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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  December 22, 2015 7:00am-9:01am EST

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♪ no indictments, a texas grand jury declines to charge any one in the jail house death of sandra bland and talk to the jury of where the case goes from here. former army sergeant goes before a military judge of charges of exertion and endangering troops. ops forces to battle taliban and six american soldiers who died in the suicide attack are remembere remembered. historic landing a new commercial space flight as the rocket launches and then safely returns to earth. ♪
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this morning the family of sandra bland says they will keep demanding answers after a grand jury failed to indict anyone for her arrest, arrest over the summer, videotape and death and jail capturing headlines around the world and welcome to your world i'm del walters. >> i'm in for stephanie sy, prosecutor insists the case is not over yet and we begin with al jazeera john henry smith who has more on the grand jury's decision. >> reporter: for more than ten hours a grand jury in texas discussed evidence presented by special prosecutors in last summer's jail house death of sandra bland and died three days after this traffic stop. >> grand jury did not return an indictment. the grand jury also considered things that occurred at the jail
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and did not return an indictment. >> reporter: the coroner says she hanged herself in the jail using trash bags and special prosecutors would not say anything other than the team carefully reviewed video of bland's time in jail. >> as far as what happened today the details of course those are all secret. >> biggest problem for me is the entire process. it's the secrecy of it all. >> reporter: 1100 miles away in chicago bland's family continued to express doubt that the sandra they knew would kill herself and about the grand jury. >> we have absolutely no confidence on what we believe is a sham proceeding. we are desperately seeking very basic information to conduct our own independent investigation of what happened to sandy there and they are not only providing it to us but they are invoking this inherent trust in the system
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that we think is inherently flawed. >> anything they asked for we have done our best to give it to them. the grand jury is committed to doing what is right and we are committed to doing what is right. >> reporter: they meet in january to examine other aspects of sandra bland's traffic stop and her arrest. >> the family is moving ahead with a wrongful death lawsuit against trooper brian and two of sandra bland's jurors and the county office and the judge set a 2017 trial date for the case and family says all of them are responsible for sandra bland's death and thank you very much. >> reporter: lambert is the attorney for sandra bland's family and joins us from chicago and thank you so much for joining us this morning. >> thank you have much for having me and from the start they have been disappointed with the process and grand jury ors met eight hours before deciding not to bring criminal charges against anyone, was bland's
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family surprised by this outcome? >> first you have to realize what it is that a grand jury does, a grand jury frankly speaking does not have a judge. a judge in the grand jury is the prosecutor and the prosecutors gets to make what is submitted or not submitted and we don't know what is submitted and testimony is sealed and not being able to be allowed to be a part of the proceeding so the reality of it is it's just a tool of the prosecutor so they can go out and say we submited evidence and unfortunately that evidence came back suggesting that nobody should be indicted. now on a practical level we have spoken to the family and shared with them we have serious concerns about how this proceeding was going to take place and unfortunately our concerns came to fruition. >> activists believe charges should be brought against the state trooper who arrested bland, a special prosecutor said last night the case is not over, does that provide any hope for the family that someone may be
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held accountable for bland's death? >> it really under scores the concern that we have. let's just be honest. since july they have had videotape of what happened to sandra at that stop. that's the easiest part to look at, isn't it? yet they still need another two months to examine that video? that is staggering to us. >> and going back to that day in july bland's mother disputes accounts her daughter committed suicide so what does she think happened that day? >> well, the problem is that she doesn't know. we don't even have the preliminary police report that he himself offered is how little information they have come forth with. the reason we have been asking for the basic information we have been asking for is so that we can get answers for this family. we are coming up, on the holidays and are in a place they can say they know what happened. >> thank you so much for joining us this morning. >> thank you so much for having
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me, thank you. prosecutors going to have to wait until june to try a baltimore city police officer again in connection with the death of freddie gray. the retrial of william porter set to take place on june 13th the case against him ending last week in a hung jury, he was the first officer tried in connection with gray's death and another officer goes on trial in january, the driver of the van where prosecutors say gray was fatally injured. he was once an american hero now army sergeant bo-bergdhal and it's the court marshal in ft. bragg, north carolina accused of endangering soldiers and if convicted faces life in pris prison. al jazeera robert ray is live from ft. bragg and robert what do we expect to see today? >> well, it's a moral condemnation of bo-bergdhdal the 29-year-old who deserted or charged with desertion in 2009
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from his platoon in afghanistan, will have arraignment starting at 9:00 a.m. and then we will have a look at exactly what the charges are after that. >> this morning i called bob and janie-bergdhal stating after five years in captivity their son bo was coming home. >> reporter: that was president obama back in may of 2014 in the rose garden but june 2009 that bo disappeared from his remote army out post in afghanistan unarmed, a day later he was captured by the taliban and held prisoner for five years. this is how he describes that experience from the podcast serial. >> how do i explain to a person that is just standing in an empty, dark room hurts and i couldn't see my hands. i couldn't do anything. the only thing i could do is
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like touch my face. >> reporter: after international political chess it was all over in the spring of 2014 berghdal with the taliban and in exchange for his freedom five prisoners in guantanamo bay. >> will close gitmo and iron clad commitment to bring prisoners of war home. >> reporter: after his return soldiers who worked with him began to speak out. >> we want people to realize he is not an american hero and did not serve with honor and dignity and respect and he ask a deserter and in a time of war. >> sergeant berghal threatened people who went to search for him. >> reporter: no proof anyone was killed trying to rescue him. >> it's the right thing to do because we in the united states do not leave men and women in uniform behind. >> reporter: after intense investigation in march of this year the army charged him with.
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>> desertion with important and hazardous duty and one count of article 99, miss behavior before the enemy by endangering the safety of a command, unit or place. >> reporter: he has been working a desk job in san antonio and could be sentenced if guilty and the 45 day search of thousands of square miles following his disappearance in afghanistan put the lives of his fellow soldiers at risk. the trial could begin as soon as may and as late as october of 2016. del. >> the charge of miss behavior before the enemy and rarely been used, in fact, not since world war ii, what makes his case so unique he is being charged with that? >> well, it's an interesting question. you know, on the desertion charge let's just say that there has been about 1900 cases of that since 2001 to the end of
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2014 by the u.s. military so that is more common than the behavior charge. but the reason the behavior charge is such a big deal is because that is the penalty that would put him in prison for the rest of his life and what that includes is you know the fact that perhaps he gave military secrets out to the enemy, the taliban and tactics that were used by the units in afghanistan, del. >> robert ray for us in a very rainy ft. bragg, north carolina this morning. fighting fierce battles against the taliban in the southern helman providence and stepped up with more teams and came after a suicide bomber killed six u.s. troops near the bagram base and one was a new york city police detective joseph lem and served in the national guard and spent time in iraq, this was his second tour of duty in afghanistan and jamie mcintyre has more from the
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pentagon. >> reporter: it was the deadliest day for troops in afghanistan since the official end of combat operations a year ago and it also comes as the pentagon reports as the overall situation in afghanistan has deteriorated and the taliban attacks have become more frequent and more effective. in afghanistan's southern providence fighting intense as taliban claims success in capturing the headquarters, governor office and other government buildings, the governor there says it left afghan soldiers and local citizens begging for food and like the latest suicide attack that killed a half dozen u.s. troops outside of bagram base it's more evidence the taliban is back. kabul has been the focus of what the pentagon calls high profile attacks and counts the deadly motorcycle suicide bombing as the 29th such attack by the taliban in or around the afghan
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cap till since the beginning of the year 27% increase over the same period last year. at the same time the taliban has shown it can also take key terrain outside of its traditional stronghold as it did back in late september and early october when it briefly held the northern city of konduz. >> it under scores it's a tough fight and far from over and also a dynamic fight. >> reporter: ash carter was in afghanistan last week to meet with top commander who candidly admitted to reporters the afghan security forces are still struggling. >> the u.s. army has been around for 20 years or seven or eight years and put it in perspective and trying to build an airplane in flight. >> reporter: report to congress offered a harsh assessment of the afghan army's lack of progress and said despite being far better armed and trained by
