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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  February 1, 2016 7:00am-9:01am EST

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♪ caucus day after months of campaigning iowa people will pick candidates in the first presidential contest. syrian security dozens of people killed in a series of attacks near damascus over shadowing talks to end the conflict there. emergency meeting and the world health organization talking about the zika virus as the outbreak continues to spread. welcome to diverse t.v. on sunday and the sag awards dominates just weeks after oscar nominations are criticized for being too white. ♪
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the battle to win eye way reaches conclusions today and prepared to caucus in the first contest of the 2016 presidential race. we all made it people. welcome to your world this morning i'm rochelle kerry. >> i'm del walters and 18 months, 60,000 campaign ads later and the long weekend of last-minute campaigning for the candidates. >> tonight we will know if results in iowa match up with the latest polling and look at the polling and this weekend des moines register survey gives hillary clinton a slight lead on bernie sanders but within the margin of air. >> and donald trump and 28% of the vote, ted cruz second with 23% and we are live in iowa and we are 13 hours away from the start of the caucuses, what are the voters saying and more importantly have they made up their minds or are they still
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undecided? >> reporter: there are still a lot of undecided voters in the caucus and remember this process is really del really about convincing your neighbors and friends to side with you, at least on the democratic side of course, the republican side you have a secret ballot and testament as to how undecided people are you had candidates this weekend campaigning to the very last-minute and today they will be out there shaking hands and trying to get people to say yes i want you to be the next president. now the top contenders and we are talking about hillary clinton with a margin and donald trump and hillary clinton came out swinging and says she is the most eligible and should take the top spot and here is what she had to say. >> i know the hard choices that face a president. if they are not hard they don't end up on the president's desk. they don't end up in the situation room where i spent many, many hours. >> reporter: and donald trump for his part he chose not to
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take place in the last debate here in the state and many people looking at him saying that is a man of courage. of course donald trump came out and says he believes soon other senators will come out to endorse him, hear what he had to say. >> when i look at what is going on with jobs, when i look at what is going on with trade deals when i look at what is going on with this horrible iran deal where we pay $150 billion for absolutely nothing. >> reporter: but everyone else says there is still a chance for an up set and caucus goers says my participation still matters del. >> let's talk about the caucus itself how long does the process take tonight and when will we expect to hear who won the iowa caucuses finally? >> remember this year there is new software going to allow a lot of the results to be tabulated much quicker than in the past and should hear things by tonight and we are central time zone and expecting by
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10:00, 11:00, by the evening time we should have a pretty good understanding of where the voters here in iowa believe the nation should go. remember it's a very critical point that historically voter turn out in this state for this particular event has only been 1-5 and expecting slightly higher but we will see. >> snow in the forecast and we are live in des moines and thank you very much, coming up, in 15 minutes we will talk with a democrat and a republican strategist on the on going presidential campaign. hillary clinton defending the latest controversy surrounding her e-mails on abc she dismissed concerns over 22 e-mails deemed top secret by the state department and clinton said they should not be a campaign issue and called out republicans for a political posturing. >> this is very much like benghazi george and republicans will continue to use it, beat up on me, i understand that, that is the way they are but after 11 hours of testimony answering every single question in public
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which i requested for many months it's clear they are grasping at straws. >> reporter: what is not sure is if they with top secret at the time they were sent or classified that way afterwards and the last batches is 7,000 pages will be released later this month. ten are dead following a suicide bottoming in afghanistan and tried to enter a police building in kabul and set off explosives by the gate and taliban claiming responsibility for the attack. negotiations to end the five-year long conflict are on shaky ground and this is near damascus and one was caused by a car bomb by the shia trub and i.s.i.l. claimed responsibility and both scheduled to meet with u.n. mediators in geneva and we are following the latest on the damascus bombing and begins with james base who is covering the peace talks in geneva so james a
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reluctant opposition delegation met with the united nations mediator for the first time and how exactly did that play out? >> well, that was a meeting they said about whether they were going to proceed any further and explaining their concerns about the process and how they believe that the u.n. resolution that set up this process has not been properly implemented, that the bombing, the be siegement is still going on the ground because the security resolution says it should end and a meeting in a few hours time with the opposition and staffan de mistura and government going to have a meeting that has now been cancelled but i think in some ways another important meeting we really should be looking at which we will have no cameras on it because it will be held away from the press is a meeting actually between two of the key sponsors of this process, a meeting with the deputy foreign
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minister of russia and assistant secretary of state ann patterson and both in geneva this evening, why is that important? because the opposition say one of the big concerns they have is what the russians are up to. it was john kerry the u.s. secretary of state and his russian counterpart who came up with this whole process, this whole idea and yet right now when the opposition here in geneva saying they are preparing potentially to start joining peace negotiations russian aircraft are still bombarding positions of the very same opposition groups that are here to talk peace so i'm sure that discussion will be an interesting discussion. it's not really something that the u.s. administration at this stage is saying out in the open but i think behind the scenes a lot of pressure on the russians. >> james in addition to the opposition concerns about what the russians are up to, what they are currently doing what else are they asking for? >> well, they are asking for the
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things in that resolution, the lifting of sieges, trying to get some of those besieged areas like the reported pictures we saw a few weeks ago from madaya and stopping the bombardment and i think the one last thing on the list is one that perhaps could be delivered easiest by the syrian government if they had some pressure on them from the russians and that is maybe releasing some prisoners who had been wrongfully held in custody. i'm being told that perhaps women prisoners, perhaps pressure put on the syrian government's side to maybe release some women prisoners, that could be a measure, a gesture to build confidence in these talks but no sign of it yet. >> talk a little more of what is happening in damascus, these attacks that are happening and what do negotiators saying it can affect the talks moving forward because surely they will? >> well, yeah, certainly that
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attack in damascus is something that everyone is watching very closely, appalling scenes and dead in damascus and think it plays into what i was just talking about if behind the scenes there have been assurances and opposition told me they have private assurances if they came to geneva there would be concrete steps taken so they can then continue on the negotiation road. if behind the scenes there is a talk for example of prisoners being released i think the fact that you have an attack in damascus like that killing so many people perhaps puts that off for a day or so and so if there was a plan that the syrian government was going to do something, offer some sort of gesture then maybe we have to wait a little longer and there is a problem, the opposition are getting restless and members of the opposition who are not happy they even came here because they say they need to see some concrete deliverables if they are going to join the process.
