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tv   News  Al Jazeera  December 15, 2013 6:00am-9:01am EST

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check check >> nelson mandela's final journey. >> farewell my dear brother, my mentor, my leader. >> after 10 days of mourning, madeba is with his ancestors, laid to rest in his ancestral home of qunu. >> mass casualties, in the colorado shootings. >> losing hope - violence in the central african republic escalates.
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thousands are living without shelter. >> to me it's freed i'm not. bit coin is freedom in the financial world. >> india - the push to expand the use of the digital currency bitcoin. >> a final farewell to a man seen as an icon, a hero and a father. good morning, i'm richelle carey. >> i'm thomas drayton. good to have you with us. >> nelson mandela raid to rest no qunu. >> the burial marking the end of a fascinating journey of a man that inspired and influenced many people around the world.
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>> 4,000 gathered for the funeral, 400 for the private burial. >> nelson mandela died 10 days ago after battling a chronic illness for months. thousands gathered to remember the leader. >> we will miss the smile, your laughter, your love and your leadership. we cherish every moment we spent with you. >> his own gesture of kindness made all those around him want to do good. thus the lesson he has taught us. we want to do good because we have seen him leading by example and doing good. >> farewell my dear brother, my mentor, my leader. with all the energy and
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determination i join the people of south africa to perpetuate your ideals. i have lost a brother. my life is in a void and i don't know who to turn to. >> we heard tribute after tribute. we have two live reports from kuehqun qunu. nick schifrin is there, but we begin with allen schauffler. >> we are in the villas across the valley from qunu. a crowd of 400 gathered here. sparse early on. elderly folks here to watch the whole thing. a great crowd now. like i say 400 or so, more than that, if you count in the police and army pressens. the biggest cheer when the casket came out of the service area, carried towards the grave
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site. and a touching moment when the elderly women in the tend behind me stood and waved as the casket was shown on the screen, going to the grave site. the big question is now what? what happens now. >> we have a guest. what is the sense about what happens in south africa now that we said 10 days of goodbyes to nelson mandela. >> thank you very much. evening or good afternoon. this is the moment we said goodbye. we are sad deep in our hearts. on the other hand we have mixed feelings. we are are happy for his life lived. we had all the stories but we
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are glad to be part of the funeral. much as we have seen it here in the big screen. we feel as part of what is happening down there. we've heard a lot of people talk this week that the only true way to honour nelson mandela moving forward is to follow his principles, to be sweeter, better to each other and get along. can south africa do this. >> yes, south africans can do it, especially following after his footsteps. we leant a lot from tata's stories. some of them or most of them we heard from himself, because we had the privilege of having him living amongst us. after his passing, we had that feeling that this man has fought, he has shown the way
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>> you are hopeful looking forward. >> we have the hope looking forward. in fact, call of us, africans, we are going to take his legacy going forward for the next generations. we have got that. we have got that responsibility to take forward what nelson mandela left. >> thank you very much. i appreciate you taking time with us after a long day. >> so that is the question, now what. remember the backdrop. there has been accusations and finger pointing among south african politicians, who was responsible for booing the president, accusations and finger pointing about who was responsible for putting the sign language interpreter on the stage, a man that was a buffoon, a dangerous one at that. there's questions about whether
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desmond tutu would come to this ceremony, whether the local wheef would come, and rancour as a background to this. can they put aside their differences and move forward. >> back to you. >> we have been hearing from people who say that nelson mandela was theirs and they had to share him and they wanted him back, if you will, to feel a personal involvement in the funeral. that was a way of taking him back and they feel a little excluded from that. have you heard that from the people there now? >> not from the people here now. those we talked to say they enjoyed the presentation on the big screen. they would have liked to have been close enough to touch the casket but the folks we talked to have not shown much frustration. we heard it in the village of qunu, from people who were angry
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that they'd been told to stay away, and the road block where we were yesterday, to see the procession come buy, they were upset that the hearse didn't slow down, didn't stop, went by in a flash. there has been a bit of upset at the way it was handled in a small village in a rural area. the folks we talked to say the big screens are fine. >> you spoke to the pastor of the church where nelson mandela was baptised. what sense of pride does the church have. >> a tremendous sense of pride from the pastor. he, again, wants to observe the pride and honour it by rebuilding and preserving the church. he's trying to get money from the south african government. he's gotten a little bit, $7,000. it's nowhere near what's needed.
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he would like to polish it up, making it a sense of pride. >> we'll turn to nick schifrin, who is in qunu. good morning to you. this is the final resting place of nelson mandela, can you tell us what this place means to him and its memory? >> yes, good afternoon, good morning. we are across the valley and the reason that those two have an impact on his life is he was born here in this area right there, behind me. nelson mandela's grandson's compound is there. his father had a dispute with a local white judge who tried to intervene in politics. nelson mandela when over to qunu from here, where alan is when he was one, one and a half. that spirit imbibed nelson
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mandela himself. i think he spoke about himself as a country boy, talking about how he froou up around the fields, milking cows, dealing in a rural community and he said he brought values with him to the presidency, notions of leadership, respect and believing in the best from everyone else. he brought it from here, becoming the sophisticated leader we saw later in the life. >> did the locals come out to watch the funeral? what was the reaction. >> like where allen was in qunu, a lot of people watched the big screen. a lot celebrated his life. this is a poignant moment, a sad moment. a lot of people are taking the moment and saying, "how can i
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best thank manned nelson mandela for the sacrifices and say goodbye. what we saw is the final trip home. nelson mandela said a man's life should end near where it began. alan and i are in places where his life began. in these towns, saying goodbye to someone they call a home-town hero, someone they own, especially now he's back, it's a sad day to everyone here to say goodbye. >> now that the celebrations have a choice of what life will be like, did you get a sense of that. >> that is the question. tomorrow morning people will wake up for the first time saying, "we have no manned to
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honour and celebrate. to a certain extend i think there were two schools of thought. the currented leadership is not living up to ideals. when he was speaking at the stadium, boos from him. a lot questioned whether the current leadership was able to take to lead and one with it. the other lead was talking about nelson mandela's values and qualities, everything he brought and satisfied. because we are talking about it, everyone in the slardship will have to live up to that. nobody knows what is next, who is next. there's a chance that the
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african national congress, that it won't be in the majority that it used to be. >> the challenges are difficult. bringing down apartheid is one thing. the legacy, and sometimes it can take decades to change. the challenges for south africa is back, knocking down the door. the challenges for the generations after are so huge, bigger than any one person. >> as one western put it to me, we have the political freedom. young black men. we have been waiting for 20 years for the opportunity. thank you. thank you for the sacrifices, for the freedom i enjoy to talk to people like me.
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now we need something else, a political leadership. by which i can have a better life. patients is wearing thin. that's why - will that patience in the blacktownship have huge supporters. some say is this leadership leading up to what nelson mandela wanted. is my life good enough, should i consider other parties or leaders. can it provide the next step. a loft of people are questioning that. >> we heard tribute after tribute. one of the speakers was the grandson of nelson mandela. let's listen briefly to what he had to say. >> through nelson mandela the world learnt the beauty of reconstellation, and the story
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of nelson mandela so much so the story of south africa. >> you are listening there, that was nelson mandela, his grandson. >> must be difficult to be nelson mandela's grandson, as we talk about what comes next. he's a dignified young man talking about what comes next. living in the shadow of nelson mande mandela. >> absolutely. behind me is one of the grandson's compounds. while nelson mandela was dying he tried to move bodies between here and qunu, where we see the burial hatch. there's a lot of ugliness. what people are looking for from the mandelas, winnie, nelson mandela's widow is leadership.
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is someone to come up, whether it's jacob zuma, the president or someone from the family, they are looking for someone to inspire them. jacob zuma said, "we need more nelson mandelas, more people to sacrifices, have the fall use. we need to keep doing that. a lot question whether jacob zuma is doing that. the notion is here, that okay we've buried tata, their father, therefore what is next. what is the next generation going to do, what can we get next. what is the economic freedom we have been looking for. there's huge questions and it's fascinating to know where it will go. best a discussion for tonight or tomorrow. now, in the community is mourning, thanking nelson mandela for his sacrifices and the modern country that he
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helped create. >> once in a generation or life-time. nick schifrin from the birth place of nelson mandela. >> saying goodbye to nelson mandela much foreign dignitaries, top government officials, celebrities and business tycoons were among the 45 paying tribute to nelson mandela. among them prince charles and oprah winfrey. nelson mandela's life documented in films and books, will help build a bridge for future generations. tania paige took a tour of his archive to see how his memory will live on. >> the center of memory is full of predictable and the strange and unusual. >> if you look at this one here,
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it's from arnold swarz negger. here is another gift >> he's behind her. who is that? >> that's oprah winfrey. >> as well as being an historic record, it's a place the public can cut through mythology. his most personal documents are in the vault. >> his mother died. he asked to attend the funeral as the sun, he wanted to bury her. he was not allowed. >> there are letters to then wife winnie and diary entries, one detailing an argument with current wife graca machel. >> he game the face of a struggle. increasingly has he's growing
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older, he felt uncomfortable with that. >> he used to come in every day. he retired in 2004, he reduced the amount of time he came. here he was surrounded by people that inspired and influenced him. famous faces filled the shelves. a look at nelson mandela the man. >> the center of memory was established in 1989 at nelson mandela's archive. >> there's a wintry mess along the east coast. >> let's bring in eboni dean for the forecast. >> some areas will see improving conditions, we have lingering snow. i'm tracking the lingering storm system bringing snow to the
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north-east. it's lifting to the north. there's snow coming down around upstate new york. some areas are seeing a foot of snow. it's adding to that, creating problems. up in the pain we'll keep the snow going. this is the set up. we have an area of low pressure. we'll have rain along the coastline. temperatures rose overnight so it's milder. on the backside of it we have colder air. interior sections will see the road. winds gust up to 30 miles per hour into parts of main and boston, pretty blustery out there. be careful if you have travel plans. winter storm warns up at least across midday. up to you. >> nelson mandela's journey begins where it began. >> thousands turn out to remember madeba. laid to rest in his home town.