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the u.s. afghan forces remain reluctant to pursue the taliban into their traditional safe havens and concluded they currently cannot ensure security and stability without further improvement. >> right now they are very, very static where they have taken a lot of casualties on checkpoints and will work on those. >> reporter: a big factor is the u.s. no longer providing air strikes for offensive operations, one finding of the investigation in the mistaken bombing of doctors without borders hospital in kunduz is the mission never should have been authorized and u.s. air power used to protect u.s. troops on the ground or afghan troops in extreme distress. >> u.s. forces are helping afghan forces from the air, not as much as in the past but this is part of the plan which is to get to the point where afghans are able to provide their own air support. >> reporter: the u.s. has been training afghan pilots to fly a simple ground attack plane known as the a 29 so afghanistan can
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provide its own close air support. the first group of pilots is only now finishing training at moody airforce base in georgia. the pentagon says despite the resilience of the taliban most gains short lived being able to retake what was lost and concedes the taliban has become more effective at finding and exploiting soft spots and has led to fragile security in some spots where in other areas there is a risk of further deterioration, jamie mcintyre, al jazeera the pentagon. the man charged with helping the couple behind the san bernardino attack is still behind bars this morning. he was denied bail in a california courtroom on monday and judge found him still poses a threat to the public and prosecutors say he bought two guns used to kill 14 people on december second. the schools in new hampshire back open again and closed monday because of that threat, the town's police chief saying
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the ongoing investigation there did not find credible evidence of an attack and didn't say it was a hoax either and over the weekend the superintendent said they received an e-mail that named two schools and threatened to harm students and staff and the bail hearing is being held today for the woman accused of mowing down thousands on the las vegas strip and 24-year-old charged with one count of murder, 35 others were hurt, her three-year-old daughter was in the car at the time telling investigators she recently became homeless and living out of her car with that little girl. rescuers pulled a body out of a landslide in southern china the first confirmed victim of the slide and 80 people are still myseissing and 4,000 peop are working to find them and a manmade mountain of soil and construction debris led to the collapse of nearly three dozen buildings and in an industrial park. today is the first day of
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winter and feels like spring in the east and being wedged between minnesota and they are not smiling. >> a little disappointed and means there is no snow in sight and no white christmas for the country because of the temperatures. if we head west we definitely have temperatures that are a little more typical for this time of year but almost the eastern half of the country is seeing temperatures well above average, in some cases over the next couple days 20-30 degrees above so already parts of the northeast back in the 60s and a lot of 70s through the southern tier of the country and by the time we get to christmas eve day even warmer. here is what we have because of this it's more of a spring type system versus a winter system and it's raining in the east and another one in the west coast and talk more about that in the next half hour but honing on in the heaviest rain in the next couple days is on the southern edge of that like the gulf coast and definitely going to see this continue not just today but then
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the system out of the west will add some moisture to this so this is a couple rainy days out here that we are going to be dealing with some of these problems and enough heat that into tomorrow, today we have a slight risk, oklahoma and texas and more enhanced rick for some of the severe weather especially as we get to kind of that central portion of the country. as we head into that christmas eve forecast i was mentioning look at some temperatures new york 72 degrees toward the end of december. that is about 30 degrees above average and it's definitely going to put part of the region in record territory but as i said all the ski resorts that make a lot of money over the christmas holiday can't even make snow at those temperatures. >> and you will be skiing. >> a lot of resorts hurting right now. >> yeah, tell me about it. >> thank you, nicole. >> when we come back dead broke, not dead beats. >> dads who want to pay child support but just can't afford
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to, how to help them break the cycle. sentence suspended and a human rights attorney in china convicted but not going to jail. ♪
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sounds like my ride's ready. don't get stuck on hold. reach an expert fast. comcast business. built for business. ♪ british troops now heading to helman providence in afghanistan to help push back the resurging taliban. >> u.s. doing the same and facebook is begging the government in kabul for help and al jazeera reports. >> reporter: it is not easy ton a moving target especially when it's the taliban and afghan soldiers and police are out gunned. >> translator: we are fighting to remove the taliban from the area therefore we need support from army to help us. right now the area is controlled
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by taliban. >> reporter: this is helman providence once controlled by the taliban and also the place where most of the world's opium is produced. on sunday the providence deputy mayor used facebook to plead with the afghan president posting your excellency and helman is standing on the brink and a serious need for you to come. since last night the district sensor is almost completely under taliban control. >> although billions of dollars or hundreds of millions of dollars have been spent for the national army but that national army seems to lack a strategic leadership and this is why you see the taliban taking advantage of this. >> reporter: the taliban appears to be criss-crossing the country, seizing large areas. two months ago its fighters took kunduz in the north for two weeks crippling the city and now
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they moved south to helman pr e province and says it will fall in their hands unless help arrives soon. >> a journalist and the arthur of taliban oil and fun mennism in central asia and is joining us from skype and thanks for being with us and write while we were not looking the taliban surge back in afghanistan obviously from the report they are there, how strong are they? >> well, i think they are very strong. we saw two months ago they took a major city in the north, kunduz, a city of 300,000 people eventually that was retaken by the afghan army but right now the situation in helman is very precarious because if helman falls it's more than likely this could trigger a domino effect in other provinces which are
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already teetering on the edge because taliban occupy most of them, other provinces could also fall as well and at the same time remember there a political crisis in kabul and antagonism between the government and the opposition figures, there is very little unity it seems inside the government and the opposition at the moment and of course there is a problem of the army and lack of leadership. >> that is not what the u.s. wants to hear. they have been in afghanistan now for 15 years at a cost of more than a trillion dollars and 2200 lives there is a reason afghanistan is called the graveyard of empires are you saying the u.s. is going to be yet another in a long line of occupying forces that have tried and failed to change the country? >> well, i don't know the u.s. is going to reoccupy afghanistan. if american troops are going to
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come back in any large number judging from what president obama has done in iraq and so far in afghanistan that doesn't look like it. nevertheless it is going to be a very dire situation in the weeks ahead and we are not seeing normally in winter we see the lull in the fighting. we are not seeing a lull in the fighting. i mean there have been four or five major attacks in kabul and kandahar and big offenses in helman and the speculation is that the taliban want to now take a providence so that they can establish some kind of alternative government in the providence and move out from their bases in pakistan and say that they are now fully based in afghanistan. and helman of course would be the ideal place because it is the heart land of the taliban movement, it is the main source of income for them because of
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the drug economy and they have a degree of popularity there among the farmers also. >> you maintain that kabul is so unsafe that u.s. forces travel only by helicopter because the taliban controls the roads, there was footage last month of a woman being stoned to death from adultery and i.s.i.l. in the country as well, what happens if the u.s. leaves afghanistan altogether? >> well, the odd thing is that actually the taliban right now, very fragmented. the taliban is facing a leadership crisis itself because its principal leader died two years ago and this was not disclosed by his other commanders and there was resentment building up within the taliban and the main taliban force have actually been fighting in the west of the country but in the east of the country it has also been
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fighting i.s.i.s. which has become a factor in at least three provinces in eastern afghanistan so the taliban are fragmented, they are divided but it seems when it comes to going on the military offensive they tend to unite and come together in order to take on the afghan government. >> joining us from pakistan via skype, thank you very much. as soon as today the african union may send its troops to burundi. the alliance gave the west african country to today to allow peace keepers in the capitol but burundi parliament said on monday it would view any deployment as an invasion. there has been escalating violence between government supporters and the opposition over the president's disputed election win in july, a human rights lawyer in china guilty of disturbing public order and inciting ethnic hatred and given
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a three year suspended prison term and arrested after criticizing the government on social media and held on charges for 19 months. greek parliament calling on government to recognize palestinian lawmakers unanimously approving a nonbinding resolution and abbas was there and talked after the vote and trying to balance improved relation with israel after a long time support of a palestinian state. protecting the king. >> and tracking down saving the lions. washing away waist and to cleanup one of the dirtyist rivers flowing through the nation's capitol.
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>> sunday on "hard earned".
