Skip to main content

tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  November 13, 2015 7:00am-9:01am EST

7:00 am
♪ if the strike was successful and we still await conformation of that it will be a strike at the heart of i.s.i.l. >> breaking news overnight targeting jihad john, one of the most recognizable. and they seized back full ntrol of the iraqi town from i.s.i.l. >> good fella goes free and mobster cleared in a multi million heist plus. >> how stupid are the people of iowa? how stupid are the people of the country to believe this crap? >> and trump on a tear and the presidential hopeful unloads during a campaign stop in iowa.
7:01 am
♪ welcome to your world this morning i'm stephanie sy. >> and i'm dell walters and a drone strike targeting i.s.i.l.'s most recognizable figures the man known as jihad john sgln it was his covered face that appeared in multiple videos showing the killings of american and other western hostages, in august 2014 he was shown in a video be heading journalists james foley and seen later killing journalist sotlof and peter kasik and promised to track him down. >> born in kuwait and grew up in london where officials say he was radicalized and moved in
7:02 am
2012 and 2014 he began making headlines. >> otherwise this knife will become your nightmare. >> reporter: his british accent named him the nickname jihad john and he is shown be heading hostages and blaming them for their deaths and they promised to hunt him down. >> making mistake of harming americans we will not forget and our reach is long and justice will be served. >> and he later apologized to his family for the attention those videos generated but he showed no remorse for the be headings or being part of the most brutal and gruesome organization. the pentagon says the air strikes targeting jihad john took place in the syrian city of raqqa would be i.s.i.l.'s capitol, the morning the mothers of those killed said the death would bring little comfort and won't bring back their sons and a short time ago david cameron
7:03 am
spoke about the reported drone strike targeting jihad john. >> this was a combined effort and a contribution of both our countries was essential. and he is a barbaric murderer and shown in those sickening videos of be heading of aid workers and has an on going and serious threat to innocent civilians not only in syria but around the world and in the united kingdom too. he was i.s.i.l.'s lead executioner and let us never forget he killed many, many muslims too. and he was intent on murdering many more people so this was an act of self-defense. it was the right thing to do. u.s. and british officials have still yet to confirm whether he was killed. in about ten minutes we will take a close r look at what the death of jihad john would mean against the fight against i.s.i.l. kurdish forces in iraq saying they made major gains in
7:04 am
their fight against i.s.i.l. retaking the key city of sinjar on the supply route to i.s.i.l. strongholds and the group held the town since last year and al jazeera amron-khan has the strategic significance if it has been retaken. >> without facing any stiff opposition the kurdish peshmerga forces have gone in the center of the town of sinjar and declared that control the whole town and came from the north and the north was controlled by them before the north of the mountain and they took that in an opposition in december where they opened up a humanitarian corridor and allowing them in the mountain to flee and since december they had some attacks on the town of sinjar but the last push was easy for the peshmerga fighters. there is something quite strange happening we have not seen before and i.s.i.l. social media accounts are on blackout it seems and no information coming out from them on this operation
7:05 am
and normally they are quite active and i have spoken to a pro-i.s.i.l. journalist who told me a lot of the i.s.i.l. fighters that left on november 11 but there is a diplomacy because what they are told by the kurdish peshmerga is they were monitoring radio transmissions where i.s.i.l. commanders were telling them they needed to stay or would be executed and that has not happen and got in the town without facing much resistance and said they control it. now it's very crucial and very strategic the town because of where it lies and i'm on one of the major supply routes and let me just show you what is happening behind me and you can see a sign there that says mosul and the local name for the sinjar and this is important because that is where the kurdish president is and he is here and monitoring events quite closely and one of the key supply lines and when they took over and i.s.i.l. took over in august they actually got as far as where i'm standing at the moment before they were beaten back by kurdish peshmerga forces
7:06 am
but right now the kurdish peshmerga are inside the town of sinjar and say they control it. >> and despite today's progress u.s. and kurdish officials are saying the situation in sinjar is still very dangerous and john kerry is in tunisia today trying to bolster social and economic ties with young democracys there and head to vienna for talks on syria, russia, iran and saudi arabia will be at the table, kerry saying the goal is to start a political transition in syria, acknowledging though on thursday that the u.s., russia and iran all differ on the future role of bashar al-assad and i.s.i.l. this morning saying it was responszable for the twin suicide bombings that tore through southern beirut and 44 people killed after explosions hit a predominately shia area of the city and 200 injured and witnesses saying the blasts happening a few minutes apart. >> translator: they targeted this place because they don't have any other way to fight us
7:07 am
back. they have run out of options and let me be clear they targeted this area because we are shia but we won't be saved. >> reporter: stronghold of hezbollah with a string of explosions back in 2014. this morning military officials investigating a member of the pentagon brass general to ron lewis on the left was removed for allegations of misconduct but pentagon are not saying what the allegations are and he is a west point graduate who led troops in afghanistan and iraq. due in court today for charges he solicited a minor for sex and lee moore was arrested on monday accused of sending obscene messages to an under cover agent posing as a teenage girl and he sent the messages while he was on duty at the white house. this morning new leadership at the university of missouri after weeks of protest that
7:08 am
ousted the president and the chancellor. >> this is a learning experience for us all and pretty much tighten our focus, improve our culture and climate across all of our campuses. >> reporter: that is law professor michael middleton and will serve as the interim president replacing this man tim wolf who resigned over his handling of racially charged incidents on the campus and one of the law school's first black graduates and will deal with cases of racial harassment swiftly and howard university in washington d.c. investigating a death threat to students and threatening to kill any black person on campus after 10:00 p.m. or taking transit and they are investigating and writing in the statement aban -- caution and encourage the community and neighbors to stay vigilant and report suspicious activity.
7:09 am
the florida police officer who shot and killed a muscina whose car broke down on a highway has been fired. the city of palm beach gardens says the officer raja may still face charges in the case and we are in miami with the details. >> the city put out a statement saying an independent criminal investigation into the officer-involved shooting is still ongoing. on october 18th jones was stopped on the side of the road waiting for a tow truck after performing at a show, officer raja not in uniform stopped to investigate the stopped vehicle and we still don't know all the details of that encounter but the lawyer for jones' family said they were told by the state attorney that raja did not show his badge when he approached jones. jones was shot three times and the gun that jones was carrying was never fired according to the family attorney. his death sparked protest in the palm beach area with the families demanding answers as to why jones was shot.
7:10 am
as for raja's termination jones' family put out a statement saying we are pleased that the city of palm beach gardens has terminated the employment of the officer who gunned down korey jones. we maintain that the officer in question also must be criminally liable for the reckless actions that night. the police union says they are disappointed at the termination, the head of the union saying that the city did not get all the facts before firing the officer. and i'm al jazeera miami. alleged monster is free this morning, 80-year-old vincent walking out of a brooklyn courtroom after a mob trial decades in the making and guilty of the movie good fellas and we have the details. >> reporter: it's the organized crime caper in martin's good fellas. >> these are the guys that jimmy put together for what turned out to be the biggest heist in american history.