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>> the hum tarian crisis. the humanitarian organization critical to the slow response to that crisis. >> from physical cash to virtual dollars. bitcoin, and it could become a commercial reality in india.
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>> good morning and welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm thomas drayton. >> and i'm richelle carey. the push in india for the virtual currency bitcoin. >> first, eboni dean, metrologist, joins us to look at the temperatures. >> it's colder than yesterday. parts of the south feeling the chill. as you step outside in birmingham, we are down into the 30s, and into the 50s, a 20 degree drop. we are at 0 in minneapolis. let's head to the north-east. snow, freezing rain and the
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plain rain along the coastline where temperatures are hovering at the freezing point. new york city and philadelphia 32. feeling colder as you get outside. >> the teen involved in the colorado school shooting planned to harm a large number of individuals. karl pierson had a shotgun, machete, three molotov cocktails and ammunition strapped to his body. he purchased it a week before the shooting. clair davis is in critical condition after being shot in the head. >> karl pierson turned the gun on himself. >> a worker in brazil has been killed on the world cup construction site. it is all for the tournament next year. the company said it has opened an internal investigation into the cause of
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accident. >> in india bitcoin is gaining populari popularity. there's a campaign to make it part of the country's financial system. virtual currencies are not regulated and people who use them could be at risk of losing money. >> cash means everything in india, despite a rise of credit cards and online payments most transactions take place with bit notes. some want to caning that. to me it is freedom. it represents freedom in the financial world. >> natasha ambrose has been part of a group in bangalore that meets to talk been bitcoin, a currency that releases people from the burden of foreign change. >> businesses are linked in different countries and statement it is very global. we need a currency that keeps up
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with that. >> these part of a grouch hosting the first bitcoin conference. >> this is not a bitcoin. what this is is a point for people to get - hold something and feel, understand about bitcoin. it allows people to receive payments. if i carry this around i can receive payment and it stayed on the computer or in my hard wallet. >> india is a cash-based society with the government keeping limits on how much money a person can take out or bring into the country. bitcoin can be downloaded on a smartphone, slip in the pocket and leave the country with millions, completely untraceable. that's raising concern. >> you will lose infoxchange.
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>> at present india's financial system does not have the infrastructure to handle virtual currencies. we don't know how to regulate it. >> ambrose invited people from the government and financial sector so they, too, can understand bitcoin in india. as wealth plays an important apparent, having its own goddess, some want to see the future shift from the physical to the virtual. >> even though there may be risk involved in using them bitcoin shows there's 12 million bit join in circulation. >> that's a lot. >> saying goodbye to the father of a nation. >> people in south africa and
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around the world pay a final farewell to the late south african president nelson mandela. >> i'm at the cotton museum in memphis where exchanges in the u.s. farm bill can have drastic effects on farmers across thest. >> tonight's heisman trophy - a look at the 79th winner coming up in sport.
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>> welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm richelle carey, good morning to you. >> i'm thomas drayton. good to have you with us. we are continuing to celebrate the life of former south african leader nelson mandela, and explore the life of some south africans who say nelson mandela's vision has not been fulfilled. >> and the advancements of cotton production and how sub siddies in the u.s. make for unfair trade practices. >> first, the victim of friday's colorado school shooting is in
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critical condition. clair davis was shot in the head by her classmate karl pierson. karl pierson was armed and intended to harm more people. >> the president of central african republic seeks an end to the violence. michel djotobia is ready to hold talks. hundreds died after a week of sectarian fighting. residents of bangui faces humanitarian crisis as food aid is cancelled. >> a man that inspired millions in his final resting place. after 10 days of mourning south africa buries its first black president. we have more. >> a day after nelson mandela
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was released from prison he came to this stadium and addressed a crowd of thousands. they gathered to watch the funeral on big screens. ma'am, what does nelson mandela mean to you? >> he means a lot to me. i learnt a lot from him. the two things i took from him was forgive and dine with the enemy. that's what i took from him. >> your mother was an antiapartheid activist. the country changed so much. she went on the streets in soweto. what do you want south africa to achieve in the next 20 years? >> they must achieve what they promised people to achieve. step by step it will come all right. >> outside the stadium people
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are dancing and singing, what they call struggle song. they are songs that nelson mandela would have known the words to. of liberation, freedom. it's a fitting tribute, words that he lived to and loved. >> far from where nelson mandela was buried life goes on, in the squatter camp. for white south africans nelson mandela is a man who did great things for south africa, but whose vision has not been fulfilled. >> this feels a long way in everywhere from the scenes of mourning and song following the death of nelson mandela. we are in a squatter camp filled mostly with white avry carnas. it's not racially exclusive, but just mutually poor. the government promised these people houses for years. they are at the end of a long
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list. former civil servant anne le roux invited me into her home. she, like many, lost everything when history turned and the all-white civil service became mostly black. >> we all were excluded. they don't worry about us. we hive in a squatter camp and nobody worries about us. we don't get help from the government at all. and we just have to look after ourselves. >> metres away from the camp black families picnic under the trees. they are the new middle class in a town build by the afrikaana boars when gold was discovered, and fought over and loshed to the british in the -- lost to the british in the anglo-bower
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war. it's the new form of leashure, camping and caravan park is an avry carn prison of sorts. they once may have been the apartheid oppressors, but history has not been kind to the avry carners. >> translation: yes, we are disappointed about it. nelson mandela tried to make things better. his dream was not realised. apartheid are put in reverse, and the blacks are suppressing the whites with economic policies. >> anne dreams of moving back to her home in the suburbs of johannesburg. >> look, i'm used to a bitter life than what is here. but, unfortunately, vings have changed. >> the dreams of this community are not a priority.
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>> despite an average 3.6% the growth rate for south africa poverty rises in the nation, according to an av roe barometer index. >> john mccain joins thousands of protesters in ukraine. he met with the foreign minister. the opposition leaders and groups huddled around camp fires this morning, in kiev's square where are ahead of a mass demonstration. we are joined life from kiev. who is senator john mccain been meeting with and what has been said? >> well, we are expecting senator mccain to make a speech on the square. any time now. he met with three of the top opposition political leaders
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here. this is the problem with his movement is they don't have a single figure. there are three senior opposition figures, he was talking do about what direction his country should be going in, he got behind the movement and was encouraged by the patriotism. we expect that what he may be taking back with him to washington will be a willingness to try to get congress to impose sanctions against the ukrainian government. we don't know what they may take, against the state probably went be welcome. the country is in severe difficulties. maybe they could be imposed against official. people believe that president viktor yanukovych and his officials have grown rich and
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fill their pockets in recent years. potentially there could be a possibility of freezing foreign assets. >> is the government listening to protesters, is there any indication that this will end soon? >> if president viktor yanukovych is serious about talking to them and agreeing to some of their demands, conceivably yes. really, this is a butting of ideas, an ideological war between russia and europe. the europeans saying, "we don't have trouble. you are welcome to your trade agreement with the russians, but we are opening up our arms to you, join us, come with us." to do that ukraine needs to sign an agreement, but we have been hearing that the european union is saying those talks have to go on hold because the ukrainian
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government is not showing serious enough signs of doing that. we understand president viktor yanukovych will head to moscow and look to sign a trade agreement or deal with moscow, with the kremlin. the ukrainians need the russians and their gas. if it looks as if he's turning his pack op europe, that will galvanise results of tens of thousands of people who have been coming out for weeks now in the center of kiev. >> there's pro-government supporters in the crowd standing out, fighting back if you will. >> i didn't catch that. i would like to make some further point that there is the concern for things to get a little hotter, because there is real concern about provocation. we did have a lot of people in town yesterday day supporting the pro-viktor yanukovych camp,
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coming out in support of the president. and people here are concerned that the government is going to try to find a way to end the standoff by any means it can. the entrance to the stand you have people doing face checks. they fear that some form of prove kiocati provocation, any form of provocation will give an excuse to clamp down. >> thank you robin. >> michelle bachelet is certain to win big in chile's election. it is the first presidential showdown between two women. michelle bachelet is expected to be backed. she fell short of 50% needed to win outright. egyptians will vote for a new constitution next month.
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the interim president has set january 14th as the start of a 2-day referendum on a revised constitution. >> approval and voter turn out will determine whether the military support the take over. the muslim brotherhood vowed to boycott of cotton production. in the u.s. government subsidies vice-president blamed for affecting the livelihood of formers in the developing world. that could change with a bill that could cut financial aid for farmers. >> this man was born on his parents farm in mississippi. his family has been here since 1957. the history of americans and cotton production has a turbulent history. profits were made on the backs of slaves. many feel persecuted.