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losing control. >> 50 and broke. i live with the consequences every day. >> harsh realities. >> i did two tours in iraq, when i came back i couldn't find a job. >> fighting to survive. >> bein' a man and can't put my family in a home that they deserve... that's a problem for me. >> hard earned pride. hard earned respect. hard earned future. a real look at the american dream. "hard earned". sunday, 10:00 eastern. only on al jazeera america. welcome back to your world this morning. the family of sandra bland demanding an independent investigation now that a jury in the accident has declined to charge anyone in her jailhouse death. she was found hanging in her cell. no decision has been made whether to charge the trooper
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who made the arrest. bowber bowe bergdahl faces a military judge this morning. he walked away from his post in afghanistan, back in june, 2000 minor. if convicted, bergdahl could face life in prison. u.s. and britain deploying special teams to afghanistan to help fight the taliban, monday, a suicide bomber killing six american service members. one was a new york city police detective and reservist. the iraqi military launched an offensive to retake ramadi from isil. >> isil taking control of rimadi earlier this year. a former parliament member telling al jazeera the fight is crucial against isil. >> the action has been planned for sometime now. they have an allowance for the civilian people to come out to
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reduce casualties to the civilians because isil has their own vicious action hiding behind civilian women and children and also -- i think the mission has been made for rimadi to be taken. it is very important, because this is an important position in the war against daish not only in iraq, but the region. rimadi is across to baghdad and jordan and this is going to break the backbone of gabe in the region. since last summer, government and kurdish forces have pushed ice oil as you have some other key towns.
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europe's refugee crisis hitting an unpleasant milestone, more than a million people have now fled, arriving on the continent this year, refugees coming from spain, italy, malta and cypress. most of them, the vast major city most coming by sea to greece. almost half of that number from syria and a third from afghanistan and iraq. meanwhile, canada now saying it will double the number of syrian refugees it takes in, immigration officials there saying their resettlement program will take in 50,000. just stood once said he would resettle 25,000 by the first of january. he was on hand to welcome the first arriving this month. donald trump is making head lines for his latest comments about hillary clinton. he used a derogatory yiddish term to insult her. he mocked clinton for taking too
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long in the bathroom during saturday's democratic debate. then he used and offensive yesterday issue term to describe her loss to barack obama. she was going to beat obama. she was favored to win and she got shlung, she lost. >> the michigan event is not the first time trump that you said phrase. in a 2011 interview with the washington post trump used the vulgarities blaming paul ryan for the republican party's loss in a special election. a minnesota judge today is expected to decide whether to allow protests inside the mall of america. demonstrators plan to gather there on wednesday over the death of a black man at the hands of police. we have this report. >> these protestors are being
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told by the countries largest mall not to demonstrate on their property wednesday, asking a minnesota judge to grant a temporary restraining order. the mall of america hopes to prevent a huge demonstration like the one last year where some stores shut down. the mall said that protest caused irreparable damage to mall of america saying as a private retailer it prohibits all forms of protest, demonstration and public debate. mall officials want protestors to delete and take down any on line materials soliciting demonstrators to gather at the mall. black lives matter protestors say that's not going to happen. >> our country was built off of protests, protest is meant to make people uncomfortable. protest is not meant to be easy, but it's a struggle that we must go through to get justice here. >> protestors hope to draw attention to the attention of damar clark, a black man killed by police. they've been demonstrating for
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months demanding video of the shooting be released. authorities say they can't, because it could interfere with on going state and federal investigations. an attorney for the mall says they don't take an issue with the message, but they don't want protests two days before christmas on a busy shopping day. >> we will take this one step at a time. if the judge issues an order retraining the demonstration and that order is violated, we'll deal with it. >> some protestors seem to be double down on their promise to go to the mall. they've been tweeting with the hash tag sue me too. >> the mall of america sent letters to the leaders of the movement telling them not a gather at the mall tomorrow or they would face arrest. >> this protestors have been sued by the mall of america for what they did in demonstrations previously. >> many of the charges were dismissed, but several face protesting charges. organizers call this a victory
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or free speech. the supreme court has ruled that the mall does have a right to control what happens on its property. >> interesting. >> billions of dollars in child support goes unpaid in the u.s., money owed by people living in poverty themselves. in baltimore, there's a program that ease that is burden on poor parents, and it's actually led to more money coming in. we explain just how often it works. >> what did owing the state money for child support due to your life? >> it affected my credit score, i wasn't able be to get a house. i wasn't able to get a car. it ruined my life. it totally ruined it. >> when a college student in baltimore fell behind on child support payment, there was little he could do to kept up to the soaring amount the state kept adding to his bill. >> it was about 30 something thousand dollars. >> how old was your daughter then. >> she had to be four or five.
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>> when did you think when you found out you owed $30,000 for child support? >> i was lost. >> it's not just the money that builds up. in the state of maryland, point in time the for failure to pay child support can include loss of any state i should license, from driving to plumbing, and even jail. >> if you are stopping me from driving, i can't pay you the money that you say i owe you. >> joe jones knew there was a better way. jones is the founder and c.e.o. of the center for urban families. >> this is the upstairs training room where the fatherhood sessions are held. >> an agency started in 1999 to help men become better fathers and providers. three decades ago, jones could have been a client. >> i owed child support for my first child, you know, i was coming out of my own addiction, my own incarceration. >> to help men and women become responsible parents, jones challenges a key requirement of maryland's welfare system.
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>> even if you don't have income, they're still going to require you to pay. >> for decades, jones lobbied state and national officials for common sense flexibility. >> we've also had to do a lot of education to help them make that distinction between dead beat and dead broke dad. >> dead bead and dead broke. >> dead beat meaning you have the financial means to pay, dead broke meaning you can't. >> these are individuals really down on their luck. >> the executive director of maryland's child support services enforcement administration said this. >> it's our responsibility to work with them in a cooperative way to help them find employment and then continue to work with so that all of their income is not being pulled out of their check. >> what do you say to critics who say these guys had these kids, they ought to pay what they owe. >> it comes down to fundamental fairness. an individual is making lets say $400 take home, think about garnishing 65% of that money.
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there's nothing left for that person to live on. >> they worked together to develop a special program enabling parents who complete classes at the center for urban families to get a job and pay the negotiated child support consistently for one year. if they do that, they earn credit for their back child support. >> the credit that's earned can be as high as 75% have state arrears. >> what does that mean, that you will reduce the arrearage by 75%? >> correct. >> he said it doesn't make sense to saddle low income parents with child support bills they cannot pay. >> i'd rather get a support obligation for a kid that the no one custody yell parent will pay rather than some large number that they never have the ability to pay and i just have it dead on the book. >> the new policy seems to be working. collections in maryland went up by nearly $40 million between 2011 and 2014. >> for all of the training and
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support the center for urban family provides parents, the ability to pay child support comes down to one essential element, the parent has to have or be able to find a job. >> to help fill that need, the center for urban families has developed partnerships with businesses throughout baltimore. >> he had boroughs took advantage of the programs which helped him land a full time position and maryland's flexible policies wiped out his back child support. >> who takes care of your daughter now? >> i do. >> how old is she? >> she's 18. she graduated from high school. she's in college. >> he esees a bright future for hips and his daughter. al jazeera, baltimore. there is criticism over the f.d.a. policy on blood donations from gay men. the f.d.a. monday formally adopting new rules allowing gay men to donate but only if they haven't had sex with another man over the last year. critics say it doesn't take into
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account the realities of how h.i.v. is translated. the chipotle restaurant chain is implementing new health safety measures following yet another outbreak of e-coli. five people have gotten sick. the c.d.c. said the diners were sickened by a different strain of e-coli than different cases. 53 people have been affected at chipotle restaurants since october. one of the most polluted we're ways in the u.s. most is because of raw assuming that winds up in the river. officials hope new tunnels can change that. we have this report. >> the river runs through some of the poorest areas in washington, d.c. the man who tests its sediment for toxic chemicals has a warning for those who take to its waters. >> don't fall in. >> this slow moving 14-kilometer shallow water way is a
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particularly bad candidate for toxic dumping, but city authorities have allowed rain water to sweep intox ins from roads and military operations since the 19th century. >> toxic metals, chlorine, and dioxin. >> the warnings against eating fish caught here are clear, yesterday a study found widespread local consumption. there is also raw assuming. the subterranean pipe system connects both assuming and rain water. it reaches capacity on particularly rainy days. some seeps to the surface, the rest is dumped straight into d.c.'s rivers. 49 billion lighters of diluted human waste throws into the an costia each year.
