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tv   News  Al Jazeera  March 9, 2014 6:00am-9:01am EDT

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prevented... >> her and a hundred more women... >> it hurts to the core >> faultlines al jazeera america's hard hitting... ground breaking... truth seeking... >> they don't wanna see what's really going on >> break though investigative documentary series death in plain sight only on al jazeera america >> . >> on the issue of the passports i'm in touch with international intelligence agencies. >> mysteries surrounding the disappearance of the malaysian plane. two passengers on board had stolen passports. >> more russian soldiers spotted in ukraine.
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>> venezuelans protesters. sarah palin rallying conservatives. >> good morning to you and welcome to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford, live in new york city. u.s. officials joined the ascertain for the missing malaysian airliner. the national transportation safety board is sending a team of experts. the u.s. navy is sending a ship to the south china sea. in less than 24 hours, it's expected to reach the site where investigators believe the plane may have come down. radar indicates that the plane may have turned back before disappearing. investigators still can't figure out why there was no may day
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signal. a twist in the mystery - officials are looking into how two passengers with stolen passports were able to get on board in the first place. they are investigating two more passengers who made it on to the flight, but names didn't appear on the flight manifest. >> all the names are with me, dedicated to the intelligence agencies, and i have spoken to the international intelligence agencies, to assist us. i've been meeting them later this afternoon. >> reporter: is that the fbi? >> yes. >> reporter: have they dispatched? >> not agents, but they have officers here. >> vietnamese military planes reported seeing two oil jets off the coast. authorities aren't confirming anything until they have clear evidence. >> still no answers about where
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and how the boeing 777 went down. the malaysian government is investigating two passengers travelling with stolen passports. we have to not jump the gun. we will get... >> reporter: [ inaudible ] >> it's not a security risk. we have to establish that first. if it is a security risk, let's see where the lapse is. i have nothing to hide. but the main thing here, for me and the families concerned, is to find the aircraft. we will find out on lapses and shortages and who is - who has brought risk to the issue. >> when asked if they were treating it as a terror investigation, the minister said they are not ruling anything out. vietnam's ministry of national defense identified two large oil slicks on saturday, near the area where the flight was in touch with ground control. no debris was found there.
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the flight left kuala lumpur on its way to beijing with 239 on board. there's no details about what went wrong. the fact that the crew didn't send a distress signal suggests that what happened may have happened quickly. >> the main thing for the flight path and coming back, it's a possibility. at this stage, ladies and gentlemen, we are still trying to collaborate with the sea world and we probably have a better picture. >> so because of that, the search area will be widened as be speak. >> the boeing 777-200 has a great record with one fatal crash. it's been flying for 19 years and as recently as a few days ago experts praised its safety features. the manufacturer boeing is monitoring the situation, but
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with little information, no one is willing to guess why flight 370 disappeared. >> al jazeera's neve barker has more information on the two men who had their passports stolen. >> well, the passports and identities of two e.u. citizens have been stolen and used by unknown assailants to board the malaysian aircraft. the first is that of 30-year-old austrian christon cozell. his passport was stolen while he was on holiday in thailand. the second is 37-year-old luigi maraldi. he lives in thailand and his passport was stolen last year. there are strong similarities between the case, both men in their 30, passports stolen in thailand. the kind of information that will get alarm bells ringing for those investigators looking into what happened to this flight. for e.u. passports, when a
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passport is stolen, the respective countries are alerted. the shangan information system would have been alerted. something happened to allow the passports to be used. another key point to notice is that e.u. citizens need visas in order to travel to china, where the flight was headed. perhaps the chinese authorities knew or didn't know something about what was happening here. what is clear, there's nor questions and a major breach of security has taken place. >> thank you so much neve barker. malaysia airlines has a near flawless safety record. at a press conference, investigators spoke of an issue with this plain. >> the aircraft had a portion of
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the wing tip torn, approximately a metre. it was repard by boeing and cleared and the repair was approved by various authorities. >> three americans were on board the plane, one reportedly philip wood from texas. an online profile said the 50-year-old worked for ibm in mal-asia. his ex wife posted this photo. >> 20 texas employees were on the flight, 12 from malaysia, eight in china. >> relatives spent saturday waiting for news that never came. none of it is promising. >> the ongoing wait for news as the anguish continues. some of the relatives gathering at the hotels in beijing. >> malaysian airlines has been criticised for a slow response
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as the emergency unfolded. a special team has been flown in offering care and support, made up of staff and volunteers. >> we are malaysian chinese and can help communicate with the families, because the airline does not have enough staff here. >> until they have confirmed otherwise, the airline lists the aircraft as missing and relatives are being prepared for the worst, it seems. this woman travelled here trying to find news of her brother-in-law. >> translation: we still don't know what has happened, we had no final confirmation. >> relatives have been turning up for briefing sessions for airline staff, looking for news about their loved ones. the whereabouts of the aircraft is unknown, let alone the cause of its lose. authorities are taking no
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chances. president ping ordering that security be stepped up. >> authorities have told relatives to prepare their passports saying when the plane is found. they can visit the site. >> a suicide attack in iran killed 22. a minibus packed with explosives was detonated in hela. 50 cars were set on fire with passengers trapped inside. we'll brung you more on that. secretary of state john kerry warned russia that annexing the crimean peninsula will close the door to diplomacy. russia is undeterred and appears to be reinforcing its appearance. >> jennifer glasse is following the developments. we hear though pro-russian
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forces have taken over a ukrainian base in the west. is that a sign that they are gaining ground? >> you know, that's a border post. i think the russians are taking ground where they can. the border guards tend to be very lightly armed, tend to be very - they are not military trained are not combat trained. they have to withdraw inside their post, and that's what we have seen across crimea. in the past week there has been a week. the military is duck in. the ukrainian military is not giving up. they say they will not give up to the russians, they've been on board the ship for a week and are remaining on board the ships. they are stuck in their own port, blockaded in. >> you can see a russian ship sitting, blocking ukrainianships. very much holding its ground, saying this remains ukrainian territory, no matter what russia
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says. >> russia is refusing to speak to the new government. are they trying to isolate the region, not allowing inspectors? ? >> i think they are trying to mix facts on the ground. i think they are trying to make it a done deal. not only do you have a referendum moved up quickly, but march 16th the reference is happening. here the city of sevastopol is declaring itself unilaterally. the crimean parliament paved the way saying it intended to be a part of russia. russian parliamentarians coming here from moscow and talking to people offering all sorts of said and benefits. we have seen crimean politicians go to moscow in the russian parliament. russia is trying to make this a done deal and use the referendum as a rubber-stamp and say it's already finished. they have reinforced the border
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with ukraine, flights from crimea to kiev, go to the international terminal. it's not a big deal. russia is trying to send a message that crimea is part of russia, it's finished. they are protecting the russian people, but there has been really no - nothing to protect them from. that is the question. what is the west or what can ukraine do? there's a flegling government in kiev, a week military. whether sanctions will do anything is unclear because russia seems firm in its staps this it wants crimea as part of the russian state. >> yet to be seen. >> jennifer glasse reporting live from kiev. thank you for being with us. >> crimea is home to many ethnic russians. many identify as ukrainian and don't want to breakaway. >> the pro-russian element is trying to discuss any and all dissent.
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>> the blocking of those monitors are an example of what is happening year. russians are asking, coordinating policy with pro-russian activists and militias who are acting with impunity. >> in broad daylight in the capital's main shopping street the looting began. pro-russian militia members took the associated press tv's lights. 30 seconds later, their camera. they burst into the studio, holding the crew at gun point. ap got some back, not before two men saw journalists filming. they took his camera and put a gun to his head. >> there is no law currently. everybody - you know the people who are doing this are not doing law. >> the lawlessness continued that night. that was reporter. this is filmed from his camera, as he filmed russian soldiers outside ukrainian military base.
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>> he, too, was attacked by pro-russian militia men. >> they tried to destroy - every time they are talking about information and say you are journalist. this is the reason why i attack you. >> it's not only journalists, pro-western activists are targets. when 30-year-old nurse protested the russian invasion, with spring, love and peace. the police looked on, remarkably in the face of a pro-russian activist, she holds her ground and her cool. today she is scared. >> do you feel safe here today? >> no. every day i feel in more danger, but it motivates me. >> she and 100 activists filled the park in protests, joined by the hundreds of demonstrators.
