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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  December 30, 2015 7:00am-9:01am EST

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only on al jazeera america. we are in the midst of a very historic and dangerous flooding event underwater, millions facing historic flooding in missouri, rains have stopped. the worst may not be over changing tactics and training. chicago's embattled mayor about to roll out new reforms for the police department spy net - capitol hill communications swept up as well and a food fight in louisiana. a decision over food stamps could leave tens of thousands hungry at the start of the new year.
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there are widespread evacuations in missouri this morning as hundreds of homes face the threat of flooding. the state governor is calling in the national guard as rivers and streams from swelled to unprecedented levels. welcome to "your world" this morning. i'm stephanie sy i'm del walters. al jazeera's correspondent is live in valley park missouri. how prepared is the state to handle the flooding? >> by all accounts, del, as well as can be expected. they are used to flooding in the area. take a look. it's a major intersection that would be busy off internet 34. you see the water, this is the river that has flown over the banks. we see a highway flown over. as high as it looks now, and we are guessing 5-6 feet. it's getting higher.
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more by four feet, cresting by tomorrow. there's the threats and the waters still rising. >> along the rising windows, neighbours are lining up with sandbags. some suburbs submerged. >> we need help. we really need help. we are saving my house now. >> reporter: hundreds of roads are closed across the state. the missouri department of the transportation warns a section of interstate 44, last flooding in 1982, may be under water today. >> i understand there's other ways around not using the interstate, but a lot of those routes are blocked. >> flooding knocked out a sewage plant and is threatening another, and a coast guard is closing an area. a severe system is blamed for more than a dozen deaths, dozens dying in outbreaks ever weather over the past few weeks. many after their cars were swept
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away. the missouri governor says the mississippi river is expect to reach high levels. he is about to call in the national guard. >> missouri is in the midst of an historic and dangerous flooding event. >> at least nine feet - be safe out there. >> reporter: and back out live you can see the one-way sign and how high the water is. interstate 44, parts of which are closed. in fact, a lot of this is interesting, because so many of the smaller creeks west of here started to fill out quickly in the last few days, when they filled up. it filled up bigger rivers like that west of us, feeding into the maromac which we are at now, and it feeds into the mississippi. it's adding up. at this moment, last check. at least 10 people in missouri died from the flooding and eight
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in illinois. >> looking at your live shot, it appears that you are very cold. how cold is it, and what about the reports that foreign soldiers are among the dead. what can you tell us? >> it's cold. it's about 25 degrees right now. the good news is no rain at the moment. as far as the others dead - you mentioned four international foreign soldiers. yes, we had that concerned that a fifth died. they found a fifth body. what happened was it happened west of here in palaski county. five foreign soldiers in a car swept away along a creek. that's how much the water is rising. this happened on a creek. they were swept away on december 26th. they were training with american soldiers at a nearby fort, fort lennon wood. that happens, the soldiers train with the americans, they were swept away part of 10 people killed in the flooding
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as you can see it's wet and cold thank goodness the rain stopped falling. the region is under threat. i want to bring in meteorologist kevin corriveau on this. you warned about this yesterday. >> that's right. we have seen five to six days of rain, all that water standing in the area, making its way downstream and funnelling in the area. we saw about 12 inches of rain at some of the peaks across missouri, iowa and illinois. and down to arkansas, down towards most of the states. really, most have seen flooding of the majority of the rain has been dumped. it's cold, we have snow to the north of where he is now. it's not much of a factor. it is for people that are losing their homes, it's cold out there. the temperatures will stay cold. let's talk about how much water has fallen in relation to what they would have this time of year. i want to go to st. louis, 440%
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above the formal average for december. they would get 2.5 inches of rain. they see 11.5 inches of rain. demoyne, talking 393%. springfield, 276% above average, and these are the rivers that are training into the mississippi. we talk about the missouri, the merry mack and the ohio. what will happen is all the water makes its way downstream, and the rivers will be cresting at different times as they go through the next several days, and into next week as well. very, very serious. right now, these are all of the flood warnings that are in effect. where you see the reds, they are flash flood. some will expire, but the areas of green are indefinite. no expiration time later today - chicago's mayor will reveal major changes
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to the chicago police department, following a series of shooting deaths at the hands ever police officers themselves. al jazeera's correspondent has our story. [ chanting ] >> reporter: under scrutiny after a series of fatal police shootings, mayor rahm emanuel and interim superintendent are expected to announce a major overhaul of how officers respond to incidents, and how they use force. according to reports, every on-duty officer who responds to calls for service will be equipped with a taser and trained to use it by june of next year. there'll be protests aimed at the police department following the release of dash cam. of a white officer shooting a black 17-year-old 16 times. the tuesday, the police officer pleaded not guilty to murdering la can mcdonald. the police commissioner has stepped down, and there has been demand for the mayors
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resignation. >> in our city and others, the use of guns creates an environment where people create problems, shooting first, asking questions later. part of this is about poverty, symptoms of segregate ght the community, the way they have been all over the country. chicago is the poster child. the police department was criticized for that after a 19-year-old was attacked. police say jones was shot accidentally, a former officer and member of the police review says police officers need more options and tasers should be mandatory. >> as far as i'm concerned, if you did not have a taser, you should not a responded to the incident. >> as pressure grows on chicago's mayor rahm emanuel, he issued a statement saying "for far to loaning chicago faced
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many incidents where officers shot and killed unarmed people. we need a new reality", the police department will replace with tasers. >> what about training for de-escalating situations, that was is a common force, deadly force. >> cit, crisis intervention training, they identify someone in crisis and try to de-escalate the situation. only about 15% of the police force is trained in that. they plan on more sessions a lot were warned. >> in cleveland, two police officers involved in the fatal shooting of the tamir rice faces an administrative review, a day after the grand jury decided not to indict officers on criminal charges. al jazeera's roxana saberi spoke to the rice family attorney. >> reporter: only a few dozen people protested in down down
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cleveland on tuesday. the message was clear. >> i'm out here today because i'm concerned and upset because justice was not done. >> justice for 12-year-old tamir rice, shot to death by the police officer. the boy was carrying a pellet gun looking like a pistol. on monday local prosecutor timothy mcginty said a grand jury decided no to indict timothy loehmann, or his partner, driving the car. >> simply put, in this perfect storm of human area, mistake and miscommunication by all involved, the mistake did not indicate criminal conduct by police. >> reporter: rice's family said mcginty should have stepped aside. >> he said that he made a recommendation to the grand jury not to charge. how he can do that when the video shows what it shows beyond
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the rice family compensation protestors are not surprised. >> race was a problem in america. no one wants to talk about it. >> reporter: how is it in cleveland? >> cleveland may be the number one. >> it may be a long way to go. it's an issue america has to deal with. >> the tamir rice case kat ate faulted cleveland into the national debate about how police officers treated african-americans, following the deaths of michael brown in ferguson, missouri, and eric garner in staten island in new york. there's a cacial analyst, a bias, there's a trend. police officer involved shootings of african-americans, at a news conference on tuesday, we asked the police chief whether the racial bias played a role in the case. >> there's bias in the reporting, there's bias in the criminal justice system and the
