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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  February 3, 2016 7:00am-9:01am EST

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criminal charges, prosecutors go after the gas company behind the huge leek in california. a new case reported in the case, this time zekar transmitted from sex, not a mosquito. >> storming through a severe weather threat from the central plains to the deep south. thousands of residents have been driven from their homes near los angeles because of a major gas leak. the company faces criminal
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charges for not reporting it. >> that leak has been going on for months leading to health problems about the environmental effect. prosecutors are taking action. >> john henry smith is here with details. what repercussions could the charges have? >> the charges are misdemeanours, and any fines would be small for a company that reaps billions in revenue. it would be a $75,000 fine for failing to report the league, and $1,000 per day for each day of the week. juxtapose that against an unfolding disaster that could reach outside california's borders. >> reporters: this family is among 13,000 that had to leave their homes to escape a methane gas leak that spewed 80,000 of methane gas into the air since late october. >> our 13-year-old daughter has
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been sick. and missed school. and has a horrible cough. >> now four misdemeanour criminal charges have been signed against the california gas company, and accuses the company of releasing greenhouse gases and reporting it leak for three days. >> this came as a lawsuit was fired against socalgas. the impact of this unprecedented leak was devastating to families in our state, our environmental and effort to combat global warming. the gas has been leaking from a take aids-old pipe, with no safety valve to turn it off. >> the people that put the well down were not intending that that encasing would be used to inject natural gas they were trying to extract oil it was insisted that the
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company complied with state and federal regulations in the time leading to the leak. >> we operate with safety, and we are in ompliance. >> socalgas promised that a relief well will plug the week by the end of february counting the lawsuit by attorney-general harris, 11 local state for federal agencies are conducting investigations or filing lawsuits against socalgas. the company will face arraignment on criminal charges for two weeks we have been covering the story for some time. with so much gas released, how big a problem are we talking about? >> experts are in agreement putting 80 tonnes into the atmosphere is equivalent to putting 70 million cars on the road.
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this, in essence runs counter to all efforts california made to cut emissions. >> it's a problem for the country, john henry smith, thank you. >> a man at the center of flint's oil crisis will not testify at a congressional hero. state appointed manager darnell early was in charge when the city switched the water. his attorney said his client could not comply with a subpoena issued last night. we have the latest. >> reporter: the fbi says it's teaming up to investigate the flint water crisis with the environmental protection agencies, the u.s. postal inspection service and federal prosecutors in michigan. the fbi says the focus will be on whether anyone violated federal law. they called for the remove of led pipes from the water, starting with those at the highest risk of exposure. >> we want to start with the
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highest risk home of kids under six, and pregnant women, this must happen immediately. that's what i'm asking for. i am morally obligated to use every bit of the power and authority my office has to make client's water safe. and the city successful for the people who live and work here. under a state appointed emergency manager, flint switched a water supply from the system in 2014 to save money. it used polluted water leading to corrosion and supply lines and led contamination in tap apart. the e.p.a.'s top environmental official made the first trip to flint since the start of the water crisis. promising to use all resources to fight the crisis. >> we are not going to resolve the problem overnight. we have to work together, and it will take short and long-term
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commitments. we are here for the long haul. >> mccarthy acknowledged that she called for the e.p.a. response after traces of lead were discovered. >> they made it clear that failure for patrols, after switching for the water. led to the crisis. >> we are here today because a state emergency manager made the decision that the city of flint would stop the water and perform untreated water, all to save money there are also growing concerns that the zika virus in the u.s., someone in texas, but after having sex with an affected person. >> reporter: the vast major city
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of infections happened. for the first time a case was transmitted. it was acquirement. the newly infected person had not travelled there. >> if a person is travelling to one of those 26 countries declared to be transmitting the disease. mostly in the caribbean and south america, they should use contacts infections are mild and deaths rare. scientists are looking at the vir and yous a rise in birth -- virus and a rise in birth defects. it's been said the virus could affect 4 million people, and announced a response unit. >> to have a tenfold increase in
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numbers and the potential for spread not just across latin america, but africa and asia, with the highest birth rates in the world, we believe is a matter of public health concern, constituting an international emergency. >> the french maker announced a project to develop the vaccine, the w.h.o. is focussing on the spread. a vaccine may not be ready for a long time. >> at the minimum, we are talking about years, not months. >> testing will be possible in texas. first state health officials need to make sure they have the right equipment. >> right now they have to send samples. dozens of u.s. residents have been diagnose with zika, they were people that travelled abroad. >> in the state of florida, six