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>> property prices are already rising in entryifying neighborhoods as the risk debates and hopes grow of a cleaner river. for environmentalists, the question is why it took two lawsuits for the city to stop the flow of sue this. >> i think there is certainly a confluence of gentrification and water quality. it would be a real shame if the communities who have been deprived of a clean river all these years were pushed out and weren't able to actually enjoy the benefits and there are already signs of that happening. >> she is concerned that it took so long to begin work on those tunnels that new higher rainfall models that take into account climate change weren't part of the planning. using the old models. 200 liters of untreated assuming
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will still flow into the river after the tunnels are complete. toxic storm runoff will be well beyond that. >> it won't be in our lifetime. the district is telling us they can't do better than completely by 2154. >> this deals with the overflow and no cleanup. there's no time frame for that. try not to fall in. al jazeera, washington. parts of california are getting much needed rain. let's bring in nicole mitchell. >> yeah, this is definitely a boon for california, still under a severe, even extreme drought conditions. as you move across the country, it's been a little too much rain recently for portions of the eastern half of the country. this is what we are looking at into what has predominantly been the northwest. this last system is one of the ones getting a little bit more of that rain into portions of california, all the way through central california. we've been seeing that some of it squeaking its way into southern california and a few
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spots could see up to an inch. if you haven't had the rain, you get that oil coating on the ground that could make the roads extra slick, besides the rains just slowing down everything in general. as we get into higher elevations, there's been some phenomenal. we are talking about phenomenal skiing in the west, some set record snow so far this winter and really good news in terms of the snow pack because that gives another moisture flow in the spring that helps with the vegetation. part of the reason we are seeing snow with this round because recent rains have been a little more rain versus snow is because we finally saw some cooler temperatures move in. today, somewhere like boise, 39 degrees, definitely a cooler temperature, especially when you contrast that with the rest of the country and all that warm air that is on the eastern side of the country. that's going to be a set up for us tomorrow, so you can see all those areas of snow. this next system starts toed a moisture into the midsection of the country, and then yod a in
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that fuel of the heat. we can actually have an enhanced risk for severe weather, so it's a little bit more of a spring pattern as we get to the eastern half of the country. >> that's not warm. that's open the windows and let the air come in. >> the heat is off at this point. when we come back, it was a successful launch and landing. >> space travel gets a boost as the commercial rocket makes history. the fat one certain to fatten someone's wallet, the spanish lottery paying out billions today. bring your family and friends together
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to discover the best shows and movies with xfinity's winter watchlist. later on, we'll conspire ♪ ♪ as we dream by the fire ♪ a beautiful sight, we're happy tonight ♪ ♪ watching in a winter watchlist land, ♪ ♪ watching in a winter watchlist land! ♪ xfinity's winter watchlist. watch now with xfinity on demand- your home for the best entertainment this holiday season.
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a flawless launch and a big night for space x. the company hit an important milestone monday in its bid to make rockets as reusable as airplanes. >> it wasn't the landing that made history, it was actually the landing that made history, marking the first time a rocket launched a rocket into pay load and made it safely back to
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earth. space x is now pushing the envelope on space travel. >> tears of joy, space x celebrating a historic landing of it's falcon rocket moments after launching it into space. it marks the first time space x after three failed attempts successfully completed its mission, to reuse a rocket for future use, the technology setting up new innovations to trim costs and clang completely how mankind changes space flight. >> a ship like no other, its place in history secured, the space shuttle pulls into port for the last time. >> when nasa landed a shuttle for the last time in cape canaveral florida in 2011, its mission of delivering pay loads to space came to an historic clothes. left in its wake, a race to space between traditional air and defense contractors and self made billionaires. with the space shuttle
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grounded,ness at a hired orbital a.t.k. for $1.9 billion to fly cargo mission to the international space station. its capsule arrived at the i.s.s.2 weeks ago, delivering thousands of pounds to equipment on a rocket purchased from lockheed martin and bowing. space partly cloudy skies founded by tesla's elon musk has several launches under its belt uses its own rockets. nasa is reportedly paying $2.6 billion for space x. to transport crews to the space station by 2017. in 2012, the first spacecraft in history delivered cargo to the i.s.s. blue or in's new shepherd, backed by amazon's jeff besos got it right first. history was made last month when the rocket touched down on a landing pad in west texas.
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>> x-rays x's vehicle went up throws to 400,000 feet. it actually went into space and came back down and landed under rocket propulsion. >> the idea is to make the new shepherd capsule named for alan shepherd available to companies and individuals so that space travel becomes almost second nature. >> say you took an airplane and only used it once and had to build a whole new one to take another flight. >> a proposition space x and brew origin will spend billions to perfect as it hopes what goes up comes back down. adam may, al jazeera. president obama is about to show off his funny side once again. the president will be comedienne jerry seinfeld's first guest when his new program begins.
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the white house pair circled the saw the lawn in a 1963 corvette stingray before chatting about life in the white house over coffee. the new season debuts on december 30. >> they've got that presidential seal wedged in between the two, so even the corvette stingray becomes presidential. >> it's very cool. do you remember when he did that between the ferns? >> yes, new boundaries being broken. there's a new look at declining number of bees across the u.s. researchers in vermont producing the first national map which bee populations, those are the areas in red that are at risk. researchers say pesticides are to blame for the disease and the drop. >> there is more fallout from the killing of cecil the lion in zimbabwe earlier this year, the obama administration putting big cats on the endangered species list. alan fisher explains what that means for big game hunters.
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>> he became an international hate figure, the internet abuse became so fierce, walter palmer was forced to close his dental practice in minnesota for several weeks. while in zimbabwe, he shot and killed a locally loved island. the killing was illegal but the dentist said he had no idea he had broken the law. his case was even raised in the white house. >> there was an advocate with leaders in nairobi. there is an advocate for trying to protect wildlife in africa. this is an issue that is a particularly important policy issue in africa, and so this is something that we're obviously aware of. >> the u.s. government said lions in central and west africa will come under be the protection of the he dangered species act. the move has been under consideration for five years and will make it harder to import lion parts like head, paws or skin. >> cecil has certainly had
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enormous impact in terms of the focus that the american public is putting on trophy hunting and certainly is relevant to this effort overall, but unfortunately cecil's situation was not unique and there are hundreds of lions every year being killed by american trophy hunters and that's evidence we documented going back to 2011 when we submitted our petitions. >> the u.s. joins france in taking action after the death of cecil the lion, bringing in tougher legislation. more than 40 airlines have stopped flying any hunting trophy. while the steps introduced can't stop hunting abroad, it is hold the new measures will stop lions being killed in the name of sport. the in connection have been drawn and one of the biggest lotteries ever. millions tuned in around the world to watch the drawing for spain's annual h elgordo lotter,
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the top winner will get a little over $400,000, but thousands of people will each win something. everyone turns out to be a winner. >> fat man. facing a military tribunal, bowe bergdahl due to be formally arraigned for leaving his post in afghanistan. no diamond, sandra bland's family seeks justice for her death. we'll be back in two minutes. >> we're following stories of people who have died in the desert. >> the borderland marathon. >> no one's prepared for this journey. >> experience al jazeera america's critically acclaimed, original series from the beginning. >> experiencing it has changed me completely. >> follow the journey as six americans face the immigration
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debate up close and personal. >> it's heartbreaking. >> i'm the enemy. >> i'm really pissed off. >> all of these people shouldn't be dead. >> it's insane.