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the department of agriculture has been accused of denying black farmers loans because of their race. >> we wanted to be equal, competitive with the other farmers and not only that, to make a decent living. >> life for roy and many other cotton farmers could be about to get harder. government subsidies may be dropped. that's a loss of 50,000 a year. >> if the government takes something away from the farmers, it will be bad. >> a lot of farmers will keep farming. >> the problem is billions of dollars distort the global cotton market. prices are pushed down making it harder for developing nations to compete. >> it's something that they have fought hard for. they've been battered by the
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courts, it's expected days of subsidies will be born. >> at a cotton museum they say there's little choice but to change the policy. >> most growers don't need them. they're against the world trade. big time. for roy and other maul cotton farmers, the future is bleak. he wants to pass it on to his children. without help, that could be harder. >> by the way, the u.s. ranks third in global production behind china and india. he's the leading exportier. they account for $25 billion in products. >> big. >> huge. >> all right, speaking of big history was made last night in the heisman trophy awarded here.
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>> lot of hearts were pounding waiting for that decision. >> john henry smith, it's your turn. >> good morning. there has been a lot of talk about this young man with his talent and effusive personality, jameis winston, florida state quarterback was a dream come true until an accusation of sexual assault by a young woman cast a poll. it cleared him and the heisman process anointed him. jessica tapp was at the presentation. >> on paper jameis winston was a shoe in for the trophy. he was the unlikely freshman quarterback leading and taking his team to an undefeated season and tight. this year's race was not just about the numbers, voters had to peel back layers of an historic record-breaking season and decide in jameis winston's character was heisman trophy
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worthy. the 19-year-old kept his composure and was exonerated off. he let his feelings show. >> i trusted in the process that evaluates the fact and truth is delivered with positive outcomes, because that's all the things i have been through this past month i remember what my daddy said, trust in the process when high ricked his job -- risked his job, and was jobless, and i was out there providing. me and my mama pays bills, and that man said the truth prevail. eventually i got a scholarship. i got my education up. we ate every night. this is not just for jameis winston, this is for the state, and i love everybody in here, i
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can't be - i'm so bliss right now. >> even though 115 voters left him off the bat -- ballot. he within in a land slide over 2,000 points to a.j. mccarron's 700. a freshman took home the coveted award. what can jameis winston do for an encore - win a title. jameis winston and seminoles take on auburn in the national championships january 6th at the rows bowl. >> jameis winston beat alabama's a.j. mccarron by 3:1. 638 first-place to 79 for a.j. mccarron. jordan lynch finished third in a surprise. last year's heisman trophy winner johnny manziel finished fifth. >> elsewhere in college football
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the move that's been rumoured for weeks happened. matt brown stepped down as the head coach as 16 seasons. he'll stick around to coach them at oregon. the program has lost third, it was 30 and 20 overall in 18 and 17. in ta statement the 62-year-old said of the change in leadership "i hope with new energy we can get this thing rolling again." >> the naval academy went into the 114th edition of the navy-army game. they beat the knights 11 times. army had a tough year. a win over navy would make everything better. this was it. the second quarter navy have nothing. reynolds - off and running.
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47 yards later 47-0 navy. fourth quarter midshipman in charge. reynolds again. navy single-season record for a quarterback. >> through to college, a match-up of two story names in college basketball. roy williams and his 18th ranked team. this was the marcus page show, leading all scores with 23 and two assists. this one was spectacular. the he'lls send the cats to a third loss by a final of 82-77. and that is sports for this morning. >> i won't bridge up the army-navy prediction you said yesterday. >> i believe i said navy would win again. pay me my money. >> boys, boys.
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>> i'll take dollar bills. going green. the vertical way. >> there's a farming trend moving across america - turning the traditional way of growing crops upside down. tñ
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>> it's sunday morning. welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm richelle carey. >> i'm thomas drayton. coming up in a moment there's a new way of farming proving to be far more sustainable. >> first a look at precipitation. eboni dean, metrologist, has the details. we are cleaning out some areas. the storm is winding down for the larger cities across the north-east. we do condition to have snow, mainly focused across northern areas of new england. heading south you may encounter
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rain. showers and thunder storms rumbling across florida, prompting the threat of tornados up into the north areas. we have rain hanging out across the area. once the front moves out we'll see drier conditions, but into the midwest we have a snow flakes flying along the lakes. winter weather advisories here into michigan as the snow showers come down. back to you guys. >> it takes a lot of energy to shift produce from california to chicago. that is why virt call farming becomes a big thing. beneath a sun in a meat-packing plant is a trend in farming. the fields grow on multiple floors, far from the mid western fields that feed the rest of the world. >> the farmer and his staff grow greens for celebrated
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restaurantures in soil-free water. >> we are shipping produce enormous differences, 1500-2,000 miles. we can't do that, we are poisoning the environment where we are growing the food and where the jobs are. >> the plant, as the indoor farm is called doesn't grow the soy beans, but must ards, basil, microgreens on the plates of white napkin restaurants. the fish supply the fertiliser that four ishes the produce. a handful of farmers across the u.s., including tenant farmers join the industry. >> for 365 days a year we control our environment and provide the best environment to grow plants in the middle of winter. we like to say we provide june 21st sunlight every day of the year. >> quality is another vantage.
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>> from your hands to someone else's, it tastes 10 times better. >> when this was a meat-packing plant, 18 wheeler plants came up, loaded up the meat and carried it off. now the loading bays are torn down. they don't need them because they carry the produce out the back in trucks and bicycles, a few miles away. when finished this device is designed to make the plant energy neutral, turning the waste into biomass. reusing things that others thing are waste or should be thrown away, you can find the energy in a structure or the workers or find these things that are cast aside and put them to productive use. >> economies like that could encourage others to make the move indoors. >> at the end of our first hour here is what we are following.
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funeral services have been held for nelson mandela. the former south african leader was buried in his ancestral home of qunu. we learn about the colorado high school shooter, karl pierson had a rifle, ammo and molotov cocktail and was set to harm more people. >> agencies criticise the u.n. in response to the crisis in central african republic. people are now experiencing a lack of food. >> i'm john henry smith - a big name in college football stepped down. details next hour in sports. >> it's snowing in parts of the north-east. i'll show you when we catch a break to dig out before another round returns. >> we leave you with the sites and sounds of nelson mandela's funeral. an hour ago he was laid to rest in his home sound in qunu. let's look back at the service paying homage to one of the
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world's most respected leaders. [ singing ] >> a young man who left seven decades ago, grew into a might by leader. . >> you brought a new world into being and told us to leave as citizens of god's rein.
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>> today mingled with grief is enormous pride that one of our own has, during his lifetime and now in death, united the people of south africa and the entire world on a scale never before experienced in history.
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[ singing ] >> nelson mandela's final journey home. >> behind me there are 95 candles that were lit early this morning around 5 o'clock. they represent the years of madeba's life. >> saying goodbye after 10 days of mourping -- mourning a military escourt carries nelson mandela's casket to its burial site. >> calls for closer ties to the
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e.u. by ukrainians. >> snow in the north-east. others will have to deal with the rain. >> the final step in his long walk to freedom. south africa's first black president is laid to rest in his ancestral village. good morning, good to have you with us. i'm thomas drayton. >> i'm richelle carey. an outpouring of love, tears, laughter and reflection for nelson mandela. a man who transformed south africa and inspired millions of people all around the world. >> a state funeral brings 10 days of mourning for the former leader to a close. a struggle for freedom helps the white minority rule. he died after battling a lung infection lasting for months. thousands gathered at a state
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funeral. you can see the gathering. remembering the leader, the man who changed the world. >> we will miss the smile. your laughter. your love. and your leadership. we will cherish every moment we spent with his own gesture of k made all those around him want to do good. the lesson he taught us, we wanted to do good because we wanted to see him leading by example and do good. >> farewell my dear brother, my mentor and leader. >> i have lost a brother. my life is in a void, and i don't know who to turn to.
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>> clearly this is a time when this is transition from a celebration to people really realising how final this is. nelson mandela's body has been laid to rest in his ancestral village in qunu, buried among family members in a modest grave. allen schauffler is there now. nelson mandela belonged to the world, but belonged to qunu. people there have such pride that this is where nelson mandela grew up, seeing him walk by, that he belonged to them. having said that everyone could not attend the funeral, right. there were some people that came out to see video screens, were there people that felt excluded? >> absolutely. and they've been puck lick about it this week. there's a tradition that if there's a funeral you can go if you want to. the folks was told there was not
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a place for them, so the residents from the village of qunu were not happy. many of them did speak out. no such rancour where i am. i am in empar across the valley and the event was happy, cheerful. a quick tour. you see the big screen that everyone watched the proceedings on, and to the left you see the temporary building put in place for the services that came today. you see the tent so folks could watch and not watch in the blazing sun. it's been hot. 400, 450 at the top for attendance here. as i said a reserved crowd, quiet, respectful. they cheered when they saw the casket and some of them stood up and waved on the big screening as it wept by. >> i know you have spoken to people there as well. i know you have a little bit - a soundbyte from someone you spoke
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to. tell me about that. the future is brighter than before. >> we are hoping for the best and believe that his passing is enlightening. everybody, to take the stand and say, "i'm going to take this legacy. madeba legacy." the legacy from qunu and take it forward. >> an interesting take on a question that is shadowing the entire event, which is what happens now. south africa now needs to figure out whether they can honour nelson mandela by living and moving forward by his principles, which we heard from dozens of speakers, can we do that? we'll all watch and see. >> let's talk about that, about what comes next, about unity. has there been any type of political rankour, strife,
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anyone speaking up. at the memorial there were people that booed the current leadership of south africa. have you heard anything to that effect. haven't heard anything like that in the run-up to this event, the funeral and burial, there were several prominent people that made a fuss about whether they'd attend and whether they'd been officially invited. archbishop desmond tutu had been one. he said "if jacob zuma is here, i'm not coming." he attended in some fashion. but they were public statements and politically charged statements by high profile people. this was a back drop for which the event, full of love and commitment and respect for nelson mandela was played out. there was a lot of political rancour in south africa.