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travel-asserted occasions, so officials are actively spraying. >> what about athletes training for the olympics. and they are around the corner. >> brazilian officials say by then the mosquito population will be down, and are saying that athletes have zero risks, and are encouraging athletes to go down there. >> brazil says it plans to deploy 200,000 soldiers and health care workers to contain the workers. they are checking for stagnant water. health officials say there has been 4,000 cases of microcephali, babies born with small heads. a group of officials are meeting in uruguay to come up with a unified response from the virus. >> we are less than a week away. and the dehli candidates are
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stepping up. sanders and hillary clinton will take part in a television town hall meeting tonight. as al jazeera lisa stark reports, new hampshire is known for his crisis. >> after iowa, a double dose of the clients. >> i'm so thrilled that i'm coming to new hampshire after winning iowa. >> reporter: it was a squeaker of a win, but the campaign will take it. hillary clinton told her supporters that they will need to work hard as they battled bernie sanders, who has a considerable lead in the polls. as they court voters, she is looking ahead. >> new hampshire will decide who will go toe to toe for the republicans to make sure they don't wreck us again bernie sanders is well-known
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and liked in new hampshire. >> last night we began the political revolution not just in iowa and new hampshire, but all over this country. >> the polls are likely to tighten aren before the primary. anthony ray hinton's number one supporter told al jazeera, she has her work cut out for her. >> i think she'll win. if she gets a good debate. and has enough time. >> reporter: what we saw last night was we saw that old regan coalition coming back together again. >> on the republican side, while ted cruz has a win in his column, adding another may not be easy. >> he'll have more of a challenge. it's a different demographic make up. more libertarian. a lot less socially and religiously conservative. >> it's more establishment candidates, such as marco rubio, who could pull out another
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surprise showing in new hampshire. >> i can take our message to people that have not voted before. >> reporter: he's squaring off against governors, and as for donald trump, he has a wide lead in the polls. >> do we thing some air will go out of the balloon now that he's not the winner. >> second or third place finish. i think other candidates will be emboldened to go after him more aggressively. >> for both side, the nest side is critical. weeding out some candidate and propelling others forward. al jazeera on the campaign trail. >> barcelona said he accepted policy. ben carson was spent when the
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crews's campaign suggested he was leading the race in iowa. the team, the candidate was going home to rest for new hampshire. it should have corrected what was said, and that ben carson was not leaving the race. >> meanwhile. while a senator used a private act to send an email to hillary clinton on the personal server, it happened in 2011. and the message contained information. there was no indication that the information was classified when it was sent. >> house republicans vowed to press on. they couldn't overtirn a vito that would have ended key parts of the affordable care act. the house needed two-thirds majority, and failed with a final vote of 231-186
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a powerful snow storm swept through the colorado, all the way through to dakotas, and white outs closed highways. strong winds made it tough on travellers. >> part of the south under threat from thunder storms. several tornados touching down in alabama. causing property damage. in tennessee, the high winds damaging homes and schools. schools will be closed today. >> there's a chance for severe weather. heavy rain could be the bigger problem. >> nicole mitchell. good morning, with the same system causing problems today. as mentioned yesterday, yesterday was the bigger day in terms of snow and rain and the potential for severe weather. here is where we have it. lingering snow in places lis wisconsin and michigan. look at the rain, up and down.
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lined up with the east coast. as it moved through last night. look at what it did. the reds are areas with different toronto reports. nine that you saw. powerlines down and homes damaged. it was expected, but still a lot of severe weather. it moves on. it's not out of the question of the it's a lower risk, but we have a marginal risk. wind damage would be the biggest thing. weather storms now, so we have heavy rain, alabama, to portions of tennessee, north of the area, and some places could be 3-4 inches through the day today. coming down quickly, the reds are the biggest concerns. overnight we were concerned about that because it's hard to see and tell how deep the water is. that will be a problem. ahead of the front, temperatures in the 50s and '60s.
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the other place we have to watch is marylands, north pennsylvania, new jersey. all the heavy rain could be a flood area as this all moves through. >> is it unusual to have tornado late in the season. >> or early. we do get them. seems we have a few more winter tornado than formal. >> on the front line. >> the defense secretary improving levels of combat. some are skeptical. >> and a mid air explosion. a hole ripped in the side of a plane.
