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tv   News  Al Jazeera  January 5, 2014 6:00am-9:01am EST

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>> it's enough water. >> militants seize control of a key iraqi city. the u.s. says no more troops. >> diplomatic shuffles - secretary of state john kerry says he's making progress in talks between israelis and palestinians. there's a long way to go. >> violence at the polls - dozens are dead in bangladesh as the opposition calls for an election boycott. >> deep freeze - the mercury in the midwest plummets, as temperatures drop to record-breaking lows.
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>> good morning, welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford. al qaeda's effort to exploit the lack of security in iraq and syria appears to be gaining traction. in iraq two cities are under siege by al qaeda-linked fighters. more alarming is the violence could set off an all-out sectarian war as sunni anger towards the shia-led government intensifie intensifies. despite how bad the fighting has gotten secretary of state john kerry says, "this is a fight that belongs to the iraqis, we are not contemplating returning." >> al qaeda-linked groups have taken control of fallujah. the other province, ramadi, is under siege. it was one of the most dangerous places during the iraq war,
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where 1300 coalition soldiers were killed. the >> the group calls it's the islamic state of levant and wants to set up a sunni state in iraq, and across the border in syria and other countries. it's taken control of parts of syria. we go imran khan for more on the fighting. >> fighters from the al qaeda-linked state in the levant claim they have taken over the main highway into the town of fallujah. one man shouts god is great as he gestures to a burnt-out vehicle, claimed to be from iraq's army. they say they sent reinforcements to iraq to battle forces. the fighting has moved to the outskirts of fallujah. sunni tribal leaders have not allowed iraqi fighters to enter
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the town, saying they should head any negotiations. it's a sign of how little they think of nouri al-maliki. the prime minister is not backing down, describing the operation as vital to the security of iraq. >> translation: there's nothing left for us in the sovereignty. we have to unite to fight for ones destroying our country, to stand by the security forces and make sure we succeed in the political process they want destroyed. >> the sunni tribal leaders in ramadi, and other anbar province managed to rerout, and take the city. but fallujah is tense. sunni tribal leaders say they've been harassed, targeted and arrested by government forces and call for the reform of the sahwa, a military force
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disbanded when iraqi forces took control. the sunni groups in the anbar province are now at a stalemate. >> there are reports that the iraqi group took a defeat in another base, in the islamic state of iraq. opposition fighters accused the group of hijacking the rebellion in syria, and zeina khodr explains why. >> protests are growing and they are more widespread. people in the rebel-held syria want the islamic people of levant to leave. they have turned guns against the group and pushed them out of some villages. there has be there has been fierce battles. in this video they say they
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captured abusz saber al tunisi, a commander of the group. a newly formed alliance wept as far as declaring war on the islamic state, demanding that i.s.i.l. fighters join the ranks of other rebel groups or hand over their weapons and leave syria. the alliance accused i.s.i.l. of spreading strife and insecurity and liberating rebel areas, spilling the blood of fighters and wrongly accusing them of hare assy. >> we decided to fight the islamic state and will not stop until we finish. they have not announced their position on clashes, but they have helped us in battles. >> rebel commanders say they have been receiving help from the islamic front. they have not come out clearly to state its position, but it was one of its commanders who was tortured and killed by the
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islamic state, that sparked the protest. >> they took him in and executed him. it annoyed a lot of people and became emblem attic. >> at the start of the uprising foreign fighters were welcomed by the opposition. that changed a few months ago when the islamic state began to take territory, imposing brutal tactics against the population. they arrested, killed and forced into exile secular opposition that called for democracy. rebels turned their guns on each other. this is the most serious violence between armed opposition and al qaeda. some call it a new revolution. it may be too early to compare to a movement, leading to tribal militia said pushing out al qaeda. rebel commanders are not ordered by the international community to wage the fight.
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al qaeda's presence targeted the revolution's image. the west has been talking about fighting in syria, instead of focussing on the regime. >> fighting between the al qaeda-linked group and syrian rebels began friday after residents accused them of killing a popular doctor. >> secretary of state john kerry is now in jordan. the late ness a series of trips -- latest in a series of trips to the middle east. john kerry wrapped up to 3-day visit to ramallah and jerusalem, where he discussed a blueprint for negotiations with the palestine president and israel's prime minister. israel's prime minister refused to reveal details the framework. >> john mccain, lindsey graham and john barasso met with israeli president shimon peres in jerusalem. mccain expressed optimism for a potential agreement. >> i think we have room for
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guarded optimism, from what we have seen. we know it's a difficult process, but i do - we do appreciate senator kerry's great efforts that he is making and are appreciative of that. we also see a willingness that perhaps has not been there in abundance in the past. >> israeli palestine peace talks resumed in july. >> doctors treating ariel sharon says he is fighting for his life. he suffered a stroke in 2006 and has been in a coma since then. >> ariel sharon was the 11th prime minister. the taliban claimed responsibility for a bomb attack on a joint n.a.t.o.-afghan base on saturday. when a suicide bomber struck outside the base, close to the german and italian embassy.
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one n.a.t.o. soldier and five militants were in that attack. >> we'll talk more about the violence with an islamic professor, to talk about why african president hamid karzai is refusing to sign a security deal with the u.s. >> president obama is on his way back to washington after spending two weeks in hawaii on his christmas vacation. the president is expected to arrive at andrew's air force base at 10am this morning. on tuesday barack obama is expected to push unemployment insurance at a white house event. >> immigration reform is on the agenda. first lady michelle obama will continue vacationing. quite the birthday gift. >> millions of americans are bracing for the coldest weather in decades. states like illinois, missouri, and wisconsin will experience temperatures they have not felt in 15 years.
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the dakotas - it could feel as low as 60 below zero, and minnesota has already ordered schools to close on monday. the first time that happened in 17 years. the st. louis district cancelled classes because the school buses wouldn't start. how dangerous are the temperatures? we know that water freezes at 32 degrees farenheit and salting roads don't work at 0 degrees. but once it drops to negative 10 degrees frostbite can occur in 30 minutes. negative 35 degrees your car's antifreeze may no longer work. and negative 40, it takes 5 minutes for frostbite to set in. is that not scary. the first time you have frostbite is a tingling sensation or loss of sensation, followed by pain and complete loss of sensation.
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>> doctors say to avoid cotton. >> dangerous temperatures last for days, meteorologist eboni deon joins us for the latest. >> we'll see at least up until wednesday cold temperatures sticking with us. something to think about as you plan for the next couple of days. here in the upper midwest where we see widespread windchill warnings in place, they will be with us until tuesday. keep it in mind. not a good idea to head out. we are talking dangerously cold conditions. if you venture out, make sure it is quick and you are prepared. this is not the only area impacted by the cold weather. we have 18 states in all with windchill warnings in place. as we take you through the day, across the dakotas, we focus attention into fargo, this is an area hardest hit with the wind making it feel cold. down to minus 64 by noon. the cold air is on the moon.
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we can dip as low as two in st. louis, it will be minus 20 degrees in chicago, and feel like we are in the single digits. cold conditions through the day, on into the evening, when, again, fargo, we can see the windchill down to the mid '60s. we are going to see the conditions persisting. we have a frontal boundary making its way south and east across the country, across the midwest to the southern plains. it's shifting further east. notice how far south the cold air will move, all the way to the panhandle of florida. that is why we have freeze watches and warnings. that means that not only are temperatures going to drop below the freezing point, they'll stay for self hours. you'll need to protect your pets, bring them inside, and your pipes as well as plants. any sensitive vegetation, that will need to be covered up.
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we expect to see cold air by tuesday morning. >> the u.s. is involved in an effort to rescue two stranded ships in the antarctica. a u.s. coastal guard will assist a russian ship and a chinese vessel stuck whilst trying to help another ship. the u.s. coast guard is responding to requests from australian, russian and chinese authorities, and is scheduled to arrive at the stranded ship in a week's time. the stranded passengers are on their way home. >> a tough lesson for a group of senegalese boys sent to learn the koran, ending up on the streets. >> i'm andrew thomas. is there trouble ahead for the resources boom? >> plus the new year bringing up a wage, but is it enough for families to make a living?
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>> good morning and welcome back
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to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford live from new york city. elections in bangladesh turned deadly, but first let's get a look at what temperatures we'll see across the nation with our mogs eboni deon -- meteorologist eboni deon. >> temperatures falling. it's cold, make sure you are dressed appropriately, bundle up. you'll need the jackets. temperatures on the rise. >> 20 in chicago. 49 in memphis. not bad houston, in the mid '60s, areas of light patchy freezing drizzle earlier on, but mainly light rain showers. steady rain on monday, and that's when temperatures could get close to 50. that's early. temperatures falling. by the overnight hours we'll see the single digits. colder air moving into the region. it's cold, but there's no
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precipitation in the area. it will change later this morning. across the south-east enjoy these milder temperatures because we'll see our temperatures fall here as well. >> thank you eboni deon. >> 11 people died in election-related violence in bangladesh. polling stations had to close despite tight security. 300 seats are up for grads, but the main opposition party is boycotting the vote, leaving half uncontested. around 50,000 troops are deployed and the u.s. and e.u. will not participate saying conditions are not conducive to free and fair elections. >> a heavy police force was in effect but they were not able to prevent violent attacks. how effective was the security.
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>> in bangladesh, at least is dozen died. it's been one of the deadliest days in bangladesh in recent months. there has been attacks on polling centres, with the polling centres set on fire. they have been attacked on civil yarnings on protestors, and even on security forces. on the face of it you have to say that the tremendous security presence failed. you should keep in mind that things could have been a lot worse. the opposition said that it would do its utmost to make sure that the elections could not go ahead. in that regard if has not succeeded. people turned up to vote in low turn outs, but they have turned up to vote. dhaka and other cities have been quite, but there's not been large-scale violence in these places. the violence elsewhere. it has to raise the question, has the government lost control. you would have to say it has. that's an important question.
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furthering it, many opposition parties called for a boycott of the elections, sitting core ugs. what did they plan to do now? >> the opposition parties - the reason they are boycotting the election is they say under the current ruling party they could not be free and fair, and want a neutral caretaker government. to achieve the goal they plan to continue street agitation and protest, hold shutdowns. they will continue to hold shutdowns and blockades. they hope this results in the economy being crippled and may result in the government to compromise combined with international pressure.
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the u.s. and e.u. have not sent observers, undermines the deal. >> when it comes to international pressure, the ruling party has a trump card, the support of india, sharing a large land border. no one has as much at stakes in bangladesh, no other country has as much as stake in bangladesh as india. the ruling party believes this means india will dictate toll si to the americans. it must bet kept in mind that with all the political turmoil and violence, bangladesh is more and more volatile, and india has its fair share of volatile neighbours. >> thank you so much for being with us this morning. >> meanwhile, many parents in senna gal are increasingly choosing to send children to religious schools, focussing on courses in islam and arabic. some of these institutions are forcing these children to beg.