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>> she swept away trash. she believes she fust ensure the sacrifices. why is it worth the risk to come out here knowing that you might be attacked? >> i don't feel i have any choice. people sacrifice their lives in order for everyone and i to be free. live free or life not worth living. >> in crimea, the space for those that oppose russia is shrinking. russia's advocates dance in the streets. they are the majority, they feel they have already won. another proceed of their soviet war history and confident that the wrenched um will mean they'll be russian. >> as soon as crimea is part of russia, the quality of life will improve. >> right now the quality of life
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for many is low. and with little law and order the future is already being decided not by pro-westerners with signs but by pro-russians with shields. >> even though he's on vacation, it's a working weekend for president obama. he spent saturday speaking on the phone with at least half-a-dozen world leaders all about the crisis in ukraine. randall pinkston has more from washington. >> president obama is working during his weekend get away in florida. the white house released this picture of his conversation with french president francis hollande and talked to u.k.'s david cameron, and the leaders of the baltic nations. the message the same - grave concertainties about russia's violation of international law, calling for vladimir putin to pull the troops back and re
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affirming for for ukraine sovereignty. secretary of state john kerry was on the phones with russian foreign minister sergei lavrov. they have had two face to face meetings, and on saturday the state department said kerry warned sergei lavrov that continued military escalation and steps to annex crimea would close off space for diplomacy. was russia listening? apparently not. sergei lavrov boss vladimir putin continues to send in troops. russia sank two of its own patrol boats to block ukraine's navy from access to the black see. the u.s. military was not sure how many troops were in crimea. at the phomn penh, they have seen enough to be concerned. >> it's a clear violation of lots of international obligations not to mention the
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1997 agreement with ukraine. it prohibits them from the kind of activities. we are concerned with the activities. blocking off ukrainian nv ail bases by sinking patrol bocks into the waterways. and establishing control of the crimea. the u.s. and wen allies threatened russia with the sanctions. the europeans are concerned if they are imposed russia might turn off the supplies. house speaker john boehner said european nations asked him to ship more american gas to central europe. >> pinks reporting from washington d.c. >> a tale of two cities as violence continuation in venezuela. anti-government protesters clashing with police while celebrations continue for something else entirely. and a wall separating israel and
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the west bank comes to a halt. the mystery surrounding the missing airliner continues. live to the airport in malaysia for the latest. >>
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good morning and welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford live in new york city. still ahead - violent protests and celebrations happening at the same time in the same city. but first let's get a look at the temperatures we'll see across the country with meteorologist eboni deon. >> it will be a nice day, even still a little cooler and we are certainly not really welcoming that cool down after temperatures soared to 70 degrees. this is a look at alexandria, virginia, where the folks got outside to enjoy the sun shine. temperatures soaring to the mid and upper '60s. high pressure is building in, we'll be greeted by bright skies as the clouds clear out. here is a look at the precip
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station sliding through the area. a little light rain, not a lot reaching the ground. as far as the temperature side of the story, a cooler push of air pushing south wards. by monday we'll get more of a south and south-westerly blow, bringing the temperatures up to the 50s and '60s. we are going see a temperature swing over the next few days. in the north-west the story the same, a persistent pattern of unsettled conditions, a cold front moving in and lots of moisture and across portland and the interior sections. high elevations dealing with the snow. now we have the milder temperatures, that will lead to flooding concerns. widespread flood warnings and advisories posted for this area. we could be talking about three to five inches of rainfall. do watch out if you have travel plans across the north-west. >> thank you so much.
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>> let's go back to the top story, that missing malaysian jetliner. scott heidler joins us from kuala lumpur. families in china expressed frustration over a lack of information. has the situation been different on the malaysian side of things? >> they have set up a facility like they had in china. smaller though. if you look at the numbers, over 150 people on the aircraft were chinese. here in malaysia, there are 38 or so. not as big a gathering as you will here on the malaysian side of the story. what has been the focus is the investigation and search and rescue operation for the aircraft. we heard from a couple of people, including the transportation minister. she said something interesting, a possibility that the plane turned around. that's kind of expanded the
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search and rescue operation, if, in fact, there's radar indications that this plane turned around, that really opens up a lot more territory that needs to be looked at when they are looking at debris or an indication that the aircraft went down and where it went down. before it was focussed on being lost on radar, now they have to expand that. there's indications, a radar history that looks like it could have turned around. that's why they greatly expanded that. malaysia airlines is offering to fly families to where the plane is found. what are they being asked to do in the meantime? >> we know for sure that they are probably going to be sent to kuala lumpur. maybe over the next couple of daysers not all at once. they'll be based here and they'll find outed where the debris is, then they'll ship
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everyone over to the family members. they are bringing them here to kuala lumpur, and it will be an easy staging ground with they'll find debris and believe that that's where the plane went down. >> thank you for being with us. >> it's become an almost daily ritual in venezuela. protesters and police crashing. student demonstrators facing. >> 5,000 protestors staging a match. 20 have died. more anti-government demoned juniors are expected. they are marking the one of mere anniversary of the hugo chavez. >> everyone is in place, and troops have been deployed. the ruling party is hoping for a
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second term and candidate marxist guerilla is leading in the polls. he's campaigning on strengthening police and popular socialist programs. >> rebel leaders in syria lost one of their last two strongholds on the lebanese border. forces loyal to bashar al-assad seized the town of zara, and say they seized a number of weapons, part of a push by pro-bashar al-assad forces to cut off rebel supply lines. in the central african republic a red cross worker was killed. thousands of people have been killed since a mostly muslim group seized power. since then various militia have been looting, killing and torturing in the mostly christian country. conservative wave of the
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republican party wrapping up, bringing out familiar faces in the race to the white house. >> it's like the little man gets screwed. >> he spent years behind bars for a crime he doesn't commit. he won a lawsuit and now he can't keep the money.
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>> good morning and welcome back. you're watching al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford, and these are the top stories. police face off with protesters in venezuela yesterday in the fifth week. demonstrators are upset over food shortages and rising inflation, and want to get red of president nicolas maduro. >> annexing the crimean
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peninsula would close the door to diplomacy. russia is undeterred. u.n. observers have so far been unable to gain access. >> federal investigators and the u.s. navy are on route to asia. authorities widening the search area as radar indicates that the plane may have turned back to kuala lumpur before it disappeared. in a new twist officials are investigating four passengers. two on board with stolen passports, and two not listed on the flight manifest. >> the conservative wing of the republican party ended a gathering with choice words for president obama. >> something happened. that hope and change your went from a catchy campaign slog jan to a reality and along the way hope and change, yes, we can - it became, no, you can't. no, you can't log on to the
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website. no, you can't keep your health care. no, you can't make a phone call without michelle obama knowing this is the third time this week you've dialled pizza hut delivery. >> senator rand paul of kentucky won the presidential straw poll at the three day conservative event known as c.p.a.c. ted cruz was second and ben carson, a retired neurosurgeon from maryland came in third. >> not only does senator rand paul win the straw paul for the second year in a row, he won it easily, far above any other contender. the only other to crack double digits was ted cruise. it's smaller from there with a crowded field of 20 more people.
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the c.p.a.c. voters are young. 60% are 40 years or younger. and their decisions are reflected. their lib tarian views are reflected. >> sarah palin gave the crowd is lot of what they were looking for. >> red meat. anger against president barack obama, and push back against the establishment, capping off three busy days at c.p.a.c. >> guns, god and lible erty, bringing together the conservative wing. a biggest unifier, a dislike of president obama. >> the president spent all of last vibing proving that he was capable of being infective. i believe he can be as ineffective in key largo as he was in the white house. >> c.p.a.c. is a chance for politicians to speak to the conservative base. some showed up with a tail wind of support. others used the opportunity to get right with the base.
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like new jersey governor chris christie, who was not invited last year because he worked with president obama on hurricane sandy relief. >> we have to talk about what we are for, not what we are against. >> the message is one thing, but deciding what it should be is another. there's a divide in the ranks of c.p.a.c. attendees over what should be the priority - social issues or economic ones. this 19-year-old grew up on a farm and conservative values. >> i'm more focussed on economic. i don't care about the social issues, as much as the economic deficit, and keeping the open option to go to whatever school you want to, or the health care options. i'm a student and don't want to have to by obamacare, i want my own choice. >> the issues were front and center for senator rand paul who pulled in some of the biggest
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crowds. >> the time is now. stand with me, let us stand together for liberty. thank you, god bless america. >> it was not just office holders playing to the crowd. with the 2016 president call scheme open, relatively new voices. >> the ship is about to sale off niagra falls and we are going to be killed. there's a bunch of people sake, "fut there's barnacles on the side. we have to get the barnacles off", forget the barnacles, we have to get the ship turned around first. >> organizers at c.p.a.c. hope voters will go home and sail the ship to the white house in 2016. the 2016 elections is a way off, between here and there, the midterm elections. a lot of activists want to see the republicans take over the senate, hold on to the house and push on from there. >> that was libby casey reporting from the c.p.a.c.
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convention in national harbour. >> one of the most influential advisors in the west wing is resigning. he became a senator nine years ago. she is leaving her position as deputy chief of operations for a job in the private sector. president obama insisted she stale on as an outside advisor. >> the separation built on the border between israel and the woin. the palestine man said the hotel was illegally seized. >> it was a welcoming place that will tell where people from all over the world will gather. it's an israeli army out post. the cliff hotel was well-known. one day in 2003 the israelis took it over. as they lived in the west bank, that made them absent owners the family says the hotel was part
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of the down of aperdice. administered, governed. the family had never left. they went to court to win it back. >> it's my family property. i live there as a child and as an adult. i met my wife here. i had my two daughters here. something we own and cherish. then it's for us. this is something that we have to get back. >> the israeli army moved in. it began to move the separation around it. the plan was to block the hotel. four times the builders, the construction teams have arrived, ready to finish the wall. the last time they were here dropped off a huge concrete block. four times the owners have a gone to court managing to get them stopped. >> now the wall is unfinished. the hotel is a security risk, they want it on the jerusalem
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side of the wall. meaning the family would lose it forever. an israeli group says the state's case is a mess. if there is worse security you would not use the absentee property law. it's a different issue than security. mixing the two issues raises a serious question and doubt as to what is happening. >> the case drew international tension. while we were there the norwegian representative arrived for an update as we were questioned by israeli soldiers. >> it's not the only dispute that the wall has created. it has gone on for 11 years, and the family accepts the israelis will accept they are wrong. the court decision could be expect within days. it could change your the lives of a family branded absent, who never went away.
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. hello. the number for this morning is 8. the letter is 0. let me explain. doug mcdermott of creighton became the i think player to score 3,000 points, the eighth player, and passed the big 0, the oscar robinson. heavy stuff. mcdermott poured in 43 points against provenance. >> mum, first off thanks for the athletic genes. [ cheering and applause ] >> coach mac, dad, whatever you want to call it, this is unbelievable. i'm speechless right now. i remember being an eighth grader on the way home from an au trip in the car. i was so disappointed in the amount of playing time i got. i wanted to quit basketball and
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become a manager, and you - you talked me out of it, call me crazy. i'm glad i took your advice for once. >> once the game began mcdermott dominated, 32 of his 45 came in the first half, the blue jays jumping to a lead. mcdermott 17 of 35, and cruises 88-73. the blue jays prepared for the tournament next week. >> wichita state maintains its record. it was a semifinals of the conference tournament, wichita state led by 14 at the half. the bears 32% shooting. 67-42 is the time. 33 and 0. number one florida keeps on rolling. >> the gaiters ripped kentucky, completing an 18 and 0. the first team to accomplish
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that feet. survived a wild cat run. cruising to an 84-65 win. florida has won a school record, 23 in a row. arizona looking for a number one team. on the road from ar gen, down two. jonathan lloyd down for the hoop. ducks up by two. jason hits the three, extending the lead to five. under three minutes to play. lloyd buries the three. they upset arizona 64-57. >> on the links, tiger woods made a charge up the leader word of the wc cadillac championship. he was tied for 25th, but that changed. tiger with a chance for birdie on the par four 11th. eight birds on the day. more of the same on 15.
