >> reporter: he was killed in a car crash and the driver of the porsche lost control and there was candles at the crash scene and he was on his way to a charity event and a sequel have been put on hold. and bob dillon is being sued, accused of racism. a group in france is angry about a quote in magazine on told "rolling stones" that blacks can sense if a white person has a klan master in their family as surfs can sense the blood. they have a long-standing conflict and european speech laws are much stricter than the u.s. which means he can be sued in france. the popularity of locally brewed liquor is growing and in detroit is the first in nearly 100 years and we report with al jazeera.
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>> two james spirits and is a company in the business of making liquor and gin and vodka and whiskey are specialities. >> that bubbling is just co 2 coming off the top. >> reporter: this is the first time liquor has been legally produced in detroit since prohibition nearly a century ago. when state lawmakers adopted the new law in 2008 it opened the door for entrepreneurs like andrew moore to invest. >> and we are honored to bring back distilling history and get back to roots of the history and spirits. >> reporter: when it was established a year and a half ago the owners considered locations all across the country. but they say detroit stood apart from the rest. >> there is an energy within the city just with people moving down here, new businesses, so i think we kind of put all those
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factors together and it was clear that detroit was the right place. >> reporter: invested $1 million in the company and turned this taxi house into a craft liquor brewing operation with a full staff front the ingredient to the packaging everything is local. some economist estimate the distillery business has the potential to boost the state economy by hundreds of millions of dollars. like many new businesses coming to detroit the city's financial issues did not deter them from setting up shop and some see obstacles and to james cofounder peter bailey sees opportunity. >> this craft distilling movement might help diversify agriculture in michigan even further as we start to grow collectively. >> their investment on a neighborhood on the rebound is welcome by many who live here. right now they are on pace to produce over 3,000 cases of premium liquor this year. in a warehouse where the aroma
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is literally intoxicating, these entrepreneurs see a future where the glass is always at least half full. bc with al jazeera, detroit. >> reporter: there are about 350 distillerys right here in the united states. they were built by the romans but are still in use today. how technology is looking into the past to map italy's under ground aquaducts. and blasting off on a mission to the moon, what chinese scientists hope to learn when their rover makes an lunar landing. >> and this means falling temperatures and winter storm warnings that are spreading in the midwest, we will have the details. these are live pictures right now coming in from tie land where protests calling for the prime minister to resign turned violent over the weekend and clashes with police continue today. this is the scene right now
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in, ukraine and they are up set about the government's failure to sign trade agreements with the european union. ♪ >> and now, a techknow minute..ñ
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welcome back to al jazeera america, i'm morgan ratford live from new york city, the high-tech tools archeologists are using to discover buried remnants of rome and let's look at the snow and rain across the country today with metrologist nicole mitchell. >> a lot of people are starting back today after a long holiday weekend and hope the weather would cooperate more but we have some trouble spots out here. the broad picture and big player is the low pressure into the northwest and some of the energy making it into the midwest with areas of rain and snow and the temperatures that are just going to be dropping. we will get to more on that but anywhere oklahoma and texas it's hard to pick up on the radar but there is that low clouds and the fog and very dense and making driving a little tough this morning as well. and into other parts of the south, some rain, heavy at times moving from alabama into georgia
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so watch for that and may make for a slow go. as i said the big player is the storm system bringing not only the areas of snow and brought some decent amounts of rain to the west coast but those temperatures they are really going to be dropping over the next couple days and the warnings associated with this are spreading and have more on the storm system in a couple minutes and back to you. >> armed with 21st century technology a group of scientists are mapping rome's ancient tunnels and waterways and some were carved by roman engineers 2000 years ago and al jazeera claudia brings us an inside look. >> a downward spiral into ancient rome where history makes 21st century technology. this group of archeologists is busy mapping one of the 11 under ground aquaducts built during ancient roman times and using state of the art technology like
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3d scanners and remote control and laser beams they want to shed light on the network of the undergroundwater ways. >> translator: the path of many aquaducts is not known because the ancient romans wanted to protect waterways by building these under ground to prevent enemies from cutting water supplies. >> reporter: and most ancient aquaducts did not survive the test of times water flows nicely next to the spanish steps and it was built in the year 19 before christ supply and sent rome with water the source is kilometers away and thousands of years later it's in use and the path and structure remain a bit of a mystery. this is where the water flows into, some of rome's most famous fountains, a celebration of the abundance of water that allowed rome to prosper and conquer the
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world. a few miles from the center of rome the aquaduct cloud is a symbol of roman engineering ingenius and one of the aquaducts mapped by an archeologist who drew a map of this in the 1920s and a starting point for today's archeologist. >> translator: and he traveled on foot or chariots and asking locals and farmers for signs of the aquaducts and we are continuing this with modern technology to track back 2000 years of history. >> reporter: a history that still runs through this backbones of the roman empire and al jazeera, rome. >> reporter: they are just one of the many contributions from ancient rome and first used concreates and paved roads and highways and innovation in
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literature including the first newspaper and bound books and they are accredited with building the blocks for welfare and legal systems as well. china has a mission to the moon in the space race. there you have it. an unmanned rocket launched sunday and it's carrying an lunar rover expected to land on the moon in just two weeks. the rover which is called jade rabbit will carry out specific experiments in search of natural resources. if the mission is successful china will be the third to carry out a soft landing on the moon and so far the u.s. and former soviet union have done it. india is passing the moon and going to mars, a space craft has officially left the earth's atmosphere and head around the sun for 10 months to build up
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speed and sling shot to the red planet and the project cost around $73 million, that is $350 million less than a u.s. space craft that was left for mars two weeks ago and stephanie has a look at what is coming up, in our next hour. >> good morning, ntsb is investigating the cause of a train derailment in new york city that killed four and injured hundreds of others and shut down a line that 26,000 people use each day. obama administration said the health website has been fixed and can handle 50,000 visitors at once. the white house said the site is working more than 90% of the time. antigovernment protests in thailand, ukraine and egypt are violent and all three countries they used tear gas and rubber bullets against the crowds. owning an original picassi for
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$100 and the painting master will be here to tell us about the opportunity and more on the mission to mars and becoming the third country to land on the lunar surface. i'm mark morgan and what may be bad news for the afc peyton manning has another offensive weapon and details ahead in sports. i'm nicole mitchell and we could have the coldest air in over a decade, i'll have the chilling national forecast. that is going to do it for this hour of al jazeera america. i'm morgan and stephanie sy is back with you in just 2 1/2 minutes. an america tonight special report. as states try to save money, are prisoners paying the price? >> what are you talking about, he's dead. >> an exclusive investigation into prison health care.
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>> this isn't a new channel, this is a watershed moment in media for america. >> this entire region is utterly devastated. >> people our here are struggling. >> the fire jumped the highway we took earlier. >> your average viewer want's to actually understand how the health care law is going to help them or hurt them. >> they know they can get extremist bickering somewhere else. >> people say that we're revolutionary. our revolution is just going back to doing the best in journalism. >> this is the place to go watch high quality journalism, period.
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>> investigators hope the data recorder recovered from the new york train derailment holds clues as to the cause. >> a day after anti-government protests in ukraine turn violent, police keep protestors at bay. >> the white house says healthcare.gov is running more smoothly. now it faces a new task as last minute users scramble to meet this month you see deadline. >> for a few hours, just back to what we've always had. it's been a huge comfort. >> a small sense of normalcy after devastating floods in colorado.
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a popular watering hole reopens once a week so neighbors can get together. >> good morning. welcome to aljazeera america. this morning, 26,000 commuters in the new york city area must find another way to get to work after the deadly train derailment at bronx, which left four dead and dozenses injured. the train jumps the tracks heading from the bronx to manhattan. ntsb investigators are on the scene. what's the status right now of those train cars? how are they being removed? >> we will come to that in a second.