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president obama today will make the first visit of his presidency to a u.s. mosque. >> he'll sit with muslims at the islamic society at baltimore. the white house says the president will focus on the need to speak out and promote religious freedom. care says the number of hate crimes against muslim americans, and the attacks. the president and founder of the republican muslim coalition will be with the president at the mosque later today. thank you for being with us. when you meet with this president, who, himself, is accused of being a muslim, and denied it, but never said so what, what will you say to him? >> well, we are very excited that he is finally visiting a mosque. i think president bush visited a mosque during his first year of presidency. it's sad to see it's taking until his last year of
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presidency to step on a mosque. i'm looking forward to having him. i'm excited that he is reaching out to muslim americans, and meeting us at our place of worship. like he's gone to churches and synagogues before. i think it's time to see dehli candidates and the president show up at our mosque. >> you mentioned the ward finally three times, seems there's a bit of ir takes that he has not gone to a mosque. how is this that this is the first time and this is a big deal? >> it bothers me a lot. he's using last-ditch effort to retch out to voters and gather up support for elections for democrats, but i think republican candidates visiting mosques need to reach out to the local communities to get over
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the fear of islam and get the minority voters. >> in the defense of democrats, not one said ban all muslims. you wrote an article saying all muslims should be banned. you invited him to visit a mosque with you. you did so in december. did he write you back? >> we are talking to his campaign. i've talked to his campaign manager cory a few times. we are working on setting up a visit for him to visit a mosque later this year. i think, you know, trying to target donald trump, and getting him to attend a prayer service at a mosque is going to take some time. we are starting to invite marco rubio, cruz, a lot of... >> why, why will it take time? >> because of the anti-islamic sentiments floating around. he has worked with muslims and has property all over the middle
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east. i think lately he's advised by anti-islamic advisors, and behind the rhetoric and banning all muslims, i would like him to change his perspective. >> yes or no, you have not heard from the candidate himself. >> not from donald trump himself, no. >> i want to ask and talk about the broader issue. when the issue was racism and president kennedy, trying to entering grate blacks across the country, do you think this president has been forceful enough in rhetoric and actions to protect the nation from muslim phobia? >> no, i don't think so. anti-islamic sentiments have known up. i think he's failed foreign policies, defense policies. a lot of policies created it.
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and that's why we are the ones that suffer and become the targets. >> what more can he do? >> i mean, he should have been strong. he pulled out of iraq. they created i.s.i.s. calling them a jv team. it's all directed at our community. and all terrorism with islam and muslims - we are seeing hate crimes come up. mosques are getting attacked. people are targeted for wearing head scarves and muslims are being hurt all over. i think, you know, he could have helped. his visit will be a first step. and i hope the other... >> you blame him more than the republicans for that? >> i think republicans are reacting to his policies. i think, you know, he could have been stronger and more assertive on the world stage. i think he pulled out and he made the first speech in cairo, and now, 7 years later, he was
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going to a mosque, what was he doing for the last six years, j didn't he show up at a mosque the first time it was burnt down during his president say. we had several hate crimes go on. i feel he could have done a lot more. we are hope thfl this is a first step for dehli candidates. they may not use the rhetoric, when it comes to national security they talk against islams and muslims. we'd like to see it change. >> thank you for being with us this morning. >> and we invite you to stay tuned. al jazeera america will bring the president's remarks at 12:15 eastern time. >> military officials are searching for answers in the marine helicopter crash in hawaii. trace elements of d.n.a. have been recovered in the water.
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none of the 12 marines have been found. the navy is looking for debris military leaders say it may take years before they can fully integrate women in december roles were opened to women. the implementation is proving to be complicated. >> reporter: much of the more than two hours of testimony concerned a controversial year-long experiment at 29 palms california, and which mixed gender units were found to be less proficient at combat tasks than male unit. the navy secretary came under fire from john mccain for dismissing the results. >> showing you that the marine study is flawed and bias even if you didn't see the study. >> reporter: mavis argued that
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the study was not a true test. the troops had to pass a minimum test. >> no one had to meet a standard for the ground combat units. there were no standards. women's advocates say that the marine corp's experiment was a way to justify excluding women from the infantry. among the critics senator christian jilly bad. >> the people ail marines -- female marines were scrutinized for the minor fitness. competing a gains men with many years experience. the pentagon was accused of being too quick to dismiss difficulties against men and women. when it comes to brute tasks, a general that admitted in combat
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size matters. >> being big, strong, having a certain body mass gives you an advantage. >> reporter: there was broad agreement that standards must never be lowered to accommodate women, some senators were skeptical that the promise would be kept to promote more opportunities. >> it's hard to imagine down the road five years from now, 10 years from now, if we don't have successful gradation us from this physically demanding programme. it's hard to imagine that this conversation won't take a different tone, and i don't see how we can guarantee na in the future the standard will not be diminished. >> the last thing in the world a woman needs it to join a unit with everyone looking over their shoulder saying well, you are not the same as we are. so i don't think anybody here thinks that standards should be
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lowered. >> also during that senate hearing, two top generals suggested that american women should be required to register for the draft. army chief of staff, and marine court commandant said they'd support the move. there's not been an involuntary draft inns is the vietnam war. >> when we come back, we talk about the battle for alep jox. >> the opposition warns it could jeopardise talks in geneva and how the u.s. is preparing for a possible megaquake.