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a par three, tiger nailing a longer but. here it is. woods three behind your leader patrick read. >> it was nice to get back. i held it together yesterday on a long day, long tough day, and that gave me a chance. i figured i am only six back, it's doable. especially with the conditions and how difficult the golf course is playing. if i go back to even par i'll be there. i did one better. >> that's a look at sports this hour. >> speaking of sport. the turmoil in venezuela is reaching to the big league. 100 venezuela played major league baseball, and while they are trying to focus on training, they worry about their families back home. we caught up with one player in florida. >> with a pregame hug and kiss to his wife and daughter, miami
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marlins venezuelan boorn oliver es takes to the mound. he's over 100 players from venezuela. anti-government political demonstrations in recent weeks resulted in more than 20 report deaths in clashes between protesters and police. alvarez brought his wife, father and daughter over earlier. it's comforting for him to know his wife is safe and with him. alvarez's wife scribes the ents as out of control. >> i'm worried about the situation. my family and my husband's family is harsh, that's where i had to come.
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>> with so. tension in his homeland the solidarity between venezuelan team-mates is growing. >> translation: the view jensans that we -- venezuelans that we have, we support each other. >> baseball has been considered america's pastime. tom are using the opportunity any to shet thoughts on more than short. many turned to social media to express support. players from the miami marlins, including alvarez, detroit tigers. the twins, texas rangers, philadelphia fillies, and washington nationals recent by posted images to twitter and instagram to alert the world to events in venezuela. they using hash tacks likes venezuela, baseball and mlb.
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the political crisis in venezuela is more visible to the world. major league baseball leaders support and empathize for the players, but it is ultimately the game that they expect the men to keep top of mind. >> they have a job to do. that's what he's doing. that's what his focus is on. you can only control the things you can control. >> henderson says he's up to date. and excited to have his family close at hand and says his primary goal is to have la wedding season. >> new orleans police issued an arrest warrant for a man they say tried to steal part of a wall. neighbours took pictures of a man trying to cut out the wall.
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locals call it rain girl. it was painted in the wake of katrina. the michigan man spent nearly a decade in prisent. he won a multimillion lawsuit. his suite and hundreds of others is in limbo. bisi onile-ere explains why. >> it was 2004 when dwayne province of detroit was convicted of killing a neighbourhood drug dealer. the 26-year-old father of three small children was sentenced 32 years to life behind bars. he was incident. >> for the first couple of years i was real angry, confused. doesn't foe what direction to turn in. >> after 10 years in prison, province found a way out with the open of the university's michigan province. he was freed and a new battle began. >> when i walked out of the
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country gaol, it seemed like all 9.5 years was like a big nightmare or dream. i woke up >> province who is 40 years old. next, a settlement panel proposed he get a $5 million payment. the city had to agree to pay for go to trial, risking exposure of police misconduct and possibly a damage award. province's lawsuit, along with others, were put on hold definitely. >> me is like the little man is getting screwed in the end. >> province was dealt another blow when detroit emergency manager released a plan to dig the stit out of billions in debt. as an unsecured creditor province could receive $0.20 on
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the dollar. under those terms a pay out from the city wouldn't be enough. >> i don't believe i should bear the burden. >> province believes the city owes him. >> that will be a form of apology to me and my family because when i got out of prison it wasn't no apology that he's sorry for what had happened. province married the woman he was dating when he was first arrested. he planned on using the settlement money to use himself. while her case has been put on hold he says he's forming ahead with plans. >> detroit's emergency manager is encouraging the plaintiff to be patient. >> it's been three years since a fatal earthquake hit japan,
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until this day the people that lived near fukushima don't trust the government. >> and i'll show you when the final air will settle back
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>> good morning to you and welcome back to al jazeera america. ahead - a program helping vets get back to work. >> first the weather with meteorologist eboni deon. >> we are start in in the north-west. funnelling in across washington and oregon. the rain not letting up. i want to show you the timing of the system that we are watching now. a frontal boundary that is moving in, along with the moisture. we'll continue to see it
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funnelling in here, mainly pushing down into northern areas of california. but the bulk of it across washington and oregon. by tuesday we'll catch a break. this is the snow that will make its way across the middle of the country by midweek. >> japan said prime minister visited the fukushima nuclear power plant. tuesday sent the facility into a melt down. as harry fawcett explains, he's wo working to revive the area. >> a journey into japan's nuclear disaster has become a daily routine. he and his colleague are former cans lors. a thriving town adjoining the fukushima power plant. >> just because we are retired doesn't mean it's our business.
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we need to do all we gan. these men and their volunteer colleagues monitor the radiation lels, clearing the waterways. personal radiation exposure say nothing. it amount to 2 million a year. the goal get people back and living in a neighbourhood. people prepared to live on the doorstep much fukushima daiichi with the crippled reactors. interlaced is a sense of realism and acceptance that bringing anyone to live here at a time when nuclear disaster unfolds will be very, very difficult. it is a task they'll have to pass on to the next generation. >> a few kilometres out of up to, a different group. into no masks or groups here.
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here to assure of government efforts. tight security prevented us from visiting them. earlier we are visiting nearby houses for evacuees. here, where they feed might ratry swaps, there are plans for sights from radioactive debris. it's not the first time the town suffered hardship. thing what our ancestors did. we have to do the same for future generations. nature is in the ascendent. and the numbers of neighbours willing to consider coming back here get smaller every day. >> nearly 20,000 people decide when earthquakes struck japan. the former neighbour hood watchman was acquitted.
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this weekend he shook hands at an orlando gun expo. an organizers supported george zimmerman, and he agreed to appear at the gun show. the event was supposed to be held at a bigger venue. is it cancelled when he learnt much george zimmerman's appearance. >> hundred of soldiers left disabled fighting the wars in iraq and afghanistan are serving their country, part of hero corp, helping police take bad people off the streets. we have their story. >> this marine says the images of war embedded in his mind are nothing compared to the images of child exploitation on iphones and hard drives. justin lost his legs on a tour in afghanistan. he says he wasn't prepared for looking into the warped mind of a child predator. >> they are doing heinous crimes
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here, back on the soil i was trying to protect. and the things that they are doing are disgusting. >> gartner and david blawe are waging a battle to take down as many child predators as possible. they are unpaid interns working at the department of homeland security. with 13 others, they are first class of hero cause. it is to supply disabled and injured veterans with training so they can find not just a job, but a career. >> these individuals, the wounded warriors demonstrated their mental, psychological and physical toughness. they are the perfect candidate to deal with this blowe left his wife and boys home. he suffered a traumatic brain injury during a tour in iraq.
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for seven years he's been trying to transition to civilian life. without a job you lose your sense of belonging. you come from a family and you enter the civilian world and it's a struggle to fit into where you used to fit in. especially for wounded vets. >> the $10 million pilot program is funded through the private sector, the goal is to see 200 wounded veterans trained and employed. hopefully the program will go through, like everyone says it will and we'll higher vets abap. it's one of the biggest problems in america, especially with how many homeless vets are out there. >> the boss tells us the vets are an inspiring presence in the office. re-ipp vigourating those working there. >> when the veterans finish training. they'll be placed at homeland
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security offices all across the country. >> the end of the first hour, here is what we are following - a twist in the disappearance of the malaysian airliners. the flight appeared to have turned back to kuala lumpur before diving into the china sea. >> and a vote for crimea, one that may be difficult for international monitors to keep an eye on. protests to be expected. violence continues, celebrations remember the life of former president hugo chavez. >> cooling temperatures for some. others are feeling the warmth. >> i'm morgan radford. i'm back with you. remember, you can tune into the website at aljazeera.com, or follow us on twitter at ajam. don't go anywhere, we'll be right back.
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>> mid air mystery. the massive search to find a missing plane, and word that two passengers had their passports stolen. >> a continued show of force as a growing number of forces are slotted into crimea. >> a ship seized over oil. >> where do you park the car if you don't have a street, for example? >> floating neighbourhoods
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solving a housing problem. they come with a few challenges. >> good morning to you. welcome to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford live in new york city. u.s. officials joined the search for the missing malaysian airliner. the transport safety board are sending a team of experts. the u.s. navy will be joining the search, sending the uss with-paintney" to the south china sea. it is expected to leave the site. authorities are widening the search area. radar indicated that the plane would have turned back to kuala lumpur before disappearing. investigators can't figure out why there was no may day signal. >> officials are investigating
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four passengers, including two who boarded the plane with stolen passports. >> the aircraft had a clipped wing tip. so a portion of the material - approximately a metre of the wing tip was torn, prepared by boeing and cleared by boeing and approved - the repair was approved by the authorities. it was safe to fly. malaysian airlines had a flawless regard. at a press conference executives spoke of the past issue with the plane. >> there are two main areas of focus. >> first, when and how it dropped off radar. there are indications through radar history that the plane made a direction turn and there are possibilities that the plane
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turned trying to turn back to kuala lumpur or to the airport close to where they potentially faced trouble. there was no distress call or may day call. that's curious, there's a radar indication that there could have been a change your of direction. second is focussing on two people that boarded the aircraft with fake passports. they are going to investigate that at the kuala lumpur airport. they have closed circuit tv footage from when the gentlemen checked in to when they boarded the plane. there are indications coming out of china. an eticket company buying the tickets after each other. that is being investigated, how the two were related and how they were let on the plane. the overall focus is finding the aircraft. as a say, with the expanded
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search and rescue, pane were involved. it will be some time before they find any debris or indication where the aircraft will go down. >> three americans were on the plane, one philip wood from text use, who worked for ibm in malaysia. his ex-wife posted this photo on facebook saying he was a wonderful man and father. >> a company based in austin texas announced 20 employees were on the flight. 12 from malaysia, eight from china. >> relatives are awaiting news of their loved ones in beijing. counsellors have been brought in, and a help center set up. some family members are angry about the lack of answers. >> i don't agree with the way the airline officials handled the situationful there's no information. one on one counselling just started.