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let me remind our viewers that the hudson line is one of the busier commuter railroads in the world. 26,000 people a day ride the rails into from upstate. many are told today at least to stay at home. this comes almost 24 hours after the rail crash here that killed four people, injured 63, 11 of them seriously. >> we were going fast when it hit the curve. it was flying. >> the train was 20 minutes from its destination. new york city's central station when in an instant, all seven cars came off the tracks. >> there were people screaming, crying out to god and asking for their family approximate it was pretty grizzly. >> the four that died were ejected from the train. another 60 were injured. >> we have evidence of people under a couple of cars. we used air bags to lift the
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car. >> for residents along the route, there was no mistaking what was happening. >> it sounded like a plane crash that kept going on and on, the buckling sound of the car hitting each other. >> many were shocked at the thanksgiving holiday ending in such a tragic way. >> i saw a dead body. they covered it with a white sheet. it's just breath taking. >> with a search that included cadaver dogs and divers, all crew members were accounted for. the injured, many flipped and tossed inside the train cars were taken to nearby hospitals. the national transportation safety board has begun the task of piecing together what went wrong, including weather speed was a factor. >> we don't know the train speed. incidentally, we have recovered the event recorder off the cab car. >> the investigation will also focus on the train's operator,
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who was injured, as well. officials from the metropolitan francis authority reported the operator said the train was going too fast in the turn and he performed a maneuver known as dumping, only used in catastrophic circumstances. >> trains take the curve 365 days a year. it's not the fact that there's a curve here, so there has to be another factor. >> by nightfall, the crews had installed floodlights and begun the process of removing the continualled trains and raring the tracks, a job continuing into today. disrupting the commute for thousands of passengers, others come to grips with how a simply early morning train ride could go terribly wrong.
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>> there's just no reason for it. >> i think that that is one of the saddest elements of this tragedy, because you've got to believe of the 150 or so people on the train with, many had been in upstate new york cell braying thanksgiving with their families and they were coming back to the city after a what hopefully for them was a happy thanksgiving weekend that they could spend together. stephanie, to answer your question, the status of the carriages is that the ntsb has allowed the disease sell engine to be righted, it's back on the rails this morning. and at least two, possibly three other carriages, no the four in front. that will happen sometime later today or tomorrow. >> what else can you tell us about these four victims? >> the victims' names came out and we have pictures of two of
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them. first, donna smith is 54 years old. the other victims were james ferrari, 59 frommont rose and it this 5-year-old an kisic from queens if that james love very well is 58, came from cold spring. he was an and you had dough and lighting engineer traveling on that train to work on the christmas tree at the rockefeller center. friends say he was going in to prepare that huge giant christmas tree for illumination in a couple of weeks' time. that that was the job he was going to do. unfortunately because of this train crash, he never made it to that job. >> thank you, john. >> the ntsb is just beginning its investigation. aljazeera's lisa stark is following that part of the story. what is the first step when looking into a crash like this?
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>> the ntsb has organized itself into six investigative teams. it will look at the track itself, from the cars to the operator, the mechanical system, such as the breaking system 31 of the first priorities will be getting the data from those event recorders. there were two on this train, one in the locomotive and one in the cab car which was up front. those recorders will be able to tell how fast it was traveling, if it did try to apply the brakes. they want the to interview the crew. they hope to do that today or tomorrow. the operator did survive. he was injured. educated that he tried to apply the brakes, that the train was coming into the curve quickly and he tried to apply the brakes. they want to see what that operator has to say. the speed in that part of the rail should have been 30 miles
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an hour. the train would have needed to slow from 70-mile an hour on the straight away to that 30 miles an hour. did that happen? investigators will be back on the rails today to try to look at the rails and the crumbled cars themselves to see what they can learn from that. >> ok. lisa stark reporting to us from washington. thank you. >> metro north has been working to prevent accidents. we have a look at some prior accidents in the mta history. >> it carries more than 82 million people a year, which is the busiest in the country. it's part of new york's metropolitan transportation authority. it is a system of subways, buses and commuters trains. the deadliest crash was in 1918 when a subway driver lost control in brooklyn. the last time passengers were killed in an m.t. the a. crash
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was 1991 when five died and another 200 injured when a train derailed in manhattan. the driver was drunk and later convicted of manslaughter. sunday's accident is the second derailment for metro north in the past six months. in may, a train went off the tracks in bridgeport, can i cut and then got hit by another tehran. 75 people were injured. back to you, stephanie. >> joining us to discuss the possible next steps in the investigation is portuguese, a former managing director of the ntsb. the most important piece of quilt is the event recorder. there are two on the train. they pulled those last night. they'll be looking at those.
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these are not as complex as the black boxes on aircraft, but will tell the speed of the train and how and when brakes were applied. they'll look at equipment, track and most importantly, human performance. >> not to speculate at all into the cause, but one of the issues that has come up in previous accidents of this nature has been sort of distracted driving. how do investigators look into that aspect? >> absolutely. the issue of weather the engineer or the operator was paying attention to his job is critical, and there have been a number of fatal accidents in the past few years on r.s in which the operators were using personal devices, cell phones, they were texting, and not paying attention to their tasks. they will pull all cell records, look at -- they'll grill the operator to see what he was doing just prior to the event
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taking place. they'll also look -- i'm sorry. >> they'll look at what the operator was doing for the past 72 hours, to see whether he had gotten the appropriate rest, whether he was fatigued, whether he was ready to do his job yesterday morning. >> will cell phone records from the crew as well as the engineer also play into that? >> absolutely. they want to see what the crew was doing, what the engineer was doing, whether people were following the rules. >> what about possible linkages? there have been other issues with specifically the metro north line just this year. how does the n.t.s.b. establish whether there are linkage it is in these accidents. >> you're right. just within the last month, metro north participated in a two day hearing in the ntsb focusing on that accident back in may. they admitted to they had allowed maintenance and track
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rare to slip. the ntsb will look carefully to see whether maintenance or track issues played any role in this accident. >> i understand they're going to be on the scene for seven to 10 days. it could take months for a final report to come on you. how broad is the scope of an ntsb investigation. would it look into the organizational structure and how this line and other train lines are run by the m.t.a.? >> absolutely. the ntsb follow little the facts. if it looks as though there were were administrative lapses and oversight, some degree of issues concerning training, they will follow the facts, they'll follow the issues. the report should take just about a year to complete, but they are very likely to have a hearing on this accident within three to six months. >> all right.
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former managing director of ntsb, mr. gold, thanks for coming in this morning. >> thank you, stephanie. >> egyptian police fired tear gas at demonstrators. the protestors set fire to a police car. the students are angry about the death of an engineering student. clashes erupted in tahrir square. it was the largest gathering there in months. there have been far fewer demonstrations since new restrictions on protests were passed a week ago. >> anti-government protests in n ukraine entered a second week. protestors occupy government buildings. they are angry about the president's refusal to sign trade agreements with the european union. we have more from key every. >> as you can see independence square behind me is still full of protestors. they've been blockading the square, making sure all the
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police barriers that were used to keep them out of the square are now used by them to keep the police out. all the government buildings in key every are blockaded. there has been one development here at the initiative of the parliamentary speaker. there were round table talks between the government and the opposition leaders. the only thing that came out of that was a demand by the opposition that parliament should dissolve the cabinets tomorrow. that's unlikely to happen, because the president has the majority in parliament. the stand out of is continuing, news on the nationwide general strike that's being called, three areas in the west of the country, the west of ukraine, right on the border with europe have actually come out in response to that call and we
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expect more regions to join them as the week continues. >> an anti-government demonstration takes a violent turn in thailand. police fired water cannons and rubber bullets at protestors. the prime minister has told the country she will do anything to stop the violence, but cannot accept the demands of protestors. we have more from bangkok. >> a battle for control of thigh land is waged on two fronts, anti-government protestors are trying to enter the office the prime minister and headquarters of the metro police. the rubbish truck was used to try to break through the concrete barriers erected by the police. it and its occupants were sent into a quick retreat, tear gas spewing from the cab. protestors want the government and prime minister gone.
