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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  November 9, 2015 7:00am-9:01am EST

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>> the nation's first openly contested vote in decades. >> growing support for the university of missouri football team taking a stand against racism on campus, they want the university president to go. >> student scientists go head-to-head to see whose robot reigns supreme in qatar.
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>> welcome to your world this morning. i'm bisi onile-ere in for stephanie sy. >> we're going to begin with breaking news. two americans have been killed in jordan, shot by jordanian police officer, details are sketchy. >> we understand they were shot inside a training center outside the capital city of amman. we'll bring you more as the story develops. >> also this morning, israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu is in washington, and in just a few hours will be at the white house, his first face-to-face meeting with president obama in more than a year. the conversation could be a contentious one. president obama and prime minister netanyahu haven't seen eye to eye on a lot of issues, including the nuclear deal with iran. >> today, netanyahu is expected to ask the president for more military funding.
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that requests coming amid increasing violence between israelis and palestinians. al jazeera's mike viqueira has our story this morning from washington. >> after years of frayed relations, a low point. trial prime minister benjamin netanyahu defying president obama and taking his fight against the ran nuclear deal to a joint meeting of congress. >> a deal that is supposed to prevent nuclear proliferation would spark a nuclear arm race in the most dangerous area of the planet. >> in some ways, the tactic backfired, angering many democrats who normally support israeli. in his first visit to the white house in more than a year, netanyahu is expected to try to patch things up with president obama and he may bring along a shopping list. >> i think that at this point, netanyahu really wants to repair
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the relationship not only with the obama white house, but with democrats and he also seeks a robust aid package to compensate israel for the security risks israel will be taking in the years ahead, especially in the wake of the iran nuclear deal. >> he will ask for a big increase in the $3 billion israel gets in u.s. military aid, including state-of-the-art fighters, aircraft and a beefed up missile defense system. two leaders have an tag needs each other for years. >> the only peace that will endure is one that is based on reality, on unshakable facts. >> in 2011, netanyahu lectured obama with cameras rolling in the oval office, rebuking the president after every said the 1967 border should she the base for a two-state solution with the palestinians. netanyahu abandoned support for
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a two-state solution, a bedrock of u.s. policy, only to backtrack after winning at the polls. now both sides have an interest in calming things down. >> to try to create a more stable and quieter base for cooperation between two countries. we've had an off and on soap opera between benjamin netanyahu and barack obama over the last seven years. >> for netanyahu, support for israel and the u.s. has always been bipartisan. repairing relationships with the democrats is a top priority. an eruption in violence in south jerusalem has left 70 palestinians and 10 israelis dead. bitter recrimination between netanyahu and the the palestinian leader, mahmoud
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abbas. there is little chance for a peace agreement in obamaed remaining time in office. >> the question is how many more deaths will we see on both sides before a peace deal is implemented. >> they are not meeting at personal friends, but most expect the end to the era of public an tip thee. >> are these two leaders expect to see eye to eye on on issues? >> this is a chance to do relationship repair. president obama does not have much time left in the remainder of his term. there are areas they maybe able to find common ground on, one is syria, the crisis there and russia's recent involvement. the two ladies can talk about what russia's presence in syria means for stability in the region. something that prime minister
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netanyahu will be looking for is military aid and this might be a place the two leaders can come to some agreement or consensus. it is likely that it will increase. the prime minister wants a 10 year deal. the groundwork has already been laid for that. we saw the u.s. jointly chiefs of staff talk with the prime recently, also, the israeli defense minister come to washington, so work has already been done on that front. >> is it your sense we will see any progress on restarting any peace talks between israel and the palestinians? >> even the white house says there is very little chance of an actual peace solution during the rest of the obama administration term, which is a touch admission, of course, because it certainly was a goal
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not only of president obama, but of john kerry, secretary of state who will be on hand today for the meeting, something that the whole team was looking towards. what the white house would like to get is some movement forward, some willingness from the prime minister and some sign from him of what can be done. one thing of course that's very important is hearing from him that he does support a two-state solution, something he seemed to walk back on when he was campaigning last spring. he said he wasn't walking back on it after the fact that the white house would like a firmer commitment on that front. that will be something that the white house hopes to pull out of it, but you can certainly imagine, that is much smaller in scope than what the white house had hoped many years ago. it's he is specialty critical now because of the time line but also because of the recent violence in east jerusalem. >> libby, thank you very much. >> also, we are learning that as soon as this week, the pentagon could layout a plan to close the
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u.s. military center at guantanamo bay, officials telling the press possible backups include the centennial prison in colorado. moving those prisoners requires congressional approval, which lawmakers say is unlikely. this morning, myanmar's opposition party seems to be heading for a landslide victory. the national democratic party is projected to win 70% of the votes. the military backed incumbents say they will accept those results. they have been in power since military rule officially ended in 2011. al jazeera is live this morning in myanmar. what has been the general reaction to these elections? >> certainly a lot of celebration happening now among supporters of that party you mentioned, the largest opposition party, the party of
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aung san suu kyi. we've only had results from 12 seats, 12 electorates when it comes to the knoll parliament. all 12 seats not lower house so far have gone to the national league for democracy, but still a very long way to go as far as those official results go. they will continue to drip out from the union election commission over the next few hours and over the next few days before we'll know officially whether the n.l.d. as is predicted has won a majority of seats in parliament and is able to win the election and form the next government. >> there's a lot of talk of these elections being historic. why are they just so important?
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>> they are build as the first open general election in 25 years since the military took over in 1962. we had a general election in 1990 and military rule, the national league for democracy won that election in a landslide, winning over 80% of the votes, but the military didn't allow it to take over, didn't recognize the results, and at that time of the election, aung san suu kyi was put under arrest. we are now in a partially civilian government, open election with the n.l.d. taking part along with many other parties, including the ruling party, of course the usdp made up of many former military generals who used to run this country when they were in
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uniform. it's a very significant vote, and so far, it seems to have gone very smoothly. >> opposition leader suu kyi has said she will run the government, but can't be president. >> we won't know who will be the next president until parliament reconvenes next year. >> thank you, wayne hay. >> the university of missouri's
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good morning board are addressing calls for the president to resign. the team's football players say they won't play unless the president quits. >> we all made this decision as a team to not talk to the media, so you are not going to hear much from the players. >> african-american students accuse the president, tim wolfe of failing to respond to issues of racism on the campus. al jazeera has more. >> protests aren't usually part of the college football playbook, but racial tensions on the campus of the university of missouri may put football season on hold. the team says they are refusing to take the field in a show of solidarity with the graduate student on a hunger strike. saturday night, the student's black student government tweeted a picture of black players linked arm-in-arm with jonathan butler. he said he's willing to die unless university president tim
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wolfe resigns. he has been under fire for a tepid response to a string of incidents on campus, included racial slurs at black students and a swastika in feces on a wall. >> we've had lots of conversations, including conversation witness protestors where they came in and they asked questions and i expressed my position. >> i don't care what you're doing. we're standing in solidarity with jonathan butler. i'm not here with a press conference. i want you resigned. i need to you leave. >> when wolfe spoke with students again, he was shouted down. >> is this because you don't believe you have the equal opportunity for success? >> back in october, butler led a protest that stopped the school's homecoming parade.