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post office. whether that played a role in the decision, i don't know. you'll have to talk to the members of the grand jury and the prosecutor's office. >> do you think it plays a role in the police department. >> everyone has a bias. >> the police department and the city are launching its own investigation reverend william meyers of the new mt zion calls it not a tragedy, but a trechry. >> what the prosecutor did over an entire year, we are not stunned by this. this was expected. he has demonstrated all along with his cherry-picking that his intent was to protect the police. and that's - that's what happened. he was not on the side of the
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victim. which is supposed to be the role of the prosecutor. he went into that uri, and set things up. and used the grand jury was something to hide behind, where he told them, which was what he intended all along that he did not want an indict: reverend myers is one of the several religious leaders who called on the prosecutor to step down. >> the affluent za team and his mother are expected to return to the states. ethan and his mother are held in mexico. a cell phone call to domino's pizza led to his arrest. police have been looking for him since missing an appointment. the get away was well planned. >> what we expected, they planned to disappear, that they had something that was almost akin to a going away party. >> we proceed with a juvenile
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sentence, his maximum sentence he receives is four months of confinement. that, in my opinion, is not a sufficient punishment for the taking of four lives. couch is serving 10 years proation for killing those four people. involving a 2013 drunk-driving crash. his lawyer said he shouldn't be held responsible because his parents didn't teach him right from wrong a search continues for prisoners released by mistake. one inmate is accused of killing his girlfriend in a car crash. allen schauffler reports from seattle. >> reporter: 3200, that's how many washington state inmates were let out of prison early since 2002, due to a long-standing software glitch. robert jackson was one of them ex he got out this august and should have been held since december. he faces vehicular homicide
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charges for an accident in november that killed his girlfriend lindsay hill. >> how do you think that family is experiencing trust in the state of washington system. >> victim's advocate lou cox calls it maddening. the boss apologised saying nothing i can say will bring back miz hill. i deeply regret that this happened. >> we don't want to see apologies, right now all we get is apologies. >> what is frustrating for cox and others is this is not a new problem. the release date error was discovered in 2012, the family of a victim of curtis robbin son, alerted the department of corrections that he had gotten out early, a department spokesman said a software fix was planned but delayed 16 separate times, there has been no explanation why. >> this problem was allowed to
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continue to exist for 13 years, is deeply disappointing. it is totally unacceptable. >> the government hired outside investigators to look into what went so wrong for so long, and the doc is promising the software error will be corrected by january 7th. corrections officials continue to work to find the offenders released by mistake. the top u.s. commander in afghanistan wants to keep u.s. troops there longer. army general john campbell told u.s.a. today he wants to put off a planned production for as long as possible. the counter force of 9800 was scheduled to be cut in half. that was a delay from a plan to withdraw all troops by the end of next year. >> u.s. officials say it is a major victory in the fight against i.s.i.l. tuesday, the pentagon announcing it killed 10 leaders, including a person linked to attacks in
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paris. iraqi forces grove fighters out of the center. jamie mcintyre has more from the pentagon. >> reporter: the u.s. says one of the i.s.i.l. leaders killed was linked to the paris attack that killed 130 people and for which i.s.i.l. claimed responsibility. the pentagon says this man, 27-year-old killed in a u.s. drone strike in syria has been in direct contact with this man. 28-year-old abdel ham eyed abood, killed in a police raid in a suburb, said to be the leader of a cell. at least three of the 10 killed by the u.s. drones and coalition jets were said to be connected for the paris attacks. these are individuals who are specifically working to strike the west. they want to strike in europe,
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in our homeland. it's important that team understand that as long as those external attack planners are operating the united states military will hunt and kill them the pentagon says in a 3-week period this month, coalition air strikes based on u.s. intelligence targeted 10 separate i.s.i.l. operatives, killing two on december 7th, one on theleth, two on the 9th, five more on 10th, 12th, 26th and 27th. >> we are striking at the head of snake, like i said. we haven't severed the head of the snake. we have to be clear about that. there's fighting to do. >> reporter: the pentagon released a kill list, and drones showing iraqi forces raising a flag over a government compound. the pentagon told a different story, showing in green parts
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that have been secured, indicating a quarter of the city needs to be cleared of remnants of i.s.i.l. fighters turkish police say they have foiled a new year's eve attack plot. police arrested two suspected i.s.i.l. fighters believed to plan attacks during new year's eve celebrations. they were reporting to detonate suicide best at two locations. a british jury convicted a his bapd and wife. the 25-year-old and his 24-year-old partner wanted to mark the anniversary of the 2005 attacks. authorities say they used twitter to ask for advice on whether to attack a shopping center or the london subway system under dispal can't ... the nts accused of -- n.s.a.
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accused of sweeping up some conversations of some americans and cubans - how summer being helped to get to the united states.
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the u.s. is accusing iran of firing a missile close to a u.s. aircraft carriers, coming within 1500 yards of the u.s.s. "harry truman." it was part of a test. it was not directed at the ship, but the pentagon is calling the exercise provocative and unsafe the obama administration is making plans to transfer 17 guantanamo bay prisoners in the coming weeks. sources telling al jazeera defense secretary ash carter
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noitifying congress as required by law. it's not clear which detainees would be travelled. if it happens, 90 men will remain. >> raul castro warns the government to be ready for tough times, telling the assembly to accept part of the growth in 2015. it is due to a drop in aid to venezuela. the economic downturn comes despite improved relations good news for thousands of cuban migrants stranded in central america. several agreed to let them continue on their journey to the united states. we have the details. around 8,000 cuban migrants have been stranded at the camp in costa rica for more that a month. nicaragua is refusing to let them dros their territory, they are trying to get to the united states. several held talks in guatemala on how to resolve the crisis. they agreed that the cubans will
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be bussed through. >> translation: guatemala expressed two guarantees, the first to mexico, to allow them to pass through the territory, and the second was not to let them cross. >> the journey has been long and complicated. many flew, not requiring them to have visas, they travelled north. they were stopped in nicaragua, a close ally of kooub jnls, any cuban that makes it on to u.s. soil is allowed to apply for residency. with improving relations, many worry that that may change. >> it's important for the united states and kusha to work together. they are at the center of the issue, along with ecuador, allowing these people to enter the county the cubans are expected to
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restart thart journey next week -- their journey next week. >> north korean officials responsible for handling the contentious relationship has died. the 73-year-old was killed in a car dent. he was a close confidante of the leader. >> you might call it a snap decision. why tens of thousands in louisiana are days away from losing food stamps. also... >> i'm daniel lack in saskatchewan. this is manny tabbo lake. it's called the dead sea because the waters are assaultee. i'll report on how salt lakes like this one can help the country hope with climate change.
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>> we're following stories of people who have died in the desert. >> the borderland marathon. >> no one's prepared for this journey. >> experience al jazeera america's critically acclaimed, original series from the beginning. >> experiencing it has changed me completely. >> follow the journey as six americans face the immigration debate up close and personal. >> it's heartbreaking. >> i'm the enemy. >> i'm really pissed off. >> all of these people shouldn't be dead. >> it's insane.