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>> when you think about it, even in funerals that are not state funerals, there's a lot that goes on in the background. that's the way these things go on. thank you so much allen schauffler. >> and nick schifrin joins us from the birthplace of nelson mandela. this is a rural, quite area. how are the people there reacting? >> i think they are bearing one of their own. there's a lot of people who are sad, touched by this day. for 10 days we talk about celebrating life. marking everything he has done for the country and the world. today people are taking it in saying this man is gone, buried in the ground. the long walk to freedom is over. we'll wake up tomorrow.
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people are taking a moment and figuring out how best to say goodbye. this is the last trip home. he died in home. he was the home-town hero and a final goodbye. the villages, were they satisfied with how he was laid to rest? >> i think in general people are honoured by being part of this man adds era, honoured watching this burial or funeral, up until the burial itself. as alan said there was a lot of people in qunu, including a family up the hill from the nelson mandela compound. no more than 7-800 feet. there's three army soldiers, army personnel carrier, and they feel like they are being
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excluded. they told me a wonderful story about how nelson mandela used to walk behind their house. they'd get a personal invitation from nelson mandela, even when he was president, to share the holiday. now they say why are foreigners getting better access and the dignitaries getting better access. why aren't his values of comraderie, friend ship and neighbourly love. they are upset this no locals were invited. >> he was a man among the people. this was a final moment. can you talk about what is next for the smaller down, what is next for the people there. >> i think this place is gorgeous, beautiful. it's stuping. but the beauty is skin deep.
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there's incredible poverty. people are not peeling economic freedom even as they thank nelson mandela for political freedom. a lot are saying, "okay, we unshackled ourselves from apartheid, but where is my job and the better opportunities. where are the vision and promises nelson mandela gave us not only for political freedom, but economic freedom, where is that. can the current leadership give us that." >> so many questions, difficult to answer. thank you nick schifrin from the birth place of nelson mandela. >> let's talk about the 4500 people invited to the funeral, to the dismay of locals. there were foreign dignitaries, celebrities, business tycoons. now, among them britain's prince
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charles, u.s. media mogul oprah winnry. nelson mandela's life was an example of a man who built bridges with people of all walks of life. that life is documented. and will help build a bridge for future generations. >> the center of memory is full of predictable and the strange and unusual. >> if you look at this one here, it's from arnold schwarzenegger. >> arnie and madeba. >> and another gift for madeba. >> he's behind her. >> he's behind her. >> who is that. oprah winfrey. >> as well as bean an historical record of nelson mandela's life, it's a place the public can cut through the mythology.
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personal documents are in the vault. >> this is his mother's death certificate. she died in 1968. he asked for permission to attend the funeral, as the son he wanted to bury here, but he was not allowed. >> there are private letters to winnie, and diary entries. one which details an argument with current wife graca machel. >> there's a sense of carrying a burden in relation to a saintly image of him. he was the face of the struggle. increasingly he felt uncomfortable with that. >> this is the office since 2002. >> he used to come in almost every day. as he retired in 2004 he reduced the amount of time he came. re reduced the amount of time. few knew the complexities of a
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man millions looked up to. the center of memories office is a look at the man and the myth. >> well, a number of you have been impacted by a winter storm that is making its mark into some areas of new england. we have video to show you. out of indiana where a number of people were impacted and we'll dig out from that, five upwards to nine inches of snow falling across northern indiana. much of the north-west clearing up to much of upstate areas of new york. snow sticking around. let's go ahead and take you to the video and show you what
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we've been dealing with. white-out conditions at times, making travel slow and messy. better to stay clear. that'll be the case. continue to have the shovels ready because you will certainly be needing them. as the storm system lifts out we are not only dealing with snow, but blustery conditions. some of that snow will be blown around. >> here is a look at the winds. wind up wards of 40 miles. new york city nearly 30 mile winds. sustained in boston, and of course belowing snow around portland where the wind of 50-20 miles at times. winter storm warnings through the areas. stretching into upstate new york and dealing with lake effect snow showers. winds picking up the snow by the time we get to the 6 o'clock
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hour. by the time we get into monday, a break from the action. another starm system to watch. that break coming to us later this evening. here, around parts of western michigan, snow from 3-5 inches. >> many parts getting a taste of wint are. meteorologist eboni dean. >> two days after ukraine's president called on protesters to stop their campaign, thousands of taking to the streets demanding he step down. >> in germany democrats vote to join socialists. >> $1.5 million is the big weather. >> how the wintry weather is playing a role in the
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>> welcome back, look at the number, $1.5 billion what holiday makers are losing
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because of the wintry weather. it's a big hit as 19% of sales are during the holiday seasons. 15% shoppers during the cold front amounting to $1.5 billion of sales lost. 32 million americans have to start the holiday shopping. >> there's time to make up for it. time to buy a lottery ticket. welcome back, i'm richelle carey. social democrats are eating humble pie. >> we'll have that in a moment, but first eboni dean with the forecast. >> chilly temperatures, air making its way down to the deep south. we are 20 degrees colder where the temperatures dropped from the 50s to the 30s. milder air. it's been snow in the east thanks to cold temperatures.
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21 in albany. we'll see milder air move in with highs near 40. >> thank you. flooding due to heavy rain in the gaza strip forced 40,000 residents from their home. more than 5,000 needed rescue, taken to safety in boats. military strucks and -- trucks and vehicles. the storm occurred at a time when it's under tight border patrol. rescue hampers hampered by fuel shortages and power cuts. >> in thailand after weeks of unrest protesters presented their demands to the military. telling leaders that they wanted the prime minister to give up power, and they want an interim government in place until elections can be held in february. the military supreme commander declined to take things publicly. >> a coalition with chancellor
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angela merkel. the vote setting the stage to reflect angela merkel on tuesday. barnaby phillips has more. >> they counted the votes diligently, results were not in doubt. it is a resounding endorsement for the party's leadership. >> translation: the presiding officer set 76% of party members who voted said yes to going into government. so the path is open to another grand coalition here in germany. angela merkel will be the dominant figure in this country's politics and across europe, for the next four years. >> mrs. merkel's cdu party won the elections. without a majority she made contentions with the democrats
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to lure them into coalition, introducing a minimum wage and increasing pensions. germany's tough approach to weaker countries is unlikely to change. >> we are playing a good cop/bad cop game. germany is insisting on the rules. it was generally the idea in the last couple of years. it's more on the side of european commission, what it represents. generally speaking i don't think they let anyone get off the book when it comes to deficit spending or not getting the structural problems in order. after the celebrations it will be hard work. the new government announced supd and on tuesday angela merkel was due to be formally sworn in. >> social democrats were highly resistant to the idea of another alliance with roger mercaangela
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the worst election lost ever. >> a construction worker died when he fell from the roof of a stadium built from the 2014 one in brazil. so far five workers have been killed all for next year's soccer tournament. the company building the stadium has opened an internal investigation into the cause of accident. >> egyptians will vote for a new constitution. the interim president adly mansour set a date. voter turn out will determine if the public support. muslim brotherhood vowed to boycott the election. >> in the u.s. government sub siddies have been blamed for
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affecting cotton farmers in third world. >> this man was born on his parents farm in mississippi. his family have been here since 1957. the history of african-americans in cotton production has a long and turbulent history. profits were made on the backs of slaves. many black farmers feel persecuted. the department of agriculture is accused of denying black farmers. >> we didn't expect to be treated like that. we wanted to be competitive with the other farmers, to make a living, a decent living. >> life for roy and other cotton farmers could get harder. government subsidies may be cut for roy. it's a loss of $50,000 a year.
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>> it will be bad if the government takes the subsidies away from the farmers. >> the problem is billions of dollars in subsidies distort the cotton market. prices are pushed down making it harder for developing nations to compete. it's something that nations like brazil fought hard against. claiming the practice is illegal and unfair. they've been backed by an international court. it's widely expected the days of subsidies will be gone. at the historic cotton museum experts like bill griffin say there's little choice but to change the policy. most growers don't need them, but they are against world trade organization agreements. if we value w.t.o. rules and regulations if we vie owlate
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them we can be fined. >> roy wants to pass his farm on to his children, but without help that may be harder. >> the u.s. ranks third in global cotton production and is a leading exporters. the cotton industry counts for $25 billion in products and services. >> chileans are returning to the polls for a presidential run-off election. the socialist candidate is expected to win. a low-voter turn out could alter the results. we have this report from santity argo. >> it's time for race two. there's little problem about the outcome. >> we know what the result will be. there's a few things that need to be decided between now and the day michelle bachelet takes
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office. at the end of the film, michelle bachelet is taking office on march 11th. speed chile's former social president michelle bachelet, running again, fell short of winning last month in the first round against her main rival evelyn matthei, a conservative economist, representing the right-wing government coalition. and it's precisely the widespread belief that the outcome is a given, that michelle bachelet's opponents are counting on. >> the leading candidate is michelle bachelet by a wide margin. the campaign makes it sounds like it's won. supporters have no incentive to vote. it could turn the race in our favour. >> the unknown is how many people will turn out in a first presidential election in which voting is not mandatory. >> i am not going to vote.