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butler told the washington post that he had pain all over, but that his covering was worth it. the campus in columbia has been on edge since the shooting of michael brown in ferguson, just over 100 miles from the school. a number of the black students enrolled are from ferguson, a predominantly black community. columbia is predominantly white. the football coach declared his support for his team, a photo on twitter showing players black and white is captioned we are united. paul beban, al jazeera. >> missouri playing brigham young on saturday if the players decide to strike and the game canceled, it would cost the school more than a million dollars. the editor of the school newspaper said calls for the president resigned as the numbers of incidents on the school campus increased. >> students have denounced a
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series of incidents. the trigger for the hunger strike that jonathan butler is undergoing now was the fact that u.n. president tim wolfe did not respond to what happened during the homecoming parade, but several things have happened in early september for example, the president of the missouri students association was called the n. word while at the university's greektown. it's really been a series of incidents. i don't think we can point to a specific one. >> in a statement late sunday, the university president tim wolfe insisted he is dedicated to on going dialogue to address those very complex societal issues, as they affect our campus community. >> two louisiana state police officers will face a judge this morning charged with second degree murder in the death of a 6-year-old autistic boy. the funeral for jeremy more tess is being held this afternoon.
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he was the boy was hid with five bullets when city marshalls fired into his truck. this is his father's fiancee. >> it hurts. it's like i'm dreaming. >> louisiana state police say they found no gun in the father's car and say there were no warrants against him. jeremy mar tess is the youngest person to be killed by police so far this year. >> there is a manhunt for whoever shot a judge in her driveway in austin. she was seriously injured, but is expected to survive. police say it's not yet clear whether the shooting was related to her work as a district judge in travis county. >> what i would love to report is that we had somebody in
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custody and that i could let me nate those concerns. the truth is that at this point, we don't have somebody in custody. >> the judge is a former prosecutor. she was first appointed to the bench in 1999 by then texas governor george w. bush. >> three texas teens are held after planning attacks on two schools. police north of detroit say posts on instagram tipped off authorities. the plot was stopped before it could be carried out. >> a fire rye crash near washington, d.c. left four dead, including a child. a pickup truck burst into flames after colliding sunday. the victims inside the church van, the other was the driver of a truck. more than a dozen others were injured. >> the team investigating the crash of a russian plane over egypt seems more convinced that a bomb downed the plane.
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one team member tells reuters he is 90% certain of it. egyptian officials say a noise heard from the final second of a cockpit recording appeared to be an explosion. they say the plane appeared to have broken up in midair while it was being flown on auto pilot. the airliner crashed 23 minutes after taking off from the sharm el-sheikh airport. >> bags filled with drugs and weapons are often allowed through security for a small bribe. >> the voting law controversy in north carolina. >> challenging voter i.d. rules
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could mean they are aimed at preventing minority from casting ballots. >> in afghanistan, the province's first female leader is facing cultural challenges trying to gone. >> what on earth caused this gigantic cave in, a dozen cars swallowed up outside an eye hop in mississippi.
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the only way to get better is to challenge yourself, and that's what we're doing at xfinity. we are challenging ourselves to improve every aspect of your experience. and this includes our commitment to being on time. every time. that's why if we're ever late for an appointment, we'll credit your account $20. it's our promise to you. we're doing everything we can to give you the best experience possible. because we should fit into your life. not the other way around.
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>> this morning, myanmar opposition party seems to be heading for a landslide victory reversing a half century of military rule. the national democratic party led by aung san suu kyi expects to win 70% have the vote.
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suu kyi is barred from being president. the military promised they will accept the results. they have been in power since military rule officially ended in 2011. joining us from berlin is a fellow at the brookings institution center for east asia policy studies. thank you for joining us this morning. >> thanks for having me. >> many in myanmar have expressed concern that the military won't hand over power if it loses, considering past issues. do these voters have a right to be worried even though the military backed government is saying we are going to go whichever way this vote goes. >> i think their concern is certainly understandable, given the many years under which they were under a military government, however, i think that ultimately, it's very likely that the military and the current government will respect the outcome of the election.
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both the president and commander-in-chief have repeatedly said that they will respect the outcome of the elections. if you think about it, the myanmar military actually consider themselves to be the author of this democratic transition. they allowed all this to occur, the release of political prisoners. liberalization of the media in myanmar. this was recognition that the past solution wasn't working and i think given that they are seeing some benefits to myanmar with the gradual opening, they will likely continue with this reform process. >> if the national league for democracy wins at the polls, what kind of leader will aung san suu kyi be without coming able to become president and how do you think she will handle the problems in the country? >> perhaps it might be better to look at what sort of leading party or ruling party will the
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n.l.d. be. aung san suu kyi is barred from becoming penalty under article 59 ever in the constitution, however she has said she will be above the president. i don't see how this can be constitutionally accommodated. she might have other ideas, but if we look at how the n.l.d. will be addressing the problems, they certainly have their work cut out for them. most of the lower hanging fruit of reform have been done. what remains are intractable issues concerning adherence to the ceasefire in the country's border regions and forging a more long lasting sustainable peace settlement with the minority ethnic states. both these issues will require the n.l.d. government to cooperate with the military. you can't have a ceasefire if the military is going to be shooting, so the n.l.d. will have to work closely with the military. there are also other problems in
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the country. we have issues with the rohingya in myanmar's western rekind states. there are some concerns that aung san suu kyi has not spoken out strongly enough about the owe inga's percent cute minority and has not fielded any candidates on the n.l.d. ticket. there's not that much reason for optimism. it's a very difficult problem, and she has called for greater security and rule of law in these areas, however, part of the problem with the rohingya is perhaps that the law has rather unfairly prejudiced them. the they are not recognized at one of the indigenous groups and imposes a very own russ rule to show that they have been in the
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country since 1823. it's difficult for very poor and uneducated community to do that, so certainly, n.l.d. has many challenges ahead of it if it does take over the government, but, it's certainly something that we hope for the best for. >> thank you so much for joining us. we appreciate your insight. >> thousands of people in burundi fleeing their homes amid fears of rising violence. government backed forces are going door to door in opposition neighborhoods raiding homes and picking up weapons. raised followed a shooting over the weekend at a bar that left nine people dead. >> a palestinian woman was shot and killed this morning in the occupied west bank, officials saying she tried to stab israeli security forces. police sunday released this surveillance video, showing another incident, a palestinian woman stabbing a security guard. it happened at the entrance of an israeli settlement. he was wounded before shooting and injuring that woman.
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77 palestinians and 10 israelis have died in weeks of violence. >> australian authorities are trying to restore order at the christmas island integration center after a riot broke out. detainees are protesting after the body of a kurdish iranian refugee was found at the bottom of a cliff. officials say he tried to escape the detention center which is separated from australia by the indian ocean. there are 300 asylum seek he is at the christmas island camp. the detention center is one of several stopover points for refugees rescued in the indian ocean before being allowed to enter australia. >> 364 days and counting. >> the presidential election just under a year away. we take a closer look at where the candidates stand right now. >> we'll look at seatbelt safety, the new nationwide push to get all of our children strapped in on those school buses.