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>> such a long, long process and many false statements and james live in geneva and thank you. as you heard james mention the suicide bombings in damascus three into derail the entire peace process and happening in a heavily guarded area leading to once again more security concerns and al jazeera zaina has the cover from turkey. >> reporter: one of the worst attacks in damascus and dozens of people killed the targets is a shia district in the capitol. clearly an attack which has the sectarian nature. i.s.i.l. claiming responsibility and really this is in line with its policy. attacks like this only increase the sectarian tensions and aisle conthrive unless there is a security vacuum so like i mention shia district and a number of the casualties were shia fighters because we know
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fighters from lebanon and iraq have joined the fight on the side of the syrian president and next to the site of the explosions is one of the most holiest shia shrines and it was protecting these shrines that was used to galvanize support in the region to join the fight. so i.s.i.l. claiming responsibility sending a message real because the timing is coinciding with talks in geneva trying to get a political settlement and the international priority is to confront i.s.i.l. and that cannot happen unless there is a political settlement in syria. so a message to the international community. we are still here and we are a potent force to be reckoned and i.s.i.l. is not invited to geneva, reminder we are still there. >> zaina reporting from turkey
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and new information this morning about deadly attacks in nigeria and they firebombed huts and opened fire on civilians in the northeastern village on saturday and 86 killed and dozens more badly burned, attackers believed to be members of boko haram and gunmen trying to storm a refugee camp but fought off by troops. four people arrested in belgium suspected of trying to join the fight of i.s.i.l. this is near the airport in the southern city of chalroy and all four planned to travel to syria and libya and not related to the ongoing investigation of paris attacks and officials say 500 belgiums may have flew to syria to join i.s.i.l. navel commanders who captured sailers and awarded the victory metal to the head of the iranian navy and four commanders and
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patrolling the gulf were seized on january 12, iran questioned and released ten sailers one day later, pentagon says the boats entered iran waters by mistake. when we come back the a anatomy of a caucus. >> look at the process and why sometimes it's hard to predict a winner. new faces of politics in myanmar, democrat eccparliament taking seats after years of military rule there. ♪
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so as eye way voters caucus tonight there is a special plan for the latin vote and it's not
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big but growing. >> push to make sure that latio voices are heard and more from des moines. >> how many of you are first-time caucus goers raise your hand. >> reporter: this is not an iowa caucus but looks like one, it's supposed to and put on be the league of latin american citizens to prepare the latino voters to caucus especially those new to the sometimes intimidating process. >> mitigating a fear or mitigate a problem we may have and making sure people know what the caucuses look like. >> lation voters not at the top of the list at iowa caucus and ranks 36 in the united states in hispanic population but their numbers have grown and activists are trying to make sure that their influence does as well. >> they can't win without us.
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>> reporter: henry runs the iowa chapter of a national organization and he believes the lation vote in this state is vital this year. >> neither democrat or republican can win without our vote with the concerns we have, they need to address those concerns. >> reporter: and in 2016 those concerns have been amplified by language from candidates like republican donald trump which has been heard by many as racist and particularly antilatino. >> took his rhetoric to get involved and today it's going to be his fault that latinos end up winning and playing a large role in the election. >> reporter: undocumented iowa person who cannot vote. >> a barrier but for myself it's not a barrier to participation. >> reporter: participation is a center of the effort and unprecedented list of voters in
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iowa. >> spent eight years creating our own list by purchasing the voters from the state of iowa and filtered through almost two million registered voters to determine who the voters are. >> reporter: latin voters are a growing demographic here, over 175,000 iowa people are hispanic and that is only 6% of the vote total population here that number has doubled since the year 2000 and the latin vote is going to be a big force in caucus years to come and in the iowa caucus you don't need big numbers to make a big difference. >> the caucuses only have about 200,000 participants and an inside game and now we are part of it. >> reporter: going door to door to invite more latino members to the game and fred also volunteers. >> glad you are attending, have a great night. >> first to get them engaged,
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make them realize that they do have a voice. >> reporter: even as they organize reminders of what they are up against are constant, this time was just blocks away from where he was van canvassing. >> our community has taken the responsibility to make sure that we turn back this. >> reporter: henry and the rest of the latin community in iowa feel the caucus room is the best place to start doing that. >> you are going to see young, brown faces sitting in the same room with old, white folks. >> uncommitted 11 votes. >> reporter: caucus a voice can make all the difference. michael shore, al jazeera, des moines, iowa. talk about the caucuses and joined by conservative political commentator lenny and our strategist del and lenny we will start with you we keep hearing about conservetism and says the
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support especially among evangelicals and talking about donald trump and married three times and yet the son of a preacher ted cruz seems to be struggling, why? >> well, because a lot of people that are being polled right now are conservative democrats and independents that relate to or feel like they lean republican. therefore when they poll conservatives you are polling those people in the mix, the other poll that is often times not talked about as much is most likely voters to go to the caucuses today and those that caucus in 2012, looking at that poll ted cruz is ahead 4-5 points so it's very interesting to see. >> in iowa you think he will be surprised at the polls tonight? >> that is why he keeps telling people i'm wasting my time if you don't vote and saying it and over the last week you are wasting our time if you don't go vote.
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on top of that when you get in a caucus situation evangelicals have a chance to talk about the two corinthians guy and talk about the guy that goes to church to get his little waiver and guy that says he never had to ask god forgiveness one time in his life when they start talking about those three things and the other inconsistencies including imminent domain and his support for it where conservatives are vastly against it i think that will be enough for cruz to pull out a narrow but significant victory. >> so let's talk about the democrats as you saw in michael shore's piece there is that growing latino presence in iowa but how big a factor is it going to be in a race that is razor thin on both sides and can they swing away from candidates who said their friends and loved ones should be deported? >> i think the latino vote is going to make a big difference no matter who it is particularly in iowa because there is not a level of outreach before to the latino community particularly on
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the democratic side and also has not been this growing number of latinos and i think their vote will be significant because of what you stated, because iowa caucuses don't typically have a huge turnout. the polling places are located in different places from where the voting, sorry places and located in different places than where the voting locations are for regular elections. so i think in this type of situation where we don't have a huge turnout of people, a huge participation historically then all of those votes count in a way that they don't typically count so i do think the latino vote will be very significant and pr sent -- presents a problem with people of color. >> let's talk about the polls on the democratic side hillary clinton is ahead going in the caucuses tonight, the last polls have been pretty accurate and iowa voters usually wait until
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the week before to makeup their minds, does she have reason in this case for cautious optimism? >> i think she has reason for cautious optimism with an emphasis on caucus. bernie sanders supporters are extremely enthusiastic and he has been energizing and pulling these very, very large crowds and it has been on a consistent basis and not received the coverage that donald trump and some other candidates on the republican side have received but he has been commanding these very large crowds and again consistently doing so so i think that that is going to play a role. there is no way around it. that the advantages that former senator clinton, former secretary of state clinton has is that she has a far more superior ground game than she had in 2008 when she famously lost the iowa caucus despite the fact people thought she would do much better there and actually came in third at that point so i think her campaign has learned, i think she has learned and i
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think they are putting a lot more time and resources go data and polls do show her having this light lead going in and with the people who have not made up their minds yet she has a slight advantage and cautious optimism is definitely the keyword there, keyword. >> lenny if ted cruz loses iowa does he have a campaign going forward in places like new hampshire and south carolina and so on, nevada? >> south carolina and nevada definitely. he wasn't doing that well in new hampshire even though he is rising there as well but south carolina, nevada they are more again leaning towards evangelicals and should be two states where he should be able to do well and go in the sec primary. he knows he is going to likely poll between one and three, if he gets in three he is going to be disappeointed and he should win tonight, this would be a big win for trump if he wins but if you listen to what he has been
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doing over 72 hours number one vote and now starting to manage expectations and it's not devastating if i lose iowa. he is trying to manage those expectations so it doesn't seem as though he has this devastating loss after winning all these national polls throughout the country over the last several months to come in second place with the first actual votes. >> before we go talk of that backdoor deal between the clinton campaign and the o'malley campaign, how would that work and what is going on there? is that typical iowa politics? >> well, there is always politics in politics but i'll say this, martin o'malley has not gained any traction. he has been out there for a long time campaigning and he is you know he has his hands waving in the air saying look at me and it has not really worked so whether there is a deal or not, at the end of the day i don't think his support really brings that much to the table. >> lenny and karen thank you very much for being with us and
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reminder join us tonight because our coverage begins at 7:00 p.m. eastern time for live coverage of the iowa caucuses and we will see you then. >> keep talking politics this time in myanmar and the first freely elected parliament in 50 years held opening session today and hundreds of officials mostly from the national league for democracy were sworn in and took their seats. the party led by chi won 80% of all contested seats in november historic election and a quarter of all seats are still reserved for the military. stepping up the fight against the zika virus. >> emergency talks to try to stop it from spreading. fashion fears the new line of women's clothing that is raising concerns in one nation. ♪