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chicago's mayor rahm emanuel expected to require every officer that answers calls to carry a taser, this after a series of shooting deaths at the hands of officers. the news can bring in tough times for people in the state of louisiana. >> the state threw out a program that let's low income people with children get food stamps even if they are not looking for a job. jonathan martin has the story. since losing her job at a new orleans community center a year ago, it's, tough finding
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steady work. >> it's not like i haven't been working. even if i have a volunteer at a center, different places that i do try to go in and help straighten up or clean bathrooms out, or whatever the case may be. >> she's worried that if she doesn't have a job by friday, the $194 in federal food stamp benefits she gets every month could be cut off. >> why should i have to fight for food right now? why should i have to fight for -- to drink water? >> more than 30,000 people in louisiana are in the same situation. they have until january 1 to find employment or risk losing food stamps. for years, states with higher than average unemployment have been granted a federal waiver, allowing low income adults without children to receive food stamps, even if they are not looking for a job. nearly 30 states still have the wafer in place but despite one
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of the highest unemployment rates in the nation. outgoing governor bobby jindal decided not to renew it for louisiana. he said the best way to break the cycle of poverty is for individuals to get a job and get off government assistance. >> it's not just trying to get on a program, no, you still out looking for work. what we do receive is nothing to linger through the month. >> some called the governor's mood mean spirited considering it is a federal benefit that doesn't affect the state budget. >> the problem is not that people don't want to work, the jobs aren't there, the job training is not there. we should get people connected to job training, not taking away food. >> louisiana's governor elect agrees and has all right sent a letter to the u.s. department of agriculture asking that the food stamp waiver be reinstated. >> i will get up every day
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fighting. >> edwards doesn't take office until january 11 and the benefits are set to expire on january 1. davis plans to visit a food bank this week in case her food stamps are cut off. at the same time, she tells us, she'll be more aggressive in looking for work. jonathan martin, al jazeera, new orleans. >> this morning, a smaller group of candidates is now in the running for the republican presidential nomination. former new york governor pataki dropped out tuesday. he rarely topped 1%. he struck a conciliatory tone announcing the decision in an on line video. >> i'm confident we can elect the right person, someone who will bring us together and who understands that politicians including the president must be the people's servant and not their master. >> he is the fourth current or former governor to drop out of the race before a single vote
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has been cast. there are new accusations today over the n.s.a. spying programs. the wall street journal reporting the n.s.a. continued to eavesdrop on benjamin netanyahu even after the white house said it would stop spying on friendly heads of state. it included private conversations with members of congress and american jewish groups, also communications between netanyahu and aids about the iranian nuclear deal. an investigative reporter and senior correspondent for military and intelligence affairs for israel's largest newspaper joins us live from berlin. thank you for being with us. were there legitimate grounds for the n.s.a. to believe that israel would try and you askedle that deal even if it meant angering the white house? well del, you said before that the white house agreed or promised that it would seize any
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kind of legal or tapping or surveillance over friendly heads of state and presumably, they chose or they tagged netanyahu to be unfriendly. benjamin netanyahu launched a word campaign against the iranian deal, which he perceived as a great national security threat to israel, and he was not ashamed. much of that was done above the table, this some have it behind the table. i would say that six israeli intelligence discovered that the united states is conducting political negotiations with iran back in early 2013 in openly man, i think there was a breach of confidence between the two sides and both sides were trying to obtain as much information as possible, what is the nature of the deal and the americans, as
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was reported this morning by the wall street journal were trying to understand what israel is plotting against them in trying to recruit congress, senate, the jewish law to do whatever they can to damage the deal and convince as many congressmen as possible to vote against it. >> is it your opinion that this was a two way street, in other words that israel was conducting the same type of spying or surveillance on the united states, what the united states was doing on israel? >> i spoke with many israeli sources about the information that israeli intelligence obtained about the talks between iran and the p5 plus one, including the united states delegate dealing with iran throughout the last two years. there was much information about it. some of it i've already published.
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they have assured me that none of that information came from direct surveillance over u.s. delegates, but it came from other channels, meaning spying on other people and that spying, that surveillance, electronic bugging led to information that involved america, as well. whether it's true, i don't know, the sources of course have their own agenda, but i would say that to read the wall street journal research, it's not surprising. i think that from the point of view of president obama and everybody could see that he saw netanyahu's attempt to damage the deal, to stop it as something of a threat to his own campaign, to what he sees at national security interests of the united states. it is clear that the united
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states in spite of snowden did not stop its surveillance even of the friendly countries and the second, that there's a deep wrist and huge mistrust between the two nations and the two leaders. i think that both leaders have expressed their antagonism towards each other, that the intelligence communities of both countries understood what they were saying in trying to bring as much information about their adversary as possible. >> there are reports that isil is now targeting israel and that groups in the sinai are now pledging allegiance to the islamic tate. how real is that threat and can
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the u.s. and israel afford to be at adds when isil is knocking on the back doors of both countries? >> isis has now those in the sinai province threatening to attack israel. it had attacked israel and israel tourists in sinai many times before. we just heard a new statement from abu bakr al-baghdadi threatening to strike israel. we had seen that al-qaeda in the past 15 years was quite hesitant before attacking israel, because israel is so trained to counter terrorism. what i think would happen is that if they would do anything either from the southern border or the northern border of israel, israel would pay less
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respect to the sovereignty of egypt or lebanon or sir yes and react aggressively to demonstrate to isis that it would not tolerate any kind of terroristic activity against its citizens. >> thank you very much. all this week, we are looking back at the important stories of 2015 and one is the deal to curb iran's nuclear program. ali very well she traveled to iran. i asked him what the agreement means for that country. >> iran is a very controlled environment, so we had a government handler with us. even though i spoke to average people, i probably didn't get as full a story if they thought they could speak to me privately and anonymously and of course that can't be done. while they were not ready to
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point fingers at their own government for the problems, the economic problems they were having, they were all exhausted by it. they wanted the sanctions gone. they didn't want talk of war with the united states and israel. they want to be able to buy things at the same price that people in the rest of the world buy things. they want to be able to move money around the world which they can't do, because they are not on the swift system. they wanted tourists to be able to come in freely and use their credit cards. they wanted to sell their wears. iran was like turkey today, a big economy with manufacturing and things like that. it's 80 million people. they wanted to be welcomed back into the world fold and they didn't really care how they got there. most people seemed in favor of cutting a deal just so that they could move on. >> it's almost like you're saying they didn't care about the details, they had more pragmatic concerns. what part of society was most affected by the sanctions? >> the middle class. it's a society where the middle
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class and upper class earn well. they want cars and i phones, but everything has to be smuggled in. you have the working class that doesn't get to move up the socioeconomic ladder. a small percentage of the women work but half of the students in universities are women, half the graduates are women. there are all sorts of things not moving forward in iran because of the fact that they've had these sanctions. >> was there optimism there that the deal would lead to a greater role for iran on a global stage, among any of the quarters? >> remember that iran is very interested in being a big regional player. right? that's their priority. they have influence in yemen, in iraq, in syria, in lebanon, and with hezbollah in palestine. their issue is that they think of themselves as the vatican or shia islam. they felt the biggest issue facing the world or at least
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this is the message that officials gave me that they want the west to hear is they think isil is a threat. isil is a sunni group and in many cases targeted shia. iran said if you bring us into the world fold, we are willing to help in this fight against isil. the gulf states are less interested in that. they do not want armed iranian troops on the ground. there already are, militias in syria and iraq with iranian backing but that's not a deal the gulf states and sunni arab world is interested in the u.s. cutting. they made that point. if up let us loose on isil, we'll help you take care of the problem. >> isn't that part of the problem in syria, not only the proxies, but you have iran playing out in syria and is the u.s. caught in the middle of that because it has struck the deal with iran on the nuclear
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issue? >> and the u.s. wants bashar al assad removed. that's at odds with what the iranians think. when you're in iran, when there is an anti american and anti israeli settlement, in their minds, in the minds of iranians, saudi arabia is the big threat. that's the one that you're not supposed to like. the regional rivalry in and around iran is very serious. the west seems to be preoccupied by the fact that iran has anti-israel sentiments. that's secondary or tertiary to their concerns about america as a whole and saudi arabia in terms of the power in the middle east. >> when it comes to the nuclear deal, we are seeing components of that deal and iran living up to those, the sanctions regime will eventually follow and that will be dismantled. is that what we should look forward to in the new year. >> i think you will have to wait until probably the later part of the presidential election or after the election, because that is going to be a very big point. as you know, most of the