7:11 am
>> reporter: but on wednesday nearly 40 years after that infamous job the only person to stand trial for it was acquitted and aging alleged wise guy invent lasoro. >> a hold up of historic proporti proportions. >> reporter: and not less than on the screen. >> authorities are not saying much more than they believe it to be the largest robbery in american history. >> reporter: robbers made off with loot from a cargo building at jfk airport and found an empty black van and not the robbers or the goods. >> $5 million in undocumented cash and a million in gems and jewelry which today would be worth over $20 million. journalist rob spent his career covering the mob. >> the various mafia families had big pieces of action at jfk at the airport. everybody was involved, banano,
7:12 am
gambino family so when the master mind of the job planned it he had to give cuts to everybody. >> reporter: that alleged master mind was jimmy burke, aka jimmy the gent. ♪ played in the movie by robert dinero. >> never rat on your friends and always keep your mouth shut. >> reporter: burke died in prison in 1996 serving time for unrelated charges. he is vincent leaving his wake in one of the many pictures snapped over the years by federal agents but the mob's once sacred code of silence has begun to crack, leading to his day in court. >> most of the people involved in the case have been either were killed, bumped off or knocked off or died of natural deaths so he is one of the last survivors so longevity in the long run did him in. >>. he was indicted last year for charges going back decades including the 1969 murder of a
7:13 am
suspected informant and during a three week trial they said he helped with the plan of the airport hold up and got a hefty cut and testifying against them mobsters including his own first cousin but in the end he beat the wrap, as the verdict was read he pumped his fist and kissed his attorney on the lips. >> got two years here and dying to get home. al jazeera. investigators say they are still hoping to find the data recorder from a cargo ship that went down last month and they found the deck caught in a hurricane, hurricane joukeen with 33 members on board and it's 33 feet below the water in the bahamas. >> the eastern country affecting a lot of you and we will turn to nicole mitchell. >> good morning, less impacts of it but dealing with it
7:14 am
nonetheless, this is a look of it moving through the great lakes and it's the remnant moisture but significant remnant moisture and a lot more in the morning hours and tapering off and we have the high winds of this in the great lakes and winds gusting to 40 miles per hour and here is a look at some hazards, on the coast of lake michigan some coasting flooding because that wind action is welding up the waves and then more significantly we have all the snow that is coming down and it is driving snow with the wind in some cases reducing visibility so anywhere this morning for the up of michigan and some places by the time we get to midday could see 4-10" of total, a pretty significant snowstorm for early in the season and the time of year we see that and duluth, minnesota to hayward, wisconsin to the up we are dealing with snow right now so here is that wide picture through the course of the day, as i said a lot of what you see in the great lakes region is in the morning hours and then it
7:15 am
starts to wind down and also want to mention and more to this a little later but a lot of heavy rain into the northwest but as we continue through the course of the day the other thing the system did is cool temperatures and not significantly below average but when we are above average and 40s in the north and 50s in the coastline and chicago 46 and the average high temperature would be closer to 50 so as we said we are not that far below average and get back to it within the next couple of days but it was a little bit of reversal of the warm fortunes. >> nicole mitchell thank you. this morning donald trump making headlines again for his latest comments on the campaign trail and going affront runner ben carson over his personal history and in iowa he said this about the tales of nearly stabbing a friend and having a bad temper. >> he took a knife and he went after a friend and he lunged, he
7:16 am
lunged that knife into the stomach of his friend but low and be hold it hit the belt, it hit the belt and the knife broke. give me a break. i have a belt. somebody hits me with the belt it's going in because the belt moves this way, it moves this way. how stupid are the people of iowa? how stupid are the people of the country to believe this crap? so here is the good news, he is now saying all of that stuff happened because otherwise he is a liar. >> reporter: trump going on to mock carson's religious awakening calling anybody who wants to vote for carson in his words a fuel. >> and suu kyi wins majority in myanmar's election but who will become president. and the custody complication, the state of utah stepping in fighting a ruling
7:17 am
that took a foster child away from a lesbian couple.
7:18 am
7:19 am
we are more on this morning's breaking news u.s. targeting the masked i.s.i.l. member known as jihad john with air strikes over syria and a vehicle he was riding in was destroyed. >> recall the uk citizen shown in videos showing the be headings including journalist foley and sotlof and prime minister david cameron says there is no confirmation the i.s.i.l. member was killed. >> we have a person with international peace and long time staff member of john kerry
7:20 am
and part of his middle east policy staff and is live this morning from washington d.c. and thanks for being with us, how important would it be in the fight against i.s.i.l. if those reports are true that jihad john is dead? >> well, it certainly would be a tactic of a victory and it would be good news but plenty where he came from and it's not a game changer and actually the sinjar news is probably a bigger development right now. >> i want to ask the question this way because what is good news to some seems to back fire in many cases, will this improve or hurt the diplomatic standing after all this is fueling what i.s.i.l. wants, they want to be viewed as this tiny person taking on the world, will this increase their recruiting? >> in the long run, i don't know it will be and there is plenty
7:21 am
where jihad john came from but can target the leadership again assuming it's true >> you talked about sinjar and want to go back to that before we pivot on the secretary of states talks and that is sinjar and why is sinjar so important? >> it is the strategic hub or a strategic hub between raqqa and mosul so if you can cut sinjar you really complicate i.s.i.l.'s ability frankly over the long run to function as a coherent state and we will see what happens but that is actually the development i'm watching more carefully than the jihad john situation. >> let's go to the talks in vein that and the latest effort to end the war in syria and john carry and iran and russia will be there, what do you expect? >> i think it's worth remembering that iran talks took 18 months and were at the
7:22 am
beginning of the process and not aware of a war that ended with a meeting so it's important to establish a process. i'm not expecting quick results but i would say this is the most promising diplomatic result with syria we have seen for a long time but we have to let the process unfold. >> if anything can be said about this white house is that it doesn't do things publically until the last-minute, are there backdoor negotiations going on in sinjar and seeing a coordinated effort between russia, iran, the united states and some of the other partners? >> well, i think it's a little by early for that, del. i mean the talks in vienna and there are 17 countries or so involved. at this point in the process i think that is appropriate, you need the big tent basically to get saudi arabia and iran in particular in the same room but ultimately and i think you alluded to this del in your question if you are really going to get progress you are going to
7:23 am
have to find a way to get the core countries and that would be the u.s., russia, saudi arabia, iran and probably turkey as well to create some smaller consolation of countries but i think this big ten shapo if you will is appropriate for the time being. if you jump into the more delicate discussions i think the process would fall pretty quickly and right now there is not enough consensus on the political outcome. >> the secretary of state john kerry your old boss down playing expectations is that a tactic or a realistic setting of the table? >> can i say both? like i said i think it's too soon to expect quick results but by the same token kind of down playing expectations is never a bad negotiating strategy. >> joining us from washington d.c. this morning and thank you very much. also developing overnight election officials in myanmar say it is official the suu kyi party won a historic majority in
7:24 am
myanmar's parliament and makes it possible for the league of democracy party to form the first civilian government in decades and suu kyi will not herself be able to become president and al jazeera's wayne hay has more. >> reporter: the magic number for the national league for democracy party was 329eats combined in both the upper and lower houses of parliament. that is the total it needed to win to be able to form the next government, to enjoy a so called super majority, form the next government on its own and encounter any combined by the development party and army and remember the army is guaranteed a quarter of all seats in parliament and as far as parliament go that doesn't matter now and uscp performed so badly in the election and won a handful of seats compared with the nld, the nld will be able to govern on its own and will be able to dictate who the next president will be and we will
7:25 am
find that out next year. we do not know who the nld's candidate for the president will be. we know it can't be the leader suu kyi, she is prevented from being the president of myanmar because of a clause in the constitution. we don't know who that will be next year. we do know it will still come down to a parliamentary vote but the coup will have a huge majority in both houses it will be able to dictate who that president will be. we also know we have guarantees from the president saying and the head of the armed forces have a huge statement saying this will be a peaceful transition of power to the nld and will acknowledge the wishes of people of myanmar. >> urging myanmar to allow suu kyi to take power, administration says it is the will of the people. what a change in five years in myanmar. >> the white house pushing for
7:26 am
her to be president. back in the country a higher education for free. >> tell you why a college in kentucky says it's going to pick up the tab for under graduate students plus. >> harry faucet from south korea's first ever international chop stick festivals for links in asia and providing more than a hint of competition.