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>> at 9:30 - "america tonight" - top investigative reporting, uncovering new perspectives. >> everything that's happening here is illegal. >> then at 10:00 - it's "reports from around the world". >> let's take a closer look. >> antonio mora gives you a global view. >> this is a human rights crisis. >> and at 11:00 - "news wrap-up". clear... concise... complete. >> welcome back to your world this morning. it's 7:30 eastern. taking a look at today's top stories. we are following breaking news, two americans have been killed in jordan. they were shot by a jordanian
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police officer. two other people, including the gunman also died. we understand this all happened inside a police training center near amman. we'll bring you more as the story develops. >> israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu arriving at the white house in just a few hours to talk with president obama. it is the first face-to-face meeting between those two leaders in more than a year. they are expected to talk about the latest round of violence between israelis and palestinians. the, the iranian nuclear deal and military aid. >> the party of aung san suu kyi seems to be heading to a landslide victory in myanmar. the national democratic party is shown to be winning 70% of the vote. the military has been in power since military rule ended in 2011. >> graduate students at the university of missouri threatening to walk out as calls grow for the school penalty to
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resign. african-american students accusing tim wolf of failing to respond to several i wants of racism on campus. >> presidential hope was are gearing up for their fourth debate. low polling numbers have knocked chris christie and mike huckabee beoff the main stage, but one of the front runners who will be there, dr. ben carson is pushing back against climbs he embellished his life story. he says the media is paying extra attention to him to try to knock him out of the race. >> there's no question i'm getting special scrutiny, because, you know, there are a lot of people who are very threatened and they've seen the recent head-to-head polling against hillary and how well i do, and they're worried. there's no question about it. >> carson's closest rival donald trump held "saturday night live" get the highest readying in
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nearly four years. not everyone was laughing. protestors marching outside number studios over his stance on immigration. >> senator bernie sanders said it needs to be more about the candidates and positions rather than personal lives. >> i know it's a crazy idea, but maybe we focus on the issues impacting the american people and what candidates are saying rather than just spending so much time exploring their lives of 30 or 40 years ago. i think the reason that so many people are turned off to the political process has a lot to do with the fact that we are not talking about the real. >> impacting real people. >> amanda covers politics at the huffington post and joins us. ben carson saying he's under attack, he says what's happening to him is unprecedented. i wonder has he forgotten hillary clinton just spent 11 ours before the house benghazi
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committee and president obama had to defend his birth and pastor. why did ben carson feel singled out? >> this is called running for president. you write books and layout facts and when you run for president, people are going to look into them especially when you are a candidate like ben carson who's entire run is basically based on his biography and sort of his inspirational rise from poverty to be this famed neurosurgeon. what he is going through is typical. john kerry had to defend the fact that he was in vietnam and earned a purple heart. people were doubting that, as well. these questions are completely natural, but ben carson blaming the media is what conservative's like to do and what the base likes. >> first he came out to the rescue of hillary clinton saying voters are sick and tired of hearing about your emails, now saying focus should be on the
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position of candidates not what they did 20 or 30 years ago. will that have the same effect on ben carson? >> i don't think it will have the same effect. bernie sanders has wanted to focus on issues. if you look at what he talks, he doesn't even talk about his own biography much, it's more about the. >>, like income and equality that he finds are most important. focusing on issues is problematic for ben carson because he had had positions that are wacky about green storage facilities and on other issues, he really hasn't put out any positions. if you do that, as well, focusing on issues for ben carson would be problematic. >> nbc fired donald trump for his remarks about mexico, then put him back on the air and made fun of those remarks object saturday night. this is how "saturday night live" tried to deal with the controversy. >> we are going to have a lot of
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fun tonight! >> you are outrageous! >> who is that? >> trumps a racist. >> as you can see, that is comedian larry david calling him a racist saying he wants to $5,000 bounty offered for somebody to do so. did trump's appearance help or hurt his presidential ambitions? >> i don't think it really hurt him too much. i don't know how much it helped him. i don't think he was very funny most of the time, but it solidified that he is an entertainer, this is what he does well, but i think a lot of groups, these latino groups who oppose trumps candidacy and remarks on immigration, calling mexican immigrants rapists and drug dealers, although they didn't get him kicked off the show, they got more awareness about their issue, they protested in front of trump tower and marched to nbc studios
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and got people talking what they are talking about, raising awareness. >> thanks for joining us this morning. there is still about a year to go before election day and there is a lot scheduled between now and then. in early february, voters in iowa are taking part in that state's caucuses. a week after that, three months from today, new hampshire voters will have their say. there are a lot of contests up to july when both parties will hold conventions and formally nominate their choices for president. >> north carolina is fighting legal challenges to one of its election laws, requiring voters to show i.d. before they cast ballots, as al jazeera reports, critics say the law unfairly discriminates against minorities. >> you will lose all your people. >> for decades, sandra looked forward to november.
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every two years, it gave her the chance to vote. last year, after casting her ballot, she got a phone call. >> they told me i'm sorry to tell you that your vote didn't count. it was a let down. >> she had recently moved from another state. because she was recently disabled, she had not updated her driver's license to use at voter i.d. >> we got a bill that ensures integrity of the voting place. >> giving north carolina 2013 implemented strict photo i.d. requirements, sandra and others found their votes disqualified. long standing laws allowing for same day registration had been eliminated. the u.s. justice department and a coalition of activists took the state government to court, arguing conservative lawmakers deliberately change bed the laws to make it harder for minority voters to cast a ballot. a voting block in 2008 took advantage of the flexible voting requirements like allowances for voter i.d.'s in record numbers.
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it resulted in the election of the nation's first black president. >> the defends in this case argue that other states do not have early voting, yet still experience surges in african-american turnout in the past two elections. they also argue that recent changes to north carolina's election laws are not racially motivated. >> those supporting the lawsuit disagree and are hopeful the strict voting i.d. laws and other restrictions can be overturned. >> it did not matter whether democrats or republicans are putting in place voting restrictions, the loser is always the same in north carolina in the south and the looser is always african-american voters. >> we should have a voice, you know. it feels like sometimes feels like we're being bullied. >> there's a lot at stake. 2016 presidential campaign is already underway. the outcome of north carolina's
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voting rights case could have precedent setting implications for voters all across the united states. al jazeera, raleigh, north carolina. >> afghanistan has refused billions of dollars in u.s. aid since the war in 2001. not everyone reaping the benefits have all that money. gore is one of the largest and most isolated provinces in afghanistan. officials say they have been forgotten by the government. jennifer glasse talked with women fighting to improve their lives. >> she's the first female governor of gore province. she knows the province needs proper and adequate security. >> you have encouraged us that with your help, we can build, develop, we can promote education and advance all other parts of the lives of the people
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of ghor province. the security you're providing us helps us work. >> she welcomion the fact that there are women fores present. they appreciate her, too. >> we were in our homes a few years ago and couldn't go out. now that we have a female governor, she can retch us. >> many anti-government armed groups in the province hide within the population. the governor tries to get out amongst the people as much as she can, coming to things like this, her first police exercise or walking with people in the market, not just staying in her office. >> she makes surprise visits to ministries to check attendances, to that i can sure people are doing their jobs. at winter approaches, she checks the shop keepers overcharge for food and close to the people of
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ghor province can afford them. >> she cares about the problems of our people and our homeland. >> she also has her opponents, several demonstrators have called for her to be fired. she says that's because she's a woman. the head of the provincial council denies that. >> we hope to god that this governor will be replaced. she doesn't have enough education. she's not patient. she's a govern who doesn't want advice. she does everything her own way. >> she said officials oppose her because they have wanted to build shops on government land and she refused. >> they decided before i came they didn't want me. after i came, the main reason they oppose me is because of their illegal demands that i wouldn't accept. they never gave me any of advice for the good of the people or the development of the people's lives. >> she says she will do her best
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despite the challenges here. if she fails, she's worried critics will say she failed because she's a woman. jennifer glasse, al jazeera, central afghanistan. >> pope francis is condemning leaks showing financial misconduct by church officials. he spoke about the scandal in his sunday address at st. peters square. he said the leaks are unnecessary because he's already working to reform the vatican. catholics who heard the address liked what the pope said. >> i liked that he was open, but he could speak about this openly, and i like that he said that the publication of the documents will not stop him with the reforming of the church that i found this very good. i like that he made a topic of it, that he did not keep silent about it. >> the pope oh pointed a commission of experts in 2013 to investigate misconduct in the
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vatican. yemen is dealing with its second deadly cyclone ape week. cyclone meg has hit the coast with 127-mile per hour winds. it is expected to move forward the mainland. it followed a cyclone last week which killed nine people. >> huge dams are targeted to be taken town in the northwest. getting rid of them is controversial. we have more. >> this is what's left of the glines canyon dam, a major hydroelectric dam on the northwest corner of washington state. it was built in 1927, demolished in 2014. there was another hydroelectric dam on the same river just a couple of miles downstream. it was more than 100 years old. it's gone, too.