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republican candidates have said we're going to rip up the deal. they've softened saying we're going to renegotiate the deal. if you see a republican candidate gaining steam or on the democratic candidate as we get closer to the election, you're going to see iran saying we're going to wait and see what happens, because we are not going to comply with the americans are just going to rip it up after a new president is elected. >> you are saying even though this was negotiated by five other nations in addition to the u.s. and effectively international law, it is still not a done deal. >> this is the reality of america still being the power that it is. if america wants to wreck this deal, it can. ultimately, so can iran. while this is called p5 plus one and approved by the united nations and with five other countries, in the end, america and iran have to stick with this deal and i think we're probably the better part of a year away from seeing if that actually happens. >> ali very well she, thanks
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much. >> iran has fulfilled a major parent of its obligation, to ship out most of its enriched uranium. >> we'll talk with joke ward about the issue of climate change. extreme weather events often associated with climate change and we are seeing record flooding along the mississippi this morning. parts of the northeast face a threat of ice. let's bring in kevin corriveau for more. >> that's in the wake of the big snowstorm that went through that particular area but is ended. we are looking at ice across the region. i'll try to get you in your new year's eve forecast, as well. let's talk about what's happening to the north. not a lot on the radar map in the wake of what we saw with the snow. first i want to show you what that snow looked like in vermont, where they saw up to six inches of know. that was the first snowfall for the year, so the ski resorts really needed the snow. most of them had been closed, relying on just man made snow across that area. temperatures right now look like this. we are seeing cooler
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temperatures to new england, portland maine at 18 degrees, new york at 41. this is where the ice threat is right now, just off the lake, freezing rain threat until 10:0p towards parts of massachusetts and new hampshire. it's going to be later today and overnight until about 3:00 a.m. so, what are we going to have for new year's eve for tomorrow night? for some of you, you will be quite happy for new york, partly cloudy conditions at 42 degrees, so not too bad, much better than last year. for the peach drop in atlanta, 49 and partly cloudy. unfortunately, if you are going to be going to new orleans for new year's eve, we are looking at a very rainy evening and the temperature there is going to be about 55 degrees. next hour, we're going to head to the west coast. i'll show you what we can expect in seattle and san francisco. >> kevin thank you very much. rising carbon levels in the earth's atmosphere has scientists looking oh for ways to cut emissions. there is a natural process in
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canada soaking up the carbon from the air. we have more. >> they call this the dead sea of canada, little man too lake. it's so salty only micro croppic creatures can live in it. evaporation makes it saltier. farmers know not to plant crops on the shore, but there is a spa like the real dead sea and it's been here for decades. >> in the 1920's and 1930's, people came from all over to visit and they came and healed themselves in the water, put the mud on themselves for exfoliants and it was very much a health place. >> salt water lakes are well known in this part of the world. aside from this one where tourism and taking the waters has been popular for decades, they are seen as a nuisance. new research shows a lake like this with saline waters may be performing a very valuable
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service. researchers at the university say that such alkaline lakes and there are hundreds here absorb atmospheric carbon and store it in the mud as a stable element. up to a third of the vast carbon dioxide, it's an entirely natural process. >> likes have been underappreciate in the carbon budget, just because total surface area relative to oceans and forests, they're not home, but the rates as which they are protesting carbon is you're never more than a few you're never more than a few minutes away from a check of faster than say the open ocean. >> as oceans become more acidic, they so that up less carbon. these bodies of water are crucial. the caspian sea, the largest salty lake in the world has similar chemistry. environmental activists say this is exactly the kind of science
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that should transform our approach to the world's carbon problem. >> we need good applied science to figure out how we actually achieve this. if we can use the applied science to set out what we need to achieve, then we can hand over to the economists and the social scientists to figure out the detail of how we get there. >> so far, governments aren't doing much with this research but excitement is building over how it might be applied. if canada ever draws up a plan to deal with emissions and atmospheric carbon. the salt lakes of the north american prairied could just be part of it. al jazeera. that rare sight in the waters off tokyo, a giant quit spotted on christmas eve is big, 12 feet long. they can be 60 feet long. they are normally found swimming in the deep sea, not floating in a japanese bay. this is the first sighting of a
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giant skid this season. >> that is a lot of calamari. we'll take a look at the multi-billion dollars price tags for the next olympic games.
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rio de janeiro will be in the global spotlight when the city hosts the summer olympics. rio faces challenges from pollution to security concerns.
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>> in a city famous for its beaches and carnival, having a good time is a way of life. rio de janeiro also has experienced hosting an international sporting event. it hosted world cup soccer matches in 2014. ed a to that the pride of making history. this is the first olympic games to be held in south america. >> it's going to be wonderful, and rio is going to well come them with open arms. >> more than half of the rio 2016 budget comes from private money. the city is taking full advantage of using existing venues from previous sporting events like the world cup. the city said construction is on time and on budget, unlike the world cup when some stadiums were finished only days before the games began. >> there are two kinds of olympics, games that take the benefits out of the city and the city that takes the benefits out
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of the games. we're taking full advantage of having the olympics in rio. >> in 2015, the city held 20 test events, including the triathlon. environmentalists are raising concerns about the site to hold the sailing competitions. here at the bay, athletes may have to compete smelling raw sewage and seeing garbage floating by their boats. the city promised they would clean up the bay significantly but officials admit their efforts may not come close to satisfying the athletes. the sailing events may have to be held elsewhere. on the periphery of the olympic park, memories and protest graffiti are what remain of a neighborhood bulldozed to make access into the area. maria initially refused to leave, even though the city offered her a flat and money. now that most of the 344 families who used to live here
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of taken the buyouts, she's decided to move, but feels a sense of loss. >> it's not that anyone is against the olympics. it's that they destroy people here, the community, everything. >> another concern is drug gangs and spillover of the violence inside the city. city officials say things were calm during the world you cup and they expect the same with rio 2016. if you're thinking about going to the biggest sporting event on the planet, 7.5 million tickets are available. more than half cost $30 or less. rio de janeiro, brazil. there was a special baseball game in israel last night in memory of an american teen who died in an attack last month. the three brothers of ezra schwartz threw out the first pitch. he was killed with two others in november when a palestinian drove his vehicle into a group of pedestrians in the west bank. he was spending a year as a volunteer in israel before
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beginning college. we know the hoverboard has been banned in many places, but a philippine priest did not know his church was one. he rode this hoverboard while singing christmas eve mass. he went up and down the aisles to applause from the congregation, even did turns on the self bouncing scooter. the diocese was not amused saying the wrist demand the utmost respect. the priest apologized. he will be out for sometime reflecting on his actions. the kindness call movement, ordinary citizens hanging clothes on walls that they dough night to the homeless during ires cold winter. one art curator compares it to robin hood. >> it's like a contemporary robin hood, but the difference of robin hood and the kindness wall is not to steal from the
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rich and give it to the poor, but put it there if you don't need it and take it from there if you need it. >> there's about 15,000, a third of them are women. ahead in our next hour, people along the mississippi river are being told to move to higher ground ahead of major flooding. we are live in missouri, one of the hasheddest hit states. the mayor of chicago says he will announce plans to overhaul the chicago p.d. after more deaths and police shootings in that city. >> we are back in two minutes with more. stay with us with us >> we're the eyes and the ears here in the arctic, we wanna be prepared. >> as the ice recedes and potential danger builds, can science keep a step ahead of disaster? >> we can't go back if we have a significant accident. the oil will make its way into the ice. >> techknow's team of experts
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show you how the miracles of science... >> this is what innovation looks like. >> can affect and surprise us. >> i feel like we're making an impact. >> let's do it. >> techknow - where technology meets humanity.
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historic flooding, missouri governor warns residents to head to higher ground as swollen rivers rise. the mayor of chicago to announce major reforms in the heavily criticized police department. crews in china locate miners trapped underground for days. the year of climate change, rising temperatures, more extreme weather making the issue one of the most talked about in 2015.
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good morning, welcome, i'm del walters. i'm stephanie sy. more than 18 million americans in 13 states are under flood warnings today and the biggest focus this morning is on missouri. >> the governor calling in the national guard as the torrential rains continue to fall. the rivers are swollen, the streams rising to unprecedented levels. >> vale park missouri west of st. louis, how is it looking there where you are? >> the pictures really speak for themselves. you can see we're at the mir mack river, just west of st. lo.