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>> about 100 relatives signed a petition demanding the airline release detailed information, and the chinese government sent officials to negotiate. >> it's rare for a plane to have problems midflight. take offs and landings are more dangerous. the boeing 777 is among the safest, flying up to 16 hours nonstop. one engine flying, its two engines burning less fuel than a smaller jet. the first and only fatal clash was when an asiana airlines flight landed short of a run way in san francisco last year. three were killed. the only other serious accident was in 2008 when a british airways plane landed short of the runway. no one was hurt. mair lines had an incident in 2005 when a triple 7 incorrectly
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estimated speed whilst flying over the o, but it did return safely to the airport. >> a bomber detonated a mini bus in the city of hela. a car bomb attack in northern baghdad killed four in a shia neighbourhood. it's not clear who carried out the attack. al qaeda breakaway group is known for targetting shia areas in iraq. secretary of state john kerry warned annexing the crimea would close the door to diplomacy. russia is undeterred. european observers have been unable to gain access and al jazeera's jennifer glasse is following the development in sevastopol. we are hearing that a group of pro-russian forces are taking over the ukrainian base in the west. does that mean the russians are
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gaining more ground? >> morgan, the russians are gaining ground where they can. it is a border post, not a military post. kind of like the coast guard here, and lightly armed, not combat trained. they retreated in their headquarters and easy for the russians to take it. they have done that across the peninsula. there are about 30,000 russian troops now in crimea in the peninsula. but the military, the ukrainian navy is not giving anything up. they have been on board the ship, holding the ship since last sunday. the russians came on board, the head of the russians came on board this ukrainian command ship demanding that they surrender the ship, joining crimean force, or to leave and
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go back. those sailors declined and are on the ship. the captain and crew, and that's true of all the ships of ukraine's black sea fleet. >> this is the third straight day that international observers tried to cross into the territory. they were shot at. how far were they able to get today. >> you know, i don't think they've had any more luck. turned around again at the border, reinforcing the border post. it's a 3-mile wide stretch and they have taken up control of it. those are military observers from 18 different countries, trying to get in and verify what is happening on the ground. russia says a reason they sent in troops was to protect the russian speaking ethnic
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population. the ofc wants to verify what is going on. they haven't been allowed to do that. they have seen shots fird over their head. the o.s.c.e. says they main committed. >> but the russians are refusing to speak to the government in kiev. they are not allowing the international inspectors. are they trying to isolate the region. is that the tactic. >> they are trying to make clear that the region is theirs. what military installations they haven't been able to take from the ukrainian military, they surround it. they are in control of the territory. >> kiev doesn't recognise the parliament, and that makes diplomacy difficult. russia created a real fact on
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the ground, in control of crimea, waiting for a referendum, that they think will rubber-stamp the occupation of crimea and make crimea a part of russia. 40% is not tat tars. ethnic ukrainians will with hold the celebration, it's the 200th birthday of the the ukrainian historical figure. they tried to have a small celebration. they were basically attacked by pro-russian demonstrators. so tensions running very high as russia has control of the peninsula ahead of the referendum, and it's unclear what they'll do to tighten their grip on the peninsula. >> thank you for being with us. >> crimea is home to many ethnic
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russians. many identify ukrainian and they don't want to breakaway. so far the russian element is trying to discuss any and outline dissent. >> a blocking of those monitors are an example of what is happening. russians are arriving. pro-russian activists and militias are acting with impunity. >> pro-russian militia members armed with ak-47s. took the associated press tv lights. they burst into the studio and held the crew at gun point. ap got some back. not before two men saw the journalists filming. >> it's the worst situation. there is no law. everybody - you know, the
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people... >> the lawlessness continued that night. that was reporter pavel. this is filmed from his camera, as he filmed russian soldiers. >> he, too, was attacked by pro-russian militia members. >> they tried to destroy - every time they are talking about information, and they say "you are journalist. this is the reason." it's not only journalists. pro-western activists are targets. when 30-year-old nurse protested the russian invasion with a side of spring, love and peace. the police looked on. remarkably in the face of a pro-russian activist she held her ground. today she is scared. >> do you feel safe? >> no, every day i feel in more
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danger. but it motivates me. >> she and 100 activists fill the park with protests, joined by hundreds of demonstrators. she swept away trash as she liked to sweep away the russians, ensurining the sacrifices of government. >> why is it words the risk of knowing she might be intact. >> i don't feel i have a choice. people sacrifice their lives in order for everyone and i to be free. live free or life not worth living. >> in crimea the space for those that oppose russia is shrinking. russia's advocates dance in the streets. they are the majority. they are proud of their soviet war history and confident that next week's referendum in
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crimea's future will be russian. >> as soon as crimea becomes part of russia, the quality of life will improve in all respects. >> right now the quality of life for many is low, and with little law and order the future is already being decided not by prowesterners with signs, but by pro-russians with shields. >> and good sunday morning to you. i'm meteorologist eboni deon with a look at the changes in the forecast. we'll see cooler weather across much of the north-east as we get the push of colder air moving southward. some areas dealt with the cold air yesterday seeing a surge of warmer air. we dealt with the snow, but take a look where we have the yellow
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shading, temperatures rising into the '60s. we are doing a flip flop. as we head out on monday we get a south push of air. in the north-west story has not changed. we are dealing with a push of moisture along with the cold front. it is still mild. we see rain. it will be heavy. but we will have cooler air. in addition to flooding concerns we are watching for rain to change your to snow. including around this area. watch out for that. aside from that widespread flooding is an issue from the west to the coastal areas of washington and these areas are dealing with the rain fall. you factor in the rain, once the winds pick up it makes for messy conditions. we'll see small trees as a
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result of the unstable conditions. yesterday in seattle we pick up over an inch and a quart. record rain fall and, yes, the rivers will be rising. flooding is an issue. the north-west not the only places getting wet. another area we are watching today for messy weather conditions across south texas. moisture and influence from the gulf of mexico. rain, thunder storms as we go through the day and isolated rain showers here along the gulf coast. >> thank you so much. the conservative wing of the republican party ended the gathering with choice words from the president. this have former vp candidate sarah palin. >> something happened. that hope and change your went from a catchy campaign slogan to a reality and along the way hope
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and change your, yes, we can - it became no, you can't. no, you can't log on to the website. no, you can't keep your health care. no, you can't make a phone call without michelle obama knowing, "this is the third time this week you've dialled pizza hut delivery." senator rand paul of kentucky won the party's presidential straw poll and the 3-day conservative event known as c.p.a.c. senator ted cruz of texas came in second. and ben carson, a retired neurosurgeon came in third. from maryland. >> the president spent all of last week proving that he was capable of being ineffective. i believe he can be as
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ineffective in key largo as he was in the white house. >> a lot of young people attended the conference. 60% of those who voted in the straw poll were under 40 years om. divided venezuela - protesters stopped in their tracks after making history. >> plus, food prices soaring in south sudan as the shortage leaves half the population struggling to feed itself. >> kenyan children turn to racing as a way to outrun poverty.
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>> good morning to you, welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford. the violence in south sudan drives up food price, but first let's get a look at temperatures across the country with meteorologist eboni deon. >> a cooler day in store across the north-east. temperatures barely moving. morning in the mid 20s. 47 not too bad around the
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capital. new york city it's 38, and a high of 40. this morning across the dakota, and minnesota, we are off to a nice start. texas - 38 in dallas, and mid-40s around san antonio. temperatures surging in the middle of the country. 40 degrees around chicago, above average, and we'll see the numbers go above average. this time of year we make it into the mid and upper 30s. we'll toss out 45. as we go into the day on tuesday. denver 72. minnesota expecting the low 40s. >> protests are expected in venezuela where more than 20 have died as police and anti-government crowds clash. the advocacy group human rights
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watch has accused the government of using brutal force. we have more from valentia. >> clashes like this is common as venezuelans take to the streets to protest against crime, inflation and police corruption. >> the opposition says their marches are peaceful. the government accuses them of inciting the violence. there's victims and accusations on both sides. >> here we continue to follow the commander in chief's orders, which have keep internal order. give citizens necessary security, unless it is necessary for us to lay down our lives we will. order must be restored. enough with the fascist groups and violence that hurts the populati population. >> reporter: this man says he was arrested during a protest
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and says he was raped with a rifle by the national guard. he's not allowed to speak publicly. off camera he said he was angry and frustrated. his mother can speak on his behalf. >> there are no words to describe how we feel. we are stuck in the apartment because we can't leave him alone. i don't believe any more in the justice system. >> reporter: manuel's case, like those of others has become nationally known. they are martyrs do the opposition cause. with a high crime rate few criminals are captured, never mind being prosecuted in places like this. with a political element of these cases, things are unlikely to about any different. while the families mourn, the fight is waned to ensure basic human rights is maintained.
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in is one of those putting pressure on the authorities. >> translation: they have not been respecting the minimum standard in torture. those detains have not had action to lawyers or families. r- the government -- >> reporter: the government maintains that it's upholding the rule of law. that it's battling against forces trying to remove it from power. the effort to maintain fundamental human rights are becoming ever more concentrated. >> the latest round of street protests started on february 12th. >> the central african republic a red cross work are was killed, happening yesterday as peacekeepers are unable to stop
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the religious fighting. thoups aned -- thousands vice-president killed. christian and muslim millish ates have been killing each other. >> a promising musician now a cripple. >> since her husband died feeding her family has always been hard. in december last year it became harder when fighting in south sudan pushed the price of food for her family ynd reach -- beyond reach. >> since the problem food is expensive. sometimes the shops are not open. life is hard. we have to eat less. we can't afterward to buy food. . >> reporter: south sudan produces little food. foreign traders were drawn to juna, but since december many of
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the residence fled and a combination of customers and prices are making the prices hard. >> before cz things were moving well. i was making good money to support me and my family. since the conflict things are bad. goods are expensive, life is hard. >> this used to be a thriving marketplace. traders came from all over the region. many have closed up their shops and gone home. right now the government is receiving enough oil revenue to function and pay salaries. rebel forces made it clear that their goal is to disrupt oil production. if they succeed it leaves the president with little income and no reserves to rely on. >> if the oil is shut down there would be a serious problem.