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at this time of the morning most children in senna gal are getting ready to go to school. these boys are preparing to go out and beg on the streets of the capital. getting a bowl is crucial. they live in an islamic school called a dara. the parents sent the boys here to study the koran, but institutionalized begging is the reality. this boy begged for six years. he says he's insulted and rejected every day, but he has to keep trying. >> translation: you go back without anything, one time they don't beat you, they tell you off. after several times, they beat you. >> out on the street it's tough. some boys get slapped or hit by cars. some people are sympathetic. most don't want to know. >> meanwhile, back at the dara the marabu that run it is agrees
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to talk to us. >> translation: it's not my choice. i wish i could stop them begging on the streets. if i had the means, i would stop this, but i don't. i have no other solution. >> the boys don't know what happens to the money they collect, but it's not spent on food. they have to beg for meals too. >> after several hours of begging, it's time to pray. there are about 20 boys living in the daraa, it's cramped and dirty. they do religious study for a couple of hours each day. for their parents who are poor and live in rural areas, sending them here means they have fewer mouths to feed. many believe it's worth it sending them here to learn the
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koran. >> this is what parents hope for when they send their parents to the city. it's a better daraa. children here are given three meals a day, and they don't beg. but for an estimated 10,000, that's a distant dream. the government's tried to regulate the daraas, but there's strong opposition from religious leaders, some of whom profit from the schools. the boys grow up trapped in conditions of slavery. >> senegal's government criminalized forced begging in 2005, but penalties against the schools were not enforced. >> the search for survivors continue it india after a building collapsed and killed 14 people. the incident happened in saturday in canacona, a city in the seaside tourist state. 10 people were pulled out alive. authorities are investigating just how many workers were on the site when the 5-storey
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building collapsed. >> secretary of state john kerry expressed support on south sudan negotiations and these talks are under way on neutral ground, in eth i don't knowia's -- ethiopia's capital. >> the talks began where the president accused the vice president of trialling to overthrow him. rival factions are now divided along ethnic lines. earlier secretary of state john kerry clarified u.s. position saying: >> al jazeera is meanwhile still demanding the release of our colleagues held in egypt. producers mohamed fadel fahmy and baher mohamed, along with correspondent peter greste have been held for eight days. mohamed fadel fahmy and peter
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greste face further questioning today. egyptian prosecutors sha they are held on suspicion of joining a terrorist group and spreading lies harmful to state security. al jazeera say they are fabricated nonsense. >> opposition leaders in cambodia have been summoned to appear in court where a mass rally was to occur. it was called off in toward to avoid a confrontation watt army. >> opposition leader sam ramsay paying respects at a memorial service for five workers killed on friday. their cause is backed by the opposition. over the last two weeks supporters of the cambodia national rescue party have been coming to the streets. security forces put a stop to that on saturday. >> the on of a... >> he sat with us and explained why he feels the government has
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used force to shut down their protest. >> they want to eliminate this growing popular protest, asking for step down, and asking for new elections. >> the government says its actions are for public safety. >> so much violent confrontation around the city. and becoming a place and freedom and liberty. >> this is freedom park. this is the staging ground for the opposition party's biggest rally. it was cleared and it is a major setback. where do they go? they want to go outside the capital city. >> this country is a rural
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country with 80% of population leaving living in the country side to mobilise the people. >> the same government ruled cambodia since it emerged from the commer rouge era, in which millions decide. there has been much involvement in the last 35 years. some feel there needs to be a stronger commitment to cambodia's development. >> it's a county in progress. it reflects the lack of maturity, and which institution and the habit how to solve problem peacefully. >> the ruling party says it wants to continue negotiations with the opposition. but rainesy will not turn to the talks until the violence stops.
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>> cambodian police banned further rallies after four demonstrators were shot dead on friday. a renewed push where thousands of protesters took to the streets in bangkok, threatening to shut down the capital in a bid to stop elections. the current prime minister has been accused of being controlled by her brother, who is self exiled. despite demands, officials say elections will take place in february. >> china is reporting a human case of the bird flu. shanghai's health commission says an 83-year-old has been infected and he bought chicken at a market. >> a change in the florida everglades. >> i'm natasha ghoneim - an airboat ride through the swamps
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is synonymous with the florida everglades. airboating is phasing out. we'll tell you why. >> i'm mark morgan - there's a reason it's called wildcard weekend in the n.f.l. it's living up to that billing. details ahead in sports.
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>> good morning and welcome back. i'm morgan radford, live from new york city, and these are the top stories this hour: the u.s. says it will not put boots on the ground as the violence gets worse in iraq. two cities are under siege from al qaeda-linked groups who have taken fallujah. ramadi is also under siege. >> pushing for an agreement - secretary of state john kerry is now in jordan, meeting with kink
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-- with king abdullah. >> bone-chilling temperatures on the way. by wednesday nearly half of a nation will shiver in temperatures of 0 degrees or low. >> more than 2 million americans will get a raise this year. the 13 states which you see here have increased the minimum wage, and others may follow suit. as reported, it may not be enough. >> the moment washington d.c.'s city council agreed to raise the min wage to $11.50, an improvement on $7.25. lobing at authorities -- local authorities are taking the initiative. >> $11.50 is low when you factor
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in the cost of living, the amount each worker produces an hour. when you use the benchmark, the minimum wage should be around $25 an hour. politicians are speaking out about income and equality in the u.s. >> you have quantities with record incomes. walmart had a net income of $7 billion. the ceo wants to hold back the people. >> president obama, too, argued for the need to pay workers a fair amount for their labour, and not keep people from utter depravation. >> if you work hard, you should make a decent living. >> president obama is supporting raising the federal minimum wage to $10.10. that would not have given stacy ardon a decent living. she was earning $11.50 an hour as an ambulance worker. she only paid her bills by
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working hours of overtime. >> important stages in the kids headlines lives i missed. i spent once a week here, and i was spending six days a week at work. >> the economic policy institute in washington d.c. has an online budget calculator working out how much someone needs to make a secure living. >> entering stacy's details shows how far from secure she is. >> annual total $99,042. she's nowhere near thax. >> you'd think we'd reward the people trying to save our lives. >> if workers are to achieve a deeper living, it needs to be bargained. >> employers held all the cars. >> stacy lost her job as she was trying to form a union. >> i actively organise, i go out on campaign. she's not giving up on fighting.
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>> permissible pot. new york's governor is expected to allow the use of medical marijuana. he plans to announce support in his annual state of address this wednesday. 20 designated hospitals would be allowed to dispense medical marijuana. 20 states, along with the district of columbia. new york's system is expected to be highly regulated than some of its more liberal neighbours. >> former fayedry barbara bush is out of the hospital. doctors say she's doing well, and the houston methodist hospital discharged the 80-year-old. she said: >> the mining industry has
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helped turn australia into one of the richest countries in the world. it provides china with raw materials, but it comes at a high cost to other industries. andrew thomas explains why, in part one of our series. >> it's a menacing site. all the more so when you realise these vehicles don't have drivers. autonomous trucks are the latest components of the industry. trucks are part of the story. the mining company fortest cue says the iron ore mine will be the most efficient. the mines are world class, well down in terms of the global cost curve, giving us head room. >> from evocatively named mines, fire tail and cloud break, they are put on trains, carry support. emptied and then loaded on to ships to china.
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there it's made into steal. each of these ships is loaded with 180,000 tonnes of iron ore. that's enough to make the steel to make the sydney harbour bridge three times over. one ship leaves three times an hour. mining 160 tonnes as fortescue is able to will bring in there 20 million of revenue. rio tinto and bhp billiton mine more. it's had consequences, pushing up the currency. >> our export base is like that of a developing country, meaning we are hugy exposed to a downturn in commodities and a slowing in china's demand for the raw materials. >> without the slowdown, the investment phase is tailing off.
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jobs are going as automated production takes over construction. australia's boom times are not over, but there's a bumpy road ahead. >> in the next hour we hear from indigenous groups who say they are not being compensated for the mining operations on their traditional land. >> less than five weeks away from the sochi winter olympics, vladimir putin is gearing up. he put on the skates for an all-star hockey game and hopped on a high-speed train. he visited volunteers and tested the ski slopes. he slapped a ban on protests at the games. it comes after two suicide bomb attacks in the russian city of volgograd killed 34 people. >> winter go home in the n.f.l. the play-off started with a bang. mark morgan is here in sport to
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tell us about it. >> if this is a preslewed of things to come, we'll be in good shape. the new orleans saint and fans heard it all week. the saints 0 and 5 on the road in the play-offs, three and five away from the superdome. the road futility hung over the team like a dark cloud, with the eagles in philadelphia. mark eagles critical in this, giving new orleans a lead. england 97. late third quarter, eagles coming back. we hand off for the shutdown. mccoy 77 yards on the ground. 20-14 new orleans up. fourth quarter under 5 minutes to play. where is sack? there he is. philadelphia up 1. after a derek sprowles kick-off aided, drew set up this, a 32
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yard coal by shane grams. signed two weeks ago. this is a 10th n.f.l. team, booting the saints into the next round. john henry smith with more from philly. >> two weeks ago. garrett hartley was changed for shane gram. his move paid off as gram made all four field goal faments in freezing temperatures, including the winner as saints won its first road game ever. >> the saint came in, there was no way we were leaving without winning. the work week, preparation, the way the guys handled travel. it was a short week. you skip a day. >> offensively we ran the ball effectively. once we got past the turnovers in the first half, you know, we
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rolled, scored the touchdowns to come out in the second, set the tone and got the game winner. sprowles, the big turn at the end. really, a complete effort. >> the saint rode a potent attack to the tune of 185 yards, including 97. no time to celebrate for the saints. next up for new orleans, another road date against the nsc's top team seahawks. >> all right, thank you so much. perhaps indianapolis head coach chuck said it best, calling it one for the ages. i think somebody said it was the second-largest comeback in the history of whatever. he said that. it was hard to describe. the colts seemingly lead in the water down 28 to kansas city, moupting an historic comeback.
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alex smith and the chiefs lead the visitors. 10 yards to the touchdown making it 38 to 10. still in the third, colt down 17, chipping away. 12 yards for the score. cutting the deficit to 10. donald brown fumbles, luc picks it up. he said, "you revert to the playground." the lead down to three. under five to play. luck finds a wide open, and i emphasise wide open. ty hilton. are you kidding me. 63 yards hilton, 13 catches, colts lead by one. 2 minutes ago, fourth and 11, last gasp. beau is out of bounds of that is that. the second play-off complete.