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the nearby river which feeds into the miramac i guess now at 36 feet. normally, the flood stage there is 15 feet, so the burbas river is flowing into the miramac and creating this huge which of water. as high as it is now, six feet here, it is expected to go higher above four feet where it stands right now use that, so the waters and threat are both still rising. >> along the rising rivers, neighbors are lining up with sandbags. gas stations and restaurants almost completely submerged. >> the water's come up really fast. >> we still need help. we really need help. we're saving my housing right now. >> hundreds of roads are closed across the state. the missouri department of traps portation warns that a section of i-44 that last flooded in 1982 may be underwater today. >> i understand there's other ways around not using interstate, but a lot of those routes are blocked right now, as
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well. >> flooding has already knocked out one sewage plant and threatening another. the coast guard closed a five-mile stretch of the mississippi river to traffic. the severe storm system behind these floodwaters is blamed for more than a dozen deaths. dozens more have died in outbreaks of severe weather over the past two weeks. many after their cars were swept away. missouri's governor said the mississippi river is expected to reach its highest level ever recorded. he is activating the national guard and warning residents it's likely to get worse before it gets better. >> it's clear that missouri is in the midst of a very historic and dangerous flooding event. >> at least nine feet of water or more coming. be safe out there. >> at last check, it appears there are 13 detectives in missouri from the flooding since it started a few days ago, about eight in illinois. among the deaths here in missouri, including five foreign
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soldiers. they train with americans at a base here called fort leonard wood. they were swept away in a car, all five of them. we don't know their names or nationalities, but that happened on december 26. the fifth body of those was found just over the last 24 hours, so certainly the threat exists still. >> we can see the waters literally rising from the last hour with that that one sign before you was not submerged and now we are literally starting to see it become so. what do we know about the levees holding back the water from flooding communities? >> in missouri, they say they are looking now at 19 what they call vulnerable levees, fearful they will overspill their banks especially one right across the border in illinois. all this water is moving towards the east into st. louis. in fact, the governor has said that's the real focus today,
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because that's where the threat is growing. the levees have not breached yet, we're told, but if they dew, that could be real problems, because this i guess the mississippi river we're talking about. new orleans, you are next. it's all heading that way. >> andy with that update from vale park, missouri, that you know. >> for the latest on the flooding, we turn to kevin corriveau. when you have flooding and you have freezing temperatures, you have a threat both to the water and hypothermia for people that get stuck in their houses. >> we are looking at temperatures below freezing. not well below freezing, we are talking about the 20s, but that is cold enough especially when you're talking about water in that region. lets look at the current temperature map. you are above freezing. we had snow pushing up to the north, up towards the north at 25, lincoln at 23. we are looking at those temperatures, really going to be staying in that area over the next several days. taking a look at the snow that passed through, this is beginnings to end, as well.
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i want to tell you about the monthly history of what we have seen here across much of this region. st. louis for the month of december has seen 440% of their normal average, so for st. louis, you would normally see about two and a half inches for the whole month of december. this month already, you ever seen over 11 and a half inches of rain for you. des moines has seen 393%, springfield has seen 276% and most that have rain has fallen in this general area and was, that rain then needs to funnel into the rivers, upstream and then make its way downstream, so where we see these cresting rivers is going to start to go down as we make our way towards the next several days, as well as next week and maybe even after that. >> coming up, we'll be talking to jake ward about the issue of climate change. kevin, thanks a lot. big changes are in store for chicago's police department. >> the mayor will announce
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revised training and new tactics after a series of shooting deaths at the hands of officers there. we have the story. >> 16 shots and a cover up. >> under scrutiny after a series of fatal police shootings, mayor rahm emanuel and the interim police superintendent are expect to announce a major overhaul of how officers respond to incidents and how they use force. according to reports, every on duty officer who respond to say calls for service will be equipped with a taser and trained to use it by june of next year. there have been pro-tests aimed at chicago's police department following the release of dash cam video last month of a white officer shooting a black 17-year-old 16 times. on tuesday, police officer jason van dyke pleaded not guilty to murdering laquan mcdonald since last year. the police commissioner has stepped down and there have been demands for the mayor's resignation. >> in our city and other cities, the use of guns creates an
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environment where people are solving problems shooting first and asking questions later. i think that part of this is all about poverty and symptoms of poverty, symptoms of segregating communities the way that they've been all over the country, so chicago is the poster child for that right now. >> chicago's police department was criticized again this past weekend after an officer shot a 19-year-old and his 55-year-old neighbor, betty jones. police say jones was shot accidentally. at least one former officer and former member of the independent police review says police officers need more options and tasers should be mandatory. >> you know, as far as i'm concerned, if he did not have a taser, you should not even have responded to the incident. >> as pressure grows on chicago's mayor rahm emanuel he issued a statement saying:
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>> the stiff plans toed a 1700 tasers and begin training next week. >> how big a role does money, resources play in this? >> the chicago police department is strapped. only 15% of the police officers in chicago, police department are trained for that and that's where they can identify somebody in crisis, deescalate the situation and often not have to use deadly force. next year they plan more session for that training. >> coming up in 10 minutes, we're going to be talking to a former police officer about changes that are going to be taking place in chicago. >> no reaction from the white house to new accusations over the n.s.a. spying programs. the wal wall street journal saye n.s.a. continued to eavesdrop object israel's prime minister benjamin netanyahu even though the u.s. said it would stop spying on friendly heads of states.
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it included private conversations with members of congress and american jewish groups and conversations about the ran nuclear deal between netanyahu and his aids. the pentagon says a missile came within 1500 yards of the uss harry truman in the strait of hortuz. the exercised is called unnecessarily pro vehicle active and unsafe. officials say airstrikes killed 10 isil leaders, including one person that was linked to last month's attacks in paris. that news coming one day after iraqi forces say they drove isil fighters from the center of ramadi. we have more from the pentagon. >> the u.s. says one of the isil leaders killed this month in syria was directly linked to the paris attacks last month that killed 130 people and for which isil claimed responsibility. the pentagon says this man,
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killed in a u.s. drone strike in syria christmas eve had been in direct contact with this man, who was killed in a police raid in a paris suburb and was said to have been the leader of the cell that carried out the series of attacks. at least three of the 10 killed by drones and u.s. jets were said to be connected with the paris attacks and planning additional attacks. >> these are individuals who are specifically working to strike the west. they want to strike in europe. they want to strike in our very own homeland. it's important that people understand that as long as those external attack planners are operating, the united states military will hunt them and we will kill them. coalition airstrikes based on u.s. intelligence this month targeted 10 separate isil operatives, killing two decembeh
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two more on the ninth and five more on the 10th, 12, 26 and 27. >> we are striking at the head of this snake. we haven't received the head of the snake yet and it's still got fangs. we have to be clear about that. there's much more fighting to do. >> the pentagon released its kill list along with u.s. drone video showing iraqi forces raising their flag this week over a government compound as they declared ramadi liberated from isil. a pentagon map told a slightly different story showing in green parts of ramadi that had actually been secured while indicating a quarter of the city still needs to be cleared of remnants of isil fighters. al jazeera, the pentagon. turkish police say they stopped a plot to attack fears celebrations in ankara and made arrests. the suspects were reportedly planning to detonate suicide
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vests at two locations during celebrationles. a british jury convicted a husband and wife from planning a large scale operation. they wanted to mark the 10t 10th anniversary of the july, 2005 attacks on london's transit system. authorities say he used twitter to ask advice whether to attack a shopping center or the london subway system. crews in china found eight survivors of a mine collapse there. the miners have been trapped since that cave-in five days ago. infrared cameras detected the miners waving their hands. clues sent supplies underground and are working to pull them to safety. a top north korean official responsible for handle the contentious relationship with south korea has died. the state run media said the 73-year-old was killed in a car accident. he was a close confident of kim
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jong-un. he played a role in diffusing tensions after the north and south exchanged artillery fire. the police officers involved in the shooting of tamir rice. the capture of the so called affluenza teen. the phone call that helped lead to his arrest.