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>> from rural midwest to war-torn mideast. she went for the money and found
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a greater calling... that could cost her everything. >> this is one of the most important sites in the century. >> proudest moment in my life. welcome back to your world this morning. taking a look at today's top stories. a gas company in southern california defends its actions this morning now that it has been criminally charged in a huge gas leak. prosecutors say the company so cal gas violated laws by failing to report and contain the leak in porter ranch. it forced 15,000 people from their homes. congress will hear testimony about flint's water case.
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darnell early's attorney saying his client can't comply with the subpoena that was only i should last night. >> an international meeting underway in uruguay where health officials are trying to figure out how to contain the zika virus. this as doctors in the accident say a case there was likely sexually transmitted from someone infected in venezuela. the c.d.c. urges people to use condoms. on offensive to cut off opposition supply lines in aleppo. >> the push is backed by russian airstrikes as the most intense seen yet. 45 civilians have been killed. the offensive coming as the u.n. struggles to get both sides to the negotiating table for peace talks in geneva. our reporter is live there now. could this new round of fighting affect the talks? >> del, it's had a hugely negative impact on the talks already. in fact, it's the primary reason
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why these talks have essentially come to a standstill. one member of the h.n.c., the main opposition negotiating body here in geneva told our team a little earlier that the russians aren't just bombing aleppo, they are also bombs the geneva talks. that's want sense among the opposition here. they are extremely frustrated. that they came here, were delayed but came with as they said reassurances that the humanitarian situation would be addressed in syria, that perhaps the siege and the bombardment might cease for a while so these negotiations could actually go forward, but that health happened. in fact, it's only intensified. now russia's come under criticism from the international community in particular, the u.k. foreign secretary who called out what he said was basically hypocrisy on the part of the russians to sponsor peace talks in geneva while
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participating in the bombardment and helping the assad regime in the north of syria. right now, they are really at a standstill and we just have no idea at this stage when the meeting meeting might take place. >> muhammed, that said, what is the u.n. now doing to get both sides back to the table. >> right now, it's really you have several meetings that are going on. essentially the u.n. is trying to make sure that these talks don't collapse. we know that there was the u.s. envoy for syria, the u.n. envoy for syria, that they had gone and met for a time with members of the h.n.c., the opposition group here in geneva, they were at their hotel a short while ago, reassuring them, so they won't walk out and leave geneva.
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members of the staffan de mistura, the u.n. envoy's team were at the hotel where the syrian regime is trying to reassure them. a lot of delicate diplomacy going on, pressuring both groups to make sure they are here, but nobody really knows at this stage what is going to happen in the hours to come. >> muhammed, thank you very much. a frightening scene on a commercial flight over somalia, an apparently explosion blew a hole in the side of the plane. the jet had just taken off and flying at 14,000 feet when the blast happened. the pilots quickly turned the plane around and were able to land safely. >> quite quite definitively that this was a bomb of some kind, probably about something a hand grenade size that would make this hole inside the airplane. >> two were injured. so far there is no official explanation for the explosion issues the t.p.p. or transpacific partnership is going to be officially signed tomorrow in new zealand. 12 nations are going to sign
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off. they represent half the world's economy but that treaty is also very controversy. al jazeera reports. >> tony's family's been making wine outside new zealand's largest city, auckland for 80 years. this batch will be sent to poland. 60% of their wine is exported. it's a sector of their business they can grow after the in trough ducks of the transpacific partnership. >> if the negotiations open the markets, it's up to the businesses and as a winery in new zealand to actually go and sell ourselves sell our product. it makes us more competitive. >> the deal has been normally negotiated by 12 nations over five years. >> it stretches back to the year 2000 when new zealand and singapore signed an agreement later expanded to chile and brunei. the united states and other countries started talks about
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widening the agreements. >> that's when critics say the deal became about big business and control, with the u.s. trying to outdo china in the region. >> it's kind of a cold war by proxy of trade and investment agreements and that's a real worry, because not only do the corporations who have had special insights and input into this agreement get to be center stage, but there is no balance of the interests. >> there have been many protests against the t.p.p. opponents say nations will lose their sovereignty because they'll need to change laws to accommodate the agreement. those signing the deal say that is nothing new. >> every agreement means they have to change their laws. we have a successful high quality free trade agreement with china. we gave up the right to charge duties on many chinese goods when they come into new zealand.