7:27 am
7:28 am
>> it's the biggest question out there. >> go inside the groundbreaking research. >> are you ready to have your brain scanned? >> ready to go! >> challenging your deepest beliefs. >> feeling the spirit is very subjective. >> i don't buy that. >> techknow's team of experts show you how the miracles of science... >> this is what innovation looks like. >> can affect and surprise us. >> i feel like we're making
7:29 am
an impact. >> let's do it. >> techknow - where technology meets humanity. you're looking live at st. louis, missouri the st. louis arch the gate way to the west 635 feet high, all stainless steel. >> well welcome back and looking at the top stories and pentagon trying to confirm this morning whether the masked i.s.i.l. member named jihad john is dead, a u.s. air strike targeted the man and he appeared in several videos be heading western hostages including journalists sotlof. they have retaken the city of sinjar and supporting the peshmerga fighters with air strikes and special forces on the ground and kurds cutoff one
7:30 am
of i.s.i.l.'s most supply routes linking them to the city of raqqa. nobody claiming responsibility for an attack on a suburb by baghdad and at least 17 people were killed there, dozens of others were injured and that funeral held by a malitia fighter who died in a fight. challenging a state judge who ordered a lesbian couple to give up their foster child >> said it was for the child's own well-being but now the state says it's not the case and john henry smith has the story. >> reporter: for the last three months they have been state approved foster parents to a now nine-month-old baby girl until a judge this week said no. >> he said through his research he had found out that kids and homosexual homes don't do as well as heterosexual homes and when they asked to show his
7:31 am
research he would not. >> now the state of utah is supporting the couple and the state argues the judge went against its recommendations and utah officials say they will appeal the ruling. >> on the one hand i am not going to expect case workers to violate a case order but not expect case workers to violate the law. >> reporter: utah does not prevent any one as serving as foster parents and lbgt parent groups says the judge was simply wrong and says the research is not legitimate. >> he made an uninformed, biased decision based on widely debunked research. >> they want to keep the girl whom they consider their daughter. >> we have been told to care for this child like all mother would and i am her mother. i mean that is who she knows and she is just going to be taken away in seven days to another
7:32 am
probably good loving home but it's just it's not fair and it's not right and it hurts me really badly because i have not done anything wrong. >> now that utah couple they are also raising pierce's 12 and 14-year-old children and now hired their own attorney who is planning an appeal on their behalf, the next hearing before the judge is planned for early next month. >> and i understand this judge is pretty controversial. [switching captioners] >> a teen girl who cult off her sister's ponytail to have her own ponytail cut off. no other judge in utah ruled gay parents shouldn't be foster parents. >> there's division this morning within the mormon church. a policies change targets gay members and their children has
7:33 am
hundreds saying they will resign. children a living with lgbt parents are not allowed to be bob tides until they are teens and reject same sex relationships. gay marriage is considered a 16 worthy of, pulse. >> the supreme court could decide whether to take up its first abortion case since 2007, considering two cases from texas and mississippi with conflicting ruling. a federal appeals court said mississippi woman should not be forced to cross state lines to get an abortion. a panel from the same court came to a different conclusion reviewing the the accident law. >> concerning the closing of guantanamo bay, 120 detainees are still there, 53 cleared for release. former white house counsel drafting president obama's executive order closing the camp in 2009 telling al jazeera's program up front that guantanamo should have been closed sooner.
7:34 am
>> out of those 53, they should be returned or transferred as promptly as is possible. they are mostly yemenis at this point. we're really talking about 59, the balance of 10 people who are going to be prosecuted and 49 people that are -- >> to be clear, yes or no, he could have shut it down in 2012, 2013. >> i believe he could have. >> ok. that's the gist of the argument that we have in the article that we've written. >> ok. >> you can see more of that enter view on line at aljazeera.com/up front. >> the military spending bell bans bringing the detainees to the united states. the administration is considering an executive action to get around that to move detainees to a super max facility in colorado. >> as we approach this prison officially called the official
7:35 am
maximum penitentiary or super max, we are 100 miles south of denver in fremont county. it's really isolated here with just a few small towns and cities nearby. in october, pentagon officials came here to tour the facility to see fit would be a suitable home for low level guantanamo depainees. they were drawn by the isolated location, but it also offers some of the tightest security in the country. the 400 or so prisoners spend 23 hours alone in their cells each day. they may go years without ever touching another home being. their cells are extremely small, 87 square feet. that's a bomb about this size. this prison was built to house the worst of the worst, homes to infamous prisoners. dzhokar tsarnaev, the unibomber,
7:36 am
and timothy mcview was here before he was executed for the oklahoma city bombing. the obama administration is considering moving some gitmo detainees. >> the question isn't whether they are reloading. are we going to charge people with crimes if we believe they've done something wrong. if they are convicted, they need to be imprisoned, if not, released. >> opposition to the relocation has been strong, and coming from different sides. more than 40 of the colorado county sheriffs, about 2/3 of them have written an open letter to the president, raising security questions. they've been led by the local sheriff of fremont county. they wrote. >> we believe it will be dangerously naive not to recognize that a civilian prison with untold in that of enemy combatant inmates locate in our state would provide a tempting
7:37 am
target for anyone wish to go free them or wishing to make a political statement. >> i believe that the sheriff's current response is nothing other than than fear mongering. >> two other sites on american soil are being considered, one in cans and one in south carolina, but no matter what site is selected, the obama administration is certain to face a major battle in congress. colorado's entire dell gigs has said that it will fight possible relocation to super max with everything they have. al jazeera, for remembers, colorado. >> college students pledging more protest after marching nice wide, all demanding financial reforms on campus. this his the event called the million student march protestors want public universities to be tuition free and student debt canceled. one school is already making changes to make education more affordable. >> the college sits in the
7:38 am
appalachian foothills south of lexington, kentucky. it looks like you're typical small liberal arts school but there is a big difference. >> i don't pay anything. nobody here pace anything. >> you heard that right, the 1600 students here get free tuition, valid at nearly $30,000 a year. there's also financial help for room and board and books. the school's mission, to provide a top notch education for bright students from low income households. many, the first in their family to ever attend college. >> if it wasn't for them, i wouldn't be able to afford college. >> i always thought hey, mike lie parents don't make a lot of money, i won't be able to go. >> it's cool to do something and break that pattern for my family. >> i see more job opportunities, opportunities to get out of our social class. >> to understand how this is possible, let's go back to 1855
7:39 am
when the college was founded by a christian abolitionist. the first college in the south to welcome women and black students, diversity remains a cornerstone today, so does something else. every student must work, at least 10 hours a week at one of 130 different campus jobs, from high tech to low tech to everything in between. >> initially that was just to provide income to students and to lower the costs of running the school, and now we've realized it's a powerful learning opportunity for students, as well. >> students do get paid a bit, but their labor still helps defray costs. they man the school farm, clean rooms, build form furniture and turn out handmaid local crafts sold on line and in the student store. much of the bill is paid with earnings from a $1 billion
7:40 am
endowment built up from donors over the decades. there is grant money, allowing the school to offer what seems impossible in these days of risingion tuitions and crushing student loans. >> the model can't easily be duplicate on a large scale, but it is a vivid illustration of how a free college education can transform lives. >> but how to help more families, especially the middle class have access to college without enormous debt? some suggest more government grants, or even free tuition at public colleges. critics say that's the wrong answer. >> that's bog to drive the price up, both by driving demand and because colleges do what everyone else would do, just say if we can get more money, we are going to take more money. >> even the president says students value the college for contributing in dollars or
7:41 am
labor. he said solving the college financial crise is in the national interest. >> if you don't give people opportunity through education, then you're not going to develop the kind of human capital that makes a strong country, i think. >> as the administration puts it, it's the best education money can't buy. lisa stark, al jazeera, barea, kentucky. >> the number of children diagnosed a autism is on the rise. the c.d.c. said over 2% of children ages three to 12 or one in 45 now have some form of autism. the overall number of parents reporting any developmental disabilities in they're kids remain the same, just under 6%. researchers caution that the increase is likely due to the way autism is diagnosed. >> surgeons at the cleveland clinic are months away from performing the first uterine transplant in the u.s. they will be temporary.