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the canyon dam was more than 200 feet high and dropping that river water down that distance, spinning turbine that is generated the electricity that made a boom town. it fault a local growing timber industry. a coalition of environmental groups and the local native american tribe began pushing to take those dams down. in the early 1990s, congress purchased them from timber interests and in 2011 began to remove these dams, the largest such project in history. this used to be a lake mill, the water that was backed up behind the dam. you can still see the outline of the shoreline there. we would have been 20 to 30 feet above the surface of the lake here. you can see how the river is cutting through the 27 million yards of silt deposited behind this dam and the dam downstream.
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there are other dams in the region pushing for more of the same. we'll have that story tonight. al jazeera at the canyon dam in washington state. >> they say a picture says a thousand years. that's about 20,000. you can more about the controversy tonight. >> big changes could be on the horizon or school buses. the head of the national highway traffic administration says he wants rules requiring seatbelts on buses nationwide. he says the federal government state school districts and bus manufacturers all need to work together to make it happen. just six states now require seatbelts on school buses. critics say outfitting school bus witness seatbelts could cost $2.5 billion. >> investigating a case of the treatment that uses extreme cold to relieve pain and other problems, a worker died after using one of those machines at the clinic. as al jazeera found out, not
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everyone agrees that cry yo therapy works. >> a number of therapy centers claim that their service offers medical benefits. they claim it boosts energy, releases pain, can jump start weight loss and even help with depression. >> there is nothing in the literature to show it helps with depression. >> the concept of using cold for injuries is centuries old. athletes have long used ice to help their muscles recover, but whole body cryo therapy isn't something you can do at home. clients pay $50 to $100 to step into a chamber and freeze for three minutes. it is pumped with liquid nitrogen, cooled down to negative 240 degrees fahrenheit.
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the machines aren't approved by the f.d.a. the agency said the f.d.a. regulates whole body cryo therapy when the manufacture promotes the device for medical purpose claims. centers across the u.s. certainly do market the procedures medical benefits, and they're the ones who have direct access to the public. the f.d.a. told use it can take action against the centers, as well, but couldn't confirm whether it was curveball conducting any investigations. >> is it fair to say there's pretty much no regulation. >> it is absolutely, there is no regulation. >> that's been the reality so far. a recent death in nevada is calling this into question. 24-year-old chelsea who worked at a las vegas cryo therapy center was found dead in a chamber. she may have been doing a cryo therapy session by herself. the state of nevada has now expanded the inquiry into the industry. the center employees insist it's safe, as long as clients are
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healthy and supervised. i went to cryo life in new york city to experience the therapy for myself. >> you're going to feel pins and needles all over your legs. >> it was like standing inside an air conditioner. i did start to feel any toes getting numb, so i did the minimum minute and a half. i can't say that i noticed a difference, but many cryo therapy enthusiasts across the country insists its benefits are real. >> your body feels invigorating, the energy just flows. it's tingling and wonderful. >> a feeling they say is enough to keep them going back. al jazeera, new york. some high tech help in the fight against heart disease. goggle and the american heart association are each pledging $25 million over the next five years to be used to build a research term combining technology and medicine.
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cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death in the world, killing 17 million people every year. i'm still thinking about the cryo therapy. >> especially heading into the winter months. >> history that is that theres some sales estimates. >> i'm at the world robot olympiad in qatar where the smartest young minds have come together to battle for robot supremacy.
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>> this morning, an investigation is underway in mississippi where this happen. the ground caved in outside an i-hop east of jackson. it swallowed more than a dozen cars. witnesses say they heard loud booms before the hole opened up. take a look at it.
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it's 15 feet deep, 50 feet wide and 600 feet long. there were no injuries, but some of those cars seriously damaged. >> it is scary. thousands of the world's youngest engineers gathering for the next generation of robots for this year's olympiad. this has to operate without human intervention. this year's event brings together more than 3,000 young robot enthusiasts from 45 countries, all in tent on learning and showing off their skills. >> we have different design. it has an advantage and we can talk to each other and then know about the advantage and we can learn from them. >> it makes our brain more
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advanced. >> no matter how big or small your robot is, you just have to manage it. >> you listen to the people talking about addressing things and you learn about it. >> robots can extract things from dangerous place from mars to ash mining. each was judged on creativity and ingenuity. >> we have something that is way out of the box, still in the theme. that has been really cool to see, like someone who found micro organisms, which you can say is a national resource. >> then there's football. two robots aside with thousands of man hours behind the design and build of each robot player. >> plastic lego building blocks
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have long tested the imagination, add to it a robotic element and here you have a serious sporting event. >> when you look at what they have been able to program these robots to do, it's incredible. obviously that gets people interested. if science is fun, or if education's fun, then people will be interested anding interested in becoming the scientists and engineers of the future. >> a malaysian team takes the title, but the consensus is that bringing so many young people from around the world together in the name of technology is a winning formula. al jazeera, doha. >> it was called the most important beatle guitar ever to hit the auction block. this morning, it's also the most expensive. john lennons guitar sold for $2.4 million, four times the estimate. the guitar was used in hits like
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i want to hold your hand and she loves you. it disappeared after a 1963 concert. part of the proceeds will go to a charity founded by lennon and his widow, yoko ono. outrage over allegations of racism on campus. students ramp up the pressure on the university of missouri's president. why they want him tock to go and what the university is doing about it. >> benjamin netanyahu visiting the white house this morning. we'll talk about why he is looking to rare ties after a very public fallout. we are back in two minutes. >> it's the biggest question out there. >> go inside the groundbreaking research. >> are you ready to have your brain scanned? >> ready to go! >> challenging your deepest beliefs. >> feeling the spirit is very subjective. >> i don't buy that. >> techknow's team of experts
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show you how the miracles of science... >> this is what innovation looks like. >> can affect and surprise us. >> i feel like we're making an impact. >> let's do it. >> techknow - where technology meets humanity.