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it would not be like the first shut down. at that time government had reserves and it was focussing on one particular challenge. here you have so many challenges. >> to susan the challenge is finding enough money to feed her family. around the country the story is the same. with half of the population struggling to get enough to eat. 2014 was supposed to be a year of growth. instead it will be a challenge to prevent phammin. >> the united nations says food shortages are causing people to walk across borders seeking asylum. refugee children arrive suffering from malnutrition. in the cross hairs, a north koreanship and its crews are the target of a bomb threat by libya. >> i'm mark morgan.
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the good old boys are undergoing a makeover as nascar strives to be more
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>> good morning to you, welcome back. i'm morgan radford, these are the top stories. u.s. officials join the search for a missing malaysia airlines plane. in a twist two passengers are on board, two on with false passports and two without being on the manifest. >> i have spoken to intelligence agencies and international the intil gens agencies. i'll meet them this afternoon. >> reporter: are they fbi? >> yes >> reporter: have they it's
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patched... >> not agents, but people i have met. annexing crimea would close the door to diplomacy. the obama administration is trying to convince russia to pull back from crimea. with talk of sanctions russia would not be the only one under pressure. trading partners would feel the pinch. >> it's the biggest shopping complex in the capital. this is the european mall. eight floors filled with the top brands from london, paris and milan. the face of a moscow facing a throat, a threat of sanctions and retaliation. shoppers anxious about what is ahead. >> it will influence us. the minimum damage is that european goods will be more
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expensive. there are a lot of them on our market. >> we are going to be fine out europe or the usa. we have a strong economy. we will cooperate more with cif countries. we'll turn east. >> in the financial center at the heart of the city, the move on the currency and trading tasks is relaxed, a feeling the sanctions are a 2-way street. sanctions can cut both ways. russia is europe's biggest single trading partner accounting for 40% of trade last year. no surprises that the e.u. failed to share washington's enthusiasm for strong economic measures against russia. some of europe's biggest economies are vulnerable. germany, 40% of gas imports come from russia, and jeremy 30%
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of -- germany 30% of iexports to russia. france negotiated a $1.6 billion military expense. and london is the safe haven for russian billon airs. spending $900 billion on the market alone. 70 companies listed on the stock exchange. >> putin said we may lose something. i don't really expect there'll be a substantial damage to russia's economy. >> in -- moscow a raft of measures are being allowed. individual private accounts and property could be cop fizz kated. the new legislation would defend the sovereignty from threats.
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>> on thursday the e.u. froze the assets of viktor yanukovych, and 16 other senior officials. that sanctions net could be widened following news of the crimea's decision to join of the russian federation. >> joining us now from washington d.c. to discuss the crisis is john squire former senior program officer for russia and ukraine at the national endowment for democr y democracy. thank you for being with us. >> good morning. >> the prime minister of crimea said he'll come to the u.s. for consul saying and earned the nickname the goblin in the 1990s. critics say he's a thug planted by the creme line. do the people in east ukraine support him. >> i'm not familiar with the nickname the goblin or his personal history.
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i can talk about the things that the united states is likely to do or really should be doing with a country like ukraine in this situation. in particular, i think that what we need to do is focus on measures such as the development of strong ukrainian government, strong ukrainian state capacity and the integration of ukraine's russian language, russian speaking minority into the government a bit better so we don't have the temptation or we don't see the success of people with shady backgrounds. >> how do you do that if russia doesn't recognise it. it's not a question of whether russia recognises the government. it's a question of reducing the level of temptation that russia might feel to do something like invade ukraine. >> which we are seeing forces on
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the ground. what comes next and what is the end came in a scenario like that. >> this is part of the problem. i don't think mr putin has an end game. in some respects this is a repetition of the cold war scenario in which putin or russia maintained that it had the right to apply military force to the various countries, and this is something of a repetition of that idea. there's no real end game allowing russia to leave crimea. probably rush awill remain in crimea for the foreseeable future. >> how difficult does that make things for washington? >> well, again, i think that this is less of a question of policy for washington than it is for trying to build up the cap rafties of the states to -- capacity of these states to make it less temping. one of the things that the government of the region needs
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to do is make a more effective effort to provide a welcoming voimpt for their -- voirnt for their russian speaking citizens. a lot of people and ukraine speak russian, and even though they have a large roll in the economy and politics, they female yenated by the status of the language was app official language. things like this can be changed easily and can mobilise the sentiment that russian speakers feel it's their country and they can play a productive role. >> you mentioned the government in the region. are they likely to create the welcoming environment when they feel like, well, they could be next. that's part of the reason they need to create a welcoming environment.
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there has been talks that one of the reasons vladimir putin invades crimea is that a democratic ukraine, a country which is similar to russia could pose a significant challenge to continuation of the authoritarian regime in russia. probably the biggest damage that could be done would be someone in ukraine who is ethnically russian and actually think they are happier living in ukraine because of the freedoms they'd enjoy. >> you mentioned the u.s. response. what about the international community. are sanctions sufficient? >> i don't think we'll find a combination of sanctions that will remove russia from crimea any time soon. i do think that what we should be doing, just to return to this point is trying to build up the
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capacities of these states. it may include offering military support, but not direct military confrontation to make it less tempting tore russia to apply this pressure. >> thank you, john square. former senior project officer. joining us from washington d.c. it's been a pleasure. >> a direct military threat is the development in the tug of war between the libyan government and millish ape. they say they will bomb an oil tanker loading oil sold by armed rebels. >> loading oil on to a tanker in one of the biggest ports. it should be a sign that the economy is back on track. but the government in tripoli is threatening to bomb the ship if it leaves port. >> last night a ship called
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morning glory entered libyan waters. this is a violation of the international law. the state of libya sent a warning to the ship. the captain said an armed group sumps on the ship. he called them militia. the tanker will be bombed. this will be an environmental disaster. >> the wrebel leader who declard himself prime minister of the region dismissed the threats. >> we are not making threats and do not want to use force. if anyone attacks us, we'll defend ourselves. he says the government has not met demands to share oil wealth, investigate corrosion in the industry. >> there are current communications with our people, and our people in tripoli, we
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are awaiting their responses and the information that will oversee the export. and in response to a law that will give burka 15% of revenues and 50% to the government for projects for the benefit of libyans. >> rebels seized fully ports, causing oil ex-forts drop to a low. costing billions in losses. if successful in will be the first sale of oil. prime minister said he was unsure why government orders to stop the ship docking were not carried out by the military. >> the militia kept their weapons and challenge authority. threats like this from the government will not help.
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>> a cargo ship hauling weapons believed to be from iran docked in israel. israel intercepted the ship and it's believed to be transporting weapons to hamas. they found 150 containers and row after row of rockets. iran says israel is lying and says the ship man came from them. >> opinion polls suggest miguel serrano in el salvador.
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former guerilla commander miguel serrano nearly won in the first round. he failed to vet a majority of votes. sanchez hopes to one on the back of his party's leftist policies. he wants to use a social agenda to revive the economy. his rival is a former mayor norman quijano. he processes to use the army to fight crime on the streets. >> whoever wins will face antagonism putting the night under political tension. >> after the election is over people on the streets will face the two main issues affecting
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their daily lives, the threat of violence and how to make a living. >> that was david mercer reporting from el salvador's capital. the sport of nascar is looking to make changes, and mark morgan is here with the details. >> they are trying to generate more interest. a nascar is going tul throttle in the hope of reaching a broader fan base. one way is by training and mentoring multicultural and female drivers. jessica taff has more. >> this is not your grandfather's nascar. it, made of predominantly white drivers, put both hands on the wheel. the divertsity platform is important. we recognise that america is a demographically diverts place.
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>> including the front office with matt seeingle being president of a nascar franchise. jamie is an engineer and dion williams turned front tireman has a second career in the pits. there has been a concerted effort to diversify. >> dahl wallis junior came from the diversity program. the 20-year-old known as buba made history, becoming the first back mass car drive to win a series race. >> the biggest thing watt the relief. in victory lane they talked about the history and the magnitude. i didn't see that. it was a tear jerker there of being a part of it. i go out, do my best and you had the highest finish of an african american. >> sweet.
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>> another driver demonstrates nascar's extent. having started out in 2014, winning his first two races the 22-year-old is on pace to be a future star. the second-year driver on the nascar k&pro series, a regional racing series says the toughest transition hasn't been the driving but the language barrier. >> i feel like we are learning a lot about how to communicate request the team. i feel like all this thinking in english, you know, communication for the team, we need to work on it. we worked on it last year. i feel like all this adap taghts is decent. >> nascar's drive to diversity is not about forgetting the legends of the past or bypassing those. it's about looking to the
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future. >> right now nascar has one of the largest fan bases of any sport. the criticism is that it's made up of 60% men and 80% are white. mostly from southern and midwestern state. successful drivers helped to move it in the right direction. >> for me, when i encountered the bad and the negative side, i was too young to under it. i mean, i had hand gestures, slurs thrown out, but i was, "okay, what is that?" it hit my parents. they told me to go out and win. i'd do that, we'd go out and win. they'd bequiet or stop complaining and finally say the kid's good.