7:42 am
the uterus would be removed after the recipient has had children a so the patient can is to be taking anti rejection drugs. >> fewer americans are smoking. 17% of american adults smoking cigarettes in 2014, that is 20% lower than back in 2005, but the smoking rates are still high among those living in the poverty line. >> one of the largest glaciers in the world is melting. >> the glacier in greenland is laughing mass of 5 billion tons per we're. it could raise ocean levels world wild by more than 18 inches. the studies suggest warming waters are melting the ice block. scientists call the changes staggering. >> this i guess one of the largest glaciers in yosemite park and is almost gone.
7:43 am
it could continue to melt and disappear in as soon as five years if warmer temperatures at high elevations continue. >> flood warnings are you were as a potent system hits the west. let's bring back nicole mitchell for that. >> that glacier enyosemite, technically they say it is not a glacier anymore, there's only one left in the entire park, see them while you can. part of the problem the last couple of years, not only the climate changing, but we haven't had a lot of moisture, so snow pack in general has had a lot of problems. this helps with it, but we're getting so much rain in the northwest, this could lend to flooding concerns. today, we are looking at this core i highlighted in red six to eight inches. you add yesterday, today, some place will go over a foot and then a couple of days ahead, devil a lot of rain moving in. you can see the spigot as we look at how much is going to
7:44 am
come in. it starts to wind down tomorrow, but this drops farther to the south. that's the good news, because the southern end not as much rain and a little with things that will help with the drought situation, so some benefits to the system. >> see them while you can. >> we are taking a look this morning at photographers telling the story of afghanistan. frame by frame follows four afghan photo journalists trying to bring a different side that a nation and the world and themselves. i asked about the challenges and the triumphs seen in the film. >> often the image we see from afghanistan is one of war and suicide bombs. it was exciting to make this film challenging our perceptions and telling the story from afghan story tellers. they are naturally covering many different things, covering peace concerts, local sporting events and also the hard stuff, too,
7:45 am
suicide bombings and stuff. we wanted to give a full picture of whatever they were covering, which is a lot. >> all these different aspects of afghan society, a photographer is shooting girls that are learning to box. why that was photographer drawn to that particular subject? >> he covers women doing everything, making a book with women doing sports and many aspects of women's lives in afghanistan. we often see only limited afghan women, but there are of a gap women doing amazing things. filming the boxing was a method fore. these women are training and they are so impressive and so strong. >> there was a darker scene, a photographer that shot sort of the drug problem in afghanistan. how revolutionary is it to have a photographer expose that
7:46 am
darker part of afghan society, drug tickets? >> when we shot filming heroin addicts under the bridge, it is a passion project for him, because he just wanted to expose that side. it's something that is really pref vent. you see people in the streets and in other places, it's a huge problem, so for him, that was something he wanted to expose. >> are there risks to these photographers? >> i think local photo journalists have a unique access to these stories, so more than anyone, i think they understand the risk and now how to navigate it. there are risks. all of them have been threatened for the work they do. it's a different high risk thing, but it's a wonderful community of people doing it and they are making strides. the last 15 years has been a media revolution in the country.
7:47 am
>> what about the risks to yourself and dough director when you're in afghanistan? >> we shot with -- we had a fixer and a driver, a guide and a driver and we relied heavily on them to navigate the scene. we were also with people, the photo journalistles who know this landscape better than anyone and relied on them to know when was the best time to film or not. >> what do you want audiences to ache away from this? >> we've had a great reaction to our premier. what's been wonderful is people take away, they've never seen this side of afghanistan. that's the big shock is a lot of people come up to us after screenings and say i had no idea, which is scary, but also amazing, and we're so excited that photo journalists get to show them this side of afghanistan. what's great is we've screened, a lot of screens we've had african-americans come to the screenings which has been great and we hoping to back to show
7:48 am
the film. >> how do they react to seeing their country in this light. >> it's an amazing reaction. it's at overwhelming because a lot of people left during the satisfactory jet regime, during the civil war and taliban regime, so we had people who were older when they left, a lot of afghan younger generations that have never seen afghanistan before. it's great for them, i hope, and they say they're thankful to see and also that americans get to see this side, thank you for showing this side, because it's never seen in the immediate. >> >> the documentary is screening in new york and l.a. and is an exquisitely shot film. >> you can see the passion and braveness on their faces. >> top stick diplomacy. >> celebrating the utensil some say can unit cultures.
7:49 am
>> a collision course, the mysterious piece of junk set to fall to earth today. [ laughter ]
7:50 am
7:51 am
7:52 am
>> while you were sleeping, a mysterious piece of space debris collided with earth's atmosphere in sri lanka. as a precaution, some officials banned fishing and instituted a no fly zone. >> a native american tribe in washington state opening a story on its reservation. we were there for the grand opening. >> this is a first for the united states, this is a recreational retail pot store on tribal land, on reservation land. wreck wreck marijuana's been legal in this state three years, stores open for more than a year, but there was special legislation passed this year allowing the governor to sign a
7:53 am
compact with tribal nations. this is the ribbon cutting ceremony for the nation's elevation store. [ cheers and applause ] >> quite a celebration here, about 75 people, tribal leaders, customers, workers, lots of folks from the local chamber of commerce and governments around the area were on hand for the celebration. this place has been busy. they had a soft open tuesday. this was the formal opening. we talked to an attorney who specializes in tribal law, and he had some words of warning for any other tribes out there across the country looking to get into this kind of business, especially if they're in states where it hasn't specifically been legalized. >> it is legalized marijuana with an asterisk, be it for commercial or medicinal
7:54 am
purposes, so any tribe undertaking marijuana commerce first needs to recognize that they are playing with fire and the really the question is how hot of a fire are they playing with, because marijuana is per se federally illegal. >> products at the store will be taxed in the same rate that customers are taxed at pot stores all over washington state, but that money won't go to the state of washington, it's bog to be kept internal by the tribe and put into education, public safety, all kinds of different programs and services that the tribe has going on. this store sits on highway 101, across the street from a major tribal casino. they are expecting a lot of people in here in the weeks and months to come and expect this store to generate a lot of revenue for the tribe. al jazeera, outside shelton, washington. >> for people who are vexed by using chop sticks, dell, you
7:55 am
need to watch this next story. if a little kid can master it, certainly you can. we have a report from the first annual chopsticks festival in south korea. ♪ >> all big sporting events require opening as her moneys these days, but for the athletes, the wait can answer the nerves. four to 6-year-olds are preparing to do combat in front of cameras broadcasting live to the nation. the weapons of choice, this is the first international festival devoted to cop sticks. some thrive, some wilt under the pressure. some enjoy the lime light a little too much. one girl stands out, a class above. the 6-year-old is crowned the chop stick prodigy. >> i practice with my mom a lot, so i was able to move lots of
7:56 am
beans. i practiced a lot. >> it's all part of an annual festival linking a city in south korea with one each in japan and china. officials decided to make the most of a shared culture going back 2,000 years. >> we could hopefully open a new future to harmony, company exitance and cooperation. >> chopsticks divide as well as unit. korean are metal and sharp sided, in china longer, better to reach communal plates. >> the medium size metal chop stick you find here is the perfect compromise. those find them a little unwieldy, slippery, but you can eat a lot of korean food perfectly politely with a spoon. >> today's practicing with extra small beans, victory is swede.