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>> it does not create legally binding obligations signing the deal. opponents will use the time to try to stop the t.p.p. back in this country, we could find out later today if bill cosby will face trial on sexual assault charges. a judge will hear more testimony after a former prosecutor said he gave big companies by more than a decade ago. we are outside the courthouse. some of the most important testimony came from that prosecutor. what did he tell the judge. >> absolutely right. this case is a modern case but at its roots are events that took place over a decade ago. at the very center, a deal was struck between the then district attorney and bill cosby not to prosecute the comedian and the issue was, was that meant to be
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forever. >> entertainer bill cosby arrived add court looking every one of his 78 years. in the courthouse, only one issue, might a 2005 non-prosecution agreement with a previous district attorney rule out prosecuting cosby. the case stems from a complaint by andrea constan in which she claimed cosby drugged and sexually assaulted her. there were several reasons the prosecutor did not go after him, saying she waited a year before going to police by which time there was no opportunity to collect traceable evidence. she said the fact that she contacted a civil attorney before going police hurt her case and he said she made inconsistent statements. on cross examination, caster made it clear he thought cosby had inappropriately touched her
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but said he thought the admissible part of her evidence didn't add up. all these things created a situation where she'd ruined her credibility and would not be believed by a jury. he said his decision not to prosecute several years ago meant he couldn't take the fifth, forcing him to testify in her civil case. she later accepted a financial settlement from the entertainer. gloria allred represents many of the more than 50 women who claim cosby assaulted them, women for whom a civil settlement represents their best hope of address. >> i find it a bit ironic that mr. cosby would seek to exclude evidence that he in fact gave quaaludes to women when that was his testimony. does he want to exclude the truth? i thought mr. cosby always wanted his day in court.
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now he appears to want to dismiss a day in court, that criminal case. >> bill cosby has repeatedly denied any wrongdoing. >> early news this morning, chloe goins has withdraw her lawsuit, one of cosby's accuser because her evidence put forward could not be corroborated. >> back to this case, there is going to be a hearing today. what do we expect? >> we expect this to wrap up today. remember, this is not a trial, it's a pretrial hearing, so everything that i've talked about involves the charge and the defense and the prosecution, so more of that today. the judge will rule whether this case can go ahead, three options on the table, dismiss it completely, or the trial can begin including bill cosby's 2005 deposition or it can begin without it.
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>> january, thank you. former drug company c.e.o. martin shkreli is due in court on security fraud charges. he has mired a famous defense lawyer to represent him. his company raised the price of an h.i.v. drug by 5000%. prosecutors say he expected a windfall from that move and an email they released, with him writing should be a very handsome investment for all of us. lets cross our fingers the estimates are accurate. president obama signed a bill requiring federal buildings on the west coast, earthquake proof. >> at the pacific northwest seismic network, scientists are looking for a few seconds of advantage warning, developing a sensor system that will tell them quickly when an earthquake
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hits. >> it will detect the non-damaging seismic waves at a location and quickly determine the size and location of that event, and transmit that information to users in population centers with the information on how long it will take for them to experience strong shaking. >> earthquake, earthquake, strong shaking expected in 21 seconds. >> those few extra seconds can make a difference if the warning can be spread to the public fast. >> it can save many many lives. >> the west coast needs that extra time, time that could be bought by an expanded sensor array. >> we are sitting on a ticking time bomb. >> for the pacific northwest, it's a matter of when this part of the country not normally associated with quakes will experience a magnitude nine
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nightmare. chris gold finger, marine biologist has studied the zone which stretches from northern california to vancouver island, about 80 miles offshore. it's where two pieces of the earth's crust collide, with one sliding under the other. >> at the upper edge, it gets stuck, so forces the north american plate that sort of buckle like this elastically and every 300 to 400, 500 years, it will let go. that's what generates the tsunami. >> evidence that something like this will happen in the future is written in the past. >> these are 1999. >> these are old. >> i know these better than i know my neighbors. >> this is what we think is probably the biggest earthquake cascadeia's had.