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she said she is willing to do anything to end the crisis. >> last night, after we met him, we found he isn't interested in the resignation of the prime minister. he wants me to return the power of the prime minister to the people. i don't know how we can proceed with this offer, because this provision doesn't exist under constitutional law, so that's why. it doesn't mean that we say no, but this negotiation, we don't know how to make it happen. >> in the meantime, the immediate aims of those fighting here are far clearer and more specific. >> in areas like this, it is not a crowd dispersal operation. it is a case of the protestors using whatever and doing whatever they can to push inside that area, and the police are heading their lines. >> as well as tear gas, rubber bullets and water cannon laced
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with chemicals are used. anyone caught unprepared is brought to a stand still. the defenses are crude, plastic bags so they don't breathe it in. the assault seems to be making little headway. aljazeera, bangkok. >> three people were killed over the weekend there and dozens more have been injured in the protests. the 85-year-old american held in north korea is in good condition according to a swedish diplomat who visited him. he was arrested more than a month ago after a tourist visit. just as he was about to take leave on an airliner, he was arrested. authorities say they are holding him to investigate war crimes. he was shown on north korean television reading what korean officials say was an apology. the u.s. is calling for his immediate release. >> vice president joe biden begins a delicate diplomatic
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mission today. he is due to arrive in japan, hoping to ease tensions in his bitter dispute with china. biden is looking to finalize a trade pact. he will make stops in china and south korea. >> the federal health care web sigh has relaunched. the white house said it is different from when it first opened up to the public. we explain more about how the website is working now. >> for starters, the obama administration met its deadline over the weekend and now says the website is working more than 90% of the time, up significantly from only 40% when it first launched. president obama's special advisor in charge of fixing the site said it is night and day from where it was on october 1. the site has a lower error rate of fewer than 1% and enough capacity to handle 50,000
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visitors at once. if it's too busy, there is a virtual waiting room that will email you when it's less crowded. republicans talked about how obamacare is a problem for americans, while democrats focused on the dramatic progress of the website, saying the obama administration hit the big benchmarks it said it would. >> 50,000 people at one time, 800,000 people a day. look, this is going to take sometime before it's up and kicking in full gear. >> 15% of the population didn't have health insurance when this started roughly. we think that number was closer to 10. what they've done is disrupted it for the 85% that had health care and their costs are going up significantly, so we've broken the system to help a few. >> the white house says enrollment jumped from 30% to 80%, but they're still calling it a work in progress. >> you logged on to the website
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this morning. is it faster, working better? >> yes. i did it back on october 1 when it was very rocky and slow you. noticed immediately that clicking through the pages was very fast. the true test of how well this new and improved healthcare.gov will really come in the next few weeks. there is a december 23 deadline. people need to meet the deadline on december 23 to have coverage kick in on january 1. >> parts of the u.s. are set to see a big drop in temperatures. for more, let's bring in meteorologist nicole mitchell. good morning. >> as you mentioned, we have all this moisture pushing on the coast. what we're going to see with that is the moisture is already causing problems. rain, snow, freezing precipitation, but this front is going to be the most dramatic change. some places expect to see the
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coldest temperatures in if you know years. i am not over emphasizing how cold this is going to be. as all of this moves in and the cold air moves in, more of this will convert to snow. the winds in some cases could gust over 50 miles an hour. you can sigh the temperatures warm a little for the midwest today, but all right by tuesday, the overnight temperatures continue to drop through the day. our temperatures will be going down the next couple of days even during the day time hours. when we see the temperature drops, 17 in billings is early in the morning. by later in the day, we could see temperatures below zero. you add in the wind chills or the wind factor, and that means
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20 degrees to 30 degrees below zero is what it will feel like in your skin. livestock or animals outdoors, make sure they have plenty of water. it's very easy to dehydrate. >> outrage over drone strikes. thousands gather in the streets of pakistan demanding -- making demands that the u.s. stop its air outusing that controversial aircraft to oh boost business. one major retailer is looking to give drones a new use. >> 141 million people. that's our big number of the day. how it factors into the holiday shopping season and why you the may not be enough to help retailers.
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>> roughly 141 million people, it's their big number of the day and how many americans are estimated to have shopped in stores and on line during the four day thanksgiving holiday. despite that large figure, deep discounts and large are store
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hours, shopping slumped. the decline is the first since the recession in 2009. spending in stores and on line fell 4% compared to last year. purchases in stores fell by 9%. spending on line todd is expected to smash records, even though many americans will be on the for signer monday. all workers plan to holiday shop on the clock. more than a third will spend an hour or more shopping while at work. 7% of human resource managers say they've fired an employee for holiday shopping. we're getting numbers on how much we suspended on line before today's big rush. sales were up 21% to three quarters of a billion dollars. on black friday, they were 15% higher, hitting $1.2 billion. on line sales jumped 17% both days. we'll have more business headlines, including how amazon is looking to get packages to
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you. let's look at what temperatures we can expect to see across the nation todd. nicole mitchell is back. >> hope everyone is off to a great monday after all that holiday shopping or your holiday travels. the northwest and into the midwest, temperatures, billings at 38 degrees. this is the warmest we're probably going to be for a week. this will keep dropping. enjoy it as you're headed out the door. a lot of the country is pretty mild as we start off this morning. we are going to have changes in the days ahead. one warm spot heading toward the saw the, always warmer than the northern tier of the country. houston is warmer than average this time of the year. billings, tomorrow morning at 17 degrees and those continues drop through the day. it really is going to be getting
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a lot colder. >> checking this morning's other business headlines now, the e commerce pie nears said his company is test i can drones that would airlift packages to buyers, calling it prime air. it would use aircraft he calls octo copte rear-view mirror s. >> >> wall street heads its first full session since thanksgiving. the record setting rally fizzled friday with, dow futures rising. the s&p stands at 1,805,000.
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overseas, european markets are lower. investigators are cautious after key manufacturing data out of the euro region. >> searching for a cause, what factors may have been behind the new york city train derailment that killed four. croatia weighs in on same-sex marriage at the ballot box. recovering in colorado, how one community is staying in touch after devastating floods tore their town apart. >> i'm mark morgan. the college football playoff season starts next season and it looks like the final year the b.c.s. may have more of its share of controversy. i'll explain later in sports.
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>> and join the conversation online @ajamstream. determining using some sort of subjective interpretation of their policy as to whether or not your particular report was actually abusive, because if it doesn't contain language that specifically threatens you directly or is targeted towards you specifically, they may not consider it abuse. they may consider it offensive. and in that case they just recommend that you block that person. >> i don't want to minimise this, because i mean, there's some really horrible things that are on line, and it's not - it's not just twitter, what has happened through social media
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and the anonymity of the net is that you see websites, hate-filled websites targetting all sorts of groups, popping up. there has been a huge number of those that exist as well. >> evey sunday night, join us for exclusive, revealing, and suprizing talks with the most interesting people of our time. this sunday, >> i spent my whole life thinking about themes and thinking about how to structure movies, so this is highly unusual. >> the director of the sixth sense, says there are five things we can do to fix education in america >> the united states has education apartheid, that's the facts... >> talk to al jazeera with m. night shayamalan sunday at 7et / 4pt on al jazeera america
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>> good morning. welcome to aljazeera america. i'm stephanie sy. here's a look at the top stories we are following this morning. a political crisis is growing in thailand. protestors in bangkok were hit with tear gas and water cannon. they are calling for the prime minister to step down. the white house said the obamacare website is rung more smoothly, handling 50,000 users at the same time. with the sign up deadline just ahead this month, it will face a big test in the coming weeks. >> federal investigators are trying to figure out why a train derailed in new york city, killing four. they are looking at track conditions, speed and why the engineer might have triggered the emergency brakes. ntsb former director told us how it will unfold. >> we have a team for signals, a
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team for rail, how many performance, operations and survival factors. those were plans put together last evening and hope to accomplish those today. we'll have another progress meeting this evening. >> that train was headed to new york's grand central terminal. that's where we are this morning, tracking the delays. good morning, jennifer. any idea when the trains will be back up and running? >> no, stephanie. if you talk to the n.c.a., the metropolitan transit authority that runs the line here, they say it's closed until further notice. 26,000 commuters usually run on that train every day. we've spoken to commuters who come in on the harlem line, they are running on time. there is a special shuttle bus service between yonkers and 242 street so that commuters can take the shuttle bus to get to the subway to get into the city.