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>> jessica taff reporting. >> the sprint cup series is in los angeles for the third race. joey has the poll for that race. >> kenya is globally recognised as an athletics powerhouse producing runners who dominated the field. the prize money is entiesing children to put on their sneakers to run away from poverty. >> children at this school in western kenya start an evening training session. they are the best runners. the region is famous for producing top world athletes. so the children from the primary school, most from poor backgrounds hope to join the list of running elite. amy is 14 years old. and she's the best female runner so farrism. >> i started running in class four. i walked hard.
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i wanted to be like favourite athlete haile gebreselassie, and assist my family and village. >> running is more than just for fun. they are pressure to perform and bring in the big money. winning international races is lucrative. those that made it, and millions in prize money and sponsorship. this region has produced many running champions. because of that there's a loft of pressure. >> they assume by excelling they will then have to be breadwin erts in the family. >> like in any other sports many to got make it beyond the dirt tracks at home. those that do graduate to athletic schools in a famous
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hub, the high altitude attracting thousands of ath lots and is known as the home of champions. >> this man has helped children for 30 years. the school has been ced ted for the success of distance runners. >> one of our jobs as mentors is to try to get young athletes to realise that it's not all about money and the business, it's about your lifestyle and values in life. >> back at her home amy found fought she was accepted into the training program at the prestigious high school. it is a ticket out of poverty. >> 20 of the last 25 mn to take first place in the boston marathon have all been from kenya. >> architecture - holes built
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with water views, no matter where you look.
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. >> >> good morning, welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford, live in new york city. let's get a look at where the rain and snow may fall with meteorologist eboni deon. >> snow is falling, but the rain is moving in. just a few snow flakes flying around the area. rain and thunder storms will certainly scrape the coast of texas and the north-west. i'll keep the umbrellas handy. >> rising ocean levels are threatening the future of the world's coastal cities, causing
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ashing techs to look for ways to look at living on water. it may pave the way for aqua architecture. >> this is the heaviest object in the house. from the basement bathroom of her home this woman explains that the house was built around her bath tub. >> there's the water. >> sometimes i see people swimming or with a canoe. >> all it takes is a peak out the bathroom window to under why the weighty fixture makes her house tilt a little to one side. her house floats on water. >> styles it really shakes, and because it's attached it will shake not like this, but this. because it can move. sometimes it can be funny. >> this is the kitchen. we spend a lot of time here,
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obviously. >> do you get diz your, because you see the water going like this. does it make you feel sea sick. >> not really. not at all. i like the water. >> this is the dining room. here we have the family in the evening most of the time. and in the summer we open the window and barbecue and also the ducks are always around and we feed them. >> the home is one of 75 similar structures built along a series of artificial islands outside the center of the netherlands capital city, it's a floating village that may be a model for low-lying communities threatened by weather, storm surges or rising sea levels. the netherlands is a densely populated place. 50% of the population lives below sea level. spouse has been scars. more than 10 years ago, a group
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of architects and engineers to utilize the water that surrounds them. that's when they came up with this. this is the architect that designed a community of noting houses. it took seven years of research, engineering and designing. they are loosely anchored in shallow water. >> the rings that you see there go up and down. it can move 60 centimetres in this case. >> the design has been an inspiration to other countries, including the united states. making a neighbour hood like this work requires creative thinking. >> you have to think about where you park the car, if you don't have the street. where do you make storage. it's an urban question. you have to make a good urban plan. >> this woman is excited about
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growing her family here and anxious to see which other water site communities may hop on board. >> the u.n. says rising sea water levels threaten bon cock, tokyo, london and sydney. they could be totally or partially under water by the end of the century. into at the end of the second hour here is what they are following for you. >> the flight turning back to kum pur before -- kuala lumpur before diving into the south china sea. crimea to vote on whether to become part of russia. >> protest in venezuela, amid ongoing violence. >> temperatures picking up. cooling in the north-east. >> i'm morgan radford, i'm back with you in 2.5 minutes when al
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jazeera america continues. remember, you can follow us for the latest information on the website at aljazeera.com, or follow us on twitter. don't go anywhere i'll be back in
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>> he was my hero, my friend. we were very close. it's tough, tough times. >> heartbreak for the brother of an american man on board malaysian airlines flight 3 70. what the airline is telling families awaiting word of their loved one. the ukrainian prime minister
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saying he'll come to the united states for consultation. >> the largest aquarium for the better part of 50 years. sea world fires back at a bill that would ban the orca show. >> it's the party before the party. what happens when the barney blow-out is blown up by the cops? >> welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford live in new york city. the united states has joined the search for a jumbo set, advantage over the south china sea. the navy ship, expected to arrive on seen in less than 24 hours from now. investigators from the national
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transport safety board headed there and will be joined by officials from faa and boeing. radar shows that the plane may have turned back to kuala lumpur before it disappeared. the burning question is why was there no may day signal. this as families with loved ones wait for an update on what happened. a spokes naun from mair lines -- spokesman from malaysia airlines delivering the news. >> we have communicated to the family members that after more nan 30 hours without any -- more than 30 hours without any contact with the aircraft, we believe that family members should prepare for the worst. >> there's a new twist. officials are looking into how two passengers with stolen passports from italy and off theoryia were able to get on board and two more passengers
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who are on the flight but whose names do not appear on the flight manifest. >> all the names are with me. i have indicated to the intelligence agencies and spoke to the international intelligence agencies to assist us and will be meeting them >> reporter: is that the federal bureau of investigation? >> yes. >> reporter: have they dispatched... >> not agents, but officers that i have met. >> we go to scott heidler in kuala lumpur. >> there are two main areas of focus when look at the malaysian side. when and how the plane dropped off radar. the chief of the malaysian air force said there's indications that the plane made a direction turn and there's possibilities that the plane turned around and tried to return to kuala lumpur or an airport close to where they potentially faced
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presumably trouble. there's no distress call, no may day call when this happened. that's curious. there's a radar indication that there could have been a change your of direction. second is focussing on two people that boarded with fake passports. they are going to investigate that at the kooum kooum pour -- kum pure international air -- kuala lumpur airport. there's indications coming out of china an eticket company that says the two men bought the tickets after each other. that is bean vetted, how the -- being vetted, how the two -- investigated how the two were let on the plane with false passports. the focus is finding it again. many nations are involved. it takes time.
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>> that's al jazeera's scott heidler in kuala lumpur. three americans were on board the plane. one philip wood from texas much an online profile saying the 50-year-old worked for ibm in malaysia and his ex-wife posted the photo saying he was a wonderful man and father. emotions ran high. family members ran from a statement. tom ward had these words about his brother. >> philip woodward was a man of god, honour and integrity. his word was goal. he was generous, creative and intelligent. phil cared about people, his family and christ. >> families waited for news that never came. they are getting information now, none promising. >> the wait for news as the anguish tips. some relatives gather at hotels.
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malaysia airlines has been criticised for a slow response. the special team has been flown in to offer care and support, made up of staff and volunteers. >> we are malaysian chinese and can help to communicate with the families, because the airline does not have enough staff. >> until they confirm otherwise, the airline lists the aircraft as missing. relatives are being prepared for the worst. this woman challenged from near province trying to find news of her brother-in-law. we still don't know what happened. we've had no final confirmation. >> relatives have been turning up for briefing sessions with airline staff at the hotel, looking for any news. the whereabouts of the aircraft is unknown, let alone the cause
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of its lose, the authorities are taking no chances. the president ordering that security be stepped up on all aircraft leaving and entering china. >> authorities have told relatives to prepare their passports saying when the plane is found they'll be able to visit the sigh. >> we'll bring you the latest and for up to the minute information 24/7 go and log on. >> secretary of state john kerry warned russia that annexing ukraine's crimean peninsula would close the door to diplomacy. european observers have been unable to to gain access to the area and jennifer glasse is following the developments. we are hearing that pro-russian forces have taken over the ukrainian base in the west. is that a sign they are gaining ground.
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>> russian forces are taking control of whatever they can take control of >> easy for russian forces to go in there. the navy has been a hard nut to crack. ukrainian sailors are on board. the russians told them to turn over the ship, lay down the weapons, change your sides and sign up for loyalties of the pro-russian crimean government. the russians consolidating the power. they haven't let observers into the country for the fourth day run, firing shots over their head. russia in control in crimea. >> russia is telling them to
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turn over the ships you mentioned but are refusing to speak to the government in kiev. they are not allowing international inspectors into crimea. are they trying to isolate the region. >> they've been trying to make clear that the region is affiliated with russia, is part of the russia, we saw the city council here. late last week it declared itself part of the russia. there are russian flags flying. headquarters here. there are russian troops, if they are not in bases, effectively presenting moved or the ukrainian military from doing anything at all. defiant words from kiev this morning, the new prime minister saying that he will not give ukraine - sorry, he will not
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give russia an inch, is planning to go the united states for consultation, what the united states and europe can do against russia is unclear. while there are 30,000 russian troops in crimea, there are 2 million crimean civilians here as well. i don't know what the plan is. moscow doesn't seem to listen to sanctions or cares. it steams ahead and consolidates power on the ground. >> a plan that we are watching unfold. jennifer glasse reporting from sevastopol. thank you for being with us. >> russia's military occupation of crimea has politicians in washington paying close attention. president obama has spent some of his r&r on the phones discussing a diplomatic solution. let's bring in randall pinkston in washington for us. secretary of state john kerry had tough talk for russia saying
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the door to diplomacy could close. how serious is that threat? >> it's a serious matter. the department spokesman revealed the talk on instructions from secretary of state john kerry. here is what is happening. the u.s. is concerned about moscow's military build up in crimea, taking over the peninsula. and are concerned about russia's support and backing for the referendum, on whether crimea should breakaway and return to russia, the state department says john kerry had several talks with russia's foreign minister sergei lavrov, and yesterday's telephone conversation in which john kerry told sergei lavrov that unless russia pulls back the military forces. of course, russia doesn't recognise the interim government of ukraine, the ukrainian frirps
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who will be -- minister who will be coming to the u.s. they say nationalist forces forced viktor yanukovych. and they want forces before protesters push viktor yanukovych out. >> let's go back to obama. he's been on the diplomatic offensive. is he trying to create a united front. >> absolutely the u.s. and european partners are trying to coordinate the response to the take over to crimean forces. russia - the u.s. was looking to europe to take the lead in a negotiating a political solution. while most of the response that we have been hearing about deals with economic sanctions, in the background there are modest military moves, the u.s.