7:57 am
swede--sweet. >> i'm so happy, my body could fly away. we practiced hard. >> they can afford to eat well as well as skillfully at their celebration dinner. >> i'm pretty sure my mom would be all those women. >> ahead, we'll have the latest on a serious story. the u.s. airstrikes targeting the man known at jihadi john. >> claims of a victory in iraq, persopeshmerga fighters say thee retaken mosul. >> they teach you how to eliminate people? >> ya. >> we've done it and that is why we are there. >> my life is in danger. >> anyone who talks about the
7:58 am
islamic religion is killed. >> don't miss the exclusive al jazeera investigation. >> i can't allow you not to go into that because that is your job. >> only on al jazeera america.
7:59 am
8:00 am
>> this was an act of self defense. it was the right thing to do. >> jihadi john in the crosshairs, a u.s. air strike target be the isil fighter responsible for killing journalists and aid workers in syria. >> iraq's kurdish fighter say sinjar is theirs, retaken from isil with u.s. help. >> how stupid are the people of iowa?
8:01 am
how stupid are the people of the country to believe this crap. >> trump lashing out, the republican presidential hopeful taking iowa voters and rival ben carson to task. >> home for the holiday, another big store says staying closed on thanksgiving is good for employees and for the bottom line. >> good morning, welcome to your-year-old this morning. >> this morning, pentagon officials are trying to confirm whether one of isil's most notorious figures was killed in a drone strike. >> it was his covered face that appeared in those videos showing the killings of american and western hostages. >> he was shown in a video beheading journalist james foley and steven sotloff, and aid
8:02 am
worker peter kasig. u.s. and british officials have said they would find him and hold him responsible. >> he was born in kuwait, grew up in london where he was rod calendarized. he moved to syria in 2012. it wasn't until 2014 that he began making headlines. >> otherwise this will become your nightmare. >> his british accent earned him the nickname jihadi john. he blamed governments for the deaths. british and u.s. officials promised to hunt him down. >> those who make the mistake of harming americans will learn that we will not forget and that our reach is long and that justice will be served. >> he later apologized to his family for the attention those videos generated, but he showed no remorse for the beheadings or for being part of the world's most brutal and gruesome organization. the pentagon said the airstrikes
8:03 am
targeting jihadi john took place in the syrian city of raqqa, believed to be isil's would be capital. >> family which hostages killed at his hand have reacted to the news saying his death would bring them little closure. british prime minister david cameron spoke about the drone strike. >> he is a barbaric murderer. he was shown in those sickening videos of the beheading of british aid workers. he posed an ongoing and serious threat to innocent civilians not only in syria, but around the world and in the united kingdom, too. he was isil said lead executioner. let us never forget that he killed many, many muslims, too. he was in tent on murdering many more people, so this was an act of self defense. it was the right thing to do. >> stay with us. coming up, we'll speak more about jihadi john and what
8:04 am
countries are doing to stop their citizens from joining isil. >> we heard from a former pentagon staffer saying killing jihadi john sends the message that the u.s. can take out isil targets. >> it would certainly be a tact tactical victory. there's plenty where he came from. i don't necessarily think it's a game changer. i would say the sinjar news is a bigger development now. >> i want to ask the question this way, what is good news to some seems to backfire in many cases. will this improve or hurt america's diplomatic standing, after all, this is fueling what isil wants. they want to be viewed as this tiny caliphate taking on the world. will this increase their numbers? >> there's plenty where jihadi john came from. it shows that the u.s. military
8:05 am
can target their lead ship. >> little said his death will be a huge blow to that organization. kurdish forces in iraq said they have made major gains, retake the sinjar, sitting on that key supply route between raqqa and mosul. the group has held that town since last year. the u.s. is supporting fighters with airstrikes and special advisors on the ground. we have more on the strategic significance if indeed sinjar has now been retaken. >> without seemingly facing any stiff opposition, the kurdish peshmerga forces have gone into the center of the talk about of sinjar and declared that they control the hometown. they came in through the north. the north was controlled by them before the north of the mountain, they took that in september where they allowed yazidis to flee. since september, they mounted some attacks on the town of sinjar, but this last final
8:06 am
push, seemingly quite easy for the peshmerga fighters. there's something quite strange happening here that weapon haven't seen before, isil social media accounts are an blackout, no information coming out from them. normally they're quite active. i've spoken to a pro isil journalists saying a lot of fighters left november 11, but there's a discrepancy. what we are told by the peshmerga is they were monitoring radio transmixes where isil commanders were telling fighter that is they needed to stay or they would be executed. seemingly that hasn't happened. they got into the town without much resistance and hold it. it's crucial and strategic, the town of sinjar, because it lice where i am, within out of the major supply routes. you can seep behind me a sign there that says mosul. the kurdish president, they are
8:07 am
monitoring the events closely. when they took over, isil took over in august, they can as far where i am standing before they were beaten back by kurdish peshmerga forces. right now, they are inside the town of sinjar and say they control it. >> that is reporting from the front lines. u.s. and kurdish officials saying the situation in sinjar is dangerous. >> isil says it was responsible for twin suicide bombings that ripped through southern beirut. 44 were killed after explosions hit a predominant shia area of the city. 200 others were injured. witnesses say the blasts happened a few minutes apart. >> they targeted this place because they don't have any other way to fight us back. they have run out of options. let me be clear, they targeted this area because we are shia, but we won't be afraid. >> the area experienced to
8:08 am
string of suicide explosion ins 2014. >> secretary of state john kerry is in tunisia to bolter ties with that new democracy there. he heads to vienna for talks on syria. he will be joined by leaders of russia, require i can't and saudi arabia. he acknowledges major differences between the u.s., russia and iran on the future role of syrian president bashar al assad. >> this morning, military officials are investigating a member of the pentagon's top brass, the top military aid to ash carter. rob lewis seen here was removed for allegation of misconduct. the pentagon not exactly saying what those allegations are. he commanded troops in afghanistan and iraq. >> a secret service agent is due in court today to answer charges he solicited a minor for sex. he was arrested on monday. he is caused of sending obscene messages and images to an
8:09 am
undercover agent posing as a teenage girl. prosecutors say he was sending the messages while on duty at the white thousand. >> this morning, donald trump is making headlines over comments. in iowa, he said this about ben carson's tale of nearly stabbing a friend and having a bad temper. >> he took his knife and went after a friend and he lunged, lunged that knife into the stomach of his friends but lo and behold, it hit the belt. it hit the belt and the knife broke. give me a break. i have a belt. somebody hits me the belt's going in, because it moves this way. it moves this way. how stupid are the people of iowa? how stupid are the people of the country to believe this crap. here's the good news.