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45-44 is the final. >> so happy we won, obviously. so proud to be a part of the team. it felt like for a moment i was trying to lose the game. i'm happy that coaches, players stuck by me, entrusted in me. >> incredible victory, great team victory. one for the ages. i don't know if they think somebody said it was a second-largest comeback or whatever in the history of whatever. so 21 was not enough. we thought we'd give them another seven to make it interesting. our guys are unbelievable. >> i think it's certainly worth hearing the coach say that again. the weekend tps with two more stellar match-ups. the bengels looking for a play-off win. then to fridge ied green bay. this is expected to be one of the coldest n.f.l. games ever
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played. the forecast calls for a temperature of 5 degrees at kick-off. with windchill it will feel like 17 below zero. that wraps it up for sport. >> it will be one of the coldest games ever. speaking of football, organizers for the play-off games in green bay are trying to warm things up for fans who will have to watch the game in frigid weather. >> we are well aware we'll have a high demand for hot drinks. we'll do everything in our power to make sure we have enough for the plans. >> in addition to keeping the drinks warm, organizers will keep the beer from becoming too combed. the stadium is putting heaters in beer towers. temperatures 2 degrees. since beer's freezing temperature is 27 degrees, looks like the fans could be drinking slushy suds. it's not so cold in florida. skimming the warm is an air boat
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and it's synonymous with the everglades national park. the everglades' days are numbered. natasha ghoneim has the story. >> those living in the florida everglades say it takes a special kind of person to live here. one of the ways to enjoy living here is through airboating. thanks to new park rules they won't enjoy their hobby for much longer. >> doyle kennon is the fixth generation of men in his family who navigated the swamps of the everglades in an airboat. he and others like him make up a community of glaids mep. they operate a tour company. >> there's no place like this in the world. you are out with mother nature. i see new people. >> coopertown airboat tours was the first commercial tour boat company in the everglades, established in 1945. two years before the government
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established everglades national park. it's one of three airboat tour operators in the parks. >> it's been a history require of our nature, culture, what we raised in and have done. >> this way of life is about to face changes due to new roles enacted by everglades national park. 2014 is the last year people will be able to enjoy skimming the swampy curves for pleasure in the private airboats. a small number of old timers will be allowed to continue. one to 2,000 people will have to dock the airboats permanently. >> tour operators will have to tell share land to the federal government. >> it's unfair. it's my opinion and that of a lot of people out here. you are taking away livelihoods and friday om. >> a spokesman with the national park says airboats create problems for the soil. curving it will restore the natural flow of water and reduce
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noise pollution. >> the patriarch of the family says living and working in the everglades made him a conservationist and the wildlife adapted to their airboat incursions years ago. >> we try to use the air boats as an educational program for schools and people all over the world so they understand the eco system and the fauna. so we have a reason for people to support and maintain it. we would like to for doing that the rest of our lifetime. >> whether there's a business to pass on, is unknown. so far the federal government hasn't offered him a fair price, and have not agreed on terms. a park spokesman says after they acquired the land each business will have to sign a contract and pay a franchise fee. >> i'm going to fight it as long as possible. >> the rules are part of the everglades restoration project. park officials will release details regarding airboating,
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camping, hiking and other ways the public uses the wetlands. >> park officials statement that 1,000-20,000 airboaters will be affected by the rules. >> experts say owls from the north pole are making their way to the windy city. >> the first tuna auction of the year takes a noez dive.
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>> good morning and welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford. live from new york city. rare snow. the owls are calling the shy town home. but first let's get a look at where the snow and the rain may fall across the country with meteorologist eboni deon. it's been a hot spot or a cold spot across the nation's mid section. it's where the frontal boundary continues to make its way through the midsection. it's down into oklahoma, and that's where we have the bulk of the snow falling.
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some stretches into the great lakes, where it's light to moderate at times. it's a big delay, but made its way to the indianapolis area, where we could end up with a foot of snow. >> dramatic footage of the coast in the u.k. >> here we go. yes. >> the moment part of a cliff collapsed in rockinor following days of rough seas m look at it tumbling. local officials urge the public to stay away. this area is usually frequented by fishermen and is popular with tourists during the summer. the u.k. was hit by rain, high tides and serious flooding. in the south-west homes and roads were underwater and emma hayward has the story. >> for days parts of britainan battered by bad weather.
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the huge tidal surges, heavy rain and gale force winds striking hard. the deluge and destruction was not as bad as many forecasters predicted. as day broke over the south-west, the worst of it seemed over. for now at least. defences holding back the tide. >> we'll be out of the woods. we have sort of hefty flooding going on upstream. we have a number of flood alerts and warnings, and i think we'll get further flood warnings and alerts. it has come at a price. protecting the town of upton upon seven cost $7 million. in this area people were resigned to flooding. this modern flood defense system is keeping the water at bay. much to the relief of many people in the area. >> up until they put the wall in, we got flooded six times,
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and the worst one is 2007, when you came up to this level, which is three feet. >> some of the defenses may have worked but the agency which looks after them found itself at the center of a political storm. plans to cut more than 1500 jobs has led to questions about whether the future environmental agency could cope with major weather events. this while the taxpayers dollar has never been in demand, with choices about where to spend public money, and possible changes over the climate. >> areas of existing urban infrastructure, major parts are in a high-risk flood area. we'll have to work out a way of managing redevelopment, which we - which is flood resistant. for now it feels like a lull before the storm, as forecasters predict there is more bad
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weather on the way. >> take a look at this 507 pound blue fin tuna selling for $70,000 at the first tuna auction of the year in tokyo japan, down from the record, which was $1.8 million. >> a majestic bird is getting attention in chicago. ashar quraishi explains why an owl usually found in places like the north pole and alaska headed south for the winter. >> i try to get here at sunrise and get here at sunset. >> it's a cold morning on chicago's lake sure. nature photographer jerry is hoping to snap a photo of a snowy owl. >> they are probably the largest owls in north america. they are amazing. beautiful to watch, beautiful to spend time with. >> with its bright yellow eyes, black beak and puffy plumage, the snowy owl has a distinct
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appearance. >> it gained noter itemy as headwig seen in "the sors rer's stone." everyone wants to experience the wise owl. >> as the arctic nom and has bedone to appear in chicago, birdwatchers braved the temperature to catch a glimpse. >> their sense of hearing is so acute they can hone in on prey under vegetation tore snow. experts say food may explain why the owls migrated this far south. >> sometimes we think there's a lot of chicks because there's food sources available at certain times of the year, and after that the adults may be
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pushing the younger ones out of their territory and they move further south. >> a resource that helps to track them is e-bird. developed at university, the online database provides information on where the owls are, and where they are going. >> the first arrived in mid november. because of the internet and how birds get reported online now, we knew to expect them. people were out looking for snowy owls before they showed up. >> experts say the snowy owl numbers will increase, giving an opportunity to see them in february or march. if tracking with hours in the cold is not appealing, there's always the zoo. >> unlike most owls that hunt at night, the snowy owl can be easier to spot because they are active during the day.
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the wing span is on 4-5 feet long, and they eat about five lemings, there's not many lemings in chicago. at the end of the first hour here is what we are following. fighting intensifies and an aing-linked group -- al qaeda linked group takes control of parts of the city. >> secretary of state john kerry says peace processes are moving forward between israeli and palestinians. temperatures across the u.s. plummeted to lows not seen in decades. al jazeera continues and i'm back with you in 2.5 minutes.
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>> fighting for fallujah. nor more troops say the u.s. >> doctors treating ariel sharon give an update on his health. >> a dozen people are killed in india after a 5-storey structure tumbles to the ground. officials are searching for survivors. >> indigenous people in australia say they are not getting their fair share of a booming mining business that is turning others into billion
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airs. >> good morning, welcome to al jazeera america. live from new york city. i'm morgan radford. >> al qaeda's effort to exploit the lack ever security in iraq and syria appears to be gaining traction. in iraq two cities are under siege by al-qaeda-linked fighters. perhaps more alarming is that the violence could set off an all-out sectarian war as sunni anger towards the shia-led government intensifies. despite how bad the fighting has gotten: >> al qaeda-linked fighters have taken control of the city center in fallujah where eight have been kill. fallujah is one of two main cities in anbar province, ramadi, the other, is under siege. anbar was a daength place for -- dangerous place for u.s. forces
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during the iraq war. more than 1300 coalition soldiers were killed there. here is what we know about the fighters. they are affiliated with al qaeda, calling themselves the islamic state of iraq and levant. they want to set up a sunni islamic state in iraq and across in syria and other countries. al qaeda took control of parts of syria and for more we go to imran khan. >> fighters from the al qaeda-linked islamic state in the levant claim to have taken over the main highway into the town of fallujah, one man shouts "god is great" as he gestures to a burnt out vehicle claimed to be from iraq's army. they say they sent backup forces to battle tribal forces. after four days of fighting the frontline moved to the outskirts of fallujah. sunni tribal leaders have not
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allowed iraqi fighters to enter to town, saying they should head anything. it's a sign of how little they trust nouri al-maliki. he describes the operation as vital to the security of the iraq. >> translation: there's nothing left for us in the sovereignty. we have to unite to fight the ones destroying our country, to stand by security forces and make sure we succeed in the political process that they want to destroy. >> the sunni tribal leaders in ramadi, the other main town, managed to route fighters and in combination with the police force secured the city. fallujah is tense. >> sunni tribal leaders say they have been harassed, targeted and arrested by government forces and call for the reform of the sahwa, a par military force disbanded in 2008. with little trust on either
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side, the bag dag government and sooun -- baghdad government and sunni groups are not in agreement. >> according to a britain-based syrian observatory for human rights, another rebel group captured a compound in monbege. opposition fighters have accused the group of hijacking the syria protest. >> protests are more widespread. people in the north of syria want the islamic state of levant to leave the country. it is not just protests, armed factions turned their guns against the al-qaeda-linked groups. there has been fierce battles in aleppo and idlib. in the video the opposition says they captured a tunisian, abusz
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saber al tunisi, a commander of the group. a newly formed syrian rebel alliance wept so far as to declare war on the islamic state, demanding that the fighters join the ranks of other groups or hand over their weapons and leave syria, the alions accused i.s.i.l. of spreading strife and security and liberating rebel areas, spilling the blood of fighters and declaring heresy. >> translation: we decided to fight the islamic state. we will not stop until we finish. the islamic front has not announced their status, but have helped us in clashes. >> f.s.a. commanders say they are receiving help from the islamic front, a powerful alliance. it has not come out to state its position, but one of its commanders was tortured and killed by the islamic state that sparked the wave of protest.