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in just a few hours, chicago mayor rahm emanuel is expected to propose major changes for the police department including revised police training and
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requiring every officer who answers calls carry a taser, this after a series of shooting deaths at the hands of officer. a retired officer, now a private security consultant joins us from los angeles. thanks for being with us. i know it's early there, so i appreciate it. something was said after the domestic incident that happened in chicago this weekend in which two people were killed, including an innocent bystander. is there a shoot first, ask questions later mentality in a lot of police departments and if so, how can better training address that? >> that mentality does not exist, plain and simple. i've been in this community 42 years and my personal experiences in the street is that we have a tendency to try to avoid situations with the use of force at that level. that's the simple, plain truth and it's irrefutable. in rewards to the training component or mechanisming that are in place, they need to continuously educate and inform
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and support their police in the street with equipment, tactics and philosophy on how to approach these situations. there is no magic book that we travel with. a lot of the decision that is we make, which are split-second are attached to or hinged on our formal training in the classroom environment, for example in a police academy, but we continue to learn in the street. in other words, the learning environment just isn't in an academy or setting where they come in and lecture you. you're on the street and learning every day about people, about yourself, about various situations, about remedies to situations, and a lot of it hinges on a person's personality traits and, you know, their own philosophies in life. >> sure. >> some people look for the path of least resistance for example. >> it may hinge on i imagine for an officer, his own mental health state. do policies and training generally address that aspect of these confrontation? >> yes, absolutely.
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i was asked this question on a prior occasion and there are mechanisms in all of these major police department that is if you're involved in incidents where you are either a witness to extreme violence, for example or loss of a partner through shooting or you, yourself have the misfortune have having to take the life of another individual, there's counseling available, they are very not confrontational but they do confront you to see what you need to help resolve for manage these issues. >> in our the majority of police killings, this is according to a major report done by the washington post happened because the suspect was doing three things, wielding weaponing, mentally ill or ran away from an officer. besides that first category in which the officer is directly threatened with a weapon, what does go into an officer's decision making and how do they address that possibility that mental health may be an issue with whatever suspect they're dealing with? >> well, you know, i want to as
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i no size about deadly force. it's to be used when you're life or the life of another individual is in imminent danger and you have no other option but to use deadly force to preserve your life or the life of another. deal with people that are mentally ill, because someone demonstrates that they appear or the at herception is that they're mentally ill, they may not be. they may be victims of cardiac arrest or seizure and have tendencies that are consistent with people that might be mentally ill. people fleeing. they call them fleeing felons is one type of label. there are certain crimes in the state of new york to terminate or affect the arrest, you are permitted to use deadly physical force, rape, arson in the first degree, escape in the first degree. clearly we are not in the practice or philosophically inclined to shoot people that run from us, but you have to
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take each set of circumstances and weigh them. >> thank you so much for your expertise on this issue this morning. >> my pleasure. in cleveland, those two police officers involved in the fatale shooting of 12-year-old tamir rice are facing an administrative review coming a day after the grand jury there decided not to indict the officers on any criminal charges. that was a decision that sent protestors out on to the streets. we talked to the rice family attorney. >> only a few dozen people protested in downtown cleveland on tuesday, but their message was clear. >> i'm out here today because
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i'm very concerned, as well as upset because justice was not done. >> justice for 12-year-old tamir rice, shot to death by a police officer last november, as seen in this surveillance video. the boy was carrying a pellet gun that looked like a real pistol. monday, local prosecutor timothy mcbegin they said a grand jury decided not to indict officer timothy low man or his partner who was driving the car. >> simply put, given this perfect storm of human error, mistakes and miscommunications by all involved that day, the evidence did not indicate criminal conduct by police. >> rice's family attorney said mcbegin they should have stepped aside for a special prosecutor. >> he said that he made a recommendation of the grand jury that they not charge. how he can do that when the video shows what it shows is completely beyond the rice family's understanding. >> when it comes to this -- >> protestors say they are not
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surprised. >> race is always a problem in america. it is there. i don't think no one wants to talk about it, but it's there. >> how is it in cleveland? >> cleveland may be the number one. >> we have a long way to go. it's an issue that america has to deal with. >> the tamir rice case has catapulted cleveland into the national debate about how police officers treat african-americans. following the deaths of michael brown in ferguson, missouri and eric garner in stanton island, new york. >> there's a bias and it's a trend that's consistent across this country, we look at police officer involved shootings of african-americans. >> at a news conference tuesday, we asked cleveland police chief calvin williams whether racial bias played a role in rice's case. >> i mean there's bias in, you know, in reporting. there's bias in the criminal justice system. there's bias in the post office. whether that played a role in
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the decision, i don't know. you'll have to talk to the members of the grand jury and the prosecutor's office. >> do you think it plays a role in your police department? >> everybody has a bias, myself included. >> the police department and the city say they're launching their own investigation of what happened to rice. the department of justice is also reviewing the case. al jazeera, cleveland. another republican is now out of the race for the republican presidential nomination. former new york governor pataki dropping out, his campaign never gaining steam, rarely topping 1%. he struck a conciliatory tone in announcing that decision in on on line video. >> i'm confident we can elect the right person, someone who will bring us together and who understands that politicians including the president must be the people's servant and not their master. >> he is the fourth current or former governor to drop out of the race before a single vote has been cast.
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>> the so-called affluenza teen and miss mother are expected to be returned to the united states today, arrested in mexico after being on the run for weeks. al jazeera has the latest. >> 18-year-old ethan couch and his mother tanya were found mingling with american tourists on mexico's pacific coast monday night. they attempted to disguise himself. he died his hair and beard and had no plans to return home anytime soon. >> i have a suspicion that his mother was assisting him and helping him has proven true, we believe and so we followed those leads and eventually led to puerta vallarta, mexico where they were taken into custody. >> his truck plowed into four innocent by standers killing them in a june, 2013 drunk driving accident. he was 16 at the time. in court, a defense expert argued his wealthy parents had coddled him into a sense of irresponsibility, a condition the expert terms affluenza,
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meaning he was so wealthy and so spoiled, he couldn't tell right from wrong. couch was sentenced to probation and rehabilitation, but no jail time. as part of the probation order, couch was ordered not to drink, so when this video apparently showing him taking part in a drunken game of beer pong showed up on line, couch and his mom disappeared, sparking an international manhunt. >> what we suspected all along had happened, that they had planned to disappear, that they even had something that was almost akin to a going away party before they left town. >> addison believes the pair fled in late november. u.s. marshals are now working with mexican agencies to deport them. it's not clear if they had accomplices. >> in a handful of months, couch will turn 19. once back in this country, authorities in texas want his case moved to adult court, where the penalties are stiffer. >> the difference for him in adult court is as long as he's in juvenile court in texas, the
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standard is the best interests of the child. in adult court, he'll be treated as an adult and in criminal law in the state of texas, we're interested in the safety of our community. >> the sheriff said his department was forced to investigate the deaths where four people died. a natural aid in the battle against climate change. >> salty lakes and how they could make the difference.
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>> you did your research. >> you're one of the most prepared journalists i've ever known. >> go inside the lives of musical icons. >> i was given a gift... i think i've used it well.