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>> a critical first step on the road to the white house. >> you have to find common ground. >> i'm doing what's right for you. >> that's the kind of debate that we need to have. >> stay with al jazeera america for... >> it's going to be about getting people out to the caucus, which is not an easy thing to do. >> comprehensive coverage that's... >> the focus will be on south carolina tonight. welcome back to your cold this morning, now 7:30 eastern time. those peace talks trying to end the conflict in syria continue in geneva today. the government and opposition delegations scheduled to meet with u.n. meet areas there. three blasts near damascus left 70 dead. one of the explosions striking
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near shia's holy effort shrine, isil taking responsibility. voters in iowa finally get their say today. they head to caucuses across the state. it is the first official contest of the 2000 syncom pain. one of the biggest questions, what is it about iowa. >> the state carries an oversized influence on politics. >> it's well known that iowa is the first in the nation to weigh in on the presidential race. less well known are the quirks behind it's caucuses. in 1972, it was only by chance at a departments in iowa scheduled their caucuses earlier
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than everybody else. 1976, republicans in the state joined it. >> i'm running for president. >> jimmy carter did well that year in iowa and went on to win the white house, iowa cemented its first in the nation status. drake university's dennis goldberg said with it comes a process which is unlike ballots. >> you've got to be at your caucus caucuses site on a monday night, be prepared to spend possibly a couple of hours there and hope there's no blizzard, that the car starts and there's nobody sick in the family. >> public buildings like churches, schools and like brothers among the places used as caucus sites in the state's 106,081 precincts. in rural areas, a caucus might
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be held in a private home. >> after hearing for surrogates for candidates, they write their choice on a piece of paper. votes are counted and returned to precinct officials. for democrats, it's most of complicated. >> people have to stand up for their preferred candidate. in this year's three person race, they will say everybody in favor of hillary clinton go to that corner, everybody in favor of bernie sanders, go to this scanner corner. everybody in favor of martin o'malley go to the other corner and everybody undeclared go to another corner. then, these are called preference groups. >> in order to be viable, a preference group has to have a certain percentage of support of those present at the caucus. if it doesn't meet the threshold, the group is dissolved and others try to win over its members. >> people are entice to go over, even if it's a preference group for hillary clinton, sanders people may say come on, you don't really support her, you
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really want to support bernie, so there's lots of horse tradings and cajoling like that. it's really interesting to watch. >> iowas system has pit falls. iowa had egg on its face in 2012 when party leaders declared mitt romney the winner of the republican caucus. >> first place, governor mitt romney with 274 votes. >> only to announce two weeks later there had been a miscount. rick santorum was the actual winner and many argue that mistake cost santorum all important momentum. this year, iowa is working to make sure history doesn't repeat itself. mary snow, al jazeera. join us tonight for our live coverage of the iowa caucus. zika virus has been reported
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across the americas. it is spreading explosively. the agency could be close to claireing an international health emergency. robert, where you are there in puerto rico, there's been a lot of new cases. tell us how concerned initials are about this. >> good morning, rochelle. 19 confirmed cases on the island, the u.s. territory. they're very concerned. we're in san juan now. with the dike vice, the worry is all these mosquitoes are found in urban areas like here, shallow standing water, anywhere there's rain coming down and you know this is a tropical area. they've been in a very severe drought dating back all the way to 2014 and they're expected to have really good rains here in 2016, so they are very concerned about the fact that that precipitation will breed many new mosquitoes, thus increasing
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the population and the numbers here of zika virus. we spoke with a state epidemiologist for the puerto rican health department. let's listen to what she says about how serious it is. >> as with the in there ducks of any new disease to the area, there's a lot of anxiety as to what does this really mean. unfortunately for zika, we don't have that many answers. all we know is zika is an old disease and mate its appearance to the rest of the world in 2007 in the pacific, and then it really exploded. >> now there's no vaccine or specific treatment for the zika virus, just prevention. that is one of the biggest issues. if you're a tourist here and you get bit by a mosquito, it's not as if you can go to a hospital and they say you're a zika virus. that's not the case. there's no treatment yet. >> what can we expect from this
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emergency meeting today in geneva? >> it is the fourth time that the world health organization is having an international meeting. one of the other times was the swine flu and clearly ebola a couple of years ago. they're expect to go potentially call this an international emergency and have a global response across the world because of it. there are huge in connection, saying there could be 3 million to 4 million cases of the zika virus just in the next year, so clearly, health officials around the world very concerned in trying to get this before it becomes an epidemic. >> all right, robert ray live for us in puerto rico, thank you. on tuesday, india's supreme court you thinking about reversing a law that makes being gay a crime.
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lgbt groups have been meeting. >> the law has been in place since british loan yell times. the gay community said it was a step forward away from discrimination, although the move was condemned by religiousous and right wing groups saying homosexuality is a we were concept. india supreme court said this kind of thing was the job of parliament and not the courts, which effectively brought the law back. no one has officially in recent times gone to jail over this law, but the gay community believed that changing social tuesday can't begin if a law like this is still in place in the country. that brings us to now, when a bench of five judges on februarf
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petitions asking it to reconsider its decision and strike down the law. >> this is from new delhi. transgender people are largely accepted in india, even as homosexuality is still illegal. an associate professor explains why the treatments are different. >> it's interesting if you look at the 2014 ruling that legalized transgender as a third category. that particular ruling, the court drew from the artifacts of indian culture, epic myths from hinduism to advocate for the special status of this group and that they are deserving of all the political, civil and economic rights of any other citizen in the country. if you compare that with the current ruling on the table, the question isis that the court argued in 2013 when it recriminallized homosexuality
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that they are not discriminating on a class of individuals, but protecting identities. in fact, they're going after the act of sodomy, which again carries over from the british statute but when it comes to protecting identities, they seem to have, you know, advocated for this notion that people's identities should be protected, even though the acts they may engage in is criminal. >> saying even though it is legal to identify at transgender, people still face persecution. >> what a fascinating angle. in cuba, some residents will be soon able to have my speed internet in their homes. prices have not been announced for the pilot project. public access to broad band internet only began last year. about 5% of the cuban population has internet service. >> the justice department announcing plans to investigate
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the san francisco police department, the probe coming as the department is scrutinized over the shooting deaths of mario woods back in december, sparking tension and calling for the police captain to be fired. this comes ahead of superbowl 50. the woman charged with helping those three inmates escape jail in southern california is going to be arraigned today. all three of now back behind bars. >> the fugitives who escaped in orange county are behind bars again and officials focusing on potential conspire tories. >> we are actively investigating other suspects who may have helped in the escape. >> a jail teacher is accused of helping them with the planning phase. investigators say her relationship with one suspect went beyond the classroom. >> she visited him several times and developed a relationship with him and it seems to be more than just casual friendship
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relationship and so she started doing his bid to go some extent. >> it ended outside a whole foods saturday when a man spotted a stolen van carrying two suspension. he alerted police and the race to catch the men played out on police radios. one man was arrested a block from the van with witnesses nearby. >> lay down, hit the ground, get on the ground. he did. he did. and they captured him, handcuffed him, put that him in the wagon, got the other one on the other side. >> they arrested the other man hiding inside the van. the third escapee had surrendered to police on friday. >> from the very beginning and i told you we were going to capture these individuals. >> the trio broke out of the orange county jail on january 22, cutting through a
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steel grill and rappeling down the jail if a sat on ropes made from bed sheets. >> the district attorney said today they will discuss further charges against other individuals suspected of helping the others break out. the big question is who provided tools for the escape. >> the question is the reward, who's going to get that? >> $50,000 reward, and it may take some time, but the person who called in for that white van that they saw near the whole foods, that person may receive some of that reward money. >> ok, thank you very much. two virginia tech students face charges in the death of a 13-year-old girl, accused in the killing of nicole lovell who vanished. one is accused of killing her, the other of getting rid of her
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body. federal investigators expected to release details about a fatal train crash last year near philadelphia. it left eight people dead, more than 200 hurt. at the time, the ntsb pointing to the train, saying it was going too fast as a factor. today's report may include black box data and vents of interviews with the train's engineer. parts of southern california are under a severe weather warning. the rain was pummeled with heavy rains, at least one killed. winds topped 100 miles per hour in some areas. that storm uprooted dozens of trees, downed power lines and also prompted flash flood warnings. officials say thousands of people are still in the dark. meanwhile, interstate 80 in northern california reopened after snow caused a 29 vehicle crash. it happened in the westbound lanes sunday near the nevada state line. 25 vehicles and four semi trucks were involved in all of that. >> the start of the new month
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brings fierce about el niño in many parts of the world. the extreme storms and floods could peak in the coming weeks. we have more from thailand. in pats of thailand, water has become a very precious commodity. the government ordered the drilling of 6,000 new wells to try to help people through the die season. at the moment, the water is for domestic use only. it's being rationed and sent to homes in rural areas where people are growing increasingly frustrated by the drought. >> it affects everyone around here. why? we rely on rain for living our lives and farming. i don't understand why we don't have enough water. >> without a lot of irrigation, it's too dry here to grow rice more than once a year, so many farmers usually plant alternative crops in the dry season, but now, they've been told not to us any water on their fields.