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it makes no difference. >> the choice is between two daughters of air force generals on opposing sides of a military coup. michelle bachelet's father was tortured. evelyn matthei's father was a member of the gunther. >> chile may be the first country in the world where the top political job is being fought over by two women. yet the focus is not on the gender of the candidates, but their different political views. >> evelyn matthei is a conservative who wants to preserve the status quo, latin america's stable economy. the left-leading michelle bachelet is promising economical reforms to better distribute wealth and opportunities. whoever wins may determine how many go out to vote.
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>> nelson mandela's journey ends where it all began. >> anemotional home-going service as thousand remember nelson mandela. he is laid to rest in his ancestral home town. we'll talk to an author who followed his life. >> and history was made when the heisman trophy winner was announced.
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>> and history was made when the
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>> welcome back, you are watching al jazeera america. let's look at the top stories: a trough in the north-east has got a big dose of winter weather. more to come. parts of pennsylvania got up to a foot of snow. now the snow is heading to massachusetts which could see
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6-12. maine could get near blizzard conditions. >> the victim of friday's colorado school shooting is in critical condition. clair davis was shot in the head by her classmate karl pierson in arapahoe high school. karl pierson was armed and intended to harm more people. [ singing ] >> a man who inspired millions, after 10 days of mourning south africa buries its first black president, nelson mandela, at his ancestral village. we are learning so much about the former south african leader. >> journalist and author of "madeba a to z - the many faces of nelson mandela." what did you think about the
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funeral service? >> south africa is good at putting on pageants and cell bragss. this is one of many. i was at its inauguration in 1994. his release were prison cas given the same global television treatment. the problem behind who has been invited, who hasn't. who is annoyed, which is what you guys focused on is a deeper question of what is his legacy, what is the nelson mandela - who is the nelson mandela who needs to be celebrated and admired. there's a debate about that. some say he's a cuddly grandfather who believes in reconciliation. others say no, he's a revolutionary leader who fought an arms struggle, went to prison, was nearly killed there, and became one of the first prisoners to become president with the hope of transforming his country.
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they won political power, but not economic power. there's as much power today as when he was president. we can't lose site of the context. that's what i tried to rite about in the book "madeba a to z, the many face of nelson mandela" >> is that because people are more comfortable talking about reconciliation than the revolution. >> everyone looks to the nelson mandela they identify and what about him they admire. he is to be admired. he's not a celebrity, saint or saviour. >> he became a celebrity. it wasn't his goal. >> he game a celebrity, but he is not madonna. >> fair enough. >> he stood for certain principles and believed in them and fought for them.
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so, really, who he is to be admired for it courage, resilience. talk to his gaolers, which nobody expected. negotiate the release - dash he negotiated in a tough way the release of his colleagues or comrades as he called them. in the movie "nelson mandela - long walk to freedom", which i documented about the making and meaning of the lopping walk to freedom. they capture this. there's many conflicts and contradictions. with a difficult personal life, the loss of his children and marriage, being alone, being isolated in a time, basically. yet managing to sustain his commitment. that is amazing. >> if that made him endeering to
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people, we look at the leaders, he was really a world leader to many. >> a lot of world leaders want to be like nelson mandela. they want the mistake and aura. they don't have it. most of the politicians by the time they leave office have lost a lot of support. their following has gone down and in this case it's gone up. more respect and entire them. he has taken a long talk. it's what we talk about, madeba a to z. there was many people, yet he had a lot to offer for us, a model of sacrifices. >> and not being perfect. where did he draw his wisdom from. where did he get this from. >> he came from a rural area, part of a tribe.
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intige nous leader, and part of a tribal culture. they stressed consensus, a method of decision making. it wasn't you are in charge, you are the dictator, you tell others what to do, he consulted with his colleagues and the people he worked with. that is something he learnt from qunu, as they call it, the place that he grew up. he has that part of it, he became a lawyer and a nonviability revolution which -- nonviolent revolutionary where nonviolence was possible. he became a violent revolutionary and barack obama, in his speech remembered that and told us to remember it, that this was a man that stood up for his beliefs and he was facing a death sentence. he said, "i am prepared to die." so the government didn't in the
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end sentence him to death. when he got to the prison on robben island he was told he would only leave in a box of the the media was not allowed to report on him. his image couldn't be seen. his image is everywhere now. >> everywhere. >> that's the irony. because everybody sees his face they think they know his story, and they don't. it's fascinating. >> there's so much to learn about him. >> good to have you with us danny. >> the president of the central african republic calls for an end to sectarian violence. michel djotobia is ready to hold talks with the christian militia. hundreds dead in a week as fighting continues between muslims and christians. billions caught in the crossfire. residents facing a food shortage. it was supposed to reach beam in
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bangui. >> a variety of health services are provided to syrian refugees in jordan. special treatment for children with autism is not on the list. >> it's left four syrian families about autism, no choice but to wash their children deteriorate without treatment. >> a destitute syrian family living as refugees in jordan with two sick children. omar has autism. and the other learning difficulties. both need special services. they have no money to pay for it. when the money came out the children have been confined to a tiny apartment. omar's aggressive behaviour leafs him no choice but to lock him up in a room. >> our children are growing up, their chances of being treatment
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is decreasing. i feel like my children's future is wasting away even though there is hope they can get better if treated. >> ever since omar left the autism center he's regressed. omar is afraid to play outside. children bully him because of his disability. they improve as long as therapy and schooling are not interrupted. >> early intervention is an effective way to reduce symptoms of autism. maintaining consistency and providing a routine are crucial. into that is what a child from aleppo had. he was sent to the autism academy in oman. he is doing so well he lives at the academy and goes to a regular school. what he doesn't have is family.
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his parents were refugees in turkey and lost contact. he's under the care of the center. >> autism centres here can't help syrian children unless there's significant funding. they can barely cope with the number of jordanian patients. the approaches and treatment of autism needs something, consistent funding. that is really sad because sometimes parents come to me and tell me if i don't have money, that means that my child has no treatment. >> the cost of treatment is $4,000. no syrian rev any family can afford that. the well being depends on whether there's enough outside funding to ensure a better life. >> all right.
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it was a night to remember. for florida's state's jameis winston. the heisman trophy, it doesn't get bigger than that. >> with his talent and effusive personality, florida seemed to be a football fan dream come true until an accusation of sexual assault cast a paul over the season of the the justice process has cleared him and the heisman trophy revered him. >> on paper jameis winston was a shoe in. the quarterback leading the nation and his seminoles to an undefeated season and title. this year's race was not about the numbers. voters had to peel back layers of jameis winston historic record-breaking season and decide if his character was worthy. through it all the 19-year-old
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kept his composure on the field and was exonerated off. he let his feelings show, as he become the youngest heisman trophy winner. >> i trusted in the process that evaluated facts and truth would be deliver. out of all the thinks delivered. i remember when my daddy trusted in the process and risked his job. and was jobless three years ago. when i was out there doing whatever i did to provide for my family, because i know he couldn't do it. me and mama had to pay bills and make everything happen. and that man, he kept by me. the truth prevailed. eventually i got a scholarship. i kept the education. i kept bringing everything home. this is not just for jameis winston, it's for florida state
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and i love everybody in here. i'm so blisz right now, man. >> 115 voters left him off the ballot. he won in a land slide, over 2,000 to 709 for the second place. >> what can jameis winston do for an encore. win a national title, of course. jameis winston and seminoles take on auburn in the national championship game at the rose bowl. >> thank you so much. i'll be back with your non-heisman sport headlines in a few minutes. for now, back to you. >> john mccain joins about 200,000 protesters in ukraine in a show of solidarity. opposition leaders call for a mass rally in kiev square where are, occupied by demonstrators.
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we joined live from key eve. so, robin, tell us about what is on senator john mccain's agenda, who he's been meeting with and what it's all about? >> i'm afraid i didn't catch the start to your question, unfortunately. the line is not too good much we have a lot of noise in the background. but if you can hear me clearly i'll let you know this: that john mccain made a speech on the stage a few minutes ago. he said he was with ukraine. he said america stood with ukraine, and said, "your future is with europe, and this is about your future and no one else's. i ensure that the people here appreciated this gesture. let's not forget john mccain is not the president of the united states, but the man that lost to the president of the united states. they want to see how america and the west can put pressure on the
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ukrainian government to make them turn around, go back towards integration, and the way they want them to do that is think about or getting serious about imposing actions on the ukrainian government. sanctions on the country wouldn't be a good thing. it's not doing a good thing from an economy perspective. they want to see you have sanctions on officials, freezing foreign assets because the people here believe the president viktor yanukovych and his government crew rich over the past few years. >> we'll go ahead and let you go. the communication is difficult. thorough report there. experts say it's a problem that will get worse - what to do with the technology we don't use. how to dispose of e-waste. tñ
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>> welcome back to al jazeera america. hope you are having a great morning. listen to this - going green.