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we call it t.11. >> how often, where, and how powerful are key questions, and of course. >> are we over due? >> for the most part for vancouver, you would have to say no, we can we are roughly 350 years into an average cycle. you won't say necessarily that we're overdue. for the southern part, we are 250 years into a 240 year cycle. >> he sees a one in 10 chance on the northern end, and also urges disaster awareness and planning. completing the earthquake early warning system could take three to five years if proper funding is in place and proper funding is a lot of money. >> the initial investment would be 38 million right up front and then 16 million per year on going for continuous operations
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and fema estimates that the damage from earthquakes on the west coast is roughly $4 billion a year. >> so a good investment. >> a very good investment, yes. >> japan and four other countries already have systems like the one the seismic center has started and wants to finish. allen schauffler, al jazeera, stealth, washington. water regulators in california are extending emergency conservative measures until fall. the latest numbers show the state cut water use by 18% last month. governor jerry brown hoped the drought stricken state could cut 25% water use. it is the third straight month the state missed its target. the storm system that plowed through the plains could produce blizzard conditions. it is a story of contrast everywhere we look. >> we definitely had those blizzard conditions yesterday but still lingering effects. a lot of the storm moved on, that's the heavy rain we talked about in the east coast to the
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south, still some areas of snow. you can pick out that this is less than the first original frames of this, but we'll still get decent amount witness u.p. of michigan, rest of michigan. high winds is our concern today. some areas saw amounts among the foot mark, with the wind blizzard conditions we talked about. we still have advisories today. as far back as wyoming, we still have blizzard warnings in effect, not for new snow coming down, because blizzard is the combination of the wind and snow. even though not new snow, the snow on the ground is creating a ground blizzard because the winds are gusting over 60 miles an hour or could through the course of the day, which is still going to reduce visibility just like a normal blizzard with the snow coming down at the time. here's the rest of that system.
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we were just talking about california and the drought situation, which we still have for a lot of the state. we've really chewed away at it in portions of the northwest and we have yet more rain coming in the next few days here. we'll see into parts of washington state, maybe five or six inches and for higher elevations, more of the snow that all the skiers have enjade. >> if only that could trickle down to the los angeles basin. we have been looking out morning wondering is it you, the clock ticking now for one lucky lottery winner in southern california. lottery officials say a winning super lotto plus ticket from august when stephanie was there still has not been claimed. it is worth $62 million, bought at a 711 in chatsworth. the lucky winner has until wednesday to show up or all the money disappeared. >> if that were me, do you think i would be here? >> of course you would.
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>> right. >> renters have the recourse when landlords fail to provide just the basics.
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statehousing laws offer little protection for renters in arkansas, lack of standards mean landlords can make you pay rent in full even though the property is lacking. >> a lot of tenants are left stranding as the homes they lived in for years are condemned. we have the story. >> what's your biggest fear? >> why do you stay? >> i don't have no money and i don't have nowhere to go. >> on december 21, 4 days before christmas, the residents of the alexander amount complex in little rock, arkansas received a notice that was hardly in the holiday spirit. >> i got some boxes, but what you need to see is over here. >> caroline ford was among the
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families told they had one week to vacate their homes because the complex was condemned. >> did you ever think you would be in a position like this? >> no. >> what are you going to do? >> i don't know, i really don't. >> in condemning alexander, the fire chief found conditions so bad, he called them life threatening. among the problems were widespread mold, exposed wiring and faulty plumbing. >> when you moved in here, had you heard stories about this place? >> yeah. >> but you still moved in. >> they take me. because i didn't have no money. >> her plight is not uncommon. arkansas is one of the worst places in the country to be a renter. if you're a low income rentaller, your options are especially bleak. >> the roof fell in. >> the roof fell in! >> yes. >> was there anybody living there? >> yeah, they was actually
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asleep at the time. >> fernando is a resident at the apartments. >> this is unsanitary, this is my back yard. >> thises is a dead animal! >> yeah. >> the state of arkansas does not require what's called habitability for renters. that means landlords aren't required to provide the basics. working plumbing, heating, hot water, unless it's written into the lease. alexander opts is one of at least three complexes to be condemned by the city in the last year and a half. for tenants, the negative impact of the landlord web tenant laws have been well documented. >> we are not taking any media at the property. >> we tried speaking with jason bolden, a real estate attorney and the landlord who owns the alexander amounts along with more than 60 other apartments. >> i have no comment. >> the residents in bolden have
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sued the city to keep the complex open. for now, the court granted them a restraining order and for some residents, it's their only hope. >> what are you going to do if they condemn the amounts? >> i don't have no place else to go. >> go into a shelter? >> yeah, i don't have but the $700 they give me a month. >> al jazeera, little rock, arkansas. >> you can see more of his reporting on america tonight at 9:30 eastern, 6:30 pacific. history is going to be made in the olympics games in rio, the first athlete to compete wearing a hijab. she earned a bronze medal in athens saturday. she started fencing when she was 13. she will compete both as an individual and in the team events. no superbowl for ryan murphy, a safety on the practice squad for the denver broncos.