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rare clouds and light rain offer some hope, but no change for this man, who normally gross soybeans at this time of year. >> i didn't have enough water to do anything now. we can't even use water provided by the irrigation department. ponds around here are too far from my area. >> there are creative sources of food and income left in the fields, but thailand's economy is struggling and on the back of a slump in rice exports last year, it's a worrying time. >> this is not just an environmental issue, it's a symptom of thailand's volatile political situation. because governments come and go so quickly, national issues like developing a sustainable water management plan are neglected. >> the irrigation problem said the problem is a lack of water storage. >> our water management plan is based on scientific and academic research and results but don't
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have enough dams or reservoirs to keep the rainfall. >> others think governments don't work with farmers to find solutions. some blame a lack of seasonal planning. >> they don't use the experts to forecast for the next three year, four year what would happen, so there is a risk management. if you don't do risk management, you're going to have the problem like risk. >> the risk now is that the dry season may extend beyond may and begin affecting planting of the next rice crop, which is do in june. when we come back, you might want to call this a diverse cast of characters. >> change is inevitable, so might as well wrap your mind around it and let's go. >> the scene actors guild celebrate diversity on the heels of the oscars so white controversy. >> you don't mess with the queen. the countdown, teams arrive
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getting ready for the superbowl.
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the iowa caucuses are tonight, but the superbowl is in the news. carolina lost to new england back in 2004. this is the first time california has hosted the superbowl since 1985. >> you know what i would say if i wore those pants. >> i would say don't. taking part in the pro bowl last night not wearing those pants, russell wilson throwing two touchdowns to lead to a victory over team rice.
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wilson became the m.v.p. the seahawks quarterback was the first player picked in the all-star game's draft. wilson's seattle teammate michael bennet was the defensive m.v.p. after recorded the game's only sack. one of the oldest carnival celebration kicked off in italy. they filed into a foggy st. mark's square in venice wearing costumes. it was jampacked for the festival. the flight of the angel, the festival ends february 9, 1 day before the start of lent. >> the government concerned about a new line of clothing for muslim win. officials say certain styles can potentially pose security threats. >> designing clothes for the muslim women, the fashion designer has a business opportunity that can't be ignored. after working in paris, she
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started her own brand in dakar, adapting her designs to the latest trends. customers no longer want short skirts and sleeveless tops, but ask for longer dresses and even the full veil. >> women, whether old or young, feel more respected wearing the veil especially in conservative societies. it's a sign of confidence and trustworthiness. >> other designers are slowing collections in dakar at the conference, an opportunity to showcase the diversity in fashion for muslim women. some of the outfits could soon be banned. the president says the veils pose a security threat. they are illegal and cameroon, niger and hand where dozens have been killed by suicide attackers ho detonated bombs concealed under their robes.
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organizer are this event say they are promoting fashion, not violence. >> i think it's a debate that's stigmatizing the wrong people. i don't have to follow the global trend. actually, it's saying in a way let's create an alternative trend. let's create this new islamic clothing trend and though i can be pope minded, without having to bare my body if i don't want to. that's the message we are trying to get across. >> the fashion is a growing market. last year alone, it was estimated to be worth $230 billion globally. >> it's not just local shops making these clothes, big brands
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see an opportunity in the fashion. >> despite the security threats and debates surrounding the veil. the demand for clothing like this is only going to grow. winning top honors at sundance, the birth of a nation taking both the grand jury prize and audience award. the film's star nate parker said he poured everything he had into making the film. another called "wiener" took home the documentary prize. it detailed anthony wiener's sexting scandal. the screen actor's guild picking several women of color this year.
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>> ladies and gentlemen, welcome to diverse t.v. >> the british actor won two trophies just a few weeks after oscar nominees failed to nominate him. queen latifah won for playing bessie. she said viewers want to see more diversity. >> growth is important and paramount. change is inevitable, so you might as well wrap your minds bit and let's go. >> this actress took home two trophies for her work in orange is the new black. the diversity of the cast was praised. >> this is what we talk about when we talk about diversity. different race, color, creed, sexual orientation. thank you so much.
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>> first performance by an actor in a leading role. >> the results of the sag awards stand in stark contrast to the oscars which nominated no actors of color this year for a second year in a row, sparking a debate with the hash tag oscars so white. >> people might be surprised to know that basically in the last 15 years, about 15% of the acting nominees have been people of color. that's not great given that we have a country that is 35, 40% people of slower but that's not miniscule. >> observers responded with a hash tag sags so black. one person tweeted it is the academy that is outdated and lacks diversity. another person wrote sags so black and i love it. >> we have become a society of trending topics. diversity is not a trending
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topic. >> view la davis has already won an oscar, keen latifah was nominated, beasts of the southern wild, selma, 12 years a slave nominated in the last few years, so there is progress being made. i'm not saying it is great, but it is progress. >> voting for the sag awards ended friday. shifting the caucuses, millennials could cause an unexpected swing. we are back in two minutes with more of your world this morning. stay with us. we will see you then. >> understanding the epidemic. >> it was terrifying. >> it's like navigating a minefield. >> go inside the new medical breakthrough. >> you had quite a reaction there. >> that's crazy. >> i really feel my life changing. >> the freedom is unbelievable. >> techknow's team of experts
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show you how the miracles of science... >> this is what innovation looks like. >> ...can affect and surpise us. >> i feel like we're making an impact. >> let's do it. >> techknow, where technology meets humanity... >> only on al jazeera america.