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the m.t.s. is saying if you can sell lecommute, that would be great, stay home, or car pool into the city. so far, the rush hour is well underway and things seem to be running smoothly. >> investigators are trying to determine why a plane carrying 10 people crashed in western alaska. the pilot, two passengers and an infant were culled instantly. 125-year-old survivor was ail to crawl from the plane to get help. the other future people aboard survived. >> the second trial of a new orleans police officer is getting underway, jury select starting today in the case of david warren, accused in the 2010 killing of henry glover in the aftermath of hurricane katrina three years ago. he was found guilty of man
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slatter and sentenced to 26 years in prison when his conviction was reversed. >> same sex couples are marrying today in hawaii. officials hope the change will boost tour imrevenues. hawaii legalized same sex marriages this year. >> cheers and celebrations for the referendum on same-sex marriages. it is a landslide victory for those who wanted marriage to stay exclusively as a union between a man and a woman. >> i'm happy and proud, people have worked hard. i met thousands of people willing to sacrifice for their marriages and family. i'm sure it will bring more
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democracy and protection and good things for marriage and family in croatia. >> although some decided not to vote, many had something to see about the ref represented did you mean and the catholic church took an active role in campaigning against same-sex marriages. >> if we want to be true believers, it is our duty to vote for preservation of the sank tilt of marriage. for us, marriage is not just a union between people, but also one in which god is always present. >> after the referendum results are officially confirmed, constitution will outlaw same-sex marriage. these who worked hard to make is that happy of disappointed. >> we are not happy. this is the first time where one very disdiscriminatory provision will enter the constitution of
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croatia and will devalue the constitution. in article three, we state that all people are equal. >> the croation government did not want to see the constitution changed. it wanted to present the not justice itself, but the entire nation at progressive, liberal in the in the spirit of our european countries. it will be hard for the government to maintain that image. the majority of those who voted send a clear message that croatia is country of traditional values and some something people gather here to celebrate the referendum results would like to be recognized. >> with the results, croatia joins hungary, poland and other european nations in banning same-sex marriages, creating the division of a conservative east and more liberal west.
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>> crow arab that declared independence from yugoslavia in 1991. >> a ralph will take place in paris. one of 50,000 ticket holders will win an original picasso. a ticket cost $135, and this is not only to benefit art unthussives, but support a cultural initiative in a lebanese city heavily damaged by military conflicts. we are joined by a lawyer and t.v. producer and one of pablo picasso's grandchildren. >> this is scientifically and
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artistically delightful. >> it is something important, because he kept it in his private collection. >> do you have any idea how much it's worth? >> today it's worth something like $1 million. it's a good chance to get a picasso for a few money. >> i've got to sign up for this. it's literally $135, you can buy one ralph ticket. you're going to make 50,000 tickets available and whoever wins the drawing gets it. why are you doing this? >> first, it's really important to protect one of the most important places of our western civilization. it's where the alpha belt was in vented, it's beyond any cultural, religious or political
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ideas. it was important for me to be part of this. >> tell me a little bit about the city and has it been neglected? i now it is a world heritage site. >> it's always important to protect, and in this operation it is to create a handy craft village, create jobs for women and for people with disabilities. it's not only something cultural, it's something social, actual, something that helps people and a site. >> tell me about your grandfather and his legacy. i understand you were 12 years old when he died and you never had a chance to meet him, and yet you share his name and clearly care about his legacy. >> the thing is that when he died, i was given many answer to say questions i never wondered about. it took time for me to adopt
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this grandfather, understand his private life with so many women and artistic life with so many periods. it was a noose happening after this wonderful grandfather. >> what do you feel like the august and rehab attire, how would he see it? >> my grandfather was a pioneer in many senses, so today, the first time ever that ralph has opened eyes with a painting as a big prize. he would be very happy to be ahead of his time. >> thanks so much for joining us this morning. good luck with the option. to buy your own ralph ticket, go to the website. thank you. >> a fire at a chinese-run clothing factory in italy killed at least seven people. workers were trapped while sleeping in a dormitory on the site.
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authorities are investigating the cause. the fire is prompting questions about the safety of the factory and similar workshops. >> bangladesh is one of the world's poorest countries with some of the lowest wangs. dangerous conditions have been reported. we gained access to a densely 307 lated slum, home to more than 200 leather tanneries. >> of all the difficult, dirty, and dangerous jobs, bangladesh is due to oh survive, these men might just have the worst. they are tannery workers who labor day in and day out, >> muhammed says he's 14, but looks older. >> there are all these scars on my hands and legs. these injuries are never ending. >> he earns about $2 a day. the water they are wading in
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without protective clothing is laced with arsonic and chrome yum sulfate. these chemicals make the leather soft and supple, but cause festering source, respiratory diseases and fatal cancers. >> lung cancer, cancer of the nose, urinary bladder cancer. >> there are more than 200 tanneries. leather sales were worth nearly a billion dollars last year. >> this is a product used worldwide for leather boots. no one is looking after our health and safety. >> a survey done found that 90% of tannery workers die before the age of 50. >> for years, the bangladesh government has made promises, saying they'll move the
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tanneries out of this densely populated slum into a modern facility. so far, all of those promises have gone unfulfilled. >> government officials does not respond to aljazeera's repeated requests for an interview. despite the if it, taker and the stink, humid is resigned to life in the tanneries. >> i have no, nothing. i have no other way. >> there's a price paid in human misery in a far off place. >> the leather tanning industry remains a crucial part of the bangladesh economy, worth $1 billion each year. it employs more than 16,000 workers. >> the dust is settling after a wild weekend of football. we have sports. >> after next weekend, we still may have only two undefeated
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major college football powers and still may be arguing about who should play in the title games. does that make seven. >> it does. >> with number one alabama falling to auburn in that amazing finish in the iron bowl on saturday, the b.c.s. standings have shuted, boasting a new number one and a new number two. florida state moves into the top spot, the seminoles throttled florida 37-7. the buckeyes squeaked past michigan for the win. when auburn's chris davis returned a missed field goal attempt, 100 yards for the clinching touchdown for alabama, it capped a crazy college football weekend and set the stage for much discussion about which two teams should be in the national title game. auburn now faces missouri in the
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s.e.c. champion game. the winner of that contest will need a loss by ohio state or florida state to get in the title game. the question may become does a one loss s.e.c. team deserve to jump over an undefeated team from another conference. let the arguing begin. >> turning now to the nfl broncos, peyton manning found a new and somewhat under used target and placed him front and center. kansas city led 21-7 in the second quarter before manning heated up, getting another receiver involved in his offense, decker, catching four passes yesterday. he had four for the season entering the game. manning's totals 22-35 for
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403 yards and five touchdowns. he was picked off twice. denver wins 35-28. >> a big win because it was a division game. played them two weeks ago, close game, tough game and new coming here, that would be tough, as well. they're coming off of a disappointedding loss last week, we knew they'd give their best shot. they came out hot and made place early, had the kickoff return. we did a good job of persevering and handling that and making adjustments and able to take the lead and keep the lead. >> in charlotte, the panthers looking for their eighth straight win hosting tampa bay. brandon lafell, 16 yards in the touchdown, carolina up 7-3. panthers win 27-6.
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in the nba, the two time defending champion miami heat are flying below the radar, if that's possible. indiana has the best record in the league at 16-1, but the heat cruising along in the early part of the season. miami hosting the bobcats last night. lebron, they are contractually obligated to show you lebron, but chris botch was the story, finishing with 22. walker at the line, a miss and tip in a tie. walker accidentally makes the free-throw. the heat win it 99-98, winning 10 in a row. >> colorado communities are backing together to recover from the devastating floods there in september. jamestown, which is just northwest of denver was nearly
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destroyed. we find how residents there are bouncing back. >> the music is back, and with it, the people are slowly returning to this foot hills town in the rocky mountains. on saturday night, sips the september flood displaced residents gathered in the james town mercantile. >> once you come in here and the music's playing, you see all your friends and for a few hours, it's back to what we've always had. it's ban huge confident. >> i'm cooking tonight. >> many are now scattered across colorado, forced to live unother communities because their properties were destroyed. they come back to james town, traveling over flood-ravaged road once a week to share their stories. >> losing our house was quite a shock. >> more than 13 inches of rain turned the james creek into a monster. the flooding still haunts these hills. chad's hill is a total loss.