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he was questioned in a prostitution sting. murphy was in charge but his brother and a woman expected of being a prostitute received citations. he was assigned to the practice squad back in november. another nfl great may have suffered a debilitating brain disease. "the new york times" reports former oakland quarterback ken stabler had the condition found in numerous former nfl players when he died last year. he donated his brain for study as part of his will. he wanted everyone to understand why his mind slipped so quickly during his final years. amazon is taking it profitable back business off fine. it will hope 400 physical book stores. it opened its first brick and mortar store in seattle last november. mcdonald's giving away books
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with their happy meals. the giveaway is a partnership with the non-profit reading is fundamental. ahead in our next hour, syria in crisis, the stumbling blocks to stop the fighting and raise billions of dollars worth of aid. as flint officials face questions in washington, the acre problems to fix the water problem now. we are back in two minutes. stay with us. . >> understanding the epidemic. >> it was terrifying. >> it's like navigating a minefield. >> go inside the new medical breakthrough. >> you had quite a reaction there. >> that's crazy. >> i really feel my life changing. >> the freedom is unbelievable.
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>> techknow's team of experts show you how the miracles of science... >> this is what innovation looks like. >> ...can affect and surpise us. >> i feel like we're making an impact. >> let's do it. >> techknow, where technology meets humanity... >> only on al jazeera america.
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calling the city into account, flint officials before congress this morning over the water crisis but the former stir manager won't be there. double trouble, a california gas company faces criminal charges and a state lawsuit for a gas leak that's forced thousands to leave their homes. a new threat, texas officials finding a new case of the zika virus sexually transmitted by an infected person. the issue at the mosque is we didn't know who was behind it, who was in it, where it came
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from. >> distrust in a wyoming town, backlash over a new mosque as president obama prepares to address the rise of islamaphobia in the u.s. today. welcome to your world this morning, i'm stephanie sy. >> congress will begin hearings into the flint water crisis but the man at the center of the problem is not going to be there. >> cornell early was subpoenaed to appear but says he cannot comply. protestors will be there and want to be heard on the crisis that is threatening their health. we are live in flint this morning. andy, what will be going on at this hearing and why won't darnell early be there? >> well, early was originally just asked to testify in front of this congressional hearing
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and he refused, but late last night, we learned from the detroit free press that he's actually now been subpoenaed. his attorney tells the free press that he simply couldn't make it in washington in time for today's hearing. early has long said that he wasn't responsible for the crisis, that when he was the emergency manager, he simply signed off an what the flint city council had already agreed to do, which was switch the water supply over to the polluted flint river, but even the head of the e.p.a. whose handling things on the ground here in flint, the operations manager, who just arrived yesterday, squarely laid the blame at early's feet. we do know that protestors are on their way to d.c. what do they want the panel to know? >> that they're still suffering, dealing with problems of their water shut off, because they refuse to pay their water bills because the water is polluted. they want answers.