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caucus day in iowa, after 18 months of campaigning voters make their choices for president. a moving target, the u.n. tries to push forward with talks to end syria's war but first they have to work out the ground rules. >> a global risk, the world health organization holding an emergency meeting today to weigh the dangers of the zika virus. they escaped inmates back behind bars. now there are questions over who helped them get out.
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good morning, welcome to your world this morning. i'm del walters. >> i'm richelle carey. the presidential campaign is about to get real in iowa. >> they say finally. voters going to the caucuses tonight to select their choice for the most powerful job in the world. court candidates, it has been an frenzied weekend of last minute campaigning and the democratic side polls showing title as a particular. des moines register gives hillary clinton a slight lead on bernie sanders. on the republican side, donald trump leads the field with 28%. head cruz is second with 23% support. al jazeera is live in des moines. still so much to be decided. what are you hearing about where
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voters stand right now? >> there are still so many votes for grabs and really, candidates are looking for those. recent voter registration roles show that more voters here in iowa are unaffiliated with any party than are affiliated with either republicans or the democrats. presidential candidates are really trying to target those undecided voters. >> we'll be patting out slips of paper fo for you to vote on. >> iowa holds its first in the nation caucuses today. over the weekend, it was all about the final push to get the candidates' message across and gotten the votes. hillary clinton told voters she's the most experience and most electable. >> i know the hard choices facing a president. if they're not hard they don't end up on the president's desk or in the situation room where i spend many many hours. >> bernie sanders pitched
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himself as the alternative. >> the status quo is simply not acceptable. we are going to make fundamental changes in our economy and in our political life. >> the latest polls show the top democrats in a dead heat, the margin a bit wider with the republicans. donald trump predicted many senators would soon predict him rather than his closest rifle ted cruz and he criticized the state of the economy under president obama. >> when i look what's going on with jobs, with trade deals, when i look at what's going on with this horrible iran deal where we pay $150 billion for absolutely nothing. >> while the stakes are high in iowa, a win in the caucus doesn't guarantee anything for presidential hopefuls. past winners have not gone on to take the presidency or the nomination and the process now that another challenge, the weather. a storm is bearing down on the state. >> everybody has to be in one place at one time. it means that if the weather is
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bad, it makes it harder for people to get to their caucus locations. of course, it's iowa, it's cold, there's a good chance of snow. >> candidates are hoping their own blizzard of last minute grassroots campaigning will overcome the weather. >> we can't roll the dice. literally millions of americans are counting on the men and women gathered here today to look every candidate in the eye to vet us, to say don't listen to what we say, look at how we've walked. >> they are walking a lot leading up to this actual caucus. normally only one in five iowaens actually take part but they expect turnout to be higher because of efforts designed to really bring those people in, namely there's a telecaucus tonight, gerbilly a giant conference call where eye was notes not living in the state will call in and take part to really boost those numbers
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tonight. >> this all gets underway in about 12 hours. how long will it be before we actually know the winners? >> well, we should have really strong preliminary numbers by the end of the evening in large part because of new software designed to report those figures back very, very quickly, so not only will this raise the hat, we're going to know results sooner than we ever did before. >> all very, very modern. thank you very much. the race for the white house is costly. candidates just reported just how much they raised in 2015 to the federal election commission. hillary clinton topped her rivals with more than $115 million and bernie sanders raised $75 million last year. ted cruz and ben carson led the pack in fundraising, donald trump's campaign pulled in with
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$19 million, much in the last month of the year. so far, donald trump has not taken money from super packs and proved that money isn't the only predictor of support. jeb bush raised the most super pac money of any candidates, $118 million. but of course he is near the bottom in the polls. >> hillary clinton defending the latest controversy surrounding her emails, she dismissed concerns over 22 emails deemed top secret, saying they should no longer be a campaign issue and called out republicans, she said for political posturing. >> this is very much like benghazi george, the republicans are going to continue to use it, beat up on me. i understand that, that's the way they are. after 11 hours of testimony answering every single question in public, which i had requested for many months, i think it's pretty clear they are grasping at straws. >> it's not clear if the emails were considered top secret at
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the time they were sent or classified afterwards. the last batch of emails, about 7,000 pages are set to be released later this month. the world health organization is holding an emergency meeting today to discuss the zika virus, the agency could be close to declaring an international health emergency. six more people have been diagnosed with zika virus in the u.s. they were infected traveling abroad. coming up, we'll be live in puerto rico where more than a dozen cases of zika virus popped up and the cdc has imposed a travel warning. 10 are dead following a suicide bombing in afghanistan, officials saying a man tried to go into a police station in kabul. he set off explosives near the gate of the building. twenty others have been injured. the taliban claiming responsibility for the attack. more trouble this morning in the negotiations to end the five year long war in syria. three blasts there killing more than 70 near damascus sunday, isil claiming responsibility. those attacks have now been put
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on hold until the u.n. envoy can meet with the opposition. he did meet with the government on sunday. >> there is a meeting planned for this afternoon and the meeting will mainly and actually exclusively focus on how we can get the implementation of international humanitarian law rewarding air bombings by rush and the regime, rewarding the prisoners, detainees as well as the besieged areas, of course, which are suffering and need urgent, very urgent relief. >> for the latest, we go to al jazeera's james bays. he is on the ground in geneva. >> both sides are here in geneva and there are talks taking place. there are no actual negotiations, the formal proximity talks with both sides at the same time here in the united nations haven't started. from the opposition side, there's a little bit of a fudge
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here. initially they said they wouldn't come unless certain conditions that are in the u.n. security council resolution that cradled this pros were met, the lifting of sieges, stopping of bombardment and the release of prisoners. none of those things have happened. some in the opposition want to keep this process going, they don't want to walk away, and so for now, they're having meetings but saying those meetings are about addressing those concerns rather than actually negotiating. i think they can keep this fudge going for a few days but as i say, there are some in the opposition delegation, particularly the armed groups that say we really need to see something concrete on the ground in syria or we will walk away, so i think a few more days of this slight confusion and then i think there will need to be a clear decision from the opposition whether they are going to stay and negotiate or whether they're leaving. >> that is al jazeera's james bays for us in geneva. suicide bombings in damascus
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threaten peace talks. more than 70 people were killed in this heavily guarded area near a shia shrine. isil claimed responsibility for the blast. secretary john kerry said it underscores why peace talks must succeed. >> while battlefield dynamics affect negotiating leverage, in the end, there is no military solution to the conflict. without negotiations the bloodshed will drag on until every form of infrastructure and every semblance of civilization i guess destroyed. >> our covering is continued from turkey. >> it is described as one of the worst attacks in government controlled damascus. dozens of people killed, the target is a shia district in the
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capital. it's clearly an attack which has a sectarian nature, isil claiming responsibility and really, this his in line with its policy. attacks like this only increase sectarian tensions and isil cannot thrive unless there is political instability, a security vacuum, so like i mentioned, the shia district, we also understand that a number of the casualties were shia fighters, because we know that fighters from lebanon from iraq have joined the fight on the side of the syrian president, and next to the site of the explosions is one of the most holiest shia shrines. it was protecting these this rhines that drew from the region to join the fight. the timing is coinciding with geneva talks where the international community us drying to get the warring sides to agree on a settlement.