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>> i was here until the floodwaters actually started to come down the street. >> this will give you a good example of the damage. the foundation here was a home on that the other side of the creek. that home will never be rebuilt, but this entire community is determined to come back. for those who plan to rebuild, nearly a fifth of the towns homes and buildings were lost. >> the flooding literally destroyed this town, but our community wasn't scratched. >> some rebuilding is underway. it will take months if not years and millions of dollars in state and federal relief to recover. >> we come in, do this, clear this, move this. >> miraculously, only one person here had was lost in the storm. 72-year-old joey died when the floodwaters crashed through his home. >> if you needed anything, he was there. >> today, his spirit lives on with friends and family ho
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celebrate husband life every time they gather, knowing he'd be the first to pitch in a help rebuild. >> it's going to take a while until it looks beautiful again, but our community never stopped for a minute. >> today, only 20 of the nearly 300 residents of this town have returned. that number is expected to grow to 70 by the end of the year. aljazeera, jamestown, colorado. >> the resilience of one community. the flooding killed eight in colorado. >> questions about those pick me ups in a can. energy drinks, the warning on how they could affect your heart. >> making a push into the great beyond. china is looking to become the new leader in space exploration.
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>> and now a techknow minute...
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>> temperatures will plummet. i'll have more coming up on that. >> caffeinated energy drinks can change the way your heart beats. 18 people were monitored. they detected harder contractions in the section of the heart that returns oxygen to the body. the researchers say it's because
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of the high cough teen contents in the drinks. china is aiming for the high ground. the probe is expected to make a soft lunar landing in two weeks. >> named after an ancient chinese moon goddess, china hopes to land its probe at the bay of rain bows. it then plans to activa the rover. it is hold the vehicle will spend three months he can proceduring the lunar surface. >> the three objectives are to manage to soft land a craft on the moon, to in spect and probe the surface and control and communicate with the craft during the mission. onboard the craft, cameras, and a telescope will observe the stars. another will look at how solar
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radiation affects the earth. >> we can receive information about the working conditions, and image data. we use this information to send orders to control its function. >> in 1970, the soviet union put a roving robot on the moon. that was followed by apollo 15, making use of this moon buggy to move astronauts and equipment. this has ground radar to examine beneath the lunar surface. scientists hope that to understand that minerals exist. china wants to bring back a rock sample from the moon. manned missions could follow in
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2025. for now, the mission is to get to the moon and safely on to its surface. >> this is china's first moon mission, but its space program isn't the knew. it launched its first satellite in 1970. >> nasa has a probe orbiting the moon, studying its thin atmosphere. nasa worries the recovery will have a serious impact on their research. they hope the scientists from the two countries can work together on the issue, but currently cannot communicate with their chinese counter parts. >> the ntsb is investigating a derailment in new york city, shutting down a train line that 26,000 commuters use each day.
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>> the obama administration said the federal health care website is fixed, working more than 90% of the time. >> anti-government protests in thailand, ukraine and egyptian have turned violent, police using rubber bullets against the crowd. >> we'll have a preview of the trial of a police officer accused of shooting a man in the aftermath of katrina. >> peyton manning has found another offensive weapon. >> we'll be back with you in just two and a half minutes.
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>> this isn't a new channel, this is a watershed moment in media for america. >> this entire region is utterly devastated. >> people our here are struggling. >> the fire jumped the highway we took earlier. >> your average viewer want's to actually understand how the health care law is going to help them or hurt them. >> they know they can get extremist bickering somewhere else. >> people say that we're revolutionary. our revolution is just going back to doing the best in journalism. >> this is the place to go watch high quality journalism, period.
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>> investigators are trying to determine if speed played a role in the deadly train crash in new york city. four people were killed and dozens injured when the train went off the rail on a sharp curve. >> thailand's prime minister goes into hiding after anti-government protests spiral out of control. >> the white house says holt care.gov is running more smoothly but now faces a new test, an anticipated rush to sign up before this month's deadline. >> it'siner monday. many may be thinking about shopping on line at work. why some employers are not going to put up with that anymore.
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>> good morning, and welcome to aljazeera america. i'm stephanie sy. this morning, 26,000 commuters in new york city suburbs are looking for other ways to get to work. this after a train derailed sunday outside manhattan. the accident left four dead and dozens injured. ntsb investigators have recovered the train's data recorder and are now trying to determine why the train went off the rails. >> our mission is to understand not just what happened, but why it happened, with the in tent of preventing it from happening again. >> the train jumped the tracks just as it was getting ready to leave the bronx and cross into manhattan. the lead car ended up feet away from the hudson river. it happened along a curved section of track which is why
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investigators are trying to determine if excessive speed played a role. we are at the seen in the bronx. john, good morning. >> good morning to you. the hudson line is part of the metro network and one of the busiest commuter routes in the world. 26,000 people ride the ails every day into the city from upstate. now, we are approaching the 24 hours mark sips the train crashed, killing four, injuring 63, 11 seriously. >> going fast, as it hit the curve, it was flying. >> the train was 20 minutes from its destination, grand central station when all seven cars came off the traction and slid down a hill, landing inches from the hudson river. >> there was screaming and people crying out for god and asking for their families. >> three of the four who died were ejected from the train.
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another 60 people were injured. >> we have evidence of people under a couple of cars, so we used air bags to lift the car. >> for residents living along the route, there was no staking what was happening. >> it sounded like a plane crash that just kept going on and on. that buckling sound of the train, cars hitting each other. >> as police, fire and rescue crews arrived, many were shocked that the thanksgiving holiday ended in such a way. >> i saw a dead body. they covered it with a white sheet. it's just breath taking. >> with the search that included cadaver dogs and divers, all of the passengers and crew members were eventually accounted for. the injured, many flipped and tossed inside train cars, were taken to nearby hospitals. the ntsb has begun the task of piecing together what went wrong, including whether or not speed was a factor when the
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train went off this curved section of track. >> we don't know the train speed. we have obtained incident recorder off the cab car. >> the operator was injured, as well. officials reported the operator said the train was going into fast into the turn and he perform's an emergency braking maneuver known as dumping, a loft resort only used in catastrophic circumstances. new york's governor is not quick to blame the curve. >> traipse take the curve every day, 365 days a year. it's not the fact that there's a curve here. there has to be another factor. >> by nightfall, the crews had installed floodlights and begun raring the tracks, a job that will continue into today, disrupting the commute for thousands of passengers, while others come to gripples with how
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a simple early morning train ride could go so terribly wrong. >> there's no reason why people coming home from a holiday should be dead. there's just no reason for it. >> and that is the thing that makes this particularly sad tragedy coming just three days after the major festival of thanksgiving. what's happening to those commuters today is they are getting off the community of yonkers being bussed into the subway station. >> what is the latest on the investigation? i know you spoke with with the man in charge there on the scene this morning. >> the ntsb are going to be here on the scene, working in shifts around the clock. we just caught up with earl wiener, the main ntsb guy here at the moment. i asked him what's going on
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overnight and what will happen today. >> we formed the investigative teams, a team for nationals, rail, human performance and operations, and survive factors. those were the plans put together last evening and we hope to accomplish those today. we'll have another progress meeting this evening. >> overnight, the locomotive and most of the carriages, certainly i can see with my own eyes at least two of them have been righted, all except for the front three. stephanie. >> what more cab you tell us about the four victims in this tragedy? >> we have four names and we've had them since midway through yesterday afternoon. two of the names, james ferrari, 59 from montrose in new york and alan kisser, 35, from queens, three of these four people were
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ejected from the crash. donna smith, 54, who loved the scouting, she was a girl scout leader and james lovell was making his way on the train to work on the rockefeller christmas tree. he never made it. >> john, thanks for that jump date. >> for years, the n testimony sb has been urging r.s to install technology that can help prevent derailment caused by excessive speed. these systems are designed to prevent human error, the cause in 40% of train accidents. since they're expensive and complicated to install, r.s want to push back the deadline by five to seven years. metro north is in the the process of installing such a
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system. we are joined by lisa stark, follow the ntsb investigation. she joins us from washington. good morning. what is the first step when the ntsb investigators look into a crash like this? >> good morning, stephanie. they have formed their investigative teams and they will fan out and each look at their observe areas. one of the first things they're going to want to do is get the information off those two data recorders that they pulled from the train. it should tell them how fast this train was going and whether the emergency brakes were applied by the operator. the other thing they want to do is talk to that operator. he is a veteran of this line, knows it quite well. the ntsb wants to talk to him to see what they can add. it appears that the train may
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have been going too fast and the operator had indicated he had tried to apply the brakes and slow that train down. he had to slow from 70 to 30 to oh get through that surf safely. n testimony sb will be looking at the recalls and those crumpled cars. >> thinking back to the times i have taken this train line, there are no seatbelts on train cars. how well can one of those carriages protect a passenger in a crash like this when there is a sudden braking from 70 to 30? >> well, the rail car's design has improved enormously over the decades. they are designed to be more crash resistant. we did learn this morning that the cars that were involved in this particular derailment were not the latest, newest cars that metro north has.