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a vertical way, a new trend. >> that in a moment. first wet weather in the forecast. let's turn to meteorologist eboni dean. who will see the rain and snow. >> the east coast is getting a bit of both. northern areas of new england are dealing with the wintry side of the storm system. on the southern end rain storms and storms blowing through parts of north central areas of florida. taking you to the north-east where the snow comes down. a few breaks on the backside of the system. it will continue to wind down. expect several more inches of snow, especially in domain where there's 3-5 inches. >> on the southern side of the system, frontal systems, bringing showers and storms. the threat is diminishing, but expect gusty winds. >> it takes a lot of energy to
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shift produce across the country from california to chicago. that's why vertical farming a becoming a big thing much. >> vertical farming. what is it. >> john hendren has the story. >> beneath the fluorescent sound in a meat-packing plant is the latest trend in farming. it's called vertical farming. they grow on multiple floors in a chicago industrial park far from the fields. this farmer grows greens in soil-free water. >> our food system is broken. we ship goods 1500 miles to chicago. we are pointing the environment. we can't do that. we need to grow where the need is. >> the plants grose mushrooms, base ill, mushroom greens,
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high-end greens on the plates of white napkin restaurants. the fish provides the fertili fertiliser. tenant farmers have joined the urban farming industry. >> for 365 days a year we control the environment and provide the best environment to grow plants in the middle of winter. we private june 21st sunlight. >> there's an advantage, quality. >> when it's pecked from your hands to somebody's hands, it tastes 10-times better. >> when this was a meat-packing plant, huge 18 wheeler trucks came up here, loaded up the meat and carried it hundreds of miles across the u.s. the loading bays are torn down. they carry the produce out the back in small trucks and bicycles a few miles away to
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downtown chicago. this device is designed to make the waste from local restaurants and breweries into biomass to fuel the plant. >> buy using creativity and using what others thing are waste. you can find the embodied energy in a structure or the good workers or things cast aside and put them to productive use. >> economies like that could encourage other farmers to make the move indoors. >> many of these urban farmers say they are 30 times more efficient than traditional farms and it is a winner. >> the coaching carousel continues to spin in college football. john henry smith is back again. hi, there, my friend. >> it spin was not a surprise, a move resumured for weeks
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happened. matt brown stepped down as texas's head coach after 16 seasons, he'll stick around to coach the longhorns. they have fallen into mediocrity. the program has gone 30 and 20 and 18 and 17 in the big 12. in a statement the 62-year-old said of the change in leadership, "i hope with new energy we'll get this rolling again." the naval academy wept into the army navy game as favourites. the midship men beat the black knights 11 times. army had a tough year, 3 and 8. a win over navy would make it right. it was a snowy day. navy up 10, keenan reynolds, on the quarterback. 47 yards later 17-0 navy.
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136 yards. middies in charge. reynolds again, from 11 yards out. navy's season says navy wins 34-7. to the college hard wood, a match-up of two storage names. roy williams and his 18th ranked tar heels. this was the marcus paige show. leading the all scores with 23 points, two assists for the ball handler. one was spectacular. the heels sent the wildcats to a third loss by a final of 82-77 >> shaun miller flanked by his assistants. they have a heck of a coaching staff and star in aaron gordon. the pride of arch gordon. it's a safe bet that number one arizona would stay number one
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after sneaking by michigan 72-70. the portland trailblazer had a record 21, three pointers. portland 20 and 4. i'm john henry smith, and that is sport. >> so-called e-waste, it's carded gadgets, appliances containing dangerous levels of led. >> it damages the environment and the health of those in contact with it. >> year after year we buy more electronic toys, gadgets and appliances. they end up being thrown out. they frequently contain gold, silver and copper and led. recycling them, if down like this in india is a dangerous and toxic job.
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it contains hazardous metals. it's not easy to treat. the appropriate recycling is taking place. if the valuals a-- valuables ar waved it's a loss of resources. >> some countries are moving towards e-waste. the increasing demand for electronics do overwhelm existing facilities, seeing millions of tonnes of waste dumped into landfill. >> it is expected to rise to 65.4 million tonnes dumped to land waste. china and the u.s. produced 11.1 million and 10 million tonnes respectively last year of waste. >> each chinese person produces 5.4 kilograms of trash. this compares to the average american producing six times
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this, 29.8 kilograms. >> a u.n. initiative created a map, looking at 184 countries, comparing how much each generates and disposes. >> the e-waste is an issue for both. we have the issue that we are facing, low collection rates despite good ewaste management systems in the place. so the consumer has to play a certain role, and he has to be aware and take action. >> let's hope the map will give governments and companies dealing in e-waste a better sense of the problem. then they can move the mountain and ensure it's disposed of. >> at the end of the second hour, here is what we are following: funeral services have
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been held for nelson mandela, buried in his ancestral home in qunu. >> protesters in ukraine have been called tonne stop their protesting. >> snow to rain in the north-east. >> i'm tracking a front and the changes it will bring - details aha. >> i'm john henry smith, another heisman trophy whipp heisman trophy winner anointed. >> more news ahead. richelle carey and i'll be back in 2.5 minutes.
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>> nelson mandela's final journey. >> let us fulfil his wish to see nations working in solidarity in pursuit of their rights and request to lift themselves from pov erty to prosperity. >> after 10 days of mourning nelson mandela has been laid to rest. mass casualties, new details emerge in the colorado school shoong. the shooter was out to harm a large number of individuals.
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>> losing hope as violence in central african republic - thousands living without shelter. >> bitcoin to me is freedom. it represents freedom in the financial world. >> in india cash is key, the push to expand the use of the digital currency bitcoin. >> a country transformed and millions inspired by a man finally laid to rest. good morning, i'm richelle carey. nelson mandela, a man seen as an icon, hero and father is buried in his ancestral village of qunu. this is a final step of a journey for south africa's first president, nelson mandela. he died 10 days ago after battling a chronic lung infection for months.
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thousands gathered to remember the leader. >> it you did give us many brilliant moments of leadership, but you did also give us moments of lots of laughter which we don't have a chance to talk about now. i think we still have to write about moments with tata. >> we salute an example laid before us. in tata that is it producing more. well done good and faithful servant. >> madeba, we will miss your smile, your laughter, your love and your leadership. we will cherish every moment we spend with you. >> his own gesture of kindness made all those around him want
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to do good. that's the lesson he has taught us. we want to do good because we have seen him leading by example. >> farewell my dear brother, my mentor, my leader. with all the energy and determination, our command to join the people of south africa in an ideal. >> i have lost a brother. my life is in a void, and i don't know who to turn to. >> we have two live reports in qunu, nick schifrin is there, but we begin with allen schauffler. the funeral drew a largely christian - basically a christian methodist ceremony and there were traditions incorporated into the burial.
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can you tell us about that. >> we don't know too much about the burial itself and what it involved. the nelson mandela family asked it be kept private and it was. the last we saw was a casket next to the pit that was dug. around the service, the turnal. we know that in local tradition an ox has been slaughtered. it would have been spoken to by the tribal elders, and they would have explained that someone needed to accompany grandparent into the afterlife. they would have assumed the animal approved of it. they would have slaughtered the animal, eaten some of it. the meat will be shared amongst the family as they gather in the aftermath of this funeral. we know at some point this week the tools used to dig the pit where nelson mandela was placed will be purified so they can be
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used again. that's what we know about the local traditions played out around the funeral. >> tell me about the people that i know you have spoken to there, that came to this location that you are, to, in their own way, participate in the funeral, even though they weren't there at the location of the funeral. >> yes, everybody we talked to was delighted to be here, clearing out now, cleaning up. probably 400 or so at the peak. some of them are here for seven or eight hours watching the ceremony on the big screen. everybody here very cheerful. a question hanging in the air is now what. how does south africa move forward now that nelson mandela is gone. how do all of us honour his principles. we had an interesting answer to that from one woman, here is the way she dealt with the question. >> so the future is brighter than before.
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we are hoping for the best, and we believe that his passing is like enlightening. you know, everybody to take up arms and say i'm going to take this legacy. madeba legacy. and take it for what? >> now the world will watch, of course, and see if the principals can be followed. interesting day here. the ceremony started late, it ran long - something we have seen in south africa, not uncommon. this was a glitchless ceremony, the first state funeral for the new south africa. >> and as you said, it's about the fact that nelson mandela seemed to raise the bar not only for sav caps, but really for the world. some of the guests that we spoke to watching the funeral. that's what they said, that nelson
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mandela challenged people on forgiveness, and it seems that that is something personal to people in south africa and the village, if they feel they have a bar to strive to because of nelson mandela. >> true. in an interesting facet of this it lends to a little bit of political fatigue. we have been hearing about the tremendous man, a great thinger, a humanitarian, someone who knew, understood and quoted the classics, educated and a man that came out of prison and heeled a country and because of where we are and what is happening, there's comparisons with the current crop of political leaders. people are wounded because they look at the bar. nelson mandela set, and they look at the rest of mere mortals running the country. people are disappointed when they look that way.
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>> it's a high bar. all anyone can do it the best. >> now to nick schifrin. he is covering nelson mandela's funeral. it's the birthplace of nelson mandela. so, nick, there has been celebrations and now nelson mandela's journey has come to on end. i know this is a huge question to put to you, but what now? what next? the celebrations are over. this is truly transitioning into grieving and it will end. what next? >> yes, i think they've been grieving for 10 days, and they are taking today to say goodbye to a home-town hero. so many here see nelson mandela as a traditional ruler, a tribe all ruler. behind me is the compound.