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we do know that the international agreement priority is to confront isil and that cannot happen unless there is a political settlement in syria, so a message to the international community, we're still here, we are a potent force to be reckoned with and we do know isil is not invited to geneva, a reminder that we're still here. in brussels today, french and belgian leaders are meeting to talk about stopping isil. four people there trying to join the organization were arrested in belgium on sunday. the country has now become a key location for recruiting. >> on the surface, life in brussels is deceptively normal. this popular market draws tourists and locals just as always, but military patrols are never far away, a reminder of the active manhunt for suspects linked to the paris attacks. security levels have now been
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relaxed, but officially an attack is still possible and probable. for many belgians, life goes on. >> if there is anything going to happen, it will. we see a little more police, but that's bit. i don't really think a lot of people have stopped doing their daily business. >> when officials meet monday, it's to find shared solutions to the common threat of more violence. the paris attacks exposed major policing flaws and gaps in intel jones that both countries are now eager to close. all but two of the men linked to the attacks were from belgium and france. police of still looking for saleh abdeslam. he managed to escape paris passing through checkpoints because he hasn't yet been identified as a suspect. security experts are calling for better international cooperation. >> we have to share with the other countries. that is necessary.
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that has to be established, set up in order to get all the information about the suspected people. that has not been done yet. >> so far, france and belgium focused mainly on ramping up security. france carried out thousands of raised, but so far, only four terrorism related investigations have been opened. for weeks, the brussels district was the center of intense police activity. many of the paris attackers had links here. the bellian meet i can't described it as an in could you baiter of jihadism. locals are eager to improve the area's reputation, but better security alone won't solve the neighborhood's deeper social problems. >> when there is more security, it makes people feel safer, the threats don't disappear like this. we have to provide work and support and we have to change
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things for the young. >> the paris attacks were among the deadliest in europe since the second world war. now, many people welcome greater security but while the lure of radical armed group's remains, so too does the are you familiar of more violence. al jazeera, brussels. political change has come to myanmar. the parliament held its opening session today. they were sworn issue and took their seats. the party won 80% of all contested seats in november's historical election. a quarter of the seats are still reserved fortunate military. more on what is called decision day for iowa voters. we have heard from the candidates for months now and finally they are going to make their choices in the caucuses. we'll talk about what happens with the candidates if they lose the state. >> residents in see bring
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getting tested in ohio for lead poisoning. stay with us.
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here'sar radical idea. together we're going to go create an economy that works for all of us, not just the 1%. >> i want you to hold me accountable for delivering for you. i don't want to over promise and underdeliver. i'd rather under promise and over deliver. >> they are pretty excited as they should be. this is a big day, the
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candidates have been propping for it and it's finally arrived. >> they will be the first to let america know who they think should be the first president. candidates have chris crossed the state making final pitches. michael font roy is live for us in washington, d.c. thanks for being with us. bernie sanders and hillary clinton neck and neck in iowa. can hillary clinton lose and can sanders recover? >> yes, the iowa caucuses is littered with people who won the caucus either on the democratic or republican side and never made much noise beyond that. four years ago it was rick santorum, on the republican side mike huckabee. richard gephardt and others are on that list. she can recover if she doesn't
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win. bernie sanders could survive, as well. bolt candidates are very well funded and have the resources to fight longer. >> how confident should hillary clinton and donald trump be, because trump is actually down playing expectations on his side. >> i think the support for hillary clinton is stronger, more solidified and more innocence than it is for donald trump. part of that is because of the uniqueness of the iowa caucuses. there are a number of people showing up that haven't caucused before. the process is time consuming. we don't know with any real certainty whether or not many of trump supporters going to actually show up. there's one thing to tell a pollster you'll be there, actually another to show up and spend the two hours necessary to
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caucus. i wouldn't be surprised if donald trump's numbers of actually lower which may be why he is down playing that. >> if anything can be said about the last election, it is that minorities, black and latinos do not poll. are there numbers out there that make the numbers in the polls we're seeing soft? >> you know dell, i think the real important piece that i think the viewers have to understand is iowa is among the least racially diverse states in the country and as a consequence is always going to have lower than normal minority turnout. i think for that reason, it's difficult to see much energy among african-americans in particular, because the candidates aren't really speaking to minority issues. to the extent that they are on immigration for example, they are saying things that don't particularly attract minority voters. >> on the republican side, we hear so much about evangelicals
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and yet ted cruz, the son of a preacher is trailing donald trump. is it time to throw out religious definitions when it comes to the conservative evangelical vote issue iowa? >> i think it's times to that the conservative evangelical vote is prepared to go with whom ever they think can actually win and that the evangelical vote is also intertwined with a variety of other strains of republican conservatism, like terrorism. if somebody can speak to those issues even if they are not particularly religious in the case of donald trump, they have as much of an opportunity to get those voters as somebody who wears it more overtly like rick santorum, mike huckabee or ted cruz. >> back door deals, there's talk of a back door deal between hillary clinton and martin o'malley that would work against bernie sanders.
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what are you hearing about that? >> i think the issue here is that there are many fewer cashed dates on the democratic side and nobody believes martin o'malley is making much noise. there's the natural sort of by play that goes on to try to attract those voters. some may result in a deal further down the line. >> at least we are there. michael font roy, thank you very much. in iowa, the state population is smaller than the city of los angeles but it carries and outside influence in presidential elections. al jazeera's mary snow reports. >> yes, it's well known that iowa is the first in the nation to weigh in on the presidential
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race. less well known are the quirks behind its caucus system, start, how it became such a draw for white house hopefuls. >> we have won a great victory today. >> in 1972, it was only by chance that democrats in iowa scheduled their caucus earlier than everyone else. >> good morning, how are you? >> 1976, republicans in the state joined them. >> i'm running for president. >> when jimmy carter did well that year in iowa, he went on to win the white house, iowa cemented its first in the nation status. drake university's dennis goldberg said with it comes a process which is unlike ballots. >> you've got to be at your caucus caucuses site on a monday night, be prepared to spend possibly a couple of hours there and you have to hope there's no blizzard, that the car starts and there's nobody sick in the family. >> public buildings like
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churches, schools and libraries among the places used as caucus sites in the state's 106,081 precincts. in rural areas, a caucus might be held in a private home. once inside, rules are different depending on the party. >> after hearing for surrogates for candidates, they write their choice on a piece of paper. votes are counted and returned to precinct officials. for democrats, it's most of complicated. >> people have to physically stand up for their preferred candidate. in this year's three person race, they will say everybody in favor of hillary clinton go to that corner, everybody in favor of bernie sanders, go to this corner. everybody in favor of martin o'malley go to the other corner and everybody undecided or undeclared go to another corner. then, these are called preference groups. >> in order to be viable, a preference group has to have a certain percentage of support of
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those present at the caucus. if it doesn't meet the threshold, the group is dissolved and others try to win over its members. >> people are enticed to go over, even if it's a preference group for hillary clinton, sanders people may say come on, you don't really support her, you really want to support bernie, so there's lots of horse tradings and cajoling like that. it's really interesting to watch. >> iowa's system has pit falls. iowa had egg on its face in 2012 when party leaders declared mitt romney the winner of the republican caucus. >> first place, governor mitt romney with 274 votes. >> only to announce two weeks later, there had been a miscount. rick santorum was the actual winner and many argue that mistake cost santorum all important momentum. this year, iowa is working to make sure history doesn't repeat itself. mary snow, al jazeera. part of that decision in
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iowa could rest squarely on the showed of young people. >> how millennials could decide who walks away the winner tonight. stopping the spread, in puerto rico, more on the outbreak of the zika virus and why it has so many people there concerned.