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>> in the name of. >> jesus. >> demanding change, the university of missouri considering its president's future after a series of race it incidents on campus. mending fences, president obama hosts israel's prime minister at the white house. could the iran nuclear deal hurt efforts to find common ground. >> two louisiana police officers due in court after shooting and killing a 6-year-old. today that child is laid to
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rest. >> a political landslide 25 years in the making. myanmar's face of democracy as aung san suu kyi leads hear party to a victory. >> good morning, welcome. >> we're following the developing story this morning out of jordan. at least three people, including two americans have been shot and killed by a jordanian police officer. the officer reportedly opened fire inside a training center near amman. >> we're told that center is used to train security force there is. the officer we are told committed suicide right after that attack. the initial reports say this morning that the two dead americans were providing security at the center. we'll have more on this developing story throughout the hour. >> there is another story we're following closely, this one at the university of missouri.
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graduate students there threatening to walk out this morning in a show of support for demands that the president of the university resign. protests have been going on for weeks. the campus, including this one took place on sunday night. the football team won't play if wolfe doesn't step down. al jazeera's paul beban has more. >> protests aren't usually part of the college football playbook, but racial tensions on the campus of the university of missouri may put football season on hold. the team says they are refusing to take the field in a show of solidarity with the graduate student on a hunger strike. saturday night, the school's black student government tweeted a picture of black players linked arm-in-arm with jonathan butler. he said he's willing to die
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unless university president tim wolfe resigns. he has been under fire for a tepid response to a string of incidents on campus, included racial slurs at black students and a swastika in feces on a wall. >> we've had lots of conversations, including conversation with protestors where they came in and they asked questions and i expressed my position. >> i don't care what you're doing. we're standing in solidarity with jonathan butler. i'm not here for a press conference. i want you resigned. i need to you leave. >> on thrsday night, when wolfe spoke with students again, he was shouted down. >> is this because you don't believe you have the equal opportunity for success? >> back in october, butler led a protest that stopped the school's homecoming parade.
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on thursday, butler told the washington post that he had pain all over, but that his covering was worth it. the campus in columbia has been on edge since the shooting of michael brown in ferguson, just over 100 miles from the school. a number of the black students enrolled are from ferguson, a predominantly black community. columbia is predominantly white. on sunday, the football coach declared his support for his team, a photo on twitter showing players black and white is captioned "we are united." paul beban, al jazeera. >> the editor of the student university newspaper said those calls for the president to resign grew louder as the number of racial incidents on campus increased. >> students have denounced a series of incidents. it seems that the trigger for the hunger strike that jonathan butler is undergoing right now was the fact that um president
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tim wolfe did not respond to what happened during the homecoming parade, in early september, the president of the missouri students association was called the n. word while at the university's greektown. the legion of black students has also been called the n. word. it's really been a series of incidents. i don't think you can point to a specific one. >> university president tim wolfe insisted he is dedicated to on going dialogue to address these very complex satisfactory sital issues as they affect our campus community. >> university of missouri is scheduled to play brigham young. should it be canceled, the university will lose $1 million. >> benjamin netanyahu will have his first face-to-face meeting with president obama in more
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than a year. he is expected to ask for more military aid. this morning, a palestinian woman was shot and killed in the occupied west bank. officials say she tried to stab israeli security forces. trying to find peace is just one of the issues. >> eric powell opposes the illegal occupation of the palestinian territories. >> bulldoze your homes. palestinian be getting bombed and none of you say this. >> using rap to spread his message. he is not hopeful anything will change. >> i honestly don't see it, because i mean, he has other issues that he feels it will, i don't know how he feels personally, but that the administration will definitely sheaf as more important for more prominent in what he needs to get done during these last few
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months. >> it's good once again to welcome -- >> that's exactly what top white house aids are saying, conceding there will not be a two-state solution while the president is in office. there might not be another round of talks. they want to hear what steps the prime minister might take to build confidence so the sides may eventually be able to talk again. the u.s. is no longer talking about reevaluates its position on the u.n. security council. they could have allowed a resolution to pass. analyst believes they won't likely take that step. >> he would probably get opposition from democrats up for reelection to strengthen ties with israelis. >> the israelis have the upper hand in public opinion. when asked if the u.s. should support israel, even if their interests diverge, 45% agreed. 47% said the u.s. should pursue its own interests.
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israel is looking for a long term financial agreement and increase in the $3 billion it gets from the u.s. each year. supporters have urged the u.s. to give israel a new bomb called the massive ordinance penetrator, capable of hilting iran's underground nuclear facility. >> providing israel with that bomb would prevent the united states from being able to restrain israel should it feel it necessary to strike iran. i think that's where the u.s. is probably keen not to give up that leverage or to delay giving up that leverage as long as it possibly can. >> the relationship between the leaders has always been tense, never more so than now after netanyahu lobbied congress on the iran deal without asking the president first. >> the message from the white
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house, this isn't the time for that. al jazeera, washington. >> president obama and prime netanyahu have not seen eye to eye on a lot of issues especially over the nuclear deal with iran. the obama administration is running out of time to mend relations before the president leaves office. al jazeera's libby casey is live with us today in washington. is today's meeting likely to help improve the relationship between these two leaders? >> bisi onile-ere, the president certainly hopes so. both sides do have an incentive to try to leave the room in better shape than they go into it. it's not just about the political fracturing. it's also the personal relationship that's taken a hit. when the prime minister chose to come to congress just last march eight months ago and address this joint meeting, not giving the white house a heads up that that decision was made ahead of time, the president didn't meet with him on that visit. it really was a low and the lobbying effort by the prime minister didn't work.
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the iran nuclear deal went through and congress ultimately did not push back hard enough against the white house to stop it. that's been an issue for prime minister netanyahu. he now does hope to get more military funding from the beyond, a commitment of a treasure 10 year deal. he has some incentive here. president obama does, as well. now even though he only has a little more than a year left in his term, he has to be cognizant of the relationship democrats need to build or rebuild with israel. it has been seen that republicans are more in line with israel right now. democrats are not happy about that. then the president has to think about the 2016 campaign and the democrats running for president, who hope to occupy the oval office next. that's also part of the legacy he needs to be thinking about, but this has been a fractured and difficult relationship, and both men go into this recognizing that there are a lot of people focused on how they
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will act, how they will respond and if they can come to any sort of deals or compromises. one area they may be able to find common ground on, syria. both countries have concerns over what russias involvement there means. >> do we expect any progress on restarting peace talks between israel and the palestinians? >> well, even the white house has admitted that there is not optimism, that during the remainder of the obama administration, a piece deal will be reached and that's difficult admission, it's something that has not just been south after. they would like some sign of progress. they want him to recommit to a two-state solution. he pulled back on that when he was campaigning for his open reelection last spring. he said i am not pulling back on that, but the white house wants a firm commitment especially with recent violence in east
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jerusalem. >> thank you. >> this morning, two louisiana police officers are due in court facing charges of second degree murder in connection with the death of a 6-year-old boy who is autistic. the funeral for that little boy is being held this afternoon, but there are still a lot of questions surrounding his death. al jazeera's jonathan martin is live for us this morning in new orleans. haven't jonathan, have police even said yet what led to the shooting? >> good morning to you, del. police have not. they still don't know why these two officers began this choice or why they were trying to pull this man over. those two officers have yet to be cooperative and come forward with information. so far in this case, it's really been body camera footage that the police have not released yet from a third officer who arrived on the scene for backup. that's been the key evidence so far in what led to these two arrests. >> louisiana state police moved quickly to arrest two police officers for killing a little boy and wounding his father.