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>> i.s.i.l. took him in and executed him. that annoyed a lot of people. it became emblem attic at what is seen as a hijacking of a revolution by a foreigners. foreign fighters were welcomed by the opposition, changing when the islamic state took territory, imposing brutal tactics. they arrested, killed and forced into exile secular opposition activists who called for democracy. >> rebels turned their gowns on each other. this is the most serious violence between the armed opposition and al qaeda. some activists call it a new revolution. but it may be too earlier i to compare with iraq's wakening movement, leading to tribal militias pushing out al qaeda. undoubtedly al qaeda's presence
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tarnished the revolution's image. the west has been talking about fighting terrorism in syria, instead of focussing on the regime. >> secretary of state john kerry is now in jordan, and is the latest in a trip to the middle east aimed at brokering a deal against israel and the plens. kerry wrapped up a 3-day visit to ramallah and jerusalem. u.s. officials refused to release any details of the framework so far. >> meanwhile, leading republican senators visited the region. john mccain, lindsey graham and john barasso met with israeli president shimon peres on saturday. mccain expressed optimism for an agreement between both parties. >> i think there's room for guarded optimism from what we have seen. we know it's a difficult process. i do - we do appreciate senator
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kerry's great efforts that he is making and are appreciative of that. we also see a willingness that perhaps has not been there in abundance in the past. >> israeli palestine peace talks resumed last july. >> former israeli prime minister ariel sharon is fighting for his life. on sunday doctors treating him said they managed to stablilize his circumstance u lottery system. there's no change in his kidney function. it's been in decline since last week. he suffered a stroke in 2006 and he has been in a coma since then. >> the taliban claimed responsibility for a bomb attack on a joint n.a.t.o. afghan base. the incident happened when a suicide bomber struck outside the base. one n.a.t.o. soldiers and five
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militants were killed in the attack. the search for survivors continued in india after a building collapsed and killed 14 people. the incident happened in canacona, a city that seaside tourists visit. 10 people were pulled out alive. just how many workers were on the site is not known. >> 16 people decide in the election-related joinings in bangladesh -- violence in bangladesh. some polling stations were close. 300 parliamentary seats are up for grabs. the main opposition party is boycotting the vote, leaving half the seats uncontested. 50,000 troops were deployed across the country, and the u.s. and e.u. refuse to send in election monitors, because the companies are not conducive to free and fair elections, more than 50,000 people are in the
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streets, but they were not able to prevent violent attacks. why was the security not effective? >> let mow put it in perspective. 50,000 were deployed, most in dhaka, and that has been quiet on election day. outside the capital, of course, it's a different story. there the government has less control, far less influence. i don't think anybody would have expected in their wildest dreams that this highly contentious election would have passed off peacefully in the country sid. we have seen a violent day in 12 months of pre-election violence in which hundreds of people are killed and thousands injured. 16 peep, the death toll currently on election day. i don't think it's a failure of security, more systematic, if you like, of the battle going on
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for decades, back and forth between the two big women of politics in bangladesh. the prime minister on the one hand, and her party, and her formidable rival, the opposition leader and her party. that is what all of this is really about. it's personal, rather than politics. >> many opposition parties called for a boycott of the election, citing corruption. how does the ruling party manage to maintain power? >> well essentially it does so by standing behind the constitution, as the opposition party has done. they've been up to the same sort of things. the government doesn't want to stand aside as the opposition demanded it should. the opposition wasn't prepared to take part, as i say. it continues to be a tit for tat battle between the two big forces in bangladeshi politics
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and it is not clear even after the election where grounds for compromise may lie. >> thank you so much for being with us this morning. >> opposition leaders in cambodia have been summoned to appear in court after anti-government protests, a mass rally was suppose the to be held. scott heidler has the story. >> opposition leader sam rainsy paying his respects at a memorial service for five workers killed on friday. they were shot by government forces during a process to raise the minimum raise. over the last two weeks, supporters of sam rainsy's cambodia national rescue party have been coming to the streetsment security forces put a stop to that on saturday. >> the sounted of a village chief... >> he sat with us and explained why he feels the government has been using force to shut down
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the process. >> they want to eliminate the growing popular protest, asking for them to step down and for new elections. >> the government said the actions are for government safety. so much violence taking place around the city, and in turn it becomes this place, and mob activity, freedom, liberty. >> this is freedom apparent, supposed to be the staging ground for the opposition party's biggest rally. it was emptied by security forces on saturday. it was a setback for momentum for the opposition party. where do they go. sam rainsy wants to go outside the capital city. >> this country is a rural country with 80% of the
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population living in the countryside. therefore, we will go to the country side to mobilise the people >> the same government ruled cambodia. there has been much international involvement in the last 35 jeers. some feel there needs to be a stronger commitment. >> somehow, it reflects a lack of maturity, and the habit, how to solve a problem peacefully. the ruling party says it can't to continue negotiating. reynie will not return to the talks until the violence stops. >> cambodian police stopped
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rallies after four were killed. >> thousands of anti-government protesters took to the streets in bangkok, threatening to shut down the capital. demonstrators accused the current prime minister of being controlled by her self-ex-island brother, the former head of thailand. protests began in november. despite demands, elections will take place in february. >> now for more on the dangerously cold temperatures in the mid west. let's bring in meteorologist eboni deon. >> it's staying bitterly cold, dangerously so, in fact, across the upper midwest. anywhere from montana and wyoming back into the great lakes. there's widespread wind chill warnings, and this will be the case through tuesday morning.
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at last count 20 states have windchill warnings up. meaning once the wind picks up, if temperatures are cold, it will make it colder. the wind really removes the insulation away from your body, taking the warm air, pushing it away, making you feel colder. the windchills could dip as low as minus 64. we'll see it again on monday. we have single digits and teens below zero. look at how the numbers drop off. we'll see the windchills drop down to as low as minus 40. that bitterly cold air, it's not confined to the upper midwest. it will head east and south. in addition to that we are watching for snow to fall. it's coming down around the st. louis area. and will continue across minneapolis. we could end up with a foot of snow. pressing across the great lakes
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to the interior of the feast. it will be mild enough for most of the moisture to be rain. in pittsburg it will mix with snow and we could see snow into the day on monday. >> homeless in america - coming up. why so many are struggling in a boom town. say goodbye to plastic. another city is giving the boot to plastic bags. plus 6.6 million, that's our big number. the man behind the number that millions flock to see - after the break.
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>> now to the big number, where more than 6.6 million, that's how many people attended masses at the vatican since pope francis was elected. that's three times as many as his predecessor pope benedict xvi drew in 2012 since 2005 and
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2006, 10 million attended his event. pope francis made headlines for a less formal tone and humility and bringing new ideas, such as the call for power to be away from the vatican. >> i'm morgan radford live from new york city. ahead - why one u.s. city is struggling with homelessness despite an economic comeback. first a look at temperatures across the nation. surprisingly enough, we'll see warming temperatures moving up the east coastline. a cold front slicing through the country and behind the front it's colder, single digits. ahead of it 50 degrees. 34 in atlanta. with the warmer air we'll see rain instead of snow in places like new york city. let's go to st. louis. it's been on the lighter side for the last few hours, but we
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upped the amounts here. now we see more than a foot in places. any plans on getting out early, watch out the snow flakes are flying. it looks nice. visibility on the low side. >> temperatures at seven. 28 in new york. expect 40s to show up. it looks like we'll keep it warm in the southern areas of florida in the south-east. >> the number of homeless families in cities across the u.s. is on the rise. that's according to a new study. topping the list, nashville tennessee. nashville's jonathan martin takes a look at why many are struggling while the city is booming. >> quasia walker and her daughter naomi are living in a homeless shelter for the second time in three years. she said it's tough keeping technical school, keeping a job and having her own home and paying daycare. >> i had a place, i got evict.
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now we are back here. hopefully we'll get another place. >> the nashville center is crowded with families in the same position. >> mothers are trying, doing it on their own. they have nobody else to help him. >> a report from the u.s. conference of mayors looked at homelessness, finding numbers of homeless families grew fastest in nashville. there's a call on the community to do something about the family homelessness when it comes to numbers of beds, capacity, it still - we can't keep up with it. >> homeless advocates say part of the problem is nashville's success. the city led the nation in job growth and it's known as a destination city for job hunters. >> whether it's fast food, fine dining, construction. the opportunities are available
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here in nashville, relative to other communities. >> the average rent is $900 for one bedroom. tough for an individual or a family to afford when working part-time. >> will connelly is director of nashville's homelessness commission. while there are a variety of programs and resource, knowing where to get help is the biggest hurdle. >> if you came and said you are about to become homeless. even though i've been working in the field for 10 years, i wouldn't know immediately what is enable for you in terms of assistance. i would have to call around and send you down a path that may or may not be helpful. >> city officials are planning to pilot a program bringing all the agencies together, making it easier for those that need help
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to get it. >> unfortunately, nashville officials say the city's shelters cannot keep up with the growing number of the homeless, and have to turn away one-third of all the people seeking shelter. >> china's reporting a human case of the bird flu. shanghai's health commission says an 86-year-old is infected with the virus. the victim reportedly bought chickens at a local market. officials are ordering a temporary closure of poultry market for three months. >> next time you are at the grocery store check out, they may not ask you whether you want paper or plastic. los angeles is the latest city to say goodbye to the plastic. >> disposable shopping bags are everywhere in los angeles - caught in fence, in the trees, the weeds. they are in the gutter waiting to be washed down the storm drain to the ocean. that's why the city banned them. it's been the law for a few
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days. >> for a long time i would leave them in the drunk of the car and forget. now i - it's become a habit and i'm grateful for that. >> it's a great thing. >> the pan applies to all groceries, markets and stores that sell perishable foods. >> if you come without a bag, you can get a paper one. >> there are exceptions. mum and pop groceries have until june to comply. billions of bags are distributed in california. it was a one-sided argument last june when the los angeles city council passed a law. >> they become trash, glowing the gutters and trash the beaches. if you want to be a fish, see what plastic does to a fish, and the food chain, what it does to life itself.
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>> now been 90 city and county governments in california have banned or limited plastic grocery bags. a prime mover is the environmental group heal the bay. i think it will have impacts larger than locally. we'll start to see momentum on the issue of plastic pollution, and its consequences state wide. and internationally. as we start to see simple changes like bringing a reasonable bag can make a difference. >> they gave me a free bag, it's very nice. >> but you didn't bridge it today? >> i didn't bring it. it's in the trunk of my car, though. >> change is not in the bag quite yet. >> stores that don't comlie could get fined up to $500.
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permissible pot. the use of medical marijuana. the governor plans to announce his store in the state address. 20 designated hospital will be allowed to dispense designated marijuana, and three states, along with columbia permit the use of medical marijuana in some form or another. new york's system is more highly regulated than some of its liberal neighbours. as violence escalates in south sudan thousands of families are forced to plea. people are making a small fortune in australia mining business. an indigenous group says it's their land, compensation they say they deserve. >> i'm mark morgan, college football's final is days away. find out how they stayed focus amidst a 29-day lay off. coming up in sport.