8:10 am
he's now saying all of that stuff happened because otherwise he's a liar. >> trump went on to mock carson's religious awakening and called anyone who warrants to vote for carson a fool. >> there's a new person in charge in the university of missouri after protests that ousted the president and chancellor. >> this is a learning experience for us all. we must tighten our focus, improve our culture, and climate across all of our campuses. >> that's law professor michael middleton, the i want rim president replacing tim wolfe who resigned. middleton is one of the law school's first black graduates. he said he will deal more swiftly with allegation of racism on campus. >> a death threat made against students threatening to kill
8:11 am
black persons on campus after 10:00 a.m. at howard university. they are encouraging students to report any specials activity. >> an and would mobster is free this morning. he walked out of a brooklyn courtroom after a mob trial that was decades in the making. he was found inning of helping to plan the infamous heist depicted in the movie goodfellas. >> it's the organized crime caper i immortalized in good fl lass. >> there was a holdup of historic proportions. >> the 1970 heist was no less spectacular in reality than on the screen. >> authorities aren't saying
8:12 am
much more than they believe this to be the largest robbery in american history. >> armed robbers made off with record loot from a lufthansa cargo building at new york's kennedy airport. investigators found an empty black van but not the robbers or goods. >> $5 million in undocumented cash, a million dollars in gems and jewelry, which today would be worth over $20 million. >> a journalist covered the mob. >> the various mafia families had big piece of action at j.f.k., the airport. everybody was involved, the families, so when the mastermind of the lufthansa job planned it, he had to give cuts to everybody. >> that alleged mastermind was jimmy burke, a.k.a. jimmy the gent, played in the movie by robert deniro. >> never rat on your friends and
8:13 am
always keep your mouth shut. >> he died in prison in 1996, serving time for unrelated charges. here's vincent leading his wake snapped by federal agents. the mob's one sacred code of silence has begun to crack, leading to his day in court. >> most of the people involved in the case either were killed, bumped off, knocked off or died of natural death. long everity in the long run did him in. >> he was indicted last year for the lufthansa job and other charges gag back decades, including the 1969 murder of a suspected informant. during the trial, prosecutors claimed he helped forge the plan for the airport holdup and got a hefty cut. testifying against the 80-year-old, several alleged mobsters, including his own first can yo cousin. he beat the rap away he pumped
8:14 am
his fist and kissed his attorney on the lips. >> i've got two years here and i'm dying to get home. >> lot of people dissecting what went wrong for the prosecution, but the defense basically tainted the witnesses as liars. >> the first cousin safe to say will not be invited to thanksgiving. >> a large storm is sweeping through the pacific northwest with threats of flooding there. [ laughter ] >> i've been talking about the inland flooding we can see with all the rain, but coastal, as well. there's such potent winds with this storm system that we could see waves 20 times at high. we pretty sure have a spigot of water. a lot of rain is going to come down, easily seen as over a foot if you end up in a heavy spot for this. the heavy concern, coastal concerns, this is today's total, six to eight inches, but we got
8:15 am
significant amounts yesterday and could see more tomorrow, as well. eventually, it spreads, the brunt is going to be washington state. this is today, and you can see this fact, that streamline of moisture, as we get into the next couple of days. this gets us through sunday evening. you can see eventually starting to dip down and places maybe in central california could get a little bit that have rain, not the heaviest stuff but we'll take what we can get at this point in time. we fast forward and you can see rain heading farther to the south. this is good news not just in terms of the mainly, bewe talked about the snow pack that season and that is very beneficial now and through the season when it mets off next spring. >> old timers used to say feast or famine. >> the florida police officer who shot and killed a musician whose car broke down on at highway has been fired. the city of palm beach garden said the officer may still face charges in the case.
8:16 am
al jazeera is in miami with the details. >> the city put out a statement saying an independent criminal investigation into the officer involved shooting is still on going. on october 18, jones was stopped on the side of the road waiting for a tow truck after performing at a show. the officer not in uniform stopped to investigate the stopped vehicle. we still don't know all the details of that encounter, but the lawyer for jones' family said they were told by the state attorney that raga did not show his badge when he approached jones. jones was shot three times and the gun jones carried was never fired. his death sparked protest in the area with the family demanding answers as to why jones was shot. jones family put out a statement saying we are pleased to the city has terminate the employment of the officer who gunned down cory jones.
8:17 am
we maintain that the officer issue question also must be criminally liable for the reckless actions that night. the police union said they are disappointed at the termination, the head of the union saying that the city did not get all the fact before firing the officer. al jazeera, miami. >> we continue to follow breaking news out of syria. >> a u.s. air strike targets a man known as jihadi john. why the u.s. and u.k. invested to much in fighting him. >> decision day for russian athletes, claims of dope sponsored athletes and the nation facing an international ban.
8:18 am
8:19 am
8:20 am
>> the u.s. targeted the masked isil member jihadi john in airstrikes over syria. there were reports a drone zeroed in on a vehicle carrying him. the british citizen appeared in videos of beheadings including two journalists. joining me now is managing director of the killian foundation. thank you for being with us. your foundation is dedicated to stopping so-called radicalization and in many ways, jihadi john became a poster child for it. how much impact will this have on isil's propaganda machine if indeed he has been killed? >> well first of all, if has he been killed, there are strategic reasons for carrying out -- for
8:21 am
killing him, actually. it is believed that he was still responsible for as a poster boy within the ground that isil has actually taken over and also reaching out to a year countries in the region, as well. more than that, he became a brand. he became a best seller for isil, which was the overriding brand, as the maske masked boge. now that he's -- if he has jib deed been kid, that is the end of a best seller within the overall brand, but there are many, many other people who would like to be jihadi john, too. in order to combat that, we need to take on the tackling and deconstruction of the brand. isil just to give an example, we monitored isil's propaganda for one month.
8:22 am
one of the surprising things is they are sending out nearly 1200 unique pieces of propaganda every month. they are a 21st century media others. it's all about the branding and ideas of recruitment. >> hundreds of other british citizens have joined isil as a result of that very effective propaganda machine. jihadi john had become a poster child of sorts for the threat of isil not just because of his brutality, but that his ideology could appeal to an educated young man from london. >> absolutely. one of the misconceptions that i've heard many so-called experts say is that they try to blame -- they try to build a profile of the typical type of person that becomes an islamist terrorist, and say it's somebody not educated, disenfranchised.
8:23 am
some who is not integrated into society. in a survey that was carried out in the u.k., 47% of the convicted islamist terrorists in the u.k. went to university or had higher education. many of the people, nearly half of the people that actually joint terrorist organizations and carried terrorist activities out of the actually were from middle class, upper middle class families. >> i guess the question is -- >> jihadi john -- >> i guess the question is what did we learn from jihadi john about what drives people to join an organization like isil. >> there are grievances that are manipulated by charismatic recruiters on line and off line. these can be genuine, partial or perceived. they're all taught to look at
8:24 am
the world through a particular world view. we call it islamism, a political ideology. they have a new sense of identity based on a whole range of different things and say the only way you can find solutions to the grievances you're facing is join our gang and carry out certain activities and of course there's a jihadist there'll that underpins that. what we've learned that is that world view, that's the soft end of recruitment to violent extremism and that really needs to be tackled by civil society in all sorts of different ways. we need to deconstruct and promote better alternatives the same way we do racism and fascism. >> will there are questions about the legality of killing him extra judicially in syria?
8:25 am
>> no, because under national law, this can be claimed as self defense. >> russia could find if athletes will be banned from international competition. track and field's gone body meeting to talk about claims of widespread doping in the russian athletic program. we are live in moscow this morning. russian officials say the doping happened under an old regime and they are thanking leadership. do you think that's going to have an effect on today's decision? >> only if they can convince the iaaf that the new leadership brings with it a new regime. it's the same old rot, then i don't think it will have much of an affect. the russians are certainly launching an all out campaign to try to persuade the iaaf that
8:26 am
this his the case, that the sins of the athletics world here in russia are in the past and russia is keen to amend what errors remain. we'll to have wait and see whether that is a campaign that is bearing fruit for russia, but i think the iaaf is quite wary about pressing what we might be able to call the full band which russia athletics, including the rio games. i think the iaaf would rather find a way of certainly punishing russia but finding a way of allowing them back in to international athletics in time for next years olympic games. >> a lot of people wondering if those athletes should still hold on to their medals. thank you very much. >> the democrats who want to be president will go toe-to-toe this weekend. >> hillary clinton at the head of the pack. why republicans may want to focus on others that in race. >> fighting back against a utah judge, what the state is now saying about his order to take a
8:27 am
foster child from a lesbian couple.