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>> his day in court, former army sergeant bowe bergdahl about to go before a military judge, the charges that could put him behind bars for the rest of his life. >> demanding justice in sandra bland's death. the family wants answers after a texas grand jury declines to indict anyone. president obama calling for a summit to end the world's refugee crisis, more than a million now reaching the shores of europe. a landmark landing, the groundbreaking achievement
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ushering in a new era of commercial space flight. welcome to your world this morning. i'm bisi onile-ere in for stephanie sy. >> i'm del walters. in about an hour, bowberg goes before a military judge. >> it is important to note this is only the beginning of the process. >> indeed. good morning from fort bragg. we just learned in the past few minutes that the arraignment will now be at 10:00 a.m., the charges desertion and misbehavior in front of the
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enemy. >> this morning, i called bob and janie bergdahl and told them their son, bewe is coming home. >> a day later, he was then captured by the taliban. >> my name is bowe bergdahl. >> and held prisoner for five years. this is how he described the experience. after international political press. bergdahl was handed over to the
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taliban, placed on a helicopter and in exchange for his freedom, five prisoners from guantanamo bay. >> we are close to closing gitmo. >> soldiers who served with bergdahl began to speak out shortly after his return. >> he is not an american hero. he didn't serve with honor and dignity and respect, and he is a deserter in a time of war. >> sergeant bergdahl in dangered the lives of thousands of men and women sent to search for him. >> at the time, the administration said there was no proof that anyone was killed trying to rescue him. >> this was the right thing to do, because we in the united states do not leave our men and women in uniform behind. >> after an intense investigation in march of this year, the army charged bergdahl with. >> desertion with in tent to shirk important for hazardous duty and one count of article 99, misbehavior before the enemy by endangering the safety of a
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command unit or place. >> sergeant bowe bergdahl has been working a desk job at fort sam houston in san antonio. he could be sentenced to life in prison if found guilty, given the charge that the 45 day search spanning thousands of square miles that followed his disappearance in afghanistan put the lives of his fellow soldiers at risk. >> the trial could begin as early as may, 2016, as late as october of next year. we're told by the military officials here. >> robert, what led to the charges and at least one of those charges is rather unique. >> it is. the misbehavior charge is unique. we haven't seen one of those since right after world war ii. now the desertion charge is less uncommon. we've seen about 1900 of those cases since 9/11 to the end of 2014, but the deal is, is the dismissed behavior charge, if that is actually what the trial
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eventually decides, that will put bowe bergdahl in prison for the rest of his life, del. >> robert ray for us, robert, thank you very much. >> stay with us. coming up in 10 minutes, we'll talk to a former jag officer about what to expect and the challenges bowe bergdahl's defense faces. retaking ramadi from isil, the army has surrounded it by all sides. the iraqi military has long said retaking that city is crucial in the fight against isil. clashes today between afghan forces and the taliban. [ explosions ] >> battles have been going on in the southern province. the taliban has almost completely captured a strategic district and on monday claimed responsibility for a suicide bombing that killed six u.s.
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troops. the u.s. is sending in special operations team to help with the fight. we have more from the pentagon. >> it was the deadliest day for u.s. troops in afghanistan since the official end of combat operations a year ago. it also comes as the pentagon reports the overall security situation has deteriorated, while the taliban attacks have become more frequent and effective. >> in afghanistan's southern province, fighting is intense as the hall ban claim success in capturing the police headquarters, governor's office and other government buildings, the governor there said it has left afghan soldiers and citizens begging for food. like the latest suicide attack that killed a half dozen u.s. troops outside bagram air base, it's just more evidence the taliban is back. kabul has been the focus of what the pentagon calls high profile attacks and counts the deadly motorcycle suicide bombing as
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the 29th such attack by the taliban in or around the afghan capital since the beginning of the year, a 27% increase over the same period last year. at the same time, the taliban has shown it can also take key terrain outside of its traditional strongholds, as it did back in late september and early october, when it briefly held the northern city of kunduz. >> the taliban's advances in some parts of the country, even if only temporary underscored that this is a tough fight and it's far from over. it's also a dynamic fight. >> defense secretary ash carter was in afghanistan last week to meet with his top commander there, general john campbell, who candidly admitted to reporters the fledgling afghan security forces are still struggling. >> the u.s. army's been around for 240 years, the afghan army for seven or eight years. we're trying to build an airplane while in fight. >> the report to congress
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offered a harsh assessment. it said: >> right now, they're very, very static. that's where they've taken casualties on checkpoints. >> one big factor, the u.s. is no longer providing airstrikes for offensive operations. one of the findings of the investigation into the mistaken bombing of the doctors without borders hospital in kunduz is that the mission never should have been authorized. u.s. air power is supposed to be used only to protect the u.s. troops on the ground or afghan troops in extreme distress. >> u.s. forces are helping afghan forces from the air, not as much as in the past, but that's part of the plan, which is to get to the point where afghans are able to provide their other than air support. >> the u.s. had been training
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afghan pilots to fly a ground assault plane so afghanistan can provide its own close air support. the first group of pilots is only completing training in georgia. the president said despite the rye civilians of the taliban, the afghan military has been able to retake anything lost. the taliban has becoming more effectived a finding and exploiting soft spots, leading to fragile security in some spots while in other areas there is a risk of further deterioration. jami macintyre. there are new calls for an independent investigation into the death of sandra bland. >> she is the woman who died in police custody over the summer, sparking worldwide questions over police actions. monday, a grand jury declined to indict anyone in that death. >> the prosecutor insisting the case is not over.
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john henry smith has more on the grand jury decision. >> for more than 10 hours, a grand jury in texas discussed evidence presented by special prosecutors in last summer's jailhouse death of sandra bland. she died three days after this traffic stop. >> the grand jury did not return an indictment. the grand jury also considered things that occurred at the jail and did not return an indictment. >> the coroner said bland hanged herself inside the waller county jail using trash bags. special prosecutor to really jordan would not reveal details of the meeting with the grand jury other than to say that his team carefully reviewed video of bland's time in jail. >> as far as what happened today, the details, of course, those are all secret. >> the biggest problem for me is the entire process. it's the secrecy of it all. >> 1100 miles away in chicago,
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bland's family continued to express doubt that the sandra they knew would kill herself and about the grand jury. >> we have absolutely no confidence in what we believe is a sham proceeding. we are desperately seeking very basic information to conduct our own independent investigation of what happened to sandy there and they are not only not providing it to us, but they are invoking this inherent trust in a system that we think is inherently flawed. >> everything they've asked for, we've done our best to giving it to them. the grand jury is committed to doing what's right and we are committed to doing what's right. >> the grand jury meets again in january to examine other aspects of sandra bland's traffic stop and arrest. >> the family is moving ahead with a civil lawsuit against the trooper, two jailers and the sheriff's office. a judge has set a 2017 trial date for that case.
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the family says all of them are responsible for sandra bland's death. >> you mentioned the officer who arrested bland. what's become of him? >> well, the trooper remains on administrative leave. that's where his bosses put him after the incident with sandra bland became national news. they found that the then 30-year-old violated a texas department of public safety's traffic stop and courtesy procedures in his dealings with misbland. schools in new hampshire back on track this morning back open, closed monday because of the threat. an ongoing investigation found no credible evidence of planned attack. he didn't say it was a hoax, either. over the weekend, the school superintendent saying the district received an email naming two schools and threatened to harm students and staff at those schools. the man charged with helping the couple behind the san bernardino attacks is still behind bars this morning. investigators say enrique marquez bought some of the weapons used in the deadly
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shooting. al jazeera's jennifer london has more from los angeles. >> federal prosecutors had argued that marquez poses a serious flight risk and although the judge did deny bail, he said he wasn't doing so because marquez does in fact pose a flight risk, but rather, he believes marquez poses a danger to the community. this based on one of the charges marquez faces, which is conspiring to commit action of terrorism. marquez did not enter a plea. he was present, he was wearing a white jump suit. he had his public defenders on either side of him at the defense table. his hands were handcuffed and he was wearing leg shackles. marquez is facing three federal charges, one of them again is conspiring to commit acts of terrorism. another charge is the illegal purchase of assault weapons. these are the long guns, the semiautomatic rifles used during the mass shooting in san bernardino and the third charge that marquez faces are
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allegations that he defrauded immigration officials by engaging in what they describe as a sham marriage to a member of sayed farook's family. he faces up to 35 years in prison. marquez's next court appearance will happen after the first of the year. >> jennifer london reporting. in a local fund for the victims of the san bernardino attacks has just surpassed $1 million in donations. the woman accused of mowing down people on the las vegas strip i also now charged with one counted of murder, 35 people hurt in that accident, as well. her 3-year-old daughter was in the car at the time. she told investigators she was recently homeless and living out of her car with her daughter. >> mar rains and high winds are expected in the san francisco bay area, follow a day of heavy rain leading to a few car crashes on monday. considering the multi-year
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drought california is facing, the weather is welcome in the bay area. >> others will be seeing rain today, some severe. >> there's a slight chance oklahoma, that expands even more, you were mentioned that rain in the bay area. this has spread into southern parts of california. i want to focus on what we have going on in the eastern side of the country, because this is impressive, as well. this is much more a spring time storm system, because of the combination of heat and severe weather that we'll see, even though today is the first day of winter. you can see this broad line of rain. the heaviest corridor for the next couple days will be anywhere from north carolina to the gulf coast, combining those three days. some places could go over six inches. we will see flooding on and off as we get across to that portion of the country, as we're watching this morning, we also have the fog back into texas
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from the gulf coast, some places down to quarter mile visibility. you can see as i kind of stop this through the day today, definitely continuing to wind up, and then we get a reinforcing shot from the next system in the west, bringing warm moisture to this. it's a couple of days before we really dry out of this system. now with all the heat that we're having, that also, this is a dynamic enough system that as i said, tomorrow, is when we really have the enhanced risk, places anywhere from portions of kentucky down into mississippi, alabama, watch for that. the whole region, wind, hail, possibly isolated tornadoes and this heat is feeing it, those 7e coastline, 70 said up the coastline by christmas eve, really impressive temperatures. >> thank you very much, nicole. >> when we come back, recognizing palestinian. >> the latest european nation giving its opinion on state hood. >> taking a stand against gun violence, the demonstrators who
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spend more than two years trying to find an end to mass shootings.