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investigators say 6-year-old jeremy david marr tess was strapped in the front seat, his four christopher pugh at the wheel. pleas say jeremy was killed, his father wounded when the two police opened fire on a dead end street in marksville, louisiana. >> both individuals were booked on one count of second degree murder and one count of tommed second degree murder. >> initially greenhouse and stafford were placed on leave while police poured over 911 calls, conducted interviews and reviewed the crime scene. >> we took some of the body cameras. i'm going to tell you this, it is the most disturbing thing i've seen. >> police have not explained why greenhouse and stafford were chasing you pugh. initial reports that police were trying to serve a warrant turned out to be false.
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every had no outstanding warrants. >> i don't know what he was thinking. i don't know why he wouldn't -- >> nothing is more important than the badge we wear on this uniform. that badge has been tarnished. >> pugh was unarmed. >> there's no indication of fire coming from that s.u.v. >> 6-year-old jeremy will be laid to rest today in mississippi. back in louisiana, his father remains in a local jail in serious condition. >> who are officials talking to as part of they've investigation? >> so far, police are talking to eyewitnesses. the thing is there have been some conflicting reports when it comes to what actually happened. some of the eyewitnesses said they saw christopher pugh back into the officers' car. some say that did not happen. police want to talk to the officers. at this point, they haven't been cooperative.
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chris pugh is being held as a local hospital heavily sedated. still a lot of people to talk to and a lot of questions to answer. >> jonathan martin live for us in new orleans, thank you very much. >> there is a manhunt underway in texas for whoever shot a judge in her driveway. the 51-year-old judge was wounded friday night outside her jump scale austin home. she was seriously injured but expected to survive. it is not clear whether the shooting was related to her work as a district judge in travis county. >> what i would love to report is that we had somebody in custody and that i could eliminate those concerns. the truth is that at this point, we don't have somebody in custody. >> the judge is a former prosecutor. she was first appointed to the bench in 1999 by then the accident governor george w. bush. >> we continue to follow that developing story out of jordan. three people including two
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americans were killed by a jordanian police officer. that officer reportedly opening fire inside a training center near amman. we have a report from amman. can you tell us more about this particular shooting? >> according to the jordanian government, which issued a statement a short while ago, two american instructors as well as one south african police instructor were killed when this jordanian policeman inside the facility opened fire at the foreign in instructors. the jordanian policeman captain was shot by jordanian security forces, although we have heard other reports suggesting that after carrying out the attack, he shot himself and committed suicide. the u.s. embassy hasn't really said much for its part yet. it said that it is investigating what it described as a security incident and relying on the
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jordanian authorities to cooperate in this investigation. >> tell us more about the center where the shooting took place. >> well first, these american police instructors are contracted by the jordanian public security department. the king abdullah police training facility just east of amman is well known in the region. it was founded 10 years ago. jordan is known for having a strong army and a strong police norse, so it's basic live used this training facility which is heavily guarded and fortified as a hub for training other police forces in the region. libyans have been trained in that center, as well as iraqis and right now we understand that 116 palestinian policeman are being trained at that facility as we speak by the american and other foreign instructors. this program, this training program is also we are told if you would by the u.s.
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>> thank you very much. the opposition in myanmar is celebrating what appears to be a landslide victory. the national democratic party led by aung san suu kyi is on track to win 70% of the vote. that could sweep it to power and end decades of military dominance. >> this morning, the team investigating the crash of a russian plane over egypt seems to be more convinced that a bomb downed that plane. twenty members telling reuters that he is 90% certain of it. egyptian officials say a notice heard from the final cockpit recording appeared to be an explosion, sake the plane appears to have broken up in midair while he was being flown on auto pilot. it crashed after taking off from sharm el-sheikh.
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security gaps are shown at that airport. more than a half dozen security officials telling the associated press about a broken baggage scanner and lax passenger screening. one official saying bags filled with drugs or weapons are often allowed to get through for just a small breaking ball. president obama holding that tense meeting this morning with israel's prime minister. >> why their relationship may not get better after something netanyahu spokesman said. >> afghanistan's forgotten people, despite billions of money spent on reconstruction. some provinces there saying they are left behind.
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>> we are live this morning in myanmar. this election seems to be a strong vote in favor of the opposition. do the people seem happy about the result? >> celebration are growing and expectations growing among supporters of the national league for democracy. the party of aung san suu kyi that they will win this reeks comfortably and they will be able to form the next government on their own. early days officially, though, as far as the official results go from the union election commission. we've only had an announcement of 12 constituencies, 12 seats
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in the lower house, all 12 of those seats have gone to the national league for democracy. that's certainly a very good start, but as far as official results go, it is early days. they will continue to filter out from the election commission in the hours and days ahead before we have an official overall result. >> wayne haye, than thank you vy much. benjamin netanyahu arrives in a few hours for talks with president obama. it will be their first face-to-face meeting in more than a year. while the iranian deal and nuke aid are on the agenda, they are expected to talk about the latest round of violence between the israelis and palestinians. this is the first meeting between these two leaders since benjamin netanyahu appeared before that joint session of congress, highly critical of the administration's nuclear deal with iran. if you are a fly on the wall,
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what do you think is going to happen when these two leaders meet? >> i think first of all, one of the main goals of the meeting is optical, to say that did he spite the differences, the u.s. and israel's relationship remains on firm footing. i think given what we've heard from white house sources over the past few days, i think what president obama is going to want to hear is what steps prime minister netanyahu is willing to take to stop the violence, to dial down the situation that we've seen in israeli, palestinian over the past several months, and just as importantly, what steps he is willing to take to prevent the foreclosure of the two-state solution. i think the fact that the white house has been saying they fear the two-state solution may be slipping away is very significant. >> by got fact that they will be asking for these steps to be taken, does that appear as if they are anti israel to some?
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>> i think you will always have some people in washington who will interpret any measure of criticism no matter how gently phrased or how much it's framed in terms of overall support for israel, any criticism for some will never be acceptable. i think it is very important to recognize that president obama by any objective measure has been enormously pro israel, and even in what he's saying now with regard to the two-state solution, many in israel actually agree with him, if not the current government headed by prime minister netanyahu. >> i want to talk about this new growing controversy involving israel's new diplomacy chief quoted as saying about president obama this is what hadern anti-semitism looks like, referring to the response to benjamin netanyahu's response to appearing before congress, the l.a. times describes it as a
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kerfuffle. is it more than a kerfuffle? >> i don't know what term i would use. it's obviously a ridiculous statement, but i think it is representative of the general view that many in netanyahu's inner circle have of president obama. i think it was not particularly surprising. it was surprising only that he was so open bit and that the netanyahu government would be so careless as to go ahead and appoint this person on the eve of a trip to the united states, the goal of which was to really restore and affirm the relationship between our two countries. >> calling it modern day anti-semitism is going very, very strongly anti obama. is that something benjamin netanyahu should address and perhaps fire this person? >> i think he clearly showed him, i think the fact that he hadn't is a strong indication that netanyahu feels this is not something he's really worried
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about. he has members of his own circle, certainly supporters of his government in israel and here in the united states making similar accusations against the obama administration. i think the fact that he appointed this person and now retained them just shows how confident he is that no matter what he does or what his government says or does, there will always be those in the united states to continue to back him. >> thank you very much. fighting more momentum with less than a year to go. >> presidential hope was getting ready for a debate they say could shift the balance. what matters to us is the changing climate, immigration reform and action on police brutality. >> a new generation of voters demand to be heard, marching on washington calling for change.