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>> good morning, welcome back, you are watching al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford. here are the top stories. >> breaking news out of iraq where a series of bomb attacks killed 14 people. they were in the iraqi capital of baghdad, including a car bomb which exploded in a shi'a neighbourhood. shia areas have been targeted as an al qaeda-lipped group in iraq besieged two separate cities. we'll bring you more on the attack. >> pushing for an agreement, secretary of state john kerry is in jordan, meeting with king abdullah. john kerry met with israeli officials hoping to establish a blueprint for both sides. u.s. officials refused to release any of those details. >> rescue workers are sorching for survivors -- searching for survivors in a deadly collapse in india. more than 10 were killed after a
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5-storey structure fell to the ground. >> thousands are fleeing bor. the red cross says most of the displaced people are located in the north of the country. the fighting began when south sudan president accused the vice president of overthrowing him. the alleged attempted coup triggered faction fighting. negotiations have to be serious, kerry said: >> gerald tan has more on the talks and the prospects of peace in south sudan. >> by the thousands they arrived at the u.n. base in juba, the only refuge they can find.
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more than 1,000 died. 200,000 others are on the move because of fierce fighting between rebels and the south sudan army. the hope for peace lies miles away in neighbouring ethiopia when negotiators are trying to thrash out a deal. >> we envisage rapid agreement. cease fire arrangements to create a conducive atmosphere to help outstanding issues. our people struggled a lot, and will not suffer again. >> the rebel delegation is striking a dtone, making a list of demands. >> with the current mass killings in the country, and political descension, there can be no conducive atmosphere for peace talks. >> the conflict is drawn along
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ethnic lines. in july, the president, who is dinka, dismissed his deputy, riek machar, who is from the nuer community. rebels supporting the president began fighting for control of capital. the violence spread. >> we need a cessation of hostilities. it must suffer now. people are suffering and dying. we cannot afford to tolerate people suffering in that way. politicians haggled. after several days of delay, both parties meet at the table. history is not on their side. for generations, the two tribal groups battle for resources. they have to decide how to bring peace to the world's youngest nation. that will not be easy. >> joining us now to discuss the talks is omar ishmael, policy
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advisor, for an organization that is to end genocide. good morning. does the slow start to the talks foreshadow the outcome. since it has taken this many days and deaths to get to that point, is that an indication of just how bit are the battle will be once we get to the negotiating table. >> that is true. if >> the start of the negotiation is an indication that the negotiation is about negotiation. or they are walking about what they are going to talk about, which is a political settlement. these are split cole leaders. the whole crisis was a political issue. now it's ethnic violence. the guys are talking about the political issue, how to resolve that first.
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there are different tables within the table. we would like to see it ended quickly. one party is talking about releasing prisoners. we want both, cessation of host ilties, and if the release of the visitors will help. people should call for that and we move on. >> you said they are talking about talking. meanwhile the fighting is so severe that the humanitarian volunteers are clearing. what does that mean for the people on the ground. who still need food and water. who will keep the piece. who will keep the peace while negotiations go on. >> the united nations doubled efforts in the south. hopefully they'll bring human
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assistance. >> the fighting is continuing. it's not helping. that is why it is important at this point. >> the truth is we have been here before on a global scale. can south sudan take any lessons from warning, from the way that thinks unfolded in rwanda. >> well, why going to rwanda, back to south sudan itself. it's history, fighting, you know, for the cessation, and for becoming a country. i remember this fighting had been there in uniified sudan in august 1955. there was a lot of history of mystery, fighting and disagreement. i hope the leaders of the south, who are now leading it to this crisis, i hope they benefit from the history of conflict. >> you mentioned history, can we expect a situation similar to that of syria, where refugees
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are flooding neighbouring countries. the other countries of east and central africa, are they ready and willing to accept refugees or is the landscape to complicate that they won't or can't. . >> i think capable is questionable, bus they have their own issues and economic challenges. however, you know, they have been willing to receive refugees, and there is about 2300, 23,000 refugees that are in uganda, for example. it is a difficult situation. they have to accommodate some of the refugees. >> thank you so much for being with us. >> australia has been enjoying an economic boon most driven by mining.
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in western australia an aboriginal group says it's their land, and they want their cut. part two of their series, andrew thomas explains why they believe they are exploited. >> living in poverty in one of the richest countries on earth. down the road this aboriginal community has rights over is fabulous wealth. >> they are exploiting our country, digging a big hole for their own personal benefit. the company ben fits, shared, the government. the people that own the land do not. it's demoralizing. >> under the sun-baked earth is a resource the world can't get enough of. this is what the whole operation is about, iron ore, a heavy red rock, the key ingredient of steel. out fear it fortescue mining is digging up 60 million tonnes much iron ore, worth nearly $8 billion. each though the land is the governments, traditional owners,
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whose ancestors lived here for generations have rights and are entitled to compensation. negotiations have broken down. leaders of the aboriginal group want a royalty of half a percent in line with what other companies pay. that peens around $40 million. fortescue offered $4 million. we have not conceded to going back to the welfare of payments of cash royalties, which is what the aboriginal corporation push for, because we know that that won't be for the benefit of the community. we don't want to see money going to a community controlled by a select few in the community. >> deadlocked negotiations are not getting in the way of mining. australian law allows it to continue even if compensation is yet to be agreed. meanwhile fortescue says it is providing training and job opportunities for indigenous people, and that will make a
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long-term sustainable difference than writing a big check. >> i'm clean, off the alcohol and drugs. and doing all this for my family as well as myself, as well as my people. >> indigenous people, then, are split. >> back in the old days, mate, we had nothing. what we had was a strong community based on family. now i haven't spoken to some of my aunties and uncles and cousins in the last four years. sad. >> meanwhile, on the mine trucks operate 24 hours a day, with no direct compensation going yet to those whose ancestors lived here for centuries, before the machines arrived. >> in the next hour it is all about the money, we meet the people making a small fortune in australia's mines industry. >> good morning everyone.
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well, the n.f.l. play-offs have kicked off, the college football season is winding to the close. the b.c.s. title game. it's monday night at the rose ball. florida against auburn. ross shimabuku is on the seen in southern california. >> the big question on media day, how will the lay off affect both teams, they have had 29 days off since the last game. and the championship game, the teams looked sluggish. this year it's not going to be a problem. auburn and florida say it's time to man up. >> the coach say eliminate the clutter. that's the first and foremost thing. don't worry about what we have done all season, focus on now. if we go out and play hard and do everything that we have to do, we'll get the results we want. >> we feel like we don't come too far. we are so hungry that we don't
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made it this far, why not finish it off. we didn't come all this way to turn around and lose. >> the players are leading the practices, keeping everyone focused. we are playing on the biggest stage. you can have fun after the game. we are enjoying the events and all that. we know this is a business trip. >> i still haven't reached my maximum goal. at the end of the day i want to be the last person on the field and holding up the crystal ball. nothing is more important than hosting the crystal ball up there with the team, saying, "we are the champions." >> florida state is looking for the first national championships since the 1999 team, while auburn is looking for a second title in four years. >> thank you ross, thank you. back later with a look at the comeback kid, and the road warriors of new orleans. that is ahead. >> price freeze - as part of a one year plan to help consumers,
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argentina's government says no more rise in prices at supermarkets across the country. critics say the government needs a longer term approach. we have this report from buenos aires. >> 194 items are on the list unveiled by the cabinet chest, ranging from cooking oil, rice, household cleaners and several brands of biscuits. >> translation: this guarantees staples will be available on the shelf. >> this family has lived with rising prices. they cope. it is not easy. >> i try to use the bread card and try to make as many payments as you can, try to pay things in 12 months from now, 12 payments, so - because a year from now,
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the same amount of money will be less valuable. >> every little helps. growing your own is one way of beating the price rises. >> prices are going to be increased 25%, or 30% or 40%. it is difficult to know. >> buenos aires bus fares rose thursday, taxi prices last month. inflation in orange is a daily reality. yesterday it was petrol. tomorrow it may be rice or pasta. >> stoppers have no choice but to live with it. it create uncertaintiy and anger. >> the government maintains inflation is under control, 10% a year. many independent economists dispute the figure, saying it's 25%. >> it may work if there was broader economic program in
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place, such that this were a short-term stop-gap measure until the greater environment or policies took effect or went in effect. since that's not the case, i'm skeptical about its use. >> the government is negotiating for more providers and supermarkets to join the scheme in a concerted effort to keep inflation under control. prices continue to rise. >> a traditional tuna auction kicks off in tokyo, where the growing demand for tuna has activists in an uproar. >> temperatures take a dive from missouri to the ohio valley. i'll tell you how cold it will feel if you step outside.
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>> into welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford. freezing rain is heading to the north-east and our meteorologist
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eboni deon is here to bring us the latest. >> we don't have anything yet, but it's definitely on its way. the both of the moisture from the lakes back to the midwest where we have the snow coming down around st. louis. the scene looking nice, but getting out on the roads could be a different story, especially later in the day. we'll show you that later. snow flakes heavy at times into the st. louis area. on the lighter side you can see the pretty picture. definitely a day to stay put until the storm moves out. while much of the u.s. is in for a deep freeze, the u.k. is recovering from a stormy deluge battling coastal areas for cases. >> look at that tumbling down where rough seas caused part of a cliff - there it goes - to
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collapse. the weather has this more severe consequences. flooding in the south-west swamped homes. the storm is not over yet. >> for days parts of britain have been battered by bad weather. it's a huge tidal surge, heavy rain and gale-force winds striking hard. the deluge and destruction was not as bad as many forecasters predicted. as day broke over the south-west, the worst of it seemed over. for now at least. with a defenses holding back the tide. >> we'll be out of the woods, but we have hefty flooding going on upstream. we have a number of flood alerts and warnings. we'll get further flood warnings and alerts. >> it came hat a price. protecting the town of upton-upon-seven cost around $7 million.
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in this area people were resigned to flooding. the modern flood defense system is keeping the water at bay, to the relief of many in the area. >> up until they put the wall in, and we got flooded six times, and the worst is seven, when you came up to this level, which is three feet. >> some of the defences may have worked, but the agency that looks after them found itself at the center of a political storm. plans to cut more than 1500 jobs led to questions about whether the future environment agency could cope with maimer weather events. this while the tax pairs' dollar has never been in more demand, with choices about where to spend public money under pressure and new challenges under climate. >> areas of urban infrastructure, major parts are in a high-risk flood area.