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>> i want the ballet world to be given the respect that it deserves. >> and global activists. >> i feel compelled to do it, because if i don't do it, who's going to do it. >> revealing conversations you won't find anywhere else. . missouri's governor warning people to get ready for historic flooding, 18 million people in 13 states now threatened by the rising waters. parts of highways and interstates are closed, evacuations have been ordered. at least 18 deaths in illinois and missouri are blamed on all of those rising waters. >> two isil fighters are under arrest in turkey. the men were reportedly planning to detonate suicide vests at two locations during news celebrations. they are turkish nationals found after a raid on a house in the city. the obama administration is
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accused of spying on israel despite promising that it would stop eavesdropping on friendly heads of state. the n.s.a. said the u.s. continued to eavesdrop on benjamin netanyahu and members of congress and netanyahu. last hour on that your world this morning. i asked israel journalist if there were legitimate grounds that israel would try to scuttle the iranian nuclear deal. >> the white house promised they would cease eavesdropping on friendly heads of state and tagged netanyahu as unfriendly. the iranian deal he perceived as a great national security threat to israel, and he was not ashamed. much of that was done above the table. some of it behind the table and
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i would say that since israeli intelligence discovered that the united states is conducting political negotiations with iran back in early 2013 in oman, i think there was a breach of confidence between the two sides, and both sides tried to obtain as much information as possible. the israelis were trying to understand what exactly the americans are trying to do with iran, what is the nature of their deal that was signed and the americans as was reported this morning by the wall street journal were trying to understand what israel is plotting against them in trying to recruit congress, senate, the jewish lobby apec doing what they can to damage the deal and convince as many congress member as they can to vote against it. >> it shows how deep the wrist
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is between prime minister benjamin netanyahu and president obama. transferring 17 guantanamo bay prisoners, sources tell al jazeera ash carter notified congress as required by law. it is not clear which detainees will be transferred or where they might be sent. there would be just 90 men left at gitmo if it happens. scientists said wildfires in tunisia is the worst disaster in 2015. an indonesian court threw out a case against a company accused of starting one of them. we have has report from sumatra. >> this is a huge blow for the ministry of environment and forestry. it accused a company of starting fires in sumatra in 2014 to clear for plantation us. the administration was seeking $570 million in damaging, making
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this case the largest of its kind. the court said it did not present enough evidence for it to find in favor of the ministry. ministry officials say they are extremely disappointed by the verdict. they believe they presented enough strong evidence. they believe it should have been a simple open and shut case. they say they were able to prove that the fires that were burning were happening on land that belonged to or concession lands that belonged to the company. this company also happens to be one of the companies that had its license suspended in recent months because of this year's forest fires. some say the forest fires are due to small farmers that use a slash and burn method to clear land for agriculture use. this is allowed intra additional communities, but only limited to two hectares of land. environmentalists say it's big plantation companies that are to blame, companies that have adopted this method because it's the cheapest to clear land and they're responsible for the large scale fires has happened. many say it is the lax
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enforcement in indonesia that allows this problem to continue. health officials say thousands have suffered respiratory problems after breathing in the dangerous smoke from chose wildfires. officials in california looking into allegations that voter data was exposed on line. the information of about 2 million voters was posted on line on the internet, including their names, addresses, phone numbers and birthdays. the california secretary of state saying his office didn't post the information, they are now trying to figure out just who did. some luxury new york city hotels are taking steps to become more energy officials. the famed waldorf history tore i can't and pierre agreed to cut emissions by 30% in the next 10 years. 16 hotels are on the list, part of a wider city initiative to reduce green how else gas emissions by 2050.
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all this week, your world this morning is looking back at important stories of 2015, including that climate deal that was reached earlier this month in paris. al jazeera's tech correspondent jacob ward explained why rising temperatures are now a major cause of concern. >> the lesson of this year is that the evidence is becoming clearer and clearer and it's becoming more and more worrisome. scientists point out that whereas for 650,000 years, ice ages were coming and going in these cycles that had to do with subtle variations in the earth's orbit it's happening fast, at unprecedented speeds. we're seeing in the last 12 years, the 10 hottest years that we've ever seen, we're seeing extremes of record temperatures, drought, all that have happening at levels that we have never seen before, not just in recorded human history, but in the time scale that we see when they sample the ice from
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ancient, ancient geologic bodies, what we are seeing is a clear impression of just out of control change. >> despite that, the associated press finding that one third of americans still don't believe that there is a climate change problem. >> yeah. >> why that is and what can scientists do to count their? >> it's extraordinary that so much amazing science comes out of the united states and so much political rhetoric clouds that science in this country. you know, we're coming out of obviously this paris climate summit. there was enough of a political momentum that 190 nations sent representatives if not their actual leaders to try and talk about this problem, solve this problem, so it's amazing that in the u.s., it's still clouded. part of that is our elected officials. lamar smith, the head of the house and science committee is still actively questions climbs change, saying scientists are distorting around the political
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agenda. over 98% of scientists are unified in saying that climate change is happening, the human cause, now basically the findings are turning away from feeling like we have to verify that this is happening and instead, we're starting to measure the impacts of this, the geologic, the weather, the effect on human kind. >> a lot of people don't know that this is an issue that hits them right dead in the pocketbook. >> that's right. it's an economic issue, as much as anything else. a new study found for instance that it had been impossible in the past to sort of look at prosperity at the national level, as it mapped to climate change. just shy of 55 degrees fahrenheit, scientists found that national prosperity drops off. at this point, we know that the united states is right at that level. countries like china and japan have already pass that had level where the median temperature is 55 degrees. the global power balance right
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now has to do with the united states and china being the big super powers with that right? it turns out that those, because these countries have already pass that had level of prosperity, we can expect our prosperity to drop off at climate change continues whereas northern europe, germany, russia, naturally colder places, scientists expect they are going to do better and better economically. if i were running for president right now, i would be talking about how we have to reverse this dynamic, because the u.s. is actually about to lose its prime see in the world, according to scientists, based on climate change. >> president obama saying this is a threat to global security. is he chicken little saying the sky is fall or is there a real threat out there? >> a few years ago, it was hard to connect the dots on this, but we've gotten to a place where it's clear and syria is the classic example. you had a tremendous drought in syria, beginning around 2007 where suddenly as much as 70% of feeds is gone, water is gone, the wells go dry and suddenly
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that entire landscape is unlivable and people leave. they go to cities, try and find another way to live and people drown into in some cases violent extremism. we're literally seeing. you're seeing not just scientists, but the analysts, the heads of the department of defense are pointing out, this is an issue of global security, because it's destabilizing the rest of the world. >> some scientists saying we are past the point of no return. is that the case? >> well, there are certainly -- it's going to take tremendous effort. i think what everybody forgets is it's going to get harder and harder to make the necessary change. there is good news. we see a new report that said if you and i gave up the use of a car, commuting torque in a metropolitan area and replaced it with bikes and public transit and walking, we could hold emissions to 2010 levels, put a cap on it there. it's an extraordinary thing but only the most progressive places are considering that.
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oslo, norway may outlaw car traffic in their downtown. if the rest of the world did that, that would be a really good thing. there are tangible steps that we can make. >> thanks for being with us. in canada, there may be a natural process helping take carbon out of the air. it involves some very salty lakes. >> they call this the dead sea of canada, little manitou lake. it's so salty only microscopic creatures can live in it. evaporation makes it saltier. farmers know not to plant crops on the shore, but there is a spa like the real dead sea and it's been here for decades. >> in the 1920's and 1930's, people came from all over to visit and they came and healed themselves in the water, put the mud on themselves for exfoliants and it was very much a health place.