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>> it's the biggest question out there. >> go inside the groundbreaking research. >> are you ready to have your brain scanned? >> ready to go! >> challenging your deepest beliefs. >> feeling the spirit is very subjective. >> i don't buy that. >> techknow's team of experts show you how the miracles of science... >> this is what innovation looks like. >> can affect and surprise us. >> i feel like we're making an impact. >> let's do it. >> techknow - where technology meets humanity. >> welcome back to your world this morning. 8:30 eastern time. two americans in jordan are dead after a jordanian officer reportedly opened fire inside a training center in amman. a south african was also killed before the gunman took his own life. that center is used to train security forces. initial reports say the two dead
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americans were providing security. >> this morning, graduate students at the university of missouri are threatening a walk out. it's the latest protest as calls grow for the school president to resign. black students accused tim wolf of failing to respond to racism on campus. >> israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu on his way to the white house for his first visit with president obama in more than a year. they are expected to talk about the latest round of violence between israelis and palestinians, the iranian nuclear deal and military aid. >> the republican presidential hope was are gearing up for their fourth debate. the top eight faceoff tomorrow in milwaukee. low polling numbers knocked chris christie and mike huckabee beoff the main stage, but one of the front runners who will be there, dr. ben carson is pushing back against claims he embellished his life story, sake the media is paying extra attention to him to try and knock him out of the race. >> there's no question i am
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getting special scrutiny, because there are a lot of people who are very threatened and then, you know, they've seen the recent head to red polling against hillary and how well i do and they're worried. there's no question about it. >> donald trump helping "saturday night live" reach its highest ratings in four years. not everyone was laughing as he hosted the show. there were protests outside the substituted yo over his stance on immigration. bernie sanders saying the race needs to be more about the candidates positions and less about their personal lives. >> i think it might be a better idea, i know it's a crazy idea, but maybe we focus on the issues impacting the american people and what candidates are saying rather than spending so much time exploring their lives are 30 or 40 years ago. i think the reason that so many people are turned off to the political process has a lot to do with the fact that we're not talking about the real issues impacting real people.
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>> aman da covers politics for the huffington post and explained by republican sanders wants to talk about issues while ben carson focuses on his personal story. >> person knee sanders has wanted to focus on issues throughout the campaign. if he look at what he talks about, he doesn't even talk about his own biography much, it's more about the. >> like income in equality he finds most important. focusing on issues is problematic for ben carson because he has positions that are pretty wacky about how the pyramids are green storage facilities and on other issues hasn't put out any positions. if you do that, as well, focusing on issues for ben carson i think would be problematic. >> you write books, layout facts and when you run for president, people are going to look into them especially when you are a candidate like ben carson, whose entire run is basically based on his biography and sort of his in
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firational rise from poverty to be this famed neurosurgeon. if you look at what john kerry had to go through, he had to defend the fact that he was in vietnam and earned a purple heart. people were doubting that, as well. these questions are completely natural, but ben carson blaming the media is what conservatives like to do and what the base likes. >> also saying that donald trump's performance on s.n.l. not likely to affect his poll numbers, did give attention to protestors on his stance on immigration. >> there is a lot on the table between now and election day. three months from today, new hampshire voters have their say. there are other contests leading up to july before the conventions. >> millions of mill len yells are coming of age just in time to cost ballots in next year's
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presidential election. hundreds are walking out of class today to march on washington. they want politicians on both sides of the aisle to help move the country forward. >> a new generation of voters are descending on the nation's calendar apartment to demand their voices be heard. here i am is a youth collection called our generation, our choice. these are students who have come today because they demand change on race, on immigration and on climate change. they are not just going to tweet or snap chat. they're going to march to the white thousand in an act of civil dice obedience because they say lawmakers need to hear them so they have proactive solutions to all these problems they say are intimately interconnected. >> the representatives aren't representing the people who voted them in so we are taking action to get them to follow our lead instead of following the lead of the corporations and big money they actually represent.
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>> the generation are not the social media obsessed group of people, that we are very much aware of the issues that are plaguing our country, plaguing the world that we live in and that we are determined to make a change and the only way that we can actually see change is if we implement it ourselves. >> you can watch the full report tonight at 8:00 eastern here on aljazeera america. >> presidential elections often turn on the issue of economics. president clinton said it's about jobs. we look at how that could play in the south. >> economists and data crunchers at the equality of economic project wonder if where you live helps or hurts your chances of improving your lot in life. >> they mapped what they call economic mobility, county by county across the u.s. and their data showed the south is where
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children born into poor homes were least likely to climb the economic ladder. their data showed the regions businesses overwhelmingly rely on low wage work. >> florida and arkansas are the only two southern states where minimum wage is just above the federal average of $7.25. in georgia, the minimum wage, $5.15. >> another measurement of economic well being, food stamps. in washington, d.c., almost 20%, about one of every five people receivers food stamps. runners up in the south are mississippi, west virginia, tennessee, louisiana, all that according to the usda. >> another report out, this one by the organization for economic cooperation and development, ranked all 50 states according to nine different measurements of well being. those are health, safety, housing, access to broad band, civic engagement, education,
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jobs environment and income. eight states in the south ranked at the bottom, the worst of the worst, mississippi. >> in mississippi, the offering weekly wage is 711 he dollars compared with the national of 1,048. of course when we think of the south, we often think of the military, because federal spending on the military is a huge part of the gross domestic product of many southern states. take a look. in virginia, military spending accounts for 13.9% of g.d.p. 8.6% in alabama. kentucky i guess nearly 8%. mississippi gets 6% of its g.d.p. from the defense department. >> one sector doing very well in the south, automobile manufacturing. that start up in detroit in the beginning of the last century. now many companies are migrating
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down here. >> formerly sleepy towns, growing thanks to a nissan plant. june the north has the big three, ford, chrysler and general motors, but the south has new non-union assembly plants. much of those have a ripple effect on jobs from parts manufacturers all the way to dealerships. >> c.e.o.'s across the country show their top five best places to do business are down in dixie, number one texas, two, florida, three, north carolina. then there's tennessee, and of course number five, the peach state, georgia. >> why do c.e.o.'s like to do business so much in the south? >> according to them, the mild weather, the low taxes, the good corporate environment and the
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business development. here's the twist. when the wall street journal did an examination of where the c.e.o.'s live and if they live in the south, the only state that came up for them was florida. robert ray, al jazeera. australia authorities are trying to restore order at the christmas island immigration center after a riot broke out. the body of a kurdish iranian refugee was found at the bottom of a cliff. officials say he tried to escape from the detention center which is separated from australia and the indian ocean. al jazeera reports. >> australia said it's trying to restore order at the christmas island immigration detention center. one australian politician said the facility is in meltdown, saying employees of the company that manages the facility have abandoned their posts. >> the situation inside the christmas island detention center now is very tense.