8:28 am
8:29 am
8:30 am
>> the pentagon is trying to confirm this morning whether the masked isil member jihadi john is dead. a u.s. air strike targeted the man. he has appeared in several videos, beheading western hostages, including journalists. >> fighters have retaken sinjar from isil forces. the u.s. has been supporting them with airstrikes and advisers on the ground. sinjar is on one of the most important supply routes. >> investigators say there is still hope in finding the data recorder from a ship that sank last month. el faro was caught in a hurricane with 32 crew members onboard. it is located 15,000 feet underwater near the bam has. >> a poll shows democratic front runner hillary clinton still popular among democratic voters. the washington post survey
8:31 am
finding 83% of democrats see clinton favor belief. in a survey leeping all americans, 51% think clinton is unfavorable, 38% see sanders that way. tomorrow, the democrats on the same stage in iowa for their second debate. the focus will be on the economy, especially wages and income inequality. joe is a democratic campaign consultant and also director of the strategic services at chatam group. how concerned should hillary clinton be about her ratings? >> it's a real stats we will keep on eye on. right now, she has very favorable numbers. when we get to the general election, it's important to remember these are mar tons, not
8:32 am
sprints. earlier polls showed she had a trustworthy issues. ever since the benghazi hearings, her numbers are trending in the right direction. >> you think the republicans hurt themselves by those marathon benghazi hearings? >> yeah, i do think they did. she did a great job, looked very commanding, very presidential. she was straightforward with the panel. she had democrats supporting her and republicans making fools of themselves with questions. she asked and answered multiple questions time and time again, very consistent and strong and stayed up there for the entire time. he think they lasted close to 14 hours and she stood through the whole thing. >> the other huge political headline has to be donald trump letting loose on ben carson, a lot of pundits calling that rant lasted 90 -- lasted a long time,
8:33 am
a very risky move. >> absolutely, it was. donald trump never ceases to amaze the viewers. he's great t.v. and knows it. there were many stories published where the establishment is getting nervous that if either donald trump or ben cash sob end up with a nomination, they'll be in big trouble. this is typical trump. he continues to have his loyal followers that i think will be loyal to him to the end. if you know anything about presidential politics in the united states, the convention is not about voters, it's about delegates. his delegates are loyal to him. it would take a home implosion to lead him. >> it seemed like 90 minutes. talking about immigration, trump's plan to deport millions of undocumented immigrants, jeb bush saying the democrats are smiling. are they? >> absolutely.
8:34 am
the debate earlier this week provided us with tons of fodder to go after many angles on republicans. republicans don't have a clear vision and that's one thing that this primary is really hurting them with. they have no united states vision on things like immigration so when they offer four or five views, tomorrow night in the debate. hillary clinton is going to be able to pick one and attack it. this is all part of a bigger strategy. >> who causes the democrats to looked most sleep? >> rubio hands down. john kasich actually causes the most heartburn within the party. >> can kasich revise a republican primary?
8:35 am
>> no, i don't think he can. rubio, if you're a betting man and a big papi of horse racing and if i'm watching rubio's horse now, he is doing great, positioned perfectly to make it through this field without causing too many bombs. other republicans better tune in on this and go after him and start vetting him like carson and like they've done to jeb. he is scot-free on this. when they go after him, it's going to test his mettle to see if he can withstand it. we're going to have a big fight come november. >> officials in utah are challenging a state judge to ordered a lesbian couple to give up a foster child. >> john henry smith has our story. >> for the last three months, april and becky have been state approved foster parents to a now nine-month-old baby girl, until a judge this week said no. >> he said through his research, he had found out that kids in
8:36 am
homosexual homes don't do as well as they do in heterosexual homes. when they asked to show his research, he would not. >> the state of utah is supporting the couple. the state argues the judge went against its recommendations. utah officials will people. >> i'm not going to expect my case workers to right invite a case order, on the other hand the law. >> lgbt parents groups say the judge was simply wrong. they say the research is not legitimate. >> he made an uninformed bias decision based on widely debunked research. >> they just want to keep the girl, whom they consider their daughter. >> we've, told to care for this child like a mothered, and i am
8:37 am
her mother. i mean that's who she knows, and she's just going to be taken away in seven days top another good probably loving home, but it's not fair and it's not right and it just hurts me really badly, because i haven't done anything wrong. >> the judge has been controversial in the past. he got an official reprimand in 1997 after he slapped a belligerent teenage boy inside the courthouse. three years ago, he sentenced to teen girl who cut off her ponytail to have her own cut off. this latest ruling is unprecedented. no other judge in utah ruled gay parents shouldn't be foster parents. >> i didn't know it was against the law to cut off a ponytail. >> i can't speak on the tony tail, but first, the pair are already parents, raising their
8:38 am
own biological kid and now is hiring an attorney to fight the ruling. >> a major backlash is brewing within the mormon church over new rules targeting gay members and their children. hundreds of the faithful promise to resign this weekend under the new rules children living with lgbt parents are not allowed to be baptized until 18. gay marriage is considered to be a sin worthy of expulsion in chai church. >> there's a diverging medical field, techno reports. >> i baptize you in the name of the father and of the son and of the holy spirit. >> religious faith.
8:39 am
it's estimated ate 4% of the world's population are into region. >> in our faith, we do believe that you have the spirit constantly with you. for people who have maybe never felt the spirit, can you try to describe components of it? >> it is peaceful, i have clarity and have a burning sensation throughout my chest. >> do you believe in your hard of hearts that you can scientifically investigate faith? >> i like to think so. >> her devotion to god and science made her a perfect subject for the university of utah's religious brain condition september. >> what motivated you to ask
8:40 am
questions about region? >> because it's the biggest question out there. >> an mri gives a detailed picture of the brain at rest. next is a functional mri that records brain activity while she reads quotes about faith paired with religious photo figures. >> what regions of the brain are most involved? >> the core typhic and the area called the insula that form a special brain network called the valiant's network. >> it is the part of the brain that decides what's most
8:41 am
important. >> your brain lit up like a christmas tree. >> wow. >> it showed a lot of activity in a lot of different regions. >> i welcome anything that embraces the fact that you have a physical reaction to that, and that that can be looked upon and measured. >> you can see more of techno's reports on the affect effects on on the brain. >> thousands took part in the million student march at campuses across the country. protestors want public universities to be tuition free and for all student debt to be canceled. they are calling for a $15 minimum wage for student employees on campuses. >> those protests follow weeks of tensions on university campuses across the country. students have been acknowledgery over racially charged incidents. the university of michigan ann arbor saw similar protests in 2013. bisi onile-ere went to the campus and found in many ways,
8:42 am
the fight continues. >> i definitely relate to the university of missouri and stand in solidarity with them in everything they are doing. >> at the university of michigan, this senior is among the 4% of black students on campus. she said her fight for more diversity at michigan took a turn when protests erupted in missouri. >> do you think what happened in missouri could happen here? >> definitely. i don't think that our students are afraid to do it, either. >> in 2013, after a number of racially charged incidents, kendall helped launch a movement that helped she had light on the challenges african-american students faced on the predominantly quite pam cuss. hash tag bbum, being black at the university of michigan instantly became a trending topic on social media.