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stepping up military engagement with poland, a former member of the soviet block and increasing air patrols, also a part of the russian empire. >> you mentioned the response to the actions. do we know that sea pack wrapped up. what is the republican response to the way that barack obama handles the situation. >> the republicans have been critical of president obama's handling of the ukrainian crisis amongst other crises. all of them accusing him of being wrekless. and at c.p.a.c. yesterday there was ridicule of the president - the former house speaker. saying that president obama has not done a good job. it didn't matter. it didn't matter that he was on a weekend get away.
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it would be no way effective. withering criticism of president obama administration, the adage about politics stops at the water's edge, not true. >> pinks k randall pinkston reporting from washington. staying in washington an influential visor is resigning. she started working for president obama when he became a senator. she is said to be leaving her position as deputy chief of operations for a job in the private sector. the president insisted, reportedly that she stay on as an outside advisor. >> george zimmerman spotted at a florida gun show over the weekend. the former neighbourhood watchman was acquitted in the death of trayvon martin. he shook hands and autographed photos. one of the organizers supported george zimmerman during his
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trial, so george zimmerman agreed to appear at the gun show. the show was meant to be at a bigger venue, but they cancelled when they learnt that george zimmerman would be appearing. >> let's get a look at the national forecast. this taste of spring that we got yesterday, is it here to stay? >> unfortunately no, we get a taste, a sneak preview and gone. that's what we are dealing with across the north-east. this is it the scene from yesterday. alexander virginia, a lot of folks out enjoying the sunshine and the warmth. today we are behind a passing cold front. high pressure is drawing in the air. temperatures cooling off significantly. you'll notice the difference. it looks like we'll see a return of milder air as we get into the
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day. the plains nice and warm and we'll see temperatures on the rise into the north-east. dallas is an area that made it into the 50s yesterday. take a look at the texture climax we -- temperature climax we get into the work week. mid 70s, in the north-west milder temperatures in faith. then add in the moisture. we are talking wide spread rain showers. that will keep the the flooding concerns in place. notice the pink area showing up. it's a winter storm warning. we are expecting rain, overnight after the cold front moves through, temperatures will fall. some of the snow could be up from one to two feet in the higher elevations. it will pile up. right now it is rain around seattle, portland.
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northern california getting in on the wet weather. here is look at the timing. through the day scattered showers moving inland. as we get into the overnight hours monday into tuesday, that's when we'll see the rain coming to an end. this is coming into monday. that's the snow change your. on tuesday the rain ends and we'll catch a break around seattle and we can put the umbrellas up. >> they say they are facing discrimination despite the americans with disabilities act. >> if i hear the term people with special needs one more time - i'm going to punch somebody. >> bringing attention to people with disabilities by putting them on the silver stream. >> and spelling bee. >> plus, two weeks, more than 90
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rounds and it came down to this. the winning word that had to be postponed because it ran out of the words.
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>> d-e-f-i-n-i-t-i-o-n >> it took two weeks. the correct spelling of definition put the winner in first. the battle was postponed because the officials ran out of approved words. during the second round they went through harder words, but sophia misspelt stifling. >> i was sad when she got it incorrectly. it messed it up. it was going to that. >> every kid that participated
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did an amazing chance. >> the champion is on his way to the national spelling bee in washington. >> welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford live in new york city. bringing attention to people with disabilities by putting them on the big screen. first meteorologist eboni deon is here with a check of the weather. >> big changes on the way. it will feel cooler than yesterday. temperatures in the 30s and 40s, and not moving more than that as we head through the day. temperatures on the cool side. you need a jacket around minneapolis and chicago. we are heading for low 40s. and the south-east is not too bad. 54 in new orleans, we could see an isolated shower or two. we are expecting highs into the upper '60s. a keep day with a mix of cloud and sunshine.
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here is a look at the national forecast. look at denver, up to 70. we'll get warmer than that. phoenix around 81. mid 50s in chicago, a wonderful start to the work week. we'll keep it going over the middle of the country. >> california has banned plastic bags and soon perhaps killer whales as entertainment. they are the main attraction in sea world, but a californian law-maker is proposing legislation to ban them based on "black fish" if the bill passes kill are whales would be released. >> time is it running out for windows xp users or they could face virus attacks. microsoft warns consumers it
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will stop supporting its users and will not send patching updates. meaning they'll be vulnerable to hackers. 30% of desktop systems use xp and microsoft says the move is meant to get people to move from xp to an operating system. >> it's been 24 years since the passage of americans with disabilities act. members of the disabled community say they are under-represented in many areas of their life. here is a look at bringing tapes to disabilities by putting them on the big screen. >> in 1971, this woman was headed to washington when injured in a car accident leaving her partially paralyzed. >> i didn't know what to call myself. >> the focus changed. for more than 40 years she's been an outspoken voice or people with disabilities, one
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channelled into a film called "invitation to dance." if i hear the term people with special needs one more time, i'm going to punch somebody. >> it's one of 23 movies by or about people with disabilities shown in the annual real abilities film festival, a week-long event held in 15 cities. 300 film makers applied for coveted spots if the line-up. >> it's interesting to put into a room a person who is deaf, a person who is bluind, a person n the wheelchair and one on the autistic spectrum. they have nothing to do with one other, yet connect on the topic of inclusion. >> festival organizers are leading by example. sign language is provided, audio prescription and all 32 venues
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were wheelchair accessible. the passage of americans disabilities acts was a milestone, signs of stigmas are everywhere. >> if i go to the entrance of a building and there's a wheelchair building saying, "this way", everyone else can go through the beautiful well of designed entrance and i go off to the side. that's one of the kinds of signals that we get all the time that we are marginal. >> a goal of the festival is to draw attention to the under-represented portrayal of them in the media. you see my disability, i can't see the average joe who pulls the door open for me, and the hidden ones are sometimes the most disabling because society doesn't know it's there.
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>> society is learning. new york city will soon require half the city's 13,000 taxis be accessible to people with disabilities. >> the festival is running until tuesday. the coordinated car bombings claiming three dozen lives. rand paul and the rest of the base gathering for the political super bowl. who they picked to run for president in 2016. the deadly violence. how one major league baseball player is keeping in touch with family has his homeland is spiralling out of control. >> it was a special night for a college senior. i'll have that and more in sport.
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. >> mr president, we won't let you, we will not let you run rough shod obvious our rites. we will challenge you in the courts. we will battle you at the ballot box. we will not let you shred our constitution. >> that's kentucky senator rand paul among many conservative republicans criticising president obama, among the speakers at c.p.a.c., and he won the straw poll at the end of the 3-day event. senator ted cruz of texas came in second. the lesser known ben carson, retired neurosurgeon from maryland came in third. into libby casey is at the convention. >> senator rand paul won it easily with 31%.
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ted cruz had 11%, and it guess smaller from there with a voweded field of 21 people. c.p.a.c. voters are young. 50% are 40 years or younger. their libertarian views are reflected in rand paul's success. sarah palin gave the crowd what they were expecting, red meat, pushing back against president barack obama, and it capped off three busy days. >> guns, god and liberty. the unifier - a dislike of president obama. >> the president sent all of last week proving that he was capable of being ineffective. i believe he can be as ineffective in key largo as he was in the white house. >> c.p.a.c. is a chance for
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politicians to speak to the conservative base. some showed up with a tailwind of support. others used the opportunity to get right with the base - like new jersey governor chris christie, who was not invited last year because he worked with president obama on hurricane sandy relief. >> we have to start talking about what we are for, and not what we are against. >> polling for a focused message is one thing, but deciding what it should be is another. there's a divide in the anxious recovery what should be the priority - social or economic issues. >> 19-year-old nicole grew up on a dairy farm with conservative values, but says it doesn't determine her vote. >> i'm focussed on the economic side of things. i don't care about the social issues.
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i'm a student. i don't want to have to have obamacare. i want a choice. >> rand paul pulled in some of the biggest crowd. >> the time is now, stand with me. let us stand together for liberty. >> if was not just office holders. with the 2016 presidential field open, relatively new voices. >> the ship is about to sail off niagra falls. we are about to be killed. there's a bunch of people looking over the side saying, "there's barnacles on the side, we have to get the barnacles off", forget the barnacles. we need to turn the ship around. >> the presidential race of 2016 is a ways off. between here and there, the 2014 midterm election. a lot want to see the
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republicans take hold of the senate and push on from there. >> we are joined by a political analyst from new york university. jeannie, a pleasure to have you on. >> quite a week politically. >> quite a week. c.p.a.c. concluded. let's look at the straw poll results. rand paul was the run away winner. what does his victory say about the way the republican party is looking in 2015. >> c.p.a.c. is made up of voters between the ages of 18 and 22. it doesn't reflect the republican party. we knew that rand paul would take this again. he inherits a strong base. it speaks to the fact that young republicans are attracted to his
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lib tarian message. he focussed marks on a wholesale change your for the foreign policy. it speaks to that, how attractive it is to voters. more interesting is we shoe marco rubio's past. we saw the rise of ted cruz, in the poll last year, stronger this year. >> let's talk about ben carson. >> a surprise. >> he tried to back pedal from comment, comparing bestiality to homosexuality and then he said gays deserve the same rights, but not more. can the republicans win the next election on such a conservative platform when the tide is turning. >> this is a big debate.
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how do we win. you have chris christie and paul ryan saying we have to appeal broadly. you have people like ben carron, making a difficult to understand argument against immigration reform. you focus on the issues and something like gay marriage is something that you have a huge amount of support for. similarly medical marijuana, something the republican party doesn't want to talk about. social versus fiscal debate will go on. they'll have a turn out. but it's tougher for them to win the general election. can chris christie and the other establishment republicans convince the conservative wing of the party that that's the case. >> the question is back to carson, is he a herman cane 2.0.