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the n testimony sb will be looking to see whether this car design may have played a factor in the fact that four people lost their lives and 11 were critically injured. they will make any recommendations to improve car safety, depending what they find from this crash. >> so many factors to look at. august's lisa stark for us in washington. thanks, lisa. >> metro north is part of the metropolitan transportation authority. the derailment was the fifth this year. in september, the m.t.a. named a committee to investigate the problem. three trains derailed on tracks this year, 76 people were hurt in may. a freight trail went off the rails in the bronx in july. with it the number one subway went off the rails in manhattan. for more on the investigation
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into the metro north train derailment, we are joined by todd curtis. mr. curtis thank you for being with us this morning. you've been following this investigation closely. >> you have a very wide range of organizations involved in this accident. typically, the ntsb brings in other organizations to help get to the bottom of an accident, but because of the tremendous resources within new york city and new york state, you have several safety organizations, not just the ntsb who are involved here. these organizations have had a long term interest as you said before in recall safety and transportation safety in new york city and state. i expect this to be an investigation that will have ride ranging effects, not just for this accident. >> what do they do as far as
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gathering and collecting evidence in the first several days of this type of investigation? >> one of the things they do is they try as quickly as possible to get what they call the perishable information, that is the information that will disappear quickly because any damage to the track, they'd like to document that, the position of the rail cars, so that they can do what they call a crash worthiness nationals, what is the ability of these cars to protect the occupants after tropical storm and is there something they can learn that can be applied to future designs. also, of course, speaking with the train crew in trying to get an idea of what they were going through in the hours and even the days leading up to the accident. >> they look at the 72 hours prior to the event of the accident. part that have will be looking at the crew on duty. what questions will the agency
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be asking them? >> well, the kinds of questions that they ask are similar to the questions they would look at in an aircraft investigation, that is were the crew working at a level that was within the regulatory limits, the number of work hours in the days or hours leading up to it, did they get proper sleep prior to getting there, were there any on going medical issues with the crew that might have affected their judgment. again, what they investigate will depend on the kinds of information they get from the initial conversations with the crew. >> without asking you to speculate, i do want to ask you about the fact that the emergency brake was pulled. does that tell us anything at all about what may have caused this accident? >> it doesn't, but i does speak to the fact that one of the issues that the ntsb will look at is the specific sequence of he vents that led up to this
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accident, the fact that the emergency brake was pulled was prior to that sequence. difficult question is why was the train crew in a position where they had to pull that emergency brake, was there one event or several events leading up to this that led to the situation that led to the emergency brake being pulled. >> all right. todd, thank you for joining us this morning, mr. curtis. >> metro north is the fourth busiest commuter rail line. 26,000 passengers ride it each day. turning to weather, some parts of the country are getting hit with cold temperatures they haven't seen in years. >> i wish i had better news on a monday, but we are going to have a potent arctic system moving across the country and really dropping temperatures. we're getting specific moisture
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with this, too. we will see the rain, which we've already had in places like washington and idaho, but then also the cold air from canada will drop temperatures in a lot of cases 30 or 40 degrees from what we're seeing this morning but the time we get a couple mornings from now. here's where we have the storm system now. the cold air hasn't quite moved in. the temperatures this morning are deceiving, because you're walking on you the door saying this us mild out here. this isn't a big deal. it is coming. that will switch some areas into snow, but we'll get a chance for freezing moisture on the roads. we have a wind component to this. winds this morning, we've had a couple of places like spokane where the sustained winds have been in the 20 said, gusts,
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tuesday during the day. look at cold temperatures. they don't warm up at all. they could be falling during the day today and into tuesday, so sub zero, as we get into late tuesday into wednesday and especially those early morning temperatures the next couple of days. when i mentioned the wind and you take temperatures that themselves could be below zero, we could have wind chills that are easily 20 or 30 below, very dangerous if you're out in these temperatures. those temperatures already tomorrow, billings will be in the teens. as i said, by the time we get into wednesday and thursday morning, that's going to be that arctic air that goes below zero. those could be the coldest temperatures in possibly 15 years. >> nicole, thank you. >> egyptian police fire tear gas to disperse hundred was protestors. protestors set fire to a police car, the students angry about the death of an engineering
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stand. clashes erupted in tahrir square. it was the largest gathering there unmonths. there have been fewer demonstrations since new restrictions on protests were passed a week ago. >> the committee working on egypts new constitution has approved a charter. the charter is called the first stage in a democratic transition since morsi was out offed in july. it has wide ranging power, including the authority to try civilians. >> an officer was convicted in killing a man in the aftermath of hurricane katrina. he has a new trial today. >> fixing the health care website. the government said it's working better than ever. >> shopping in your slippers, millions of americans are gearing up for cyber monday. why the day's on line sales are
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catching up to black friday. >> taking a live look where crews are working around the clock on that derailed metro north tehran. and a host willing to ask the tough questions and you'll get... the inside story ray suarez hosts inside story weekdays at 5pm et / 2pm pt only on al jazeera america power of the people until we restore our freedoms atñ
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>> good morning, welcome back to aljazeera america. i'm stephanie sy. the retrial of a police officer who shot and killed a man in the aftermath of hurricane katrina up next. first, let's get a look at temperatures across the nation today. nicole. >> good morning. we're not doing too bad this morning, bess spite all the arctic doom and gloom i've been talking about. a lot of 30's and 40's and all across the country, even down to 60's in the south. none of those teens this morning yet. enjoy it while you can. for the ref of the day, one of the warm spots out here. another one of our stories is at the south, which runs warm are that that the north is going to run above average, 10-15 degrees in a lot of cases. 77 today in houston or 61 in memphis. that is accurately above average and pretty comfortable if you're
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headed this direction, it is parts of the northwest that are really going to feel that difference. even though we have forties around billings this morning, by tomorrow, the high, which might be early in the day only 17 and probably temperatures continuing to fall. stephanie. >> nicole, thank you. freeze in rain is blamed for a huge pile up on a massachusetts interstate. 65 cars and three tractor trailers crashed on i-290 in worcester. at least 35 people needed hospital treatment. the highway is now open again after being shut down for five hours. >> the second trial of a new orleans police officer is getting underway, jury select starting today in the case of david warren. >> he is excused of the 2010 killing of david glover in 2010. we are joined live from new orleans. what can you tell us about this new trial and how the community
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there is responding and reacting to it? >> you know, stephanie, it's a really big deal here. this is a city that was obviously in a lot of turmoil after katrina on any level that you can even think about, and certainly we've heard so many cases of police miscon duck in the city after the storm. this was a case that obviously garnered national attention. it was certainly a very big deal here, and this is a second trial. we're talking about a police officer, three police officers who were caused of killing a man on the west bank of new orleans and burning his body in a car. they were all tried together, so the big deal here and the reason the pellet court turned over this decision last year was because they were all three tried together, so defense attorneys are now saying that that should not have happened, that the man accused of shooting
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the victim in this case, david warren, the police officer accused of shooting this man, was tried with other officers who were eventually accused of a cover up, of falsifying police documents. that case was overturned in 2012. right now, what we're dealing with essentially is another trial. he's going to go into court today and we're going to have a new trial. you can certainly imagine what's happening in the city right now after several of these cases, kind of a confrontational, very concerning feeling. >> we should be clear that warren was convicted in the first trial. i imagine this has got to be difficult for the family of the victim. have we heard from them at all and their reaction to this retrial? >> yeah, the family's obviously
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concerned about this. they wanted some closure and thought they had it. now they're finding out that they don't. i can tell that you defense attorneys are saying that this isn't an open and shut case right now. i mean, this has opened pandora's box in terms of what happened to the police department and sort of all policing after katrina and cross accused of this kind of thing, so kind of a concerning case but an important one, a very big deal. they think this is going to last about two weeks and we're going to have a whole new jury, a whole new deliberation and set of circumstances. >> perhaps new evidence, which we'll watch for. ben, thank you. >> a drug given to pregnant women in the 1950's and 1960 said is still in a battle. it was supposed to ease morning sickness, but caused birth defects. one case in australia has been settled for 10 was millions of
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dollars. we report. >> these women were born without limbs because their mothers took the drug when they were pregnant. they are among more than 100 people in australia and new zealand set to get compensation from the british distributor after a a settlement of $81 million. >> i nearly cried, actually. >> the drug was given to women in the 1950's and 19 sitting's for morning sickness, but left hundreds if not thousands of birth deformities across the world. >> it's not often you get a result for people injured 50 years ago. it is really a very historic result. >> last month, a spanish court found in favor of a group of people claiming injuries. the german manufacturer may be liable to pay compensation. in a written statement to aljazeera, they said:
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>> the real dimensions have been vastly under reported and underestimate. in particular, the number of people affected by it has been vastly in excess of what the public has come to know and not just in australia. not just in new zealand, but in every country where it was available and distributed. >> the world health organization warned the u.k. it had inadequate regulation for the drug. three years ago, the british government apologized and agreed to pay compensation. there are still many cases pending around the world, including in the u.s., where hundreds of women took the drug during clinical trials. aljazeera. >> it is now being used in a research trial in italy, being
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tested on children to see if it eases symptoms of crohn's disease. >> here now is what is making business news this morning. wall street today holds its first full session since thanksgiving. stock futures little changed after the record setting rally. >> european markets are lower, spain leading the deline after data show the weak manufacturing in the country in november. asia, markets closed lower after chinese manufacturing barely expanded in november. >> nobel prize winning economist robert schiller is raising concerns about a stock market bull. schiller said sunday that the current wall street boom is worry some, because the economy is till weak. it predicted the bubble in his book shows irrational exuberance.