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when you're on hold, your business is on hold. that's why comcast business doesn't leave you there. when you call, a small business expert will answer you in about 30 seconds. no annoying hold music. just a real person, real fast. whenever you need them. so your business can get back to business. sounds like my ride's ready. don't get stuck on hold. reach an expert fast. comcast business. built for business. to discover the best shows friends together and movies with xfinity's winter watchlist. later on, we'll conspire ♪ ♪ as we dream by the fire ♪ a beautiful sight, we're happy tonight ♪
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♪ watching in a winter watchlist land, ♪ ♪ watching in a winter watchlist land! ♪ xfinity's winter watchlist. watch now with xfinity on demand- your home for the best entertainment this holiday season. >> in a little more than an hour, army sergeant bowe bergdahl goes before a military judge, formally arraigned on the beginning of his court martial proceedings on charges of desertion, misbehavior bro the enemy, caused of walking from his post in june of 2009 in having a. he was captured by the taliban and held for nearly five years before he was exchanged for five taliban detainees. lt. corn is a professor of law, once served as an army jag or
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judge advocate general and joins us from houston this morning. thanks for being with us. how strong is the case against bowe bergdahl? >> i think the case is very strong on the question of whether he committed these offenses, but the real case in this trial is going to focus on what the appropriate sentence should be once he's convicted, and that's going to be a much more complicated process, i think. >> bergdahl facing life in prison. how unusual is it, the prosecutor said they wanted no time or less time and yet he winds up facing life. >> well, it wasn't really the prosecutors who said that, it was what we call the investigating officer at the pretrial hearing, the investigating officer made a determination based on everything that he saw that a jail sentence for more than six months or so or any jail sentence would be inappropriate. it's up for the court martial to decide based on the evidence whether or not they agree with that or he deserves a punishment
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that includes a jail sentence. candidly, contrary to the statement at the top of the hour, i don't think there's any real possibility that he's going to face life in prison as a penalty. >> when we talk about military courts and i have covered them, they are confusing to say the very least. explain what a court martial actually is. >> court martial just stands for military court. the court martial process can be confusing at the beginning of the process and after the trial, but really, once the trial begins, and that's what's happening today, the arraignment is the formal beginning of the criminal trial, the criminal trial in a military court looks almost identical to the criminal trial in any civilian court. there's a judge, prosecutors, defense counsel, rules of evidence, rules of procedure, and if sergeant bergdahl decides he'll be tried by a jury, it will not be a jury of his pierce, but there will be a jury
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and jury selection process and deliberations and instructions, so anybody inside that courtroom would find what they see happening from now until the end of the trial to be very familiar with what they would expect in a civilian courtroom. >> donald trump saying bowe bergdahl is a traitor. senator john mccain, the head of the senate armed services committee saying he's going to hold hearings if bergdahl is not convicted. with that as a backdrop and the fact that you mentioned a jury, not a jury of his pierce, can there be a fair trial? >> i feel very strongly there can be a fair trial. i think it's unfortunate that there's this hyperbole surrounding his case. it's clear from the charge sheet he's not accused of being a traitor. there are crimes in the military code to deal with that type of misconduct and he was not charged with those offenses. he made a very bad decision, i believe and he needs to be held account only for it, but he's also an american citizen and soldier, he's presumed innocent
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and he's entitled to the process he's due before we legally condemn him. i think it's unfortunate that we have these statements being made by high level officials. having said that, i believe military jurors are capable of doing their duty. that's the business they're in, and when the military judge instructs them that they must decide the case based solely on the evidence and their conscience and select a penalty that is appropriate but not excessive, i'm confident that they'll be able to fulfill that obligation. >> professor, thanks for being with us. >> thank you. a state with some of the countries toughest gun laws may soon see them week understand. a special commission in new jersey appointed by governor chris christie is recommending changes, including making the permitting process easier. it only needs approval from new jersey's attorney general, not the democratic controlled
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legislature to become law. other americans want more and not fewer gun control regulations. a small group of them has been demonstrating outside the white house every week for years now. al jazeera's lisa stark first met them nearly two years ago. she went back this week to see if they've reached their goals. >> take a look at this protest against gun violence and now this one, what's the different? nearly two years' time but virtually no change in federal gun laws. >> i came out here and saw you almost two years ago. >> yes, you did and we welcome you back sadly, not personally, but we wish we didn't have to be here. >> this group sets up in front of the white house nearly every monday, ever six july, 2012 after the mass shooting at a colorado movie theater that left 12 dead. >> why are you still here? >> we're still here for our children and our grandchildren. >> the demonstrators call gun violence a public health
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emergency. they want what they call sensible gun laws, background checks for every sale, including those at gun shows, an assault weapons ban and mandatory gun safety training. there has been no movement on any of this in congress. just one day after this month's attack in san bernardino, california, the senate voted down two gun control bills, including one to stop those on the terrorist watch list from buying a weapon. >> change takes time, and particularly when something as entrenched as the gun culture is in our country, it takes time. >> it's a constitutional right. why shouldn't people be able to have their guns? >> they can have guns. i don't think anyone needs an ak47. >> public support for some of these tougher laws has slipped. a recent new york times news poll suggests just 44% of americans favor an assault weapons ban.
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50% are opposed. 15 years ago, 70% favored such a ban. the politically powerful national rifle association says americans have rejected tougher laws, telling aljazeera america: >> some who pass by here debate gun rights. others shake their heads at the time line of tragedies spread out on the pavement. >> it seems harder to get a driver's license than it does to get a gun. we need to look at that. >> even some gun enthusiasts say they are open to more regulation. 14-year-old mary catherine dixon lives in georgia and hunts quail, but says she understands the protestors' point. >> you use guns, you're comfortable with guns? >> yes, i am, but that is only my dad, before i could ever shoot a gun.
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i started shooting a couple of years back, i had to take the gun safety course. >> president obama has talked passionately about tougher gun laws. his administration says he's looking at ways to act on his own, but without congress, there may be little the president can do. lisa stark, al jazeera, washington. not on our property. >> the nation's largest mall trying to block protests over the shooting death of a black man. president obama calls for action to help millions of refugees. one country is already leading the charge in giving them a new life.
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>> at 9:30 - "america tonight" - top investigative reporting, uncovering new perspectives.