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>> i don't know if he rises to that level. he's not widely known. he made his name fighting obamacare. he never held political office. to say he's akin to someone like president barack obama is a huge stretch. it's one thing to talk about getting into parliament. it's another to win a presidency. she's a fabulous neurosurgeon and made a game for himself. whether he can be taken seriously is yet to be determined. >> carson - no clear front runner emerged. we are looking at a clear front run are. at the conference, when anyone was ask the about chris christie's george washington bridge the answer was hillary clinton had benghazi.
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>> we heard a lot of talk about benghazi. every time hillary clinton's name came up, it went to benghazi. every time bridge gate came up it went to benghazi. democrats have to come up with a way to have a positive message for her to answer the criticism. it's not as much of an issue in the primaries. as time goes by there's a fatigue about focus on obamacare, and the irs, and what the republicans are going to offer to move forward. hillary clinton can say the same things. she talked publicly. i think that maybe time is on her tide. >> if there was any doubt that the partisan divide in washed s
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i is -- in washington. the dust up shows us how ugly it can get. >> what is your question? >> let me say what i have to say. i listened to you to the last 10-15 minutes. >> you are released. >> you will sit and allow me to ask a question. i'm a member of america. i'm tired of this. >> that was a strong words. i mean, he apologised, but to incidents like this have a lasting effect on the credibility of our congressman. >> they do. look at a congress with approval ratings of 8-9%. and the tape you played explains in large part why. you are cutting off the mipority member, the leader of the
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minority party. what happened to the free debate and speech. you have lawyerize pleading the fifth and the member of the minority party being muted. he had a loud voice to overcome that. it is trump bling. republican for democrat. that is what turns people off to congress. you know, you think it may end or bridge an end to the inquest into direct scandal. it will move forward. it's a troubling sign. >> contributing to that fatigue. >> the fatigue. enough already. let's hear what we are doing going forward. >> political analyst and professor of campaign management. always a pl pleasure to have yo with us. >> a suicide bomber killed 32.
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police say 50 cars were set on fire after a minnie bus was detonat detonated. it's not clear who carried out the attack. al qaeda breakaway group is known for targetting shia areas in iraq. >> rebel fighters in syria lost one of their last two strong holds along the lebanese border. >> forces loyal to bashar al-assad seized zara on saturday. they say they seized a number of weapons from rebels who surrounded, part of a push by pro-bashar al-assad forces to cut off rebel supply lines that stretch into lebanon. >> today marks seven years since former fbi agent robert levinson was captured in iran.
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he was working as a freelance spy for the c.i.a. in a statement they asked iran for its safe return and says the u.s. government has an obligation to bring him home. >> fab use louse duke and andrew wiggins of kansas may overshadow one of the all-time greatest careers. mark morgan is here to tell us about that. >> thank you so much. we have heard all the talk about the freshman ride. they have a great start. the individual career i'm talking about is coming to a close in record-breaking fashion. doug mcdermott of creighton became the i think college player to score 3,000 points, and he did it tosses in a career-high 45 in prove conditions on senior night. >> mum, first off, thanks for the athletic genes.
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[ cheering and applause ] >> coach, matt, dad, whatever you want to call it, i'm speechless. i remember being an eighth grader. i was disappointed in the amount of playing time i got. i wanted to quit basketball and become a manager for you. you talked me out of it. you called me crazy. i'm glad i took your advice. >> after his humorous and touching pregame speech he dominat dominated. the blue jays jumping to the lead. mcdermott 17 and 5 were the field. creighton cruising to 88-73 win. the blue jays 24 and 6, preparing for the big east tournament in new york city.
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wichita state maintains an unblemished record. wichita led by 14 at the half, never looking back. they played some d, holding the bears to 32% shooting. wichita improves to 33 and 0. number one florida is rolling. the gaiters ripping kentucky, completing an 18 and 0 regular season, the first team to accomplish that feet. they led at the first. cruising to an 84-65 win. florida has won a school record 23 in a row. arizona looking for a number one seat in the n.c.a.a. tournament. oregon down two. lloyd at 16. conducts -- conducts up by two.
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under three minutes to play. the duct upset. orcan may have locked up an n.c.a.a. bid in the process. turning to golf. tiger woods jumped back into concontinuation. woods tied for 25th. tiger will drain this one. woods eight birdies on the day. more of the same on 15. the whole par three. watch tiger with a long put. he knocks if down. woods carding a six under 66, three shots behind leader patrick reed. i held it together yesterday, a long tough day. that gave me a chance today. i figured, i'm only six back. it's doable. especially with the conditions and how difficult the golf
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course is playing. if i get back to par, i'll be right there. i did one better. >> that's a look at sport. >> thank you so much. speaking of sports, the turmoil in venezuela is reaching the big lead. 100 venezuela play major league baseball. they are trying to focus on spring training, they worry about their families at home. >> with a pregame hug and kiss. venezuela born alvarez prepares to take to the mound. he is one of over 100 major league baseball players from venezuela, a country mired in social and political violence. anti-government protests resulted in more than 20 reported deaths in clashes between protesters and police.
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alvares brought his wife, daughter and father over earlier than planned. it's comforting to know they are saif. alvares's wife describes the event in venezuela as out of control. >> i'm very worried about the situation. >> arvarez says his priority is a winning season for his team. with so much tension in his homeland the solidarity is also growing. >> the few venezuela that we have, we support each other 100% and are focussed on working hard. we are training to be 100% ready. baseball - many of the league players hail from venezuela.
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many players have turned to social media to express support for their country men and a return to calm. players from the miami marlins, including arvarez. detroit tigers, minnesota twins, seattle, philadelphia fillies and washington national posted images to quitter and instagram to alert the world to events in venezuela. the players are using hash tags like venezuela, baseball and nlb. major league baseball leaders support and emphasise with players and say it's the game they expect to keep top of mind. >> sports guys, they have a job to do. that's what he's doing, i know that's what he's focussed on, going out there and pitching.
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you can only control the things you can control. >> heading into the 2014 season, henderson says he's excited to have the family close at hand. his goal is to have a winning season. >> from chaos in venezuela to chaos in an american college town. police in massachusetts arrested 40 students after a large party got out of control. officers used pepper sfra -- spray on a couple of students. the party event is an annual event. >> they were on the ground, against the walls. everyone was running. there was a little hill. it was mud on the ground, so no one could get away on time.
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people were sipping in a mug. people were trying to move. >> college officials say they'll review the behaviour of those that were arrested. some may face expulsion orsuspension. >> he coined the phrase black power. we'll talk to the author about a new book on
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. >> oh, god. here they come. >> not quite, but proof that americans can enjoy a spanish tradition. it's the first year of the bull run in tampa florida. 5,000 spectators came out for
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one of seven bull runs. bumps, bruise, blood noses, but no serious injury. >> ahead. the life of an activist that coined the phrase black power. first let's look at the snow and rain with meteorologist eboni deon. >> it will be wet in the north-west. if you are making our way around seattle or california, watch out for the rain. southern areas of texas getting the influence from the gulf of mexico. heavy rain will stay offshore. >> he's known for popularizing the term black power. a look is out about stokely carmichael. charismatic and controversial, he created the black panther party and his activism put him on the radar of the federal bureau of investigation.
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>> a professor of history and founding director of the center for the study of race and democracy is the author of the book "stokely a life", and joins me for awe special segment "weekend conversation." we know that this book was 10 years in the making. why stokely carmichael. what was it about him that you found compelling >>. >> well, i first heard about stokely carmichael when i was in high school. there was a television series called "eyes on the prize", show occasions stokely's black power speech and it sparked my interest. he was impossibly handsome, charismatic and passionate. >> we'll show the viewers some of that passion. >> we've got to turn our backs
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on this country. yes. we need to worry about what is good for america. what is good for black people. >> that characterises some of the fire you were talking about. for someone credited with popularizing the term black power, why is he not so wide by recognised right now? >> well, i think several reasons. one, carmichael leaves the united states in 1969 and becomes the pan african revolutionary. he changes his name. he's a leader who is not martyred. dr king is killed at 39, malcolm x killed at 39. he remains a passionate revolutionary figure. many of his colleagues and peers are more pragmatic, had been elected officials, and became
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somebody who continued to answer the phone, ready for revolution. >> i know you mentioned in your book that carmichael was friendly. why was king bothered by the slogan, black power. >> dr king thought that black power would turn off-white americans, people they needed and there was too many connotations of violence. they knew each other since 1963, they marched together. an interesting story with dr king and stokely is that in april 1967 they headlined a major antiwar demonstration at the united nations. a couple of weeks later dr king called him up and wants him to go to his church. stokely said he can't be, king said "i want you to come because
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i am going to speak up about the vietnam war", and there's footage of him leading a standing ovation after the speech on the vietnam war. >> you had access to 20,000 pages from fbi on carmichael. why was the federal bureau of investigation watching him to closely. what was he afraid of. >> i'm afraid he may be a black messia. dr martin luther king, stokely carmichael could be a figure bringing together many strands of the black movement triggering a war. they were fearful of his black advocacy and antiwar activism. >> let's go back to where we are
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now. the country has an african american president. what do you think carr michael would say? >> i think he would say these are the contradictions of american society. he would be generous about president obama and the first family personally. politically he'd disagree with drone strikes, war, economic inequality. stokely carmichael was a leading voting right. he'd see the obama victory as an example of a kind of progress, but not the revolutionary progress that he saw. >> author of new biography, and a history professor. thank you for being with us.
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>> that's it for this edition of al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford. we leave you now with live pictures from independent square in ukraine. stay tuned.
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this is al jazeera: hello. this is the newshour. i am stephen cole. a suicide bomber strikes south of baghdad as iraq's president says war is declared on his country. frantic relatives wait for answers as the search for a missing passenger jet nears the end of a second day. a land of divided loyalties. rallies across the country. the value of a vote in north kore

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