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>> hilton is looking to make more money when it goes public. the hotel chain now expects to raise $2.37 billion in its initial public offering. previously, hilton said it anticipated gettng $1.25 billion. the price will be priced from $18 to $21 a share. >> holiday shoppers heading on line this cyber monday. >> why a new distillery decided to open up schott shop in detroit. >> the college football playoff system starts next season and now looks like the final year the b.c.s. could have more than its share of controversy. i'll explain later in sports. >> you're looking at a live picture of grand central
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terminal. 26,000 daily commuters have their trips disrupted today because of a train derailment. with the most interesting people of our time. this sunday, >> i spent my whole life thinking about themes and thinking about how to structure movies, so this is highly unusual. >> the director of the sixth sense, says there are five things we can do to fix education in america >> the united states has education apartheid, that's the facts... >> talk to al jazeera with m. night shayamalan sunday at 7et / 4pt on al jazeera america
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>> welcome back to aljazeera america. i'm stephanie sy. we're following that train derailment in new york. four people were killed, dozens others injured sunday when a metro north train went off the rails in the bronx heading into manhattan. ntsb investigators are on the scene and workers trying to upright the cars. they've had some success with that this morning. 26,000 commuters use that hudson line to get into new york city each day. the train was headed to new york's grand central terminal, jen you ever glass is there this
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morning. i know it's rush hour there and you've spoken with a few passengers who are having a difficult time getting to work. what are they doing to get where they need to be? >> good morning, stephanie. yes, a very frustrating commute this morning petitioner thousands of passengers who would normally take that hudson line here to new york's grand central material national. there are shuttle buzz's running at 242 street and yonkers where the train is running t to new yk city. some commuters are saying they are not going to make the commute at all. >> a it's going to take an hour longer than usual, so i figured today, i'd work from home until they get the train back up. >> that young man didn't know
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there had been a train crash. he coming back into the city after the thanksgiving holiday. i saw many very frustrated folks this morning coming into grand central terminal when they realized they already have a long commute. some work untarry town new york, working upstate. one woman said her commute is already two hours in the morning and this will make it longer, 22,000 people affected by this line closure. this could go on for an indefinite period of time. they don't know when it's going to reopen. the tracks have to be radar, as well, so we're seeing a difficult morning rush hour the first monday of a the thanksgiving holiday here at grand central material national. >> hopefully, they're employers will understand if they're late. jennifer glass reporting to us from grand central terminal, jennifer, thank you. >> vice president joe biden begins a delicate diplomatic
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visit today in japan. he is looking to ease tensions. he will make stops in china and south korea. >> after nearly two months of harsh criticism, the obama administration says healthcare.gov is now ready for its next big test. >> the obama administration met its deadline over the weekend and now says the site works more than 90% of the time. that's up significantly from 40% when it was launched two months ago. >> the bottom line, healthcare.gov on december 1 is night and day from where it was on october 1. >> that's president obama's special advisor in charge of fixing the website that was originally bogged down with with hundreds of bugs. the white house says dramatic progress has been made with the
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site now performing with private sector like velocity. the site now has a lower error rate and capacity to handle 50,000 visitors at once. if it's too busy, there is now a virtual waiting room that will email you when it's less crowded. democrats say the new report shows the administration hit the big benchmarks. >> 50,000 people at one time, 800,000 people a day. look, this is going to take sometime before it's up and kicking in full gee. what we have to look at is those states where you have well functioning websites like new york, kentucky. >> republicans see it differently. >> here's the problem. you have 15% of the population who haven't had health care. we think it's closer to 10. it was disrupted for 80% of peel.
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we've broken the sometime to help the few. nobody would fix a problem that way. >> even supporters admit there's still room for improvement, but say both sides of the aisle must come together to fix it. >> i have in my pocket here eric cantor issued this playbook against obamacare the other day. they are not trying to work with us to address these issues. yes, there are problems, there's no denying that, let's work to fix them. we know what it looks like when it's fixed, like california, like new york. >> the white house says enrollment has jumped from 30% to 80%. it's still calling the site "a work in progress." >> i know you logged into the site this morning. how was it, paster? how were the improvements. >> i logged into the site october 1. it is quite a difference. you can click through wow having to have any lag time. that is just clicking through the pages, not going through the entire enrollment process. the too test will be in the
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coming weeks leading up to that december 23 deadline. some procrastinators, if they get on and have a huge surge of people trying to he be roll, they could probably see more problems. that's going to be the big test. december 23 is the deadline if they want to have coverage kick in on january 1. >> thank you. >> joining us now to evaluate the current state of healthcare.gov and how young people are affected by the affordable care act is eric smith. good morning. young adults defined at between 18-34. have you noticed the improvements to the website and do you think all of these problems the, site had affected the appeal obamacare had to young adults? >> we've seen pretty dramatic improvements. the website is loading faster, we're not seeing some of the
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same error messages. we have been using the site and been pretty able to navigate it. i think that's all very promising and gives us a lot of confidence going forward. i think young people have been watching the site very closely and wanted to work and like all of us have been frustrated that it hasn't worked faster. hopefully, we're beyond that and really at the level where we can educate people and get them help signing up. >> most analysts have said the success of obamacare on the whole depends on young, healthy people like yourself, signing up. do you have evidence that people will sign up, that there's a need and there's a desire to have insurance among the young and healthy, the young invincibles, as you call yourselves? >> absolutely. the reason why there's $19 million unissued young people is cost. when you make it more affordable like in massachusetts, the
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uninsured rate 20 from 27% to 5%. in california, a little under a quarter of the new enrollees in the exchange were young people, which is very promising. we have a lot of work to do, just to get the word out. this generation knows very little about how the law works, and while december 23 is an important deadline, we're looking to the end of march as the real deadline to get people signed up. >> that's when they might face the tax penalty. california is seeing early success. can that be replicated? >> we are seeing variation amongment states. there are 36 states that rely on the federal gough for healthcare.gov. all of these states doing their own exchanges, and some states have been very smart reaching out to young people, trying
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different techniques. that is starting to pay dividends. i think we're going to watch closely to see which states are winners and which are losers as this rolls out. hopefully, we can do everything we can to make sure that young people in all the states see the benefits. >> thank you. >> thanks for having me. >> despite deep discounts and longer store hours, holiday sales slumped, the decline the first since 2009. spending in stores and on line fell from last year. purchases in stores fell by 9%. about 141 million americans shopped in-stores or on line in the four day span. spending on line today is expected to smash records, though. that's even though many americans will be on the job. it's cyber monday, of course. a survey showed most workers
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plan to shop while they are on the clock. 7% of the human resource managers say they've fired an employee for holiday shopping. one of the busiest places in the nation today is sure to be the amazon.com fulfillment center in phoenix. that's where we are joined live now. what have they done to prep for today? >> well, stephanie, they brought on 70,000 seasonal workers that handle the huge volume of shipments they'll be dealing with. last year, they got so many orders, it came out to 300 current sessions. retailers expect a bigger cyber monday. >> forget shop that until you drop, today it's click until you quit. cyber monday is expected to bring in $2 billion in sales. >> we do think this holiday will be our best ever. >> at the fulfillment center,
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it's boxes as far as the eye can see. people and machines work in tandem to pack them. addressed and outthe door. >> we are hiring 20,000 more seasonal workers than last year. >> santa may not be able to handle cyber monday deliveries. companies like fedex can, estimating they'll send out 22 million packages. >> we have to plan for it year round, but we're ready. >> cyber monday sales weren't as impressive in 2005 when it was first coined by a division of the national retail federation. then it was just the 10t 10th busiest on line sales day. fast forward to this year, it's expected to be number one. >> a lot of stores have big promotion honest line. >> we don't have to deal with lines. >> consumers realizing they can knock off their shopping list with a few keystrokes. >> the early bird gets the good