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>> salt water lakes are well known in this part of the world. aside from this one, where tourism and taking the waters has been popular for decades, they are seen as somewhat of a nuisance. new research shows a lake like this with saline waters may be actually performing a very valuable service. researchers at the university say that such alkaline lakes and there are hundreds here absorb atmospheric carbon. their complex chemistry store it in the mud as a stable element. up to a third of the vast carbon dioxide, it's an entirely natural process. >> we have to make sure we don't drain them.
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lakes have been underappreciated in the carbon budget, just because total surface area relative to oceans and forests, they're not home, but the rates as which they are protesting carbon is you're never more than a few minutes away from a check of faster than say the open ocean. >> as oceans become more acidic, they so that up less carbon. these bodies of water are crucial. the caspian sea, the largest salty lake in the world has similar chemistry. environmental activists say this is exactly the kind of science that should transform our approach to the world's carbon problem. >> we need good applied science to figure out how we actually achieve this. if we can use the applied science to set out what we need to achieve, then we can hand over to the economists and the social scientists to figure out the detail of how we get there. >> so far, governments aren't doing much with this research but excitement is building over how it might be applied. if canada ever draws up a plan to deal with emissions and atmospheric carbon. the salt lakes of the north american prairied could just be part of it. al jazeera.
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continuing on this theme, a backlash over a boom in oil production. >> we'll talk about the health problems that some people in california say are tied to the hunt for crude. down goes the champ, the embarrassing moment for mike tyson, getting a lot of attention on line. wait for it.
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>> this neighborhood in south los angeles spans nine square miles but is home to one of the largest oil fields in the country, a symbol of industrial prosperity for some and encroachingion eyesore and health hazard for others. >> you've grown up in the shadow of bill oil. what has that been like for you? >> it's stressful, but also something that is just really scary. i ended up getting sick,
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particles were going into my window, and so my eyes were literally shut for about two weeks. >> other residents have complained about headaches and breathing problems. a study in 2014 finds there are potentially dangerous coming pounds and chemical mixtures in the air near oil production sites. greater los angeles and big oil have grown up together. more than 30,000 people live within 300 feet of an oil well, but according to a lawsuit filed against the city of los angeles by a coalition of environmental and youth groups, the city's lax process disproportionately impacts communities of color, communities like wilmington. >> we see this pattern where the neighborhoods that are majority latino and black have been neglected or disregarded or less valid in protecting the health and safety of residents. >> gladys is an attorney with
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the nonprofit communities for a better environment, one plaintiff in the lawsuit. >> the conditions that the city has imposed on oil operators in black and latino neighborhoods are less stringent. the rigs are operated or allowed to be operated with diesel power, so there is more particulate matter, more emissions. it's noisier. >> on the west side, neighborhoods like beverly hills, they are far less out in the open. you won't find an oil pump in the middle of a church parking lot like in wilmington and up won't see an oil rig in a park like the 13 houses from where ashley lives. >> throughout the city, residents have filed grievances, have asked the city to shut down these facilities or improve conditions and the city has not listened. >> she said the city isn't listening and we know they are not talking. the city attorney's office can't
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comment object pendings litigation. oil company warned resources which runs maker drilling operations in will mick to know also declined our request for an interview, as did two city council members. we also called the western state's petroleum situation, a for profit trade group for the industry. our phone calls were never returned. >> do you think that it's realistic to just stop oil drilling in the city of los angeles? >> if the city abided by its duty, both moral and legal and political duty to protect the health and safety of its residents, it would deny drilling praises in neighborhoods. they are inherently incompatible with healthy enables. no child should have to grow up next to these facilities and be subjected to asthma, respiratory problems, neurological dangers. >> i feel that being part of a community predominantly of color where we are funneled into the life of industry, we are also
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not given a lot of civil rights. i think that is exactly why we're doing this lawsuit, is because that is exactly what the city has violated. they have violated our civil rights. >> ultimately, that will be up to the courts to decide in what's sure to be a long contentious battle between big oil and a small neighborhood. jennifer london, al jazeera, wilmington, california. on the weather front what a difference a week makes, parts of the northeast dealing with icing. >> last week we were dealing with above average temperatures, now those temperatures are completely different. we had a snowstorm push across this area. you can see it last night. that was much needed snow across much of new england. up to this point, they had none. in vermont, they were getting their plows out.
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the ski areas are loving this. the snow that fell will be in place for the next several days. we saw up to a foot of snow up towards the northern parts of maine. this is what the temperatures look like now. we are looking at port land, maine, 19 degrees not going up to much. for albany, you are above freezing, so any snow that fell in the hudson valley is pretty much gone now, but there's two areas we are going to be dealing with, today, the freezing rain parts of the lakes as well as freezing rain tonight in parts of new england. we are going to be looking at what's happening for new year's across the west coast. las vegas, 32 degrees, clear skies. seattle, 32 degrees, as well. for los angeles, 50 degrees and clear skies. not too bad. >> this is the winter i remember. >> yes. >> kevin corriveau, thank you be. rio de janeiro in the spotlight. >> the challenges for the city as it prepares to host the 2016
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summer olympics.
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we've been hearing a lot about the dangers which hoverboarding. this is something mike tyson now knows firsthand. i took his daughter's toy for a ride. she washed him not to fall and then of course, he ate it. tyson posted the video himself with a message, seemed like a good idea to ride my daughter's
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hoverboard but i guess not. >> hoverboard troubles for a priest in the philippines, the priest discuss spend because he rode his hoverboard singing at christmas eve mass. he went up and down the aisles to the applause of the congregation but the diocese not laughing, the priest has since apologized. a statement says he will be out of that parish for sometime to reflect on his actions. we are less than 220 days away from the 2016 summer games and organizers in rio say they'll be ready. the city still faces problems with pollution and security. >> in a city famous for its beaches and carnival, having a good time is a way of life. rio de janeiro also has experienced hosting an international sporting event. it hosted world cup soccer matches in 2014.
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add to that the pride of making history. this is the first olympic games to be held in south america. >> it's going to be wonderful, and rio is going to welcome them with open arms. >> more than half of the rio 2016 budget comes from private money. the city is taking full advantage of using existing venues from previous sporting events like the world cup. the city said construction is on time and on budget, unlike the world cup when some stadiums were finished only days before the games began. >> there are two kinds of olympics, games that take the benefits out of the city and the city that takes the benefits out of the games. we're taking full advantage of having the olympics in rio. >> in 2015, the city held 20 test events, including the triathlon. environmentalists are raising concerns about the site expected
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to hold most of the sailing competitions. here at the bay, athletes may have to compete smelling raw sewage and seeing garbage floating by their boats. the city promised they would clean up the bay significantly but now officials admit their efforts may not come close to satisfying the athletes. the sailing events may have to be held elsewhere. on the periphery of the olympic park, memories and protest graffiti are what remain of a neighborhood bulldozed to make way for access into the area. maria initially refused to leave, even though the city offered her a flat and money. now that most of the 344 families who used to live here have taken the buyouts, she's decided to move, but feels a sense of loss. >> it's not that anyone is against the olympics. it's that they destroy people here, the community, everything. >> another concern is drug gangs and spillover of the violence inside the city. city officials say things were
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calm during the world cup and they expect the same with rio 2016. if you're thinking about going to the biggest sporting event on the planet, 7.5 million tickets are available. more than half cost $30 or less. rio de janeiro, brazil. it's caused a lot of chaos for them, all the development for the olympics. that's it for us. coming up next from doha, more on the dangerous flooding hitting the mid portion of the country. your word is back tomorrow beginning at 7:00 a.m. eastern. for the latest news anytime, go to aljazeera.com. have a great day.
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a new syrian army offensive backed by russian air power. activists say hundreds of civilians have been killed during the three month campaign. you're watching al jazeera live from our headquarters here in doha. also coming up, voting is underway in the central african republic after several delays, people decide on their new president. families leave ramadi as the army tries to clear remaining pocketf

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