8:43 am
>> last year, michigan's black student union issued a list of demands to college administrators, calling for improved racial diversity and inclusion on campus. so far, a few of their demands, such as providing more financial aid have been met, but she says much more needs to be done. >> now i can't say when i walk campus, there are a couple of new black faces i see. that's cool, but it's still an uncomfortable environment for african-american students. >> say they've seen progress. >> they are now aware and acknowledge that we do not have the diversity we claim to have. >> by september of 2016, the college is expected to announce and implement a campus wide diversity plan.
8:44 am
robert sellers, vice provost at michigan said that the college is taking the issue of race seriously. >> i think missouri and i want that is are occurring at yale have sort of put higher education on notice that issues of inclusion and opportunity and diversity and equity are paramount to what we do. >> i definitely plan on holding the university accountable. i definitely plan on taking action. >> on a campus that has yet to see racial tension reach a boiling point, leaders caution that change will likely take time. bisi onile-ere, al jazeera, ann arbor, michigan. >> straight ahead, greenland is disappearing billions of tons as a time. >> why it could have serious consequence for the rest of the world. >> clouds of junk floating in space, the dingers posed by the
8:45 am
debris we put into the cosmos.
8:46 am
8:47 am
>> one of the largest glaciers in the word is melting. >> it is losing mass at a rate of 5 billion tons per year. there could be enough melted ice to raise ocean levels 18 inches worldwide. the satellite imagery suggest the ice blocks are melting.
8:48 am
>> this is yosemite national park. it is almost gone, losing about find% of its volume, 80% of surface area since 18 yea three. >> the number of children diagnosed a autism is on the rise. the c.d.c. said over 2% of children ages three to 12 or one in 45 now have some form of autism. the overall number of parents reporting any developmental disabilities in their kids remain the same, just under 6%. researchers caution that the increase is likely due to the way autism is diagnosed. >> surgeons at the cleveland clinic are months away from performing the first uterine transplant in the u.s. they will be temporary. the uterus would be removed after the recipient has had children so the patient can is
8:49 am
stop taking anti rejection drugs. >> this ordered their wrote about his first love, music. >> it shows how we all influence each other, whether you're in a bond of musicians or in a band in life, you influence people that you come in contact with with your talent. franky became this great symbol that have, because he is the greatest guitar player to ever walk the earth. he comes out of the womb and grabs more music into his two little fists when he first emerging than anyone has ever done before, so we follow him throughout his life. he suffers greatly and when he's young, he loses his mother the day he was born and becomes an orphan and is sent to america when he was nine years old with
8:50 am
a single guitar and six magic strings. those strings can change people's life and when they do, they turn blue. he gets six opportunities to change his life, sort of a metaphor of how often we affect one another with our talents and with our music. the last element he pointed out, he's sort of forest gump, he's fictional but everything else is real. he's at woodstock and meets tony bennett. there are real people who let me write in their voices in the book, but he's fictional. >> i'm sure you asked duke ellington for permission. >> not duke, but a off others.
8:51 am
>> a lot of my own musical factual sees were sort of played out. >> mitch always wanted to be a musician. >> i am so jealous. he is one of my favorite authors. does he write because he loves to write or because he wants to make money? >> he loves to write, loves music more. with his best seller, he wrote it thinking he was raising money for a professor with a.l.s. it sold millions of copies. >> with the five people you meet in heaven, i want it to be six, seven, eight, nine, 10, it was a good read. >> a future show will be airing in the next couple of weeks with a longer talk with him. >> junk is crashing into the atmosphere. >> a major international store
8:52 am
closing its doors on thanksgiving, saying the move is going to help its bottom line.
8:53 am
8:54 am
june space debris intercepted the atmosphere near sri lanka at 1:19 eastern time. the most likely burned up. >> there are countless other piece was space young in orbit.
8:55 am
jacob ward explains. >> when you think about as thomas, professionals that get to use the big rigs or back yard amateurs like me using a low powered telescope, you think about watching natural objects in space, man nets, stars, comets or the occasional man made object that's doing what it's supposed to, satellites clicking away up there. there's a new field of as tran my watching for space junk, the debris we've scattered across low earth orbit with all out of activities up there. that is multiplying, objects are beginning to create whole new fields of debris. we have 21,000 objects moving at incredible speeds, several miles per second, which means their very dangerous to the satellites we rely on. being able to predict the movement of that stuff, especially when it comes and makes contact with the atmosphere or god forbid, the surface of the earth, that's very important.
8:56 am
that's why everyone's been watching this particular object, w.f.1190f. so closely. in the past, we've been very bad at predicting how this stuff is going to come down. when sky lab came down, it did so sooner than we expected. there is a lot of solar activity up there, space weather, drag on sky lab. it behaved in a way we did not expect. we thought it was going to hit the ocean, but parts of it came down in australia where people live. all of that is of great concern to scientists. in this case, the opportunity to truly validate this two-meter object as it comes in and burns up in the atmosphere. that opportunity was such a big deal to people, because it really represents the possibility of validating our predictions, getting better, it's a very rare opportunity, but opportunity to get better at mitigating the possible risks of this stuff smacking into other satellites or coming down in the
8:57 am
future. >> an asteroid traveling 78,000 miles per hour is expect to go part earth this weekend. it will be 100,000 miles away. >> fewer americans are smoking, the c.d.c. saying 17% of adults smoking in 2014 is 20% lower than 2005, but still high among those below the poverty line. >> we are two weeks away from the biggest shopping weekend of the year. >> some stores are switching things up this year, staying closed. hermela aregawi reports. >> employees at the clothing store h.&m will be able to spend thanksgiving day at home. the retail store follows staples in closing its stores on the holiday. >> i'm really proud of what they're doing. i like the idea that they put families first in front of the
8:58 am
bottom line. >> more than two dozen other retailers, including costco, home depot and r.e.i. will close up shop on thanks give day, but r.e.i. is keeping its doors shut on black friday, as well. >> there were some tears, actually. the idea of being in retail and the opportunity to spend both thursday and friday with their family is pretty special. >> retailers say decisions like that seem to generate brand loyalty among customers who support letting workers spend the holiday with family. there may be a financial factor behind all that good will. according to the national retail federation, black friday weekend sales were down 11% last year. retailers say that could be because of the earlier thanksgiving day sales. two weeks from today, the lure of discounts will still bring out the shoppers including those who hit the stores mere hours
8:59 am
after eating their turkey, but last year, fewer shoppers headed to stores. the retail association says in november, 2014. shopper traffic fell 5%. many choose to go on the web instead. >> a lot of the strength in holiday sales these days really does come from the on line channels, especially with consumers. >> while several brick and mortar stores will be closed on thanksgiving, the web will be busy. the index predicts and 18% increase in on line shopping that day. worth more than a billion and a half dollars in sales, more than half of that shopping will be done on smart phones, and that would make this thanksgiving the biggest mobile shopping day of the holiday season. hermela aregawi, al jazeera, new york. >> so the controversy continues. >> coming up next, more on the battle to retake sinjar in iraq.
9:00 am
we'll continue to follow the drone strike that may have killed jihadi john. >> kurdish forces raise a huge flag in sinjar to mark their victory against isil. >> from al jazeera headquarters in doha, also ahead: >> myanmar's opposition party led by aung san suu kyi sweeps the victory in historic elections. >> the u.n. looks at boosting forces in burundi, concerns are growing that violence could spiral out of control. an aging mobsters accused of planning a major airport heist walks out of a u.s. court a free man.

57 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on