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>> everything that's happening here is illegal. >> then at 10:00 - it's "reports from around the world". >> let's take a closer look. >> antonio mora gives you a global view. >> this is a human rights crisis. >> and at 11:00 - "news wrap-up". clear... concise... complete. >> welcome back to your world this morning. time to take a look at today's top stories. fierce fighting between afghan forces and taliban in the southern hellman province, the u.s. and britain helping afghan government troops in that country's fight. monday, the taliban claimed responsibility for a suicide bombing that killed six u.s. troops. armyar gent bowe bergdahl faces the start of court martial proceedings connected with leaves his post in afghanistan in 2009. bergdahl is accused of desertion and endangering fellow soldiers.
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if convicted, he could face life in prison. >> the family of sandra bland demanding an independent investigation now that a grand jury in texas declined to charge anyone in connection with her jailhouse death. she was arrested last july and later found hanging inside that cell. no decision has been made yet on whether to charge the trooper seen her arresting her. the attorney for sandra bland's family, last hour on your world this morning, we asked him how surprised both he and the family were by monday's grand jury decision. >> first, you have to realize what it is that a grand jury does. grand jury frankly speaking doesn't even have a judge. the judge in a grand jury is the prosecutor. the prosecutor gets to make the decision what evidence is going to be submitted and what evidence is not going to be admitted. it's a secretive process. the testimony is sealed, and we're not even able to be allowed to be a part of that proceeding. so, the reality of it is, it's
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just a tool of the prosecutor so that they can go out and say we submitted evidence and unfortunately, that evidence came back suggesting that nobody should be indicted. now in a practice alex, we have spoken to the family and shared with them that we had serious concerns about how this proceeding was going to take place and unfortunately, our concerns came to fruition. >> many activists strongly believe that charges should be brought against the state trooper who arrested bland. a special prosecutor said last night that the case is not over. does that provide any hope for the family that someone may eventually be held accountable for bland's death? >> it really underscores the concern that we have. let's just be honest. since july, they've had videotape of what happened to sandra at that stop. that's the easiest part to look at, isn't it? yet they still need another two months to examine that video? that's staggering to us. >> going book to that day in july, bland's mother disputes accounts that her do your
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committed suicide. what does she think happened that day? >> well, the problem is that she doesn't know. we don't even have the preliminary police report that the officer himself offered. that's how little information they have come forth with. the reason that we've been asking for the basic information we've asked for is so that we can get answers for this family. we're coming up on the holidays now and they're still in a place where they can't say to themselves that they know what happened. >> lambert believes the decision to have the grand jury return in january is another attempt to delay the release of a texas ranger's investigation into bland's death. he will ask the federal judge to compel texas authorities to turn over the document. >> in maryland, prosecutors are going to have to wait until june to try a baltimore city police officer again in the death of freddie gray. the retrial of william porter now set to take place on june 13. the case against him ending last week in a hung jury.
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he was of the first officer tried in connection with gray's death. another goes on trial in january that. the trial in january involves the driver of that police van where prosecutors say that gray was fatally injured. a minnesota judge today will decide whether to allow protests at the mall of america on that we have this report. >> these protestors are being told by the country's largest mall not to demonstrate on their property wednesday, asking a minnesota judge to grant a temporary restraining order. the mall of america hopes to prevent a huge demonstration like the one last year where some stores had to shut down. the mall said that protest caused irreparable damage to mall of america saying as a private retailer it prohibits all forms of protest, demonstration and public debate. mall officials also want
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protestors to delete and take down any on line materials soliciting demonstrators to gather at the mall. black lives matter protestors say that's not going to happen. >> our country was built off of protests, protest is meant to make people uncomfortable. protest is not meant to be easy, but it's a struggle that we must go through to get justice here. >> protestors hope to draw attention to the death of jamar clark, a black man killed by police. they've been demonstrating for months, demanding video of the shooting be released. authorities say they can't, because it could interfere with ongoing state and federal investigations. an attorney for the mall says they don't take an issue with the message, but they don't want protests two days before christmas on a busy shopping day. >> we will take this one step at a time. if the judge issues an order retraining the demonstration and that order is violated, we'll deal with it.
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>> some protestors seem to be doubling down on their promise to go to the mall. they've been tweeting with the hash tag sue me too. >> the mall of america sent letters to the leaders of the movement, telling them not a gather at the mall tomorrow or they would face arrest. >> what's the arguments of the protestors? >> they say they have a constitutional right to protest. even if the mall were granted the right to prevent people from interesting it, they say the mall cannot tell them what to post or not post on social media. >> thanks for being with us this morning. republican presidential front runner donald trump is making headlines for his latest comments about hillary clinton. he used a derogatory yiddish term to insult here. in grand rapids, michigan, he mocked clinton for taking too long in the bathroom during
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saturdays democratic debate. he used an offensive yiddish term to describe her loss to then senator obama. >> she was going to beat obama. i don't know hood be worse. i don't know, how does it get worse? she was going to beat, she was favored to win and she got shlung. she lost. i mean she loft. >> the michigan event is not the first time trump used that phrase. in a 2011 interview with the washington post, trump used the vulgarities describing paul ryan in a loss in a special election. recognizing palestinian state hood, lawmakers are calling on their government to do the became. palestinian president abbas was there and talked to lawmakers after the vote. alexis tsipras has been trying to improve relations with israel while at the same time his party supports a palestinian state. palestinians are also raising money trying to rebuild homes recently demolished by israel.
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while the money is pouring in, some of upset at the palestinian authority, saying it's not doing more to help. we have more from the occupied west bank. >> these are the ruins of a home demolished by the israel military early they are month. the rest of the multi-story building which he shared with his extensive family was also badly damaged, making large parts uninhabitable. he is accused of shooting dead the settler couple in october. he's been in prison ever since. his wife says she doesn't know why she and her young son have been punished for a crime they didn't commit. >> it's unfair, but what can we do. my husband's in prison. he's probably worried sick about us. >> since october, there has been a wave of violence across the occupied territories. 120 palestinians and a dozen israelis have been killed. israel has cracked down hard on the violence by making mass
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arrests in palestinian areas and ordering the demolition of the homes of palestinians suspected of carrying out attacks. outraged by the demolitions, palestinians in the occupied west bank have started raising money to help affected families rebuild. more than $250,000 has been raised in a week. thousands of dollars worth of construction supplies have been donate and offers of labor have also poured in. many here say they were motivated to offer to help because they were angry at the palestinian authority not doing more. >> the idea was fueled because of a lack of official response, but a few days later, officials got involved. that really encouraged us. >> israel's policy of demolishing palestinian homes i also considered illegal under international law, and is described by human rights groups as nothing short of collective punishment. it's also not new. from 1967-2005, hundreds of homes in the occupied territories were demolished as a
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punitive measure. it ended in 2005 after senior military leaders said it didn't prevent violence and was legally questionable. >> prime minister benjamin netanyahu brought back housing demolitions as a policy around two years ago after the killing of teenaged israeli settlers. since then, dozens of palestinian houses have been destroyed and in the last two months alone, 10 have been reduced to rubble. still, that hasn't led to any meaningful slowdown in the violence, so if the policies intended to have a deterrent effect, it doesn't appear to be working. al jazeera, occupied west bank. president obama is calling for more action to end the global refugee crisis. the white house says the president will host a summit on refugees next year, but it isn't scheduled until september. this morning, the international organization for migration said more than a million people have fled to europe so far this year. the u.n. refugee chief saying people who reject syrian
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refugees are allies of extremists. >> those that reject syrian refugees and especially if they are muslim are the best allies of the propaganda and recruitment of extremist groups. >> nah that tough talk from the high commissioner of refugees coming from the security council meeting on the crisis. he said people are forgetting the refugees are the victims of terror and not the source of it. canada vowed to double the number of syrian refugees it takes in. immigration officials there say their resettlement program will take in 50,000 refugees in 2016. prime minister justin trudeau originally promised to resettle 25,000 syrians by the end of february. he was on hand to personally well cup the first arrivals earlier this month. the director of the council for canadian refugees, a watchdog group supports the resettlement of newcomers. thank you for joining us this
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morning. >> you're welcome, good to see you. >> janet, the long list of u.s. governors want to block syrian refugees but canada as recently as yesterday announced that the country hopes to double its intake of refugees. has there about that push back yet especially as it pertains to the vetting process? >> it is interesting to see the contrast in canada as opposed to the united states. from my experience, it seems that many americans are just as welcoming toward syrian refugees as canadians are, but maybe what extinguishes the country is there has been a strong political leadership from all levels, mayors of cities to eventual free meres to the new government, which has really made welcoming syrian refugees a priority target for the beginning of their mandate. in terms of vetting, the liberals have always been clear since before they formed the
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government that making sure that security was done properly was a necessary requirement, so they weren't skim ping on that side, but neither have they made it a barrier to bringing in syrian refugees. >> now many refugees began arriving to canada last week, more than 1400 have arrived since november, and as mentioned, 50,000 are expected by the end of next year. is your office prepared to handle an influx like that? >> i think it's important to remember that canada receives every year about a quarter of a million immigrants, and we have a long history of welcoming refugees as part of that movement to canada, so although obviously these are larger numbers and larger numbers particularly from one particular community, it's not as if this is something new to us, and we are a very wealthy country. i think also, if you compare with the numbers arriving in some european countries, not to
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mention even of course a country like lebanon, where they have a million syrian refugees in a much, much tinier country, so the numbers that canada's taking in really are in a general perspective quite small, so it's nothing to get too, too excited about. in fact, we've seen heard from some communities when they see how many people are coming to their communities, they're saying that's very little compared to what we can do. >> so your office is well prepared to handle the people coming in. what are some of the challenges that some of these refugees may face once they arrive? >> well, like any newcomers, they may face the challenges of learning new languages, french, i think that many of the syrians arriving won't necessarily already be able to speak in one of those languages, so language learning is a step we'll have to go through. there's also concern for some kids that may have been missing
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school, if they've been for a few years in jordan or lebanon or turkey, maybe they've not been able to go to school. some kids are having to go to work in order to earn small amounts of money to keep their family afloat, so there may be schooling to catch up on. there's also awareness that many people may have trauma that they have suffered and there may be post traumatic stress disorder that needs to be dealt with and in canada, we don't really have adequate mental health services either for canadians or for refugees that are arriving. >> all right, thank you so much for your expertise. appreciate it. >> thanks that for your interest. >> always fascinating to see how the two countries are handle the refugee crisis. a look inside the new building that makes more power than it uses. more people getting sick at chipotle.