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>> a critical first step on the road to the white house. >> you have to find common ground. >> i'm doing what's right for you. >> that's the kind of debate that we need to have. >> stay with al jazeera america for... >> it's going to be about getting people out to the caucus, which is not an easy thing to do. >> comprehensive coverage that's... >> the focus will be on south carolina tonight.
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that is des moines, iowa. it's the capital city and capital of the political universe at this hour as caucuses are set to begin at 7:00 p.m. eastern time. welcome back to your world this morning. after months of campaigning, iowa voters get their say in the presidential race today. they will head to caucuses around the state to select is choices for republican or democratic. it is the first official contest of the 2016 campaign. al jazeera is live in des moines, so the candidates have just about 12 hours to sway any undecided voters, any feel for how many undecided voters there actually are? >> oh, yeah, there are many many undecided voters. in fact, recent polls of republicans suggested that as many as 45% of likely republican
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caucus goers can be persuaded to change their minds. a lot of these candidates are targeting them. a good chunk of these undecided voters mill len yells, a group that everyone is trying to get a piece of. >> just days before the caucus, training at drake university for millennials called w.t.f. is a caulk with us and it's a hands on lesson on what happens in an iowaen caucus. many young people hold broadly diverse views. >> there is a huge disproportion amount of people of color locked up and this this is unjust for us. we consider this as one of the biggest unjusts of our generation. the suffering that my black brothers and sisters are enduring is heartbreaking. >> we went through september 11
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and we went looking barack obama being elected and the invasion of iraq and the financial crisis. i think those things shaped how we look at the world. >> i think the biggest issue would be a free market, obviously. >> richard, logan and bree, faces of young iowaen. saying the allowing of gay america makes it easy tore gain supporters. >> more and more millennials in the middle will switch their votes to this side. >> you feel the party is more welcoming? >> i feel the major is a big dividing issue, a big wedge issue especially for millennials. >> we got married four or five
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months ago, five months ago now, had the honeymoon, bath the house. now it's the caucus, we've been go go go go go. we are ready to sit and put our feet up and go wow, we're married. >> building a life with his new husband, he's worried federal perfect sits could hurt his family's future. >> just like we have to balance our bucket to do the mortgage and car payments and save for our kids' education, we have to make that work, but for some reason, our federal government doesn't do that. i believe that if we don't get the numbers right in the next decade, my kids are not bog to have the life that i want them to have, that the american dream says they should have. >> president of drake university student democrats is concerned about the collapse of the middle class. >> i hold two jobs. i go to school full time, and i still can't make it. i've been very fortunate. i was born white in a middle upper class family.
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i was private schooled my whole life and even i feel the effects of this, let alone the minority populations, people born into poverty, who feel it worse. >> mill millennials are consided poor at turning out to vote. >> the caucuses were held in january, when college students were on break, not on campus. this year is different. students will be back at school but they are influence may be limited to mostly college towns. >> rachel is a political scientists and director of the iowa caucus project at drake. >> when you have a few precincts that are heavy live populated by college students, their votes will matter a great deal in those precincts, but statewide, that's unlikely to have a major effect on the outcome of the
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vote overall. >> she seems to leave the vote open. it could be different this time. because of millennials ability to otherwise on line. >> if you can spark some political motivation under the votes of young people. >> everyone wants to set that flame afire and get young people out. even though iowa is not representative of the entire country, it's certainly much more agricultural, that within the millennial population, the key demographic, there's a diversity of views and they really provide a test for some of these candidates. >> iowa is always first, so that obviously gives it huge significance. we know in the past, just because you win iowa, doesn't really mean you're going to go on to win the presidency. how significant is the caucus this time around? >> you raise a very good point. consider this.
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right now we have fringe canned daylights that no one would have thought would be doing so well, namely donald trump and you have bernie sanders and iowa represent as test of sort of establishment of mid america. the question becomes if these normally fringe candidates can make it here, then they really have momentum coming for the larger election. to put this in more consequential terms, in 2008, president obama was campaigns, he won iowa and it was seen as a big moment because if a black man could win in a largely white state and grab that vote, he would have potential for the rest of the country. this is a test for candidates that would otherwise seem fringe. >> very good perspective there. live for us in des moines, thank you. join us tonight for live coverage of the iowa caucuses that begins 7:00 p.m. eastern time right here on aljazeera america. world health leaders are in geneva this morning for an emergency meeting on the zika virus. cases have been reported in 25
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countries and territories across the americas. the world health organization saying the virus is spreading in their words explosively. the agency could be close to declaring an international health emergency. robert ray is live in san juan puerto rico, the c.d.c. issuing a travel warning there as well as after a rash of new cases. how is the island handling this outbreak? >> 19 confirmed cases here in puerto rico. we're in the capital of san juan, the major issue right now is that health officials are very worried about the mosquitoes populating dense areas especially with a drought that has occurred in the past two years here, they are expecting a heavy rain season, which will increase the population of the mosquitoes and as you know, tourists from around the world flock to puerto rico especially this time of year with the warm temperatures. there's not a whole lot health officials can do, because
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there's no vaccine or anything like that. people when they contract the virus, it's not like there are visible signs. they can go to the hospital, one in five will probably be hospitalized, according to the c.d.c. the c.d.c. is working closely with health officials in puerto rico to figure out exactly the game plan. right now it's prevention, fumigating and making sure tourists and residents are spraying their bodies. let's listen to what the health minister had to say. >> we're certainly very concerned. we had the recent memory of the very vivid memory of the chicken goon i can't to the island that spread like wildfire. there's a lot more of symptomatic individuals, 70% 290% know they have that virus,
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so it's easy for surveillance purposes. for zika, it's a totally different story, because 80% do not show clinical signs. it will be a little bit of a challenge to monitor exactly how the disease is spreading. >> the world health organization does not meet frequently like this. the last one was ebola and they got criticized that perhaps they should have convened much earlier. they are meeting right at the proper time according to them and the c.d.c. as you said earlier, we could be seeing an international emergency global response prepared by as soon as tomorrow follow the world health organization out of geneva. overall, tourists are flocking here to san juan, beaches are packed. people are aware but whether or not they're very freaked out yet, doesn't seem that way. >> are you seeing a sense that
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the people coming there are concerned? are they buying deet at the stores or spraying themselves or just taking life as normal. >> a mix of both. we did hear chatter in the lobby here, where could they find mosquito display. it really popped up in the last few days. overall, clearly people are taking caution. the beach below me is packed already, but it's not like there is mosquito flying around everywhere here in san juan, the big issue is you get a rainstorm that comes in and standing water, that's clearly where the mosquitoes will breed, they come up and start biting people. you heard the health minister say that it's not easily detectable when people get this, so there is caution, but i wouldn't say it's hysteria.