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he is seen as someone who took values of this place and became the world states moun, the you're bane man, the sophisticated leader. they say, "hey, look, this is where he started and we need to thank him and say goodbye." now they say what is next or who is next. they look around at the mere mortals leading the a.n.c. the party that is ruling that saying where is the next nelson mandela, or are these people taking nelson mandela's lead and running with it. >> i talked to a member of the a.n.c. this morning. let's listen to what he had to say? >> a lot of people were scared of doing wrong things because of the old man, and he was respected everywhere. now it's a question of will the nation unite again? >> and you heard that point. as long as nelson mandela was alive
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people would act appropriately and say what would madeba think if i did this. now that he's dead there's a worry among the act visits who say maybe people will not listen to what nelson mandela said or take his leadership and go with that. there's a worry about the current leaders. >> nick, a few moments ago a guest who wrote a back about nelson mandela "the faces about nelson mandela", the question we put is where did nelson mandela draw wisdom. he said it clearly came from the tribe he bass from. one thing he learned was to get consensus from people. can you talk about the village he's from. and how it helped to develop the person that nelson mandela became. >> i think it's a great question. we are looking at three phases of a young man's life, the first year and a half spent here, his
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father was a tribal all chief and his father had a dispute with a white judge. he was stripped of his title. that's when he moved to qunu. 10 years later his father died. that's the instrumental years. he was under the tute lig, adopted by the tribal king. that person took manned are in and showed him how he led. nelson mandela said he learnt things about how to persuade things from the back, in those years as a teenager, that's why people are proud of him, proud to be associated with him. they see him as a tribal leader. he took the values that he saw is the 12, 14, 16 when adopted by the tribal king and applied
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those later this his life. they added an ability to perside and understand the white south african culture, and he learned that in prison. he was an angry man when they got to prison, and was more mill tant than we remember him as. 27 years later he was tempered and understood how to persuade his enemy, how to sit across the table and convince him. those two things combined into the man we are celebrating. >> basically all these experiences made them into the man, the man the world needed him to be at the right time. we would never know that at the moment, but looking back that's what happened. we're all the product of our environment and this is what the world needed him to be. nick schifrin, fantastic reporting there. thank you so much. >> a moving tribute to nelson mandela with readings from many of his family members.
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and his grandson spoke about his grandfather's legacy that inspired him to be an activist. >> through nelson mandela the world learnt about the spirit of forgiveness, the beauty of reconciliation. so much so, the story of south africa. >> also at the funeral foreign dignitaries, top government officials, business tycoons and members of the royal family among 4500 paying tribute. among them britain's prince charles and oprah winfrey. nelson mandela's life was an example of a man who built bridges with all walks of bridges, and the life documented in films and books. al jazeera's tania page takes a tour of his archive to see how his memory lives on. >> the center of memory is full
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of predictable and strange and unusual. >> if you look at this one here, it's from arnold swars negger. >> arnie and madiba. >> another gift given to madeba. >> he's behind her. >> he's behind her. >> who is that? >> oprah winfrey. >> as well as being an historical record of nelson mandela's life, it's the place the public can cut through mythology. >> this is his mother's death, who died in 1968. he asked for permission to attend the funeral. he was not allowed. there are private letters to his wife and diary entries, one detailing entries to his current wife graca machel.
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>> there's a sense of carrying a burden in relation to a saintly image. he became the face of a struggle. increasingly he felt uncomfortable with that. >> this is the office since 2002. he used to come in almost every day and as he retired, really retired in 2004, he reduced the amount. time he came. >> here nelson mandela was surrounded by people that inspired and influenced him. famous faces filled the shovels, few knew the complexities of a man. nelson mandela - the man and the myth. >> center of memory was established in 1999 as nelson mandela's official archive. >> a wintry mess for people in the north-east. let's bring in meteorologist eboni dean who i hope has a bit
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of good news. >> the good news is the snow is winding down in new york city. mainly north ward, across northern new england where we have to deal with the snow. reports of 5 inches of snow. up wards of a foot in some arse. higher amounts, hag 14 inches of the white stuff. be prepared, have the shovels ready. now, we had some rain along the north-eastern coastline. much of that pushing out to sea as the frontal boundary moves to the east. we had an aerial of low pressure. on the backside of it colder air. as the snow wraps up blustery winds making it feel colder. here is a check of the winds, blowing sustaineded upwards to 30 miles.
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making it feel colder than what it is. as far as our winter storm warges that have been up this morning, some are dropping off. seeing improvement here. we'll keep the warges in place until this evening. as far as the the timing up until midday. after the 9 o'clock hour, that's when things wind down. looks like we'll see better weather in time for the commute. there'll be slicks on the roadway. >> nelson mandela's journey ends where it began. an emotional home inform going service as thousands turn tout to remember nelson mandela. >> the humanitarian crisis in central african republic, humanitarian organization critical of a slow response to the crisis. from physical cash to virtual
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dollars, bitcoin - it could be a reality in ind ya. tñ
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>> good morning, welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm richelle carey. the push in india for the virtual currency bitcoin. first, though, meteorologist eboni dean is here with a look at the forecast. >> we are talking about the chilly temperatures pushing all the way down to the mid south. still around zero in minneapolis. freezing point, but the winds are picking up making it feel colder, like the teens in albany. feels like we are sitting minus 9 in portland. cold temperatures and milder air moving in for the afternoon around new york city. by monday. it will be a colder start to the new work week. >> firefighters in glendale colorado contained a fire at a
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residential building under construction. flames reached as high as 30-40 feet in the air. the fire spread and burnt to another apartment building before firefighter contained it. >> the teenager involved in the col school -- colorado shooting planned to injure a lot of people. he had a shotgun, three molotov cocktails and amunation and a back pack. >> clair davis is a young woman of principle and purpose. she is an incident young lady and he was an innocent victim of an evil act of violence. >> karl pierson was likely
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targetting a faculty member who kicked him off the debate team. >> the president of the central african republic called for an end to sectarian violence. michel djotobia is ready to hold talks with christian militias. hundreds are dead in a week as fighting continues between muslims and christians. civilians are caught in the crossfire. aid that was supposed to reach people in bangui was cancelled because of security risks. >> these people are waiting for a doctor to see them. they are sleeping at the airport with no shelt are or mosquito nets. some of these children have malaria. doctors without borders criticised the united nations for not doing more. >> i think it's unacceptable. it's not like we are in a remote area. i don't know how we can ignore
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them. people say we'll go back home. everybody here wants to go home. if they are here it's for a reason. i want to know they are here, now, today. there are too many wounded people at the main hospital. so surgeons are using a warehouse to operate in. you can stee the conditions that these surgeons are working under. it's not a proper operating theatre. there's no ventilation. they are using chlorine to sterilise the wound. gunshot victims are a challenge here. >> a few hundred metres in all of this, the prime minister of the country moik lass tiangaye. he will not leave the base for his own safety. like every politician, he has no control over what is happening. i asked why he won't visit tens of thousands of people living
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close by. >> translation: you have to be realistic. i have to think of my own security. i don't have a car. do you want me to go on foot? i don't have an armed security guard. you can't expect me to go where my safety is not guaranteed. >> this is what he says. close to the airport a victim of sectarian violence. >> these are the remains of a general killed and stripped by an angry mob. >> there's death here, and life. this woman named her son francis hollande. he was born the day the fremp president -- french president visitored bangui. >> if i leave here, what will i do. they pillaged my house. i have nothing. >> this is a country that has
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all but collapsed. they are almost totally reliant on outside help. >> a construction worker died when he fell from the roof of a stadium built for the 214 world cup in brazil. five workers have been killed across the country. the country building the stadium has opened an intern investigation into the cause of the accident. in india the digital currency bitcoin is gaining popularity. virtual currenty is not regulated and people that use them could be at risk of losing their money. >> cash is everything in india. despite the rise of credit cards and online transactions, most
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transactions take flake place with banknotes. some want to change that. >> bitcoin, to me is freedom in the financial world. >> this woman is part of a group that meets to talk about bitcoins, releasing people from the burden of infoxchange and extra charges. >> businesses are linked to different countries and states. we need a currency that keeps up with that. she's part of a group that will hostway bit doing conference. they'll want to get individuals accustomed to this. this is for people to hold something, and understand about bitcoin. what it does is allows people to receive payment. if i carry this around i can receive payments.
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>> ind ya is mostly a cash based society, with the government keeping limits on how much a person can take out and bring into the country. all people have to do is download and hop on a plain and leave the country with millions. that is raising concern. >> that is what india is worried about. >> since bitcoins are anonymous, there's worry about money laundry. >> we do not note how to regulate it. that's a problem much authorities are wondering about a way to regulate this. >> ambrose and others attending the conference invited people from the government and financial sec for to better understand the potential of
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bitcoins in india. as wealth plays an important part in india's culture, even having its own goddess some want to see that wealth shift from the physical to the virtual. >> saying goodbye to the father of a nation. people in south africa and around the world say a final farewell to the late south african president nelson mandela. >> i'm john henry smith, youth served at the heisman trophy presentation. a look at the 79th winner - coming up in sports.