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there are no guards inside the facility. >> sources inside the facility say the violence began over the weekend after the death of an iranian kurdish refugee who tried to escape. the detainee, in his 30's had south refuge in australia but jailed instead. his body was found at the bottom of a cliff. >> we also know that he was suffering from psychological and physical harm due to not only the traumatic circumstances which he fled witness a kurd from iran, but also being held in prolonged detention, which caused him severe harm and also at times left him suicidal. >> detainee rights groups accuse the australian government of cruel and in humane treatment at christmas island. there's concern that the people seeking refuge in australia will get even worse. >> these are people who theoretically are staying on
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christmas side choosing not to come back to new zealand because we know they could do that. now the risk i guess that they actually damage their own appeals because they undertake over criminal activity. >> some australian politicians say there's a crisis at the detention centers in australia, saying it's time for the government to start being up front about the conditions at these facilities. >> for yours at the moment, the priority is that we restore order within the center and people on the ground undertaking those activities. >> australia says although it takes a tough stance on asylum seekers, it tries to meet international standards when it comes to looking after them. al jazeera. iran's president is criticizing the media in his own country, accusing hard line journalists of acting like undercover cops. the president rouhani said outlets are telling their audience who is going to be
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arrested tomorrow. he also defended the media though, saying that newspapers and other outlets should not be shut down by intelligence officials. >> rouhani's claims come as a prominent human rights advocate has been arrested by the egyptian army. he was detained sunday morning and charged with publishing false news. he wrote an investigative story last month about a possible coup against egypt's president. >> pope francis condemning leaks showing financial misconduct by vatican officials, saying the leaks are unnecessary because he's working to fix the problem. catholics who heard his address liked what the pope had to say. >> i liked that he was open, that he could speak about it openly, and i like that he said that the publication of the documents will not stop him with the reforming of the church. i found it very good. i like that he made a topic of
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it, that he did not keep silent about it. >> the pope will oh point a commission of experts in 2013 to investigate misconduct at the vatican. >> the leaders of one province in afghanistan say they have been forgotten by their own government. >> the chief of this hospital say it doesn't have enough staff or equipment. the sewer system is backed up. only one female doctor for the whole population, and most of the hospital doesn't have
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running water. >> billions which dollars in aid has been spent in afghanistan but there's not much sign of it in ghor province. >> you can see that ghor has missed out on the money. >> the province is 400 kilometers from the capital and getting here by road isn't easy. the paved roads end here. right now, the journey to kabul takes more than 24 hours. if this was paved, it would take about five. >> the long commute means 35 cents is added for everything brought in.
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only a quarter of the hospital has power provided by diesel generators that are expensive to run. power costs 25% more here than kabul. almost no homes here have running water. children have to walk a kilometer or more to a spring to get the only water that's fit to drink. as long as ghor province lacks these services, many have little chance of a sparkling future. >> we're getting a new sense today of the impact of climate change. the united nations says greenhouse gases in the atmosphere hit an all time high last year. in a separate report, the world bank found climate change could push more than 100 million people into extreme poverty in 10 years. >> some say we are already
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seeing the affects of climate change right now. >> a bright light off the coast of california, signs of alien life or something else?
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>> this is what's left of the glines canyon dam, a major hydroelectric dam on the northwest corner of washington state. it was built in 1927, demolished in 2014. there was another hydroelectric dam on the same river just a couple of miles downstream. it was more than 100 years old. it's gone, too. the canyon dam was more than 200 feet high and dropping that river water down that distance, spinning turbine that is generated the electricity that made a boom town. it fault a local growing timber industry. a coalition of environmental groups and the local native american tribe began pushing to take those dams down. in the early 1990s, congress purchased them from timber interests and in 2011 began to remove these dams, the largest such project in history. this used to be a lake mill, the water that was backed up behind the dam. you can still see the outline of the shoreline there.
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we would have been 20 to 30 feet above the surface of the lake here. you can see how the river is cutting through the 27 million cubic yards of silt deposited behind this dam and the dam downstream. there are other dams in the region pushing for more of the same. we'll have that story tonight. al jazeera at the canyon dam in washington state. >> you can see more tonight at 8:00 eastern. >> big changes could be on the horizon for school buses. the head of the ntsb wants rules requiring seatbelts on that buses nationwide. he said the federal government, state, school direct and bus manufacturers need to work together to make it happen. just six states require seatbelts on school buses. outfitting school buses could cost $2.5 billion. >> a cool approach to new age
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health care, but is it safe. >> is it cool? it's actually cold. we'll look at cryo therapy after a work at a center died. >> find out what caused the earth to collapse, taking all of these cars with it.
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>> this morning, an investigation is underway in mississippi. that's where this happened, the ground caved in outside an i-hop
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east of jackson in meridian. it swallowed a dozen cars. witnesses heard loud booms before the hole opened. it is 15 feet deep, 50 feet wide and 600 feet long. amazingly, there were no reported injuries, but some cars were seriously damaged. >> you see them, but never that big. >> authorities in nevada investigating a fatal case of cryo therapy. a worker died after using one of the machines at the clinic. not everyone agrees that cryo therapy works.
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>> a number of therapy centers claim that their service offers medical benefits. they claim it boosts energy, releases pain, can jump start weight loss and even help with depression. >> there is nothing in the literature to show it helps with depression. >> the concept of using cold for injuries is centuries old. athletes have long used ice to help their muscles recover, but whole body cryotherapy isn't something you can do at home. clients pay $50 to $100 to step into a chamber and freeze for three minutes. it is pumped with liquid nitrogen, cooled down to negative 240 degrees fahrenheit. the machines aren't approved by the f.d.a. the agency said the f.d.a. regulates whole body cryotherapy when the manufacture promotes the device for medical purpose claims. centers across the u.s. certainly do market the procedure's medical benefits, and they're the ones who have direct access to the public. the f.d.a. told use it can take action against the centers, as
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well, but couldn't confirm whether it was currently conducting any investigations. >> is it fair to say there's pretty much no regulation? >> it is absolutely, there is no regulation. >> that's been the reality so far. a recent death in nevada is calling this into question. 24-year-old chelsea, who worked at a las vegas cryotherapy center was found dead in a chamber. she may have been doing a cryotherapy session by herself. the state of nevada has now expanded the inquiry into the industry. the center employees insist it's safe, as long as clients are healthy and supervised. i went to cryo life in new york city to experience the therapy for myself. >> you're going to feel pins and needles all over your legs. >> it was like standing inside an air conditioner. i did start to feel my toes getting numb, so i did the
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minimum minute and a half. i can't say that i noticed a difference, but many cryotherapy enthusiasts across the country insists its benefits are real. >> your body feels invigorating, the energy just flows. it's tingling and wonderful. >> a feeling they say is enough to keep them going back. al jazeera, new york. >> this week, more than a billion dollars worth of art is up for auction. one new painting could fetch more than $100 million. christies is expecting a big haul from this, called nurse. it could bring in $80 million. this could set an auction record for a sculpture if it sells for an estimated 18 to $25 million. >> that's it for us here in new york. >> coming up next from doha, the latest from myanmar where aung san suu kyi's party appears to
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be heading for a landslide victory in national elections. >> we're back tomorrow morning at 7:00 a.m. >> burrell operations in myanmar with a major gain in the opposition party of aung san suu kyi. >> tension at home and abroad, israel's prime minister flies to washington for talks with president barack obama. >> human rights watch warns of an impending

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