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sale. the majority plan to shop first thing in the morning. back to you. >> new numbers just in show how much was spent on line before today's big rush. thanksgiving internet sales were up 21% to three quarters of a billion dollars and on black friday, they were 15% higher, hitting $1.2 billion. the two day increase was 17% compared to last year. >> the e commerce pioneer who founded am dan wants to get purchases to customers in a half hour. it would use aircraft called octo copters. >> union organizers are calling for fast food strikes across the
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country. they want hourly wages raised from the federal minimum, $7.25 to $15. industry officials say wage hikes would force layoffs. >> anti-government protests enter a second week in ukraine. protestors and police battled today in key every. hundreds of protestors blocked entrance to government buildings, angry about the government's refusal to sign trade agreements with the european union. many camped overnight in tahrir square. >> a political crisis is growing in thailand. protestors in bangkok were hit with tear gas and water cannons. they are calling for the prime minister to step down. we are joint from bangkok. what is the prime minister doing
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to combat this unrest? >> the government, including the prime minister have taken a very soft approach so far to these protests. it was an acknowledgment, a message coming out from the prime minister's office repeatedly that it did not want to use force against the protestors. it's feared that if they were clashes around the streets of the tie capitol bangkok resulting from any sort of crackdown against the protestors that that could make the situation worse, makes the political divisions worse and play into the hands of the anti-government protestors who have been on the streets. the violence that we have seen particularly over the last couple of days really hasn't been about police coming out on the streets to try to disperse the crowds. it's been about the police defending the key positions around the capitol that the protestors have been saying that they want to seize from the government in order to force
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this administration. >> is there dialogue open between the protestors and government? >> well, we really saw that for the first time sunday night where when there was acknowledgment that is a meeting take place between him and the leader of the anti-government movement, who himself is a former deputy prime minister. also present at that ming were representatives from the armed forces, including the all powerful chief of the thigh early, the tie military a very powerful political force. there is a feeling that if there is to come to any sort of revolution, perhaps the army needs to become involved with a security measure or negotiations behind the scenes.
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we saw the first science monday evening. nothing was decided. the anti-government leader aim out of that saying they were no better off, there was no negotiation, it was a meet and greet situation. there have been reports that perhaps there are more mings taking place between those respective leaders. >> the dust is settling after a wild weekend of football. mark morgan is here to tell us about it. >> are you a college football fan? >>meh. >> i didn't expect a meh. here's the deal with number one alabama falling to auburn that in amazing finish saturday, the b.c.s. standards have shifted, boasting a new number one and
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number what. florida state moves into the top spot. the seminoles throttled florida over the weekend. ohio state is now second. the buckeyes squeaked by rainfall michigan, needing to stop a two-point conversion to hold on for the win. auburn to win over alabama had the tigers in third. missouri is now number five. >> 100 yards for the touchdown against alabama mauve set the stage for much discussion about which teams should be in the national title game. now auburn faces missouri in the s.e.c. championship game this coming weekend. obviously the tigers fresh off that win over obama. it seems the winner of that game will need a loss by florida state or ohio state to get into the title game.
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does a one loss sec team deserve to jump over an undefeated team from another conference. everyone discuss in a group and get back to me. >> the nfl, another sunday and another impressive performance by peyton manning, this time in front of a raucous road crowd in kansas city. the chiefs led before manning really started to heat up and got another receiver involved in his high powered offense. decker catches 4t.d. pass yesterday, after only three during the entire season. decker with great grabs on the day. manning was picked off twice. he has 41 touchdown passes for the season, 50 is the record. >> techs cans hosting the
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patriots. texas up 17-7. bill belichick scribbling. houston takes a 24 ore 21 lead. belichick still scribbling. the patriots answer, fourth quarter, pours in from seven yards out, new england back on top. later, tate scores again from 10 yards out, houston not giving up the ghost. the patriots would tie it up at 31. with three minutes left, again from 53. new england wins i 34-31. >> last june in the eastern conference finals, the pacers lost a tough game seven on the road to the miami heat. this season, the pacers want to host any game seven and they are very serious in their pursuit of the east's best record. >> indiana facing the clippers, another solid performance from
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george. george knocks down the three, 4-10 from beyond the arc. the clips knock it free, crawford with the steal ahead to collison for the finish. clippers tied at 94. pacers with a 2 point lead. he misses the jumper, calm taps, ball bouncing around. the pacers hang on to win it 105-100. indiana has won seven straight and improve to 16-1. >> i'm mark morgan and that's sports. >> bringing back the business of booze. the big bet that some brewers are making on detroit with the city's first distillery in decades. >> blasting off on a mission to the moon, what chinese scientists hope to learn when their rover makes a lunar landing. >> >> we have a potent tomorrow system in the west, already
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numerous storm warnings out and arctic air could send temperatures below zero. >> and now, a techknow minute..ñ
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>> just ahead, the alcohol business gets a boost in detroit for the first time since prohibition. >> first, a look at the weather. nicole mitchell is back. >> we have a strong storm system. this is the one into the northwest with temperatures by the time we get through the next couple of days will tumble in some cases below zero. that's going to be pretty brutal. already has moisture in the northern tier. i'll get to more on that in a second. i want to show we've had showers, places like georgia this morning, you're dealing with that. >> scooting across the northern plains, some of that has been freezing rain, so be very careful on the roads and definitely bundle up heading out the next several days. stephanie. >> nicole, how long. >> china is getting into the space race with a mission to the moon. an unhand rocket launch is carrying a lunar rover expected
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to land in two weeks. it will carry out scientific experiments and search for natural resources. >> the popularity of locally brewed liquor is a new distillery in detroit is the first in nearly 100 years. we report. >> two james spirits, a distillery located in detroit is a company in the business of making liquor. gin, vodka are their specialties. this is the first time liquor has been approved in detroit since prohibition. when state lawmakers adopted the small distiller law, it opened a door for entrepreneurs like andrew moore to invest. >> we're really honored to bring back distilling history and get back to detroit's roots with the
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other spirits. >> when two james distillery was established, the owner considered locations all across the country. they say detroit stood apart from the rest. >> there's an energy within the city, just the people moving down here, new businesses, so i think we kind of put all those specters together, it was clear that detroit was the right place. >> they invested a million dollars into the company and turned this old taxi warehouse into a craft liquor brewing operation with a full staff. from the ingredients to the packaging, everything is local. some economists estimate the distillery business has the poo 10 they will to boost the state economy by hundreds of millions of dollars. the city's financial issues didn't detour them. >> this might help diversify
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agriculture in michigan even further as we start to grow collectively.
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>> from our headquarters in new york, here are the headlines this hour. >> al jazeera america is the only news channel that brings you live news at the top of every hour. >> a deal in the senate may be at hand and just in the nick of time. >> thousands of new yorkers are marching in solidarity. >> we're following multiple developments on syria at this hour. >> every hour from reporters stationed around the world and across the country. >> only on al jazeera america.
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consider this: the news of the day plus so much more. >> we begin with the government shutdown. >> answers to the questions no one else will ask. >> it seems like they can't agree to anything in washington no matter what. >> antonio mora, award winning and hard hitting. >> we've heard you talk about the history of suicide in your family. >> there's no status quo, just the bottom line. >> but, what about buying shares in a professional athlete?
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