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when you're on hold, your business is on hold. that's why comcast business doesn't leave you there. when you call, a small business expert will answer you in about 30 seconds. no annoying hold music. just a real person, real fast. whenever you need them.
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so your business can get back to business. sounds like my ride's ready. don't get stuck on hold. reach an expert fast. comcast business. built for business. a game during portland last night, that was his tooth flying out. he stashed it in his stock and kept on playing. >> he went on to score 18 points, leading the hawks to a win against the trailblazer. as for the tooth, he plans to visit the dentist today. you just got to keep on playing. >> play through the pain.
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chipotle is putting new standards in place. at least five people getting sick in kansas, north carolina and oklahoma. they were sickened by a different strain than the other cases. 53 people now affected by e-coli at the restaurants since october. it has been certified as one of eight living buildings in the world. the seattle bullet center that the data to prove it. little build to create more energy than it consumes. >> we are getting a tour starting right at the very top. take a look at this huge solar array on the roof here, 575 different panels. even in the gray and rainy pacific northwest, this is enough to generate 232,000-kilowatt hours of electricity per year. this building actually generates more juice than it uses, in fact
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60% more energy generated than used in a year's time. this is owned and operated, was designed as well by seattle's bullet foundation and they say it's the greenest building in the world. >> not just in energy, but in water, intoxics, in sewage treatment and all of the things we are trying to incorporate in one design. we have, i think fundamentally changed the way that buildings are viewed by architects, engineers and developers. >> the bottom part of the top to bottom tour is the ground floor. as you might expect, we find the parking garage, as you would in any commercial believe, but this garage is a little bit differently. no spaces for cars, 25 racks for bicycles. bicycles encouraged, cars discouraged. >> tonight, we're going to tell you a lot more about this place. we're going to take you inside the systems of this building, right inside the walls and straight through the floors and
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learn more about why this is called a living building. climate change is warming the world's lakes. that's cord to go research by nasa and the national science foundation. scientists used temperature readings from 235 lakes over 25 years. they found the lakes are warming at an average of two degrees fahrenheit every decade. that can damage the life in the water and around it. it can make those lakes unsafe for humans. the western u.s. getting hilt with wet weather including badly needed rain in california. good morning, again, nicole. >> good morning. as far south as camp pendleton, so some wet marines this morning, but it's much needed rain, as we head toward this portion of the country, you can see however south this is getting. it definitely slows things down, because not used to driving in this all the time, and the roads will be a little extra slick when you haven't had rain in a while. we've got all the snow that's
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been moving interior, so the higher elevations watch for that and this has brought wind, so high winds whipping that and making the visibility reduced, as well. we'll deal with this. the reason we're seeing snow, more snow in the last couple systems than we had a week or two ago is this portion of the country has at least gotten some of the cooler weather, spokane today, for example, at 31 degrees, not above freezing, clearly any participation would be the white stuff variety. what we have currently will also move into the midsection of the country and enhance all the rain that we're already seeing, so this is tomorrow's forecast, not only white areas of snow, but more rain and possibly even some severe weather just north of the gulf states, so that's something to watch, but if you like the snow for christmas, the west is now where we have pretty much the only possibility for that, because of all the warm weather elsewhere. >> all right. thank you very much, nicole.
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>> one small step for man, one big step for commercial space travel. >> we are talking about the successful landing that can change the way we go to the hemps. >> grabbing a cup of joe with the commander in chief, president obama gets behind the wheel for a popular, series.
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>> president obama is taking
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some time out to be funny, the president will be the first guest on the new season of jerry seinfeld's series, comedians in cars getting coffee. the pair circled the south lawn in a 1963 corvette stingray before chatting about life in the white house over coffee. newt season debuts december 30. >> not much of a drive. a new look at the declining number of bees across the u.s., the first national map of bee populations shows areas of red with bees at risk. the researchers blame pesticides and disease for the decline. it is called a major milestone for space travel. >> space x launched its rocket on monday, but it was the landing that got the most attention and made history, marking the first time a rocket launched a pay load into orbit and returned safely to earth. as adam may reports, space x is
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one of the few companies pushing the envelope on space travel. >> cheers of joy, space x celebrating a historic landing of its falcon rocket moments after launching it into space. it marks the first time space x, after three failed attempts successfully completed its mission to reuse a rocket for future use. that technology setting up new innovations to trim costs and change completely how mankind approaches space flight. >> a ship like no other, its place in history secured, the space shuttle pulls into port for the last time. >> when nasa landed a shuttle for the last time in 2011, its mission of deliver pay loads to space came to an historic close. left in its wake, a race to space between traditional air
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and defense contractors and self made billionaires. with the space shuttle grounded, nasa hired orbital a.t.k. for $1.9 billion to fly cargo mission to the international space station. its capsule arrived at the i.s.s.2 weeks ago, delivering thousands of pounds to equipment on a rocket purchased from lockheed martin and bowing. space x, founded by tesla's elon musk has several launches under its belt uses its own rockets. nasa is reportedly paying $2.6 billion for space x. to transport crews to the space station by 2017. in 2012, space x launched the first spacecraft in history to deliver cargo to the i.s.s.
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blue origin's new shepherd, backed by amazon's jeff besos got it right first. history was made last month when the rocket touched down on a landing pad in west texas. >> space x's vehicle went up throws to 400,000 feet. it actually went into space and came back down and landed under rocket propulsion. >> the idea is to make the new shepherd capsule named for alan shepherd available to companies and individuals so that space travel becomes almost second nature. >> say you took an airplane and only used it once and had to build a whole new one to take another flight. >> a proposition space x and brew origin will spend billions to perfect as it hopes what goes up comes back down. adam may, al jazeera. june that's it for us here in new york. >> coming up next from doha, the latest on that fight against the taliban in southern afghanistan.
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>> have a great day and a better morning. the battle for ramadi, a big offensive to retake the city from isil. hello, you're with al jazeera live from doha. also to come on the program: the greek parliament votes to recognize palestinian as a state in the presence of president abbas. a grim milestone, the number of refugees coming into europe has hit the 1 million mark.

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