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>> live from san juan, puerto rico, thank you very much. genetically modifying those mosquitoes may be the best way to get rid of them. that's what a company in oxford, england is doing. >> this is the mosquito that spreads dengue fever, yellow fever and now the zika virus. how to control and eradicate an insect one of numbers in the billions and can reproduce prolifically. >> one female can produce 16 million off bring, all able to spread the disease. the solution is to breed in a mortality jean that prevents the offspring reaching adulthood. >> at this lab, genetic biologists use an and the dead and allow them to create
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millions of the male mosquitoes. the males don't bite or spread disease. once released to the wild, they can decimate the mosquito population. >> as we release our males, the females can't tell the difference between our males and a wild one. if given the choice, it will be a 50-50 straight bet. if she mates with ours, then the offspring will die. it's a numbers game. we need to put more males out there so more of the females mate with ours, every time a female mates with one of ours, she's not going to have viable offspring, so you bring the population down. in practice, that means in a town within six months, you can reduce the mosquito population by over 90% and that's in every case that we've done it. >> between april and november last year in partnership with the authorities in the brazilian city, the company released 25 million of the modified males. it achieved an 82% drop in the
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number of wild mosquito larvae. the males are identified through a color marker which is passed on to their offspring, monitoring the offspring is a simple matter of seeing how many of the larvae show up with a red color. the company already has a factory in brazil producing millions of the transagainic mosquitoes every week and building a bigger facility to produce tens of millions of mosquitoes a week in anticipation of regulatory approval. the sites of fumigation vehicles blanketing vehicles with insecticide might esure the how many population but it has shoulder lived effect on the mosquito population. introducing a self destruct seen appears to be a far more effective tool and u.s. regulatorses looking at the program in florida. federal investigators are
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expected to release new information today about that fatal train crash last year that happened may 12, that amtrak derailment leaving eight dead, more than 200 hurt. at the time, the n.t.s.b. pointed to the train going too mast as the cause. today's report may include black box data and transcripts of the interview with the train engineer. first flint michigan, now debring, ohio with a water contamination problem. they are holding a second round of blood tests for some residents. they are trying to find if anyone is impact the by elevated levers of lead in the water supply. the. was only notified about this issue january 21, months after the public water system was notified. the director of water policy at the ohio environmental council joins us from columbus, ohio this morning. thank you for being with us. there's flint, now we're hearing about what's going on in ohio.
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i'm sure other towns are concerned, as well. what are the common factors in operations where this is happening? >> certainly. well, thank you so much, are first for having me on to discuss this very important, serious issue. we know that in the united states, we have aging water infrastructure, so very old lead pipes across the country and in fact, the american society of civil engineers gave our water infrastructure a grade of a d., a nearly failing grade here in the u.s., which is simply unacceptable for one of the richest countries in the world. in addition to that, when you combine that with the issue of corrosive water, that is when you have a real serious problem, so you have old lead pipes, corrosive water which then causes leeching of lead out of the water into our drinking supply, a real problem and then the third piece, the real nail in the coffin is a lack of
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government accountability and that was certainly the careless root multiple lines of government in flint, michigan where obligations to keep the public save and to protect clean drinking water were not taken care of. >> obviously it's still being pieced together, what went to terribly wrong in flint. generally speaking, who is responsible, where is the accountability to stop things like this from happening? >> well that's a great question. so, first of all, we do have these local water treatment facilities and there is -- that's the first point of responsibility for keeping drinking water safe, but the back stop is really in ohio, our state agency has the e.p.a. and they oversee these local drinking water facilities, so really both agencies are accountable to the public and need to follow the applicable federal and state laws. we also want to emphasize that
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in ohio, our state lawmakers do not have to wait to take action, so we have encouraged our state legislators again to look at improving our law where we can, things like increasing our public notification time, which we've seen as simply too lengthy in our law, making sure that we have better testing and also making sure that the enforcement is there and that penalties will be given when these local treatment facilities are not upholding their obligation again to keep drinking water safe. >> when a city is old, a town is old and also when there is a high personal of low income residents, how much more of a risk do they have of having bad drinking water? >> that's a great question and certainly we have seen this in flint michigan. i think many would agree it is so unfortunate that, you know, across the country,
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disadvantaged communities bear the burden of environmental pollution, and see that as a disproportionate rate. in ohio, we are waiting to see, sebring ohio, chagrin falls, a wealthier community, this could be affecting communities across the state of ohio. too soon to tell. it does aggravate the situation, though, to your point when low income communities, disadvantaged communities have these sorts of problems, they don't have the same sorts of resources to deal with the problem, so things like getting their own water testing done or getting water filters to put on in the home, those are things that are more difficult for these low income communities, and really aggravate the situation. >> melanie houston with the ohio environmental council, thank you very much. >> they are so concerned we are only seeing the tip of the iceberg. still ahead after eight days
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on the run, they are back behind bars this morning. >> thee california inmates back in jail as police try to figure out who helped them escape. strong storms on the west coast leaving thousands without power this morning. orning.
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the san francisco police department faces a probe after of the shooting of mario woods
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in december. it sparked racial tensions and calls for the police chief to be fired. a woman charged with helping inmates escape from a california jail is going to be arraigned today. >> all three men of back behind bars. >> the fugitives who escaped an orange county jail are back behind bars and officials are investigates conspirators. the jail's teacher is use accused of helping them with the planning stage. investigators say her relationship with one suspect went beyond the classroom. >> she visited him several times and developed a relationship with him and it seems to be more than just a casual friendship relationship and so she started doing his bidding to some extent. >> it ended outside a whole foods saturday when a man
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spotted a stolen van carrying two suspects. he alerted police and the race to catch the men played out on police radios. one man was arrested a block from the van with witnesses nearby. >> lay down, hit the ground, get on the ground. he did. he did. and they captured him, handcuffed him, put him in the wagon, got the other one on the other side. >> police later arrested the other man hiding inside the van. the third escapee had surrendered to police on friday. >> from the very beginning and i told you we were going to capture these individuals. >> the trio broke out of the orange county jail on january 22, cutting through a steel grill in their cell and
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rappeling down the jail facade on ropes made from bed sheets. >> when we come back, diversity in hollywood.
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parts of southern california are under a severe weather warning. the region was hammered with heavy rains this weekend, one killed. the winds topped 100 miles per hour in some areas. this storm uprooted trees, downed power lines and prompted flash flood warnings.
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thousands are still in the dark. last night's vein actor's guild had diversity. >> we have more. >> welcome to diverse t.v. >> actor idris elba summed up the tone of the awards. he was not nominated for an oscar. queen latifah won for playing bessie smith in h.b.o.'s "bessie." >> growing is important and paramount. change is inevitable, so you might as well wrap your mind around it and let's go. >> taking home two tree fees for her work in orange is the new
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black, laura prepon placed diversity. >> this is the face of diversity. thank you so much. >> the nominees are. >> the results of the sag awards stand in stark contrast to the oscars, which nominated no actors of color if year for the second year in a row, sparking debate across the industry and on twitter with a has she to go oscars so white. >> to some extent i have to say i think the academy is getting something of a bad rap on this particular issue. people might be surprised to know basically in the last 15 years that 15% of the nominees have been people of color. that's not great given that the country is 35% to 45% of color, but it's not miniscule. >> some tweeted sags so black hash tag.
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another tweeted: >> another person wrote: >> we have become a society of trending topics. diversity is not a trending topic. >> viola davis won, queen latifah was nominated a couple of years ago, beasts of the so you hadern wild, selma, 12 years a slave nominated for best picture in the last few years, so there is progress being made. it's not great, but there is progress. >> voting for the sag awards ended friday, more than two weeks after the debate erupted over the lack of diversity in the academy awards nomination. >> that's it for us here in new york. >> your world this morning back tomorrow morning beginning at 7:00 a.m. eastern time. of course we're going to have all the results from the iowa caucuses, who won and where all the campaign and the campaigning goes from here. we will see you tomorrow morning
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back here at 7:00 a.m. stay with us. a suicide bombing in afghanistan's capitol. the taliban says it's responsible. >> hello, i'm in doha with the world news from al jazeera. also ahead, syria's opposition said it's received assurances on providing relief to people as negotiations for talks continue in geneva. >> the new faces of politics in myanmar, taking their seats after decades of military rule. stepping up the

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