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we'll have to work out a way of managing redevelopment, flood resistant. >> for now it feels like there's a lull before the storm. forecasters predict there's more bad weather on the bway. >> good morning everyone. it had to be annoying. the saints and their fans hearing over and over and over that when drew breese and company lead the atmosphere of the superdome they struggle. the saints 0 and 5 on the road in the play-offs, looking to snap the futility. the running game critical. engram giving the saints a lead. ingram 97 of the rushing. eagles coming back in the third. nick foulds handing to shane
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mccoy. 77 yards on the ground, 20-14. new orleans still up. fourth quarter under five minutes of play. foulds rolls out. touchdown home team. philadelphia up one. after a derryn sprawls kick-off was aided by a penalty, drew breese engineered a 10-way try. shane's fourth goal of the game, a 32 yarder. gram signed two weeks ago. this is his 10th n.f.l. team, booting the same times into the next ground. john henry smith with more from philly. >> the saints changed kickers two weeks ago. shape gram, kicking excusively in cold weather cities was the replacement. he made all four field golds in freezing temperatures -- goals in freeding temperatures. >> the players felt there was no
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way we would leave without winning. it's easy to say. the work week, preparation, the way the guys handled travelling and a short week on a saturday. you skip a day. >> offensively you run the ball effectively. once we got past the turnovers in the first half, you know, we rolled, scored the touchdowns, coming out in the second, setting the tone. obviously go down and get the game winner. special teams coming up with big place strauls. four field goals by shane gram. a team effort. >> the saints wrote a surprising rushing attack to the tune of 185 yards, and 87 by former heisman trophy winner mark ingram. next saturday seattle seahawks.
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>> thank you, john henry smith. alex smith and the chiefs visiting the colts in the afc wildcard. smith to nile davis. 10 yards to the touch done. 38-10. kansas city, one of four passes for smith. donald brown scoring twice fumbled. andrew luck picks it up. indy within three. under five minutes to play. luck is looking for an open man, boy does he find one, how did ty hilton get this open. 63 yards on the play. hilton 33 catches. the coach completes the second biggest comeback. indy wins it 35-44 is the final. that's ports at this hour. >> thank you so much. >> seafood can be expensive. imagine spending tens of thousands on a fish. that happened at the first tuna auction in japan.
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al jazeera's dominic kane reports the high demand is raising serious environment concerns. >> this is tokyo's fish market. perhaps the biggest in the world. it's the first blue fin tuna auction. new year, and the pressure is on. usually the bidding is intense. last year one fish sold for a record-breaking $1.7 million, but prices slumped. this year's winning fish fetched 20 times left. >> i'm glad the price for this year's bid went back to being reasonable. i bought six tunas, we are able to eat a lot and well. >> japan's appetite for blue fin tuna is so great it accounts for throw quarters of worldwide catch. much of the fish in this auction
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ends up in sooushie restaurants across the country. high demand means some traders have taken a turn for the worst. >> we have seen slight signs of recovery. of the total number of fish traded, and the market declining, which is our concern. and >> environmentalists say blue fin tuna stacks are becoming depleted and steps need to be taken to deal with the problem. that is no concern for this year's winning bidder. he can look forward to feasting on his prized fish some time soon. >> at the end of the second hour, here is what we are following. secretary of state john kerry says the peace process is moving forward between the israelis and the palestinians. he says there is a ways to go.
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the search for survivors continues in india killing 14. 10 people made it out alive overnight. more than a dozen died in election-related bangladesh, causing hundreds of polling stations to be forced to close. >> coming up next hour in sports, the saints approve the nai sayers wrong - they can win outside. that's ahead. >> i'll show you how low temperatures can fall and where records could break. >> i'm morgan radford, and i'm back with you in 2.5 minutes with the latest new us.
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>> fighting for fallujah. al qaeda militants seize control of an iraqi city, but the u.s. says no more troops. >> diplomatic shuffle, secretary of state john kerry says he's making process in talks between israelis and palestinians. he warns there's a long way to go. >> violence at the polls as dozens are found dead in bangladesh as the opposition calls for an election boycott. plus, deep freeze. the mercury in the midwest plum et cetera as temperatures drop to record-breaking lows.
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>> good morning, and welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford, live from new york city. we have breaking news out of iraq, where a series of bomb attacks reportedly killed is a people. the attacks are in the iraqi capital of baghdad and include a car bomb which exploded in a predominantly shia neighbourhood. they have been targeted as an al qaeda-linked group in iraq. it's a sign that al qaeda could be exploiting security measures. perhaps more alarming it the fact that violence could set off an all of out sectarian wore. anger towards the government intensifies. years after the u.s. withdraws from iraq, secretary of state john kerry says despite how bad the fighting has gotten, it's a fight that belongs to the iraqies, we are not cop
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templating -- contemplating returning. eight people have been killed. fallujah is one of two main cities in iraq's anbar province, the other is under siege. anbar is one of the most dangerous places for u.s. forces during the iraq war. more than 1300 coalition soldiers were killed. here is what we know about the fighters. they are affiliated with al qaeda. they call themselves islamic state of d islam and levant. they want to set up in syria and other countries. for more on the fighting in iraq we go to al jazeera's imran khan. >> fighters from the al qaeda-linked islamic state in levant claim to have taken over the highway to fallujah. a man shouts god is great, as he gestures to a burnt-out vehicle
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they claim is from iraq's army. they say they set reinforcement from syria to iraq to battle tribal although forces. after four days of fighting the frontline moved to fallujah. sunni tribal leaders have not allows iraqi army fighters to enter, saying they should head operations. it's a sign of how little they trust the government of nouri al-maliki. the prime minister is not backing down, describing the operation as vital to the security of iraq. >> translation: there's nothing lefts for us. we have to unite to fight for ones destroying our country, standing by our computery forces and succeed in the political process that they want destroyed. >> the sunni tribal leaders in ramadi managed to route al qaeda fighters.
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fallujah is tps. sunni tribal leaders say they've been harassed, targeted and arrested by government forces and call for the reform of a paramilitary force disbanded after al qaeda was defeated in 2008. >> both the baghdad government and the sunni groups are at a stalemate. >> there are reports now that the same al qaeda-linked group suffered a defeat in syria. according to the britain based syrian observatory for human rights, another rebel group captured a compound in the town of monbej, belonging to the islam uk state of iraq and levant. they were accused of hijacking fighting in syria. >> protests are growing and they are becoming more widespread. people in the rebel held north of syria want the islamic state in iraq and levant to leave
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their country. it's not just protest. armed factions turned their guns against the al qaeda linked group and pushed them out of villages. there has been fierce battles, in this video the opposition says they captured a tunisian, abusz saber al tunisi, a commander of the group. a newly formed syrian rebel alliance went as far as declaring war on the islamic state. it demanded i.s.i.l. fighters join the ranks of other groups or hand over their weapons and leave syria. the alliance accused i.s.i.l. of spreading strife and security. spilling the blood of fighters and wrongly accusing them of heresy. >> translation: islam why can state equals israel in ruthless. they have not announced their stance tonne clashes, but --
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stance on clashes but have helped us in battles. >> f.s.a. commanders say they are receiving help from the islamic front. it hasn't stated its position, but one of its command erts was tortured and killed which sparked the wave of process. >> they executed him. it annoyed a lot of people and was emblem attic as what they see as the hijacking of the revolution by foreigners. >> at the start of the uprising foreign fighters were welcomed. it changed a few months ago when the islamic state took territory, imposing brutal tactics. they have arrested, killed, for the into exile secular opposition activists who called for democracy. rebels turned their guns on each other. this is the most serious violence between syria's armed opposition and al qaeda.
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some activists call it a new revolution, but it may be too early to compare to iraq's awakening movement which led to the tribal initiatives. >> undoubtedly al qaeda's presence tarnished the syrian rebels image. >> fighting between the al qaeda linked group and other syrian rebels began friday after residence accused them of killing a doctor. >> five months of negotiations in the middle east and secretary of state john kerry says there's progress and a lot of homework. he's fishing for an agreement between israeli and palestine leaders. john kerry is in jordan. it's his latest in a series of trips to the middle east aimed at brokering a deal between the two sides.
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earlier john kerry was in ramallah hammering out a framework with nouri al-maliki and benyamin netanyahu. talks continued after a 3-year break. leading republican senators visited the rangeon. john mccain, lindsey graham and john barasso met with shimon peres on saturday. mccain expressed optimism for an agreement. >> we have room for guarded optimism, from what we have seen. i know there's a difficult process, but i do - we appreciate john kerry's great efforts. we are appreciative of that. we see a willingness that perhaps has not been there in abundance in the past. >> in a few moments we'll have more indepth conversation on the israeli-palestine conflict and
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what it may mean for sectarian violence in the region. >> former israel prime minister ariel sharon is fighting for his life. doctors treating him said they managed to stablilize the circumstance u lottery system over the weekend. there's no change in ariel sharon's kidney function which has been declineded last week. he's been in a coma since then. >> president obama is on his way back to washington. that's after two weeks in hawaii. he is expected to arrive on tuesday. and push unemployment insurance on the white house on tuesday. on the agenda is immigration reform, and first lady michelle obama will continue to vacation in hawaii, quite the birthday gift for the president ahead of her 50th birthday. >> millions of americans are bracing for the coldest weather in decades. states like illinois, missouri,
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and wisconsin will experience temperatures they haven't felt in 15 years. in dakotas, 15 below zero. minnesota ordered schools to close on monday. the first time it happened is 15 years. it cancels classes. so just how dangerous are the temperatures. we foe that water freezes at 32 degrees. and we know that salting roads doesn't work around zero. once it drops to negative 10, negative 35, your car's antifreeze may no longer work, and at negative 40, it takes five minutes for frost bite to set in. that is not squary. >> the first time there's frostbite or a tippingling sensation in the fingers,
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followed by pain and loss of sensation. >> doctors say to avoid cotton. the dangerous temperatures can last for days. meteorologist eboni deon joins us with more. >> we rant to the start off with wind speed. this determines how cold it feels. winds gusting up to 32 miles per hour. from this area to tul sea. it is paying it feel from five upwards of 25 degrees colder than the air temperature. it's important to bundle up. a widespread windchill warning is in place, stretching down to st. louis where we saw rapidly changing conditions. let's look at a live view of st. louis. this is light snowfall. but now it's blustery. the snow is blowing an flapping
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winds. we have the wind picking up. as far as our windchills go through the day, it feels as cold as minus 64 degrees. it will feel like minus 20 in omaha. around st. louis, it will feel like 2 degrees. temperatures take the dive and we see windchills dropping as low as 40 degrees. and indianapolis, and on into cincinnati. not only around st. louis, but where it snowed. today mainly rain here, but we have freezing rain advisories in place because light drizzle can be freezing at times. the u.s. was involved in an effort to rescue two stranded ships in antarctica. the u.s. coast guard will assist a russian trip trapped in ice last month.
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it helped a chinese vesel that got stuck trying to help another ship. the u.s. coast guard is responding to requests from the australian russian and chinese authority yis and is scheduled to arrive in a week's time. >> a tough lesson for a group of sena gallees boys, off to learn the koran, and huh they ended off the streets. >> a rise in the minimum wage, is it enough to arp a living. >> it's all will money. >> we need the drivers making a miner fortune in australia.