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>> welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm richelle carey, let's look at the top stories this morning. the victim of friday's colorado school shooting remains in
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critical condition. 17-year-old clair davis was shot in the head by her classmate karl pierson at arapahoe high school. karl pierson was heavily armed and intended to hurt more people. the president of central african republic seeks to end the violence. michel djotobia says that he's ready to hold talks with christian militias. hundreds died in a week. sectarian fighting continues. residents of bangui face residential crisis as food aid is cancel. [ singing ] >> a man who inspired millions in his final resting place after 10 days of mourning. south africa buries its first black president at his ancestral village. >> the day after nelson mandela was released from prisonee came
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to this stadium in soweto and address said thousands. they gathered here to watch the state funeral on the big screens. ma'am, what does nelson mandela mean to you. >> he meant a lot to me. i learnt a lot for him. the two things i took from him was - forgive your enemy and dine with your enemy. that's what i took from him. >> your mother was an ain apartheid activist and the public changed so much that she went out on the streets in soweto. what do you want to see in the next 20 years? >> they maust achieve what they didn't, what they promised the people they'd achieve. eventualingly, step by step. >> outside the stadium people are dapsing and sipping --
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dancing and singing what they call struggle songs, songs that nelson mandela would have known many of the words to, talking about freedom and hope for the future. it's a fitting memorial in soweto. >> joining us to offer insight on nelson mandela's legacy. ambassador robert, a former ambassador to the republic at vanuatu and professor at law school. >> you met nelson mandela at the united nations when he had been freed from prison. what was the experience like? >> it was exhilarating. everyone was excited to see a person that we had called for his freedom for quite a time and everyone new that he was the person that should have been the president of that country a long
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time ago. >> and when you say we had called for his freedom. talk about what role vanuatu played in apartheid. >> vanuatu was a small nation in the pacific. i was the ambassador to the united nations. vanuatu took a position that the regime in south africa was illegitimate and had no status, because most of the people in the country never voted or was allowed to make decision. >> pretty powerful. >> it seems like a no-brainer but so many countries had not done such a thing. >> yes, but it was a moral position that the government had taken and the then prime minister of the country, father walter was an anglican priest
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and we discussed what should bet the country's position to apartheid and south africa. the government felt removing apartheid was not enough that the government needed to be legit missed. >> talk about the meeting between your prime minister at the time and nelson mandela. what was that like? >> this was in namibia, at the independence of that country. >> father leney was representing rachel vanlandingham, and he met nelson mandela. father was a humble man. he walked up to nelson mandela and introduced himself saying, "pleased to meet you, i'm the prime minister of vanuatu, a small county in the south pacific", mr nelson mandela looked at him and said vanuatu,
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i know your country you say the government is illegitimate and called for strong actions in support. >> he knew. >> he did. despite 27 years in prison, he knew who was supporting him and who were taking different positions and was very as tute and insightful always. >> how did that make your people people, that he knew that it was not in vain? >> father was surprised, pleased and happy. he reported this when he went back home and people were very moved because rachel vanlandingham is a small country, and it has many issues itself. one of the biggest is climate change. it always felt that the new south africa was a great ally for the maul island countries
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with respect to climate change and global warming and water issues. >> you were a small country but very much leaders on this issue of apartheid. thank you ambassador for sharing these stories. professor at pace law school former ambassador to the republic ofhat washington stands with him. >> the free world is with you. america is with you. i am with you.
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>> robin walker joins us life from kiev. i know you have a difficult time to hearing us. the crowd is loust. tell us more about senator mccain's meeting, who he has been talking to and what his purpose is there. >> i think the people on the square would have appreciated his gesture,
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kremlin. >> robert - robin walker live in kiev. we'll check in, the report changes by the hour. >> michelle bachelet is poised to win chile's run off.
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the first presidential showdown. it is the first round of voting center left. michelle bachelet won twice as many votes as her rival evelyn matthei, but fell short of 50% needed to win outright. kosovo, since that time, is represented by some european countries and the united states. countries like russia will recognise a sovereign nation. recently a member nation with a billion members gave a stamp of aapproval. was it right for facebook to attend. we are joined by professor of global airs. kosovos are pumped, excited about the move. what do you make of it? >> i think the move tells us that we have a new player in the
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world power structure. certainly in world media platforms. if we can think about whether anything comparable, 15 pore 20 years ago, we can't imagine it. we have a platform where people can participate directly around governance and make their voices known and governance in turn are paying attention to facebook. basically kosovo can say on facebook i am from kosovo. i'm from kosovo. when i was invited to be on the - to talk with you. i went on facebook and looked for kosovo and found it very easery, and it wasn't called a country, it was called, like the united states, location, place, et cetera. so facebook really doesn't have
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to pay attention to formal traditional diplomatic realities and can follow the sentiments of the people. in facebook itself, when it issued a statement about this, said we follow the action. it was a lot of activity there. and we gave it a name. >> are there real implications to this. >> i think so. i think we have a new form of direct empowerment that we have not seen before. we have a bay for global pressure so to speak, a global means of expression that governments and private sector institutions must pay attention to because the people can speak out intermediaries, and places and countries that tried to
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repress social media. >> we think of the arab spring where social media tried to be suppressed and it doesn't. >> that's right. the depran revolution in iran, or a means that people hefr had. koso have as in the past wouldn't have been able to say, "we are here, recognise our political access," in a direct way for all citizen. >> do you think facebook - surely they knew there would be discussions about this. >> absolutely. >> if they didn't do this willy-nilly for lack of a better word. >> absolutely. if you read their statement there was an interesting article in the new york times. if you read their statement they
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basically say, you know, they considered it and understand they don't claim to be an official ash iter of who is a country and talk about the u.n. given controversy about google use in china, the use of twitter in egypt, the social media companies have as tute political vus. it was a considered move. >> fascinating. thank you so much for coming in we appreciate it. associate professor at university center for global affairs. >> history was made last night as the heisman trophy was awarded in new york. john henry smith is here with that. >> the winner was the secret everyone knew. with his talent and effusive
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parliamentary, florida state quarterback jameis winston was a fan come true until an xuification of sexual assault cast a poll. sips the accusation the legal increase cleared his name and the heisman trophy anointed him. jessica taff was at the heisman presentation. >> on paper jamesin winston was a shoe in. he led the nation in florida seminoles's to an unbeaten season and title. this year's race was not just about the numbers. voters had to peel back the layers of jameis winston's record-breaking season and tied if winston's cashing tore was heisman worthy. the 19-year-old kept his composure on the filed. he became the youngest heisman winner ever. >> i trusted in the process.
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truth is delivered with positive outcomes. this is all the things i have been through. i remember when my daddy trusted in a process. when he risked his job. and was jobless three years ago when i was out there doing wherever i did to provide for my family, because i know he can do it. me and my mama paid bills, making everything happen. and that man, he can't find me, but the truth prevail. eventually i got a scholarship. i kept the reputation up. this is not just for jameis winston, this is for florida state. and i love everybody in here i can't be that much - i'm so blisz now. >> the flort quarterback one in a landslide.
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over 2,000 point to 700 in second place. >> the second largest where a freshman took home the coveted award. what can jameis winston do for an encore - win a national title. seminoles take on auburn at the rose bowl. >> johnny manziel, last year's winner finished in tifth. >> elsewhere in college football the move that has been rumoured for weeks is matt brown stepped down. he'll stick around. the horns had fallen into mediocrity. the program has been 30 and 20, 18 and 17 in the big 12. in a statement the 62-year-old said of the change in leadership, "i hope with new energy we can get this thing rolling again."
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>> the navy academy went into the army-navy game as favoured. coming in 7-4, midshipman beat the black knights. army had a tough year, 3 and 8. but a win over navy would making better. >> second quarter navy up 10 keenan reynolds. 17. 136 yards. fourth quartser. middies in charge. this time rallying from 11 yards out. 29 rushing. navy single season record 34-7. >> to the college hard wood, a map uch with two story names, roy williams and his 18th ranked north carolina welcomed the 11th ranked kentucky. it was the marcus page show. 23 points, only to assist with the young ball handler. one was spectacular.
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the heels sending the widecats to a third loss. >> head coach sean miller flanked. we were going to have arizona highlights. there you have. flanking shaun miller for arizona. they have n.b.a. ped gri. this any will in the freshman era. 14 and 5, it's a safe bet that arizona will stale number will stay number one after speaking by 72-70. >> going green - the vertical way. the new farming trend turning the traditional way of growing crops upside down.
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>> welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm richelle carey. let's get a check of the wet weather across the country with meteorologist eboni dean. >> we have a frontal boundary
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moving across the eastern u.s., pushing flow florida where we are watching a line of storms. it will bridge wet weather there. we have colder air moving in. it is dry. none of the snow flakes reaching the ground. we have snow out there, mainly northern areas of new england. we'll watch late effect snow continuing into michigan. >> it takes a lot of energy to ship produce from california to chicago. vertical farming is becoming a big thing in the windy city. john hendren has the storey. >> beneath a fluorescent sun in a former meat-packing plant. these grow in multiple floors far from the rest of the world. this farmer grows greens for restaurantures. >> the food system is broken.
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we are shifting produce enormous differences. we can't do that, we are poisoning the environment where we are growing the food. >> the plant as the indoor faum is gone count grow the soy beans. it grows high-end micro cleans an the plates of restaurants. the fish supply the fertiliser nourishing the produce. a handful of farmers including those that rent plant joined the industry. for 360 days a year we control the environment. we like to say we provide june 21st sunlight every day of the year, the longest day of the year. >> there's another advantage - quality. from your own hand or somebody's hand the day before, versus
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being shipped to california, it tastes better. when it was the meat packing plant hundreds came here. now they are torn down. they don't feed them any more. they carry the produce out the back on bicycles. when it's finished this device is designed to make the plant energy mute ral, turning the waste into biomass to fuel the plant. using creativity and reusing things that others think are waste, finding the embodied energy in a structure, you can find good workers and things that are cast aside in the past and put them to good use. >> economies like that could encourage other farmers to make the move ipp doors. >> that will do it for this addition of al jazeera. we'll leave you with sights and sounds from nelson mandela's
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funeral. he was laid to rest in his home down of qunu a few hours ago. let's look back at the service paying tribute. and the father south africa's democracy. [ ♪ music ]
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>> the young man who left seven decades ago, grew into a mighty leader. >> you brought a new world into being and taught us to live as citizens. >> today, mingled with our grief is the enormous pride that one of our own has, during his lifetime, and now in your death,
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united the people of south africa and the entire world on a scale never felt before or experienced in history.
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see anywhere else. >> i've never heard him say, that he was grateful to the united states... >> talk to al jazeera with jimmy carter only on al jazeera america
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