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>> good morning, welcome back to al jazeera america. elections in bangladesh turn deadly. let's get a look at what textures will see across the nation with meteorologist eboni deon. >> it's going to be a cold one in many places across the middle of the country.
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to the north-east we'll start on the chilly side. it will be gold enough to support freezing rain and parts of new jersey and philadelphia. if we do have freezing rain advisories in place. however, we'll warm up as we head into the afternoon. it's been mild across parts of florida. 60 in orlando. in atlanta it's a chilly start. the upper midwest, that's where the core of the coldest air in the nation, minus 10. that's the air temperature in minneapolis. it's minus 19. take a look at what is ahead tonight. we'll see near-record lows. we could ta a record of minus 18 in chicago. >> at least 16 peel have died in election-related violence in bangladesh for more than 300 polling stations forced to close. that's despite tight security heading into the poles. 300 parliamentary seats are up
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for grabs. but the main opposition party is boycotting the photo, leaving 4568 the -- vote, leaving half the seats unconcepted. u.n. and e.u. refused to send lelent ral commission monitors because the elections are not fair and free. >> all ball in dhaka, no rush to the polls. the incapability of holding a free and fair vote meant today would go of the government's way. >> translation: i gave the vote. continued the process of democracy and respect the constitution of bangladesh. >> the opposition held an election like this themselves. this time they should have taken part for the sake of the country. >> outside the capital a different picture of polling stations luted and burning.
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victims of political violence, hundreds dead and thousand injured much many innocent bystanders. violence a feature of the decades-long rivalry between the parties. the prime minister sheikh hasina, who didn't need to vote, her own seat uncontested. >> with an opposition-declared national strike in force, streets from quiet. election day is normally a festival. this is no ordinarily election. among those i spoke to, one young man of a generation who expects more. >> we need a leader. we are lacking good leadership. a good leader can stop the problem easily. the outcome is not in doubt. the question of legitimacy will
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happening heavy over the government's victory. constitutionally it's legal. the government will blame the opposition for its boycott and political violence preventing many voting. add to that criticism, it's clear the government will struggle to establish credibility or popular mandate moving forward leaving one likely prognosis for the months ahead. >> there may be more days when the streets of dakar are deceptively quiet and the threat of violence keeps people in their homes, away from work. more uncertainty in a country that would have liked to put the turmoil of recent months behind it. >> jonah hall it live in bangladesh. this is a population that is largely discontented about their ruling party. can we expect retaliation in the
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coming days? >> well, you know, i think it's a question of context. it's pop ulation unhappy with the ruling party, that doesn't especially want the opposition in either. it's a population discontent with its politicians as a whole. in terms of retaliation, there won't be a mass movement, there's not a revolution moving. the opposition will not want the election result to stand. they'll want to continue their pressure on the government to call early elections again. the government indicated that it might be willing to go to early elections, but only on its terms, but the problem is hard to see where compromise lies. the government is gearing up, calling a strike for wednesday.
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there has been more than 70 strikes, they cost the economy deer. that's where the government will feel the most pressure. it is losing revenue, and it can't afford to continue to see the economy decline. it may be the pressure forcing it into an early election. >> you mentioned compromise. can you go back a minute and explain the main differences between the ruling and the primary opposition party? >> well, in essence politically, policy terms in a way you and i understand government. there aren't many differences. these are not ideological issues or problems that exist. they are not policy problems. they are, to a large degree personal problems between the two big women in politics. the prime minister on the one side, and her rival long-time
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decade long rival. the these women can't talk to each other, let alone begin to find a way to solve the problems. that's at the heart of what is going on. it's as much about politics as personal. >> a tense situation. >> jonah, thank you for being with us. >> secretary of state john kerry arrived in jordan to update leaders on his discussions with the palestine president and the israeli prime minister. john kerry talked about the difficulties bringing the parties together, on saturday. and said a framework would cover issues such as borders, security and the fate of jerusalem. >> this is hard work. there are narrative issues. difficult complicated years of mistrust built up. all of which have to be worked through and undone and a pathway
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has to be laid down to the parties have confidence and know what is happening and the road ahead is real, not illusionary. >> a professor for peace and development at the university of maryland and senior fellow at the savant fellow at the brookings institute and is in washington d.c. thank you for joining us. >> kerry insists he's made progress. plin and israeli leaders are throwing around serious kupti accusations. benyamin netanyahu said the palestinians were not serious. and the palestinians said, "no one has more to lose than us." with the loose talk, can john kerry establish a framework to guide the talks. >> first of all, when you look at it you diplomat expect the palestinians or israelis to say there is progress until there's a deal.
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they are in the early stages. john kerry is trying to formulate a plan. most understand that when you deal with final status issues, the status of jerusalem, the settlements, the borders, refugees, right of return, all of these questions, every side is going to be reluctant to make compromises unless there's a package deal. we wouldn't know if there's progress until it's announced. the early indications obviously are not particularly telling. now, can john kerry pull it off. obviously most people are pessimistic. among palestinians, i did a poll, and half the palestinians and half the israelis don't think a deal will ever happen. 4% of israelis and 11% of palestinians think the negotiations will continue. there's pessimism unless
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confronted with a dam, and then the majority rally to support a deal. >> you mentioned settlement. i want to focus on that. can we continue to talk about peace when israel continues to build settlements, it's been reported that they decided to expand the settlements and didn't announce it. the steps are provocative and the u.s. took a position against them. for whatever reason, given the memory of what happened with obama, there was no agreement on that. settlements are counterproductive, working against peace, and more than that, when you negotiate a peace deal, to by there'll have to be a settlement dis mantlement, how is it that you build more. yes, it's counterproductive, buts nonetheless we are talking about a short time line, about
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the secretary of state is really aiming for something in the spring. we wouldn't know any deal that would be acceptable to the palestine will have to call for dismantlement of settlements preventing palestine from beamibeing a continuous state. we don't know the outcome, although there are measures in the short term undermining confidence. >> our reporter nick schifrin was there and was talking about the religious narrative. how can you get peace when the israelis force the palestinians to recognise israel as a jewish state. they didn't make jordan do it, how can they force the palestinians to accept the religious narrative. >> what we have to keep in mind, the state can declare itself whatever it wants. we accept that israel can
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declare itself whatever way it wants to. what is asked, obviously, is something more profound, going against the palestinians own narrative. we find, therefore, in the poll that we did in the west bank and gaza, that besides jerusalem identifying, accepting israel as a jewish state is the second biggest obstacle to a deal. fascinating to see that it emerges above the settlements. a reason is what's to the palestine citizens of israel. you have about a million and a half palestinian citizens of israel, what would their status be if the state was defined as a jewish state. if you look at the palestine narrative since the beginning of - since the 1948 war and the palestine homelessness and refugees, accepting the legitimacy of the jewish state
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from the beginning means they have a problem explaining or dealing with the - what they perceived to be a profound injustice. it is a problem for the palestinians. in the end i think there's going to have to be some kind of addressing that through a mechanism that would satisfy both sides. one is possible and what the secretary of state is working on. >> thank you very much. >> at least 14 people are dead in a seaside tourist in india after a building collapse. it happened saturday. at least 10 people were pulled out alive. many were still trapped under the rebel. authorities are investigating how many workers were on site when the building collapsed.
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>> coming up, a major change in the florida everglades. a long-held tradition is being phased out. >> i'm mark morgan. colts moving on in the n.f.l. play-offs. that story on the way.
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>> welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford, these are the top stories. bone-chilling temperatures are on the way. by wednesday half the nation will freeze. the deep freeze on the heels of a snow storm that blanketed much of the country. pushing for an agreement. secretary of state john kerry is in jordan meeting with king abdullah. john kerry met with israeli and
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palestine officials hoping to establish a blueprint for a deal between both sides. the u.s. refuses to release details of the framework. >> the u.s. will not put boots on the ground. two cities are under siege by al qaeda-linked fighters who have taken home of fallujah. eight people have been killed so far and a city in the same province, ramadi, is also under siege. >> the taliban reportedly claimed responsibility for a bomb attack on a joint n.a.t.o. afghan base on saturday. the incident happened when a suicide bomber struck outside the base, close to the german and italian embassies. an n.a.t.o. soldier and five militants killed in the attack. >> president hamid karzai still refuses to sign a security deal. the agreement would keep u.s. troops in afghanistan for 10 years.
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hamid karzai's position raises questions about afghanistan's future. insurgents could gain control over key areas in the country if american troops fully withdrew as soon as next year. with us is professor of islamic history at islamic university, richard bullet. >> hamid karzai's comments suggest he's hesitant for two reasons. he doesn't want n.a.t.o. counterterrorism raids and wants the u.s. to step up peace talks with the taliban. is there a chance he'll get what he wants. >> he's a lame duck. he has an election coming up. he cannot run. it's for the next president to push his agenda or whatever agenda the next president has. all he can do is raise issues that he holds this agreement
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hostage. and yet the agreement has been negotiated and reopening that notion is not in the cards. it's more posturing on his part at this point. than a serious effort to change the terms of the agreement. >> speaking of presidents, let's talk about the timing. why is it so important that he sign this ahead of president obama's state of the union address. president obama came into office wanting to terminate, to wind down two wars begun in the bush administration. he has gotten us out of iraq, and now iraq is backsliding. nevertheless, we are out. he would love to get us out of the afghanistan to whoever runs for president following him, as a democrat, can say that obama
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got us out of the republican wars. it makes a difference for the upcoming congressional elections in the fall. he'd love to say in the state of the union speech that he is winding down the second of the two. >> back in afghanistan, the tribal leaders, they say, "we're out of here. if you don't sign it we'll leave the country", is there anything that the leading group can do to enforce it. >> the loia jerga is not a strong body when it comes to executive actions. they can express views. the agreement has been passed by the loia jurga, it's unlikely they'll be able to do anything other than posture, which is what is going on. the importantling is what is the
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position of the presidential candidates. >> we have not heard on that. >> we have been talking about the withdrawal of troops. is it possible there'll be a civil war if americans leave? >> i don't think so. it's not really something that fits the afghan political and geographic structure. the country is divided into provinces. when you look at the way the taliban took over, they did it through a series of local agreements with warlords in different parts of the country. it never was a unified taliban government. i think that as the taliban seek to reappear on the scene, once hamid karzai is gone, once the americans are gone, that they will go on a local basis, rather than through a coordinated civil
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war. clearly they would like to, once again, rule the country. i don't see it taking the form of a civil war. previously when they were seeking power, there was a different group. now there's a single army of the central government which changes things somewhat. whether the government proves effective or whether warlords appear where they have been previously, we don't know. >> if power is localized in the local group, will america have leverage when it pulls out troops? >> the leverage from the central government is the leverage of financial support, and will leave a training group for the army. >> whether that economic leverage reaches into the provinces and whether it is able to gain the allegiance for the
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central government of local forces, i think is - i'm skeptical about this. i think that afghanistan is likely to go back into a sort of warlord oriented posture and there's not a lot of the americans can do. i think it's a reason they want to get out, but they are stuck. >> thank you so much for being with us this morning. >> meanwhile, australia mining boom is making a lot of people very, very rich - from train drivers to sex workers. hundreds are hopping on board the gravy train. those on the top are making millions. andrew thomas is now in the third part of wave of fortune down under. >> in the remote parts of australia are the highest paid train drivers. it's lonely work, but for pulling trains for mine support, drivers earn upwards of $180,000
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a year. >> 240 k/hr, stopping at 800m, which is not bad. >> the trains are 3 ~km long, the cargo iron ore. >> it's not physically hard. more mentally - fatigue, heat, stress. you don't want to make a mistake. >> we'll formally open the meeting. >> trade unions stopped attempts to bring in cheaper foreign workers, one company is introducing computer-controlled driverless trains. into how often does the home computer crash. the technology is there, it's not flawless. can it deal with rapidly changing conditions and information. >> for now, drivers are still in the cab. given how visible iron ore trains are the drivers' salaries attracts attention.
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it's not just them earning what seems incredible salaries. mines themselves are best accessed by air. thousands of tradesmen and women commute from perth by plane, working 12-hour shifts, on 24 hour a day operations and live between four to 10 days on site. the most qualified earn over $100,000 a year. >> money. all about money. that's it. that money has consequences. in those towns that are near mine, prices for everything from property to personal services are high. rumours people sell themselves for $800 an hour are probably channelling -- exaggerated. >> if people have more money it helps sex workers. people will engage with the service if they have disposable income. mining and where mines spend it,
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managers and owners made billions. andrew forrest made around 6 billion and committed to give the overwhelming majority away to good causes. >> you put in a position where you accumulated great capital. it comes with it a responsibility to do the best you can with it. >> some fortunes are bigger than others of the for almost everyone involved, as the iron ore piles up, so does the cash. >> many parents in senna gal are sending their children to boarding schools focussing on islamic teaching. some institutions are forcing the children to beg. >> at this time of the morning most children in senna gal are getting ready for school. these boys are preparing to go out and beg on the streets of the capital dhaka. getting a bowl is crucial.
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they live in an islamic school called a dara. their parents september them here to study the koran, but institutionalized begs is the reality. this boy begged for six years and is insulted and rejected every day, but he has to keep trying. >> if you go back without anything one time, they don't beat you or tell you off. after several times, they beat you. >> out on the streets, it's tough. some boys are slapped or hit by cars. some people are sympathetic. most don't want to know. back at the daraa, the marabu that runs it agrees to talk to us. >> it's not my choice, i wish i could stop them belling on the streets. if i had the means, i could stop this. but i don't.
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>> the boys don't know what happens to the money they collect. it's not superintendent on food. they have to beg for meals. after several hours of begging, time to pray. >> there were about 20 boys. it's cramped and dirty, they do religious study. for her parents who are poor, sending them here means they have fewer mounths to feed. many believe it's worth children begging on the streets because they have the opportunity to move to the city and learn the koran. >> this is perhaps what parents hope for when they send their children to the city. it's one of the better daras. children are given three meals a day and they don't beg. for an estimated $10,000, that's
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a distant dream. the government tried to regulate the daraas, but the strong opposition from religious leaders, some of whom profit from the school, so the boys grow up trapped in conditions of mere slavery. >> 2,000 airboaters in florida may have to park their swamp cruisers for good because efficients at the everglades national parks are creating now rules. airboat operators will have to sell their land to the federal government as part of the everglades restoration project. >> it's win or go home in the n.f.l., mark morgan is here with the details. >> the n.f.l. playoffs begin last fight. the new orleans saints and fans heard it all week long when the team led the big easy. saints, 0 and 5 on the road in the play-offs.
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3 and 5 away from the super bowl. the road of futility hung over the team with a cloud over the game against the eagles. mark inkals. watch him give new orleans a lead with the run in the third quarter. ingram with 97. late third - eagles coming back. nick foulds to shaun mccoy. mccoy 77 yards on the ground. 20-14 new orleans, still up. fourth quarter, under five minutes. philly back up by one. 24-23, a dramatic ending in store, because after a kick off against the eagles drew breeze engineers a play drive. that is shane gram, his fourth field cold, a 32 yarder as time expir expires. gram signed over two weeks ago, his 10th n.f.l. team and moving
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the saints into the next round. john henry smith with more. >> two weeks ago the saint changed kickers, replacing garrett hartley with shane gram, a 13-year veteran kicking exclusively. the move paying off as gram made field goal attempts in freezing textures, include youing -- including the winner in the 1 on the road ever. ism the work week, preparation, the way the guys handled travelling. it's a short week. we play on a saturday after a sunday game. >> offensively we ran the ball effectively. once we got past the two turnovers we rolled, scored the touchdowns in the second half. obviously going down and getting the game winner when we needed to. special teams coming up.
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four field goals. really, a complete team effort. >> in the game, the saints riding a rushing attack to the tune of 185 yards, 97 by former heisman trophy mark engram. >> another road date next saturday against the nsc's top seed seattle seahawks. >> thank you john henry smith. at 38-10 he said, "we'd win, stay with me", he willed us to the win. they are comments from andrew lux team-mates following a comeback over the chiefs. the legend grew after engineering a come back. the visitors to a huge advantage. this is the third-quarter action. smith to nial davis for the dutch down. 38-10.
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still in the third, colt chipping away, now down 17. over the middle. koby, 12 yards. cutting the deficit to 10. fourth quarter, donald brown, scored twice, fumbles disks into -- dives into the end zone. luc looking for his favourite target since reggie wayne. ty hilton, 63 yards. 13 catches, 224 yards, colts lead by one. 2 minutes to go, fourth and 11 last gasp for kc. dwayne bow - he's out of bounds, that's it, the second-biggest comeback in n.f.l. history is complete 45-44 is the final. wildcard weekend continues with two stallar match ups. beng else and chargers. cincinnati unbeaten at home.
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bengels looking for their first win in 23 years. >> packers and the 49ers, expected to be one of the coldest n.f.l. games. forecast varies. temperatures about 5 degrees kick off. wind chill 17 below zero. that wraps up the sport. >> new york could allow limited use of medical marijuana. the governor plans to announce support in his annual state address on wednesday. he's been reluctant to reduce the laws, but 20 designated hospitals will be allowed to dispense marijuana to im patients. 21 states permit the use of medical marijuana in some form or another. new york's system is expected to be regulated than some of its liberal neighbours. >> 13 states which you see here have increased the minimum wage.
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others may follow. it may not be enough. >> the ayes have it unanimously. >> the moment washington d.c.'s city down agreed to raise the minimum wage to $11.50 over the next two years, a substantial improvement on the federal minimum wage of $7.25. across the country local authorities are taking the initiative. $11.50 an hour is low when you factor in the cost of living, the amount each workers produces an hour and the growth and income of the top 1%. using those benchmarks the minimum wage should be around $25. politicians are speaking out about income and equality in the u.s. >> you have these companies having record incomes m walmart had a net income of $17 billion. the ceo makes $1,100 per hour, and you want to hold back the people. >> president obama argued for
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the need to pay workers a fair amount for labour and not keep people in utter deprivation. >> if you work hard you should make a good living. >> president obama is supporting raising the federal minimum wage to $10.10, not giving stacy ardon a decent living. she was earning $11.50 as an ambulance worker. she could pay her bills by working hours of overtime. important stages. i was missing out on a lot because i spent once a week here, and was spending six days a week at work. >> the economic policy institute in washington d.c. has an online budget calculator working out how much someone needs to make a secure living. entering stacy's details shows how far from secure she is.
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$99,422 - she's nowhere near thax. >> you'd think we'd give more to people trying to save our lives. >> if workers are to achieve a decent living, wages have to be broadened. >> now, and for too much of the last generation, employers held the cards. >> stacy lost her job as she was trying to form a union. >> i actively organise and go out on campaign. >> she's not giving up on fighting for a liveable wage. >> former first lady barbara bush is out of hospital after a 6-day battle with pneumonia. doctors say she's doing well and discharged her friday morning. >> why experts say owls from the north pole are making their way down to the windy city.
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>> into welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford. let's get a look at the cold snap hitting parts of the country with meteorologist eboni deon. >> watching a strong cold front stretching from the great lakes to the southern plains, precipitation is falling, mainly snow in parts of the midwest, but some areas are going to change over from rain to freezing rain. we'll see it now. in de-long island we see freezing rain advisories in place through the early parts of the afternoon. are expecting
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are expecting are expecting a light glaze across the city area. >> a majestic bird is getting attention in chicago. we explain why a bird from the north pole comes south for the winter. >> it's a bone chillingly cold morning on the lake shaw. nature photographer is hoping to snap a photograph of a snowy owl. >> probably the largest owls in north america, so they are, you know, amazing. beautiful to watch, beautiful to spend time with. >> with its bright yellow eye, black beak and puffy white plumage, it has a distinct appearance. it gained notoriety as hedwig in the harry potter series, seen here in "the sorcerer' s stone",
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it is thought of as a magical creature. >> their sense of hearing is acute. they can hone in on prey under heavy vegetation or snow: experts say food may be why they have migrated this far south. >> sometimes there's food and famine. they may have a lot of chicks because food is available. after that the adults may be pushing juveniles out of range. they move further out. >> one resource helping to attract the sightings is eberg. the online database provides real-time information on where the owls are and where they are going. the first ones arrived in
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mid-november. because of the internet and how birds get reported online now, we knew to expect them. people were out looking for snowy owls before they showed up. they were seen in other areas nearby. >> experts say the snowy owl numbers will increase, giving birders an opportunity to see them in late february, early march. >> in that is not appealing - there's always the zoo. >> that will do it for this edition of al jazeera. i'm morgan radford, thank you for joining us. another news update after the break. >> we traveled here to japan to find out what's really happening at fukushima daiich >> three years after the nucular disaster, the hidden truth about the ongoing cleanup efforts and how the fallout could effect the safety of americans
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>> are dangerous amounts of radioactive water, leaking into the pacific eververyday? >> join america tonight's michael okwu for an exclusive four part series, as we return to fukushima only on al jazeera america real reporting that brings you the world. giving you a real global perspective like no other can. real reporting from around the world. this is what we do. al jazeera america.
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>> every sunday night, al jazeera america presents extraordinary films from the worlds top documentary directors this week: is love enough? >> that was a dream of ours... four children.... >> a little girl, removed from everything she's ever known... >> she's gone through a ton of orphan stuff... >> if their hopes don't turn out to be the reality...are they gonna crash? >> an unflinching look at a family learning to love >> i think she could have used a hug... >> dark matter of love on al jazeera america
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