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what they'll hear today is also from the michigan environmental qualities new director. he will testify in information released that he's blaming the e.p.a. for all this, saying they dragged their feet when they were learning about these problems in the water. the e.p.a. long said it was the michigan department of environmental quality's fault for not instituting the corrosion controls in the water, that the e.p.a. had asked for, so a lot of finger pointing going on, and in fact, both the director of the michigan department of environmental quality and the regional director of the e.p.a., both lost their jobs in this water crisis, so a lot of blame going around that they'll hear about today. certainly and blame aside, there is also an f.b.i. investigation. why are though involved and what are they looking into specifically? >> well, they're looking in to see whether actual federal violations of law took place here. they're being kind of vague about it now, joining with the
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u.s. postal service inspection that is also investigating this, federal investigators, the e.p.a. sent this new person appointed by president obama to oversee the operations here in flint. she just arrived yesterday and she said her biggest goal right now is to target the enables here with the highest risk of lead contamination. it's not all evenly distributed. the neighborhoods on the north side of the city are where the problem is really at its most serious. while the operations go on to fix the problem, as you saw there you, the blame over there and moo to blame in all this goes on and we'll hear about it today in washington. >> the residents of flint still waiting for drinkable water. thank you, andy. >> we'll speak with a resident from flint about the challenges that she and her fame have faced as a result of a crisis in our next half hour. we are seeing the first criminal charges against the gas
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company in california over a gas leak leading to health problems and evacuations. >> this family are among the 13 those people who have left their homes in porter ranch to escape a methane gas leak. it has spewed 80,000 metric tons of methane into the air since late october. >> our 13-year-old daughter, she's been sick, as well and missed school. she has a horrible horrible cough. >> l.a. county district attorney jacki lacy fired four misdemeanor control charges against souther california gas company, accusing them of releasing the greenhouse gases and failing to report the leak for three days. this move came on the same day california attorney general filed a lawsuit against so cal gas. she said the impact of this unprecedented gas leak is devastating to families in our state, our environment, and our
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efforts to combat global warming. the gas has been leaking from a decades old people with no safety valve to turn it off. >> the people who put that well down were not intending that that casing would be used to inject natural gas or to withdraw it. they were trying to extract oil in the 1950's. >> so cal gas spokesman has repeatedly insisted that his company complied with state and federal regulations in the time leading up to the leak. >> we operate with safety, and we see to all of the regulations and we are in total compliance. >> so cal gas has promise that had a relief well it's digging to seal the damaged well will plug the leak by the end of february. >> counting the lawsuit by attorney general harris, 11 state or local agencies are
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investigating or filing lawsuits against so cal gas. >> once so cal mansion to plug the leak, is all of this over? >> not necessarily. there are 114 other wells at the same canyon storage site, as this leaking well. regulators ordered the gas company to inspect every one of them before using them again. environmental groups want so cal gas to shut down the entire site and never use it again. >> john, thank you very much. there are also growing concerns this morning in the u.s. over the zika virus in this country. >> someone in the accident contracted the virus not through mosquito bite but after having sex with an infected person. we have the latest. >> the vast majority of zika virus infections have happened through mosquito bites and health officials confirmed a careless that was likely sexually transmitted. the case in dallas county, the accident was acquired from someone who went to venezuela. the newly infected person had not traveled there, so the
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c.d.c. and doctors say the best precaution is to use protection. >> if a person is traveling to one of those 26 countries that have been declared by the pan american and world health organization to be transmitting the disease, mostly in the caribbean and south america, they should use condoms for their sexual contacts. >> zika virus infections usually mild and deaths rare. scientists are looking at birth fee effects in brazil. the virus could affect 4 million people in the americas. >> to have a tenfold increase in numbers and the potential for spread not just across latin america but into africa and asia which have the highest birth rates in the world we believe is a matter of public health concern and constitutes an
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international emergency. >> french drug maker announced a project to develop a zika virus vaccine. the spread of mosquitoes is being developed. >> we are talking about years not months for a vaccine. we have to be cautious about a vaccine. >> testing for the zika virus will be possible in the accident. health officials need the right equipment, chemicals and training. >> we have a sample sent to atlanta, throwing the process down. >> dozens of residents have been diagnosed with zika, mostly people who have traveled abroad and been bitten by mosquito. >> six travel associate cases have been confirmed of the zika virus, officials are spraying pest sides in several areas. >> brazil has a big incentive for this to go away by august. >> the upcoming olympics. they stay by august is when
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they're finishing up their winter months, the population of mosquitoes will be down and they're asking the athletes to go down there and participate in these games. >> thank you very much. an international meeting is underway in uruguay, health officials meeting from latin america and south america to figure out how to contain the virus. it was called by the brazilian president. they were deploy soldiers and health care workers to try to fight the virus. we are live in uruguay. what do we expect to come out of today's that' hearings? >> there are over 13 health representatives from latin america and also from the caribbean today to discuss how to fight the spread of the zika virus. this meeting was called by brazilian president rousseff. there are over 1 million confirmed cases of the zika
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virus with babies whose birth born with defects. everyone we have spoken toe say that cooperation is key to controlling this virus. >> the u.s. and chile are the latest countries to report cases. is it now too late for officials to make a significant dent against the spread of zika virus? >> yes and we're just hearing a case has just been confirmed as zeke, too, everyone we have spoken to here say it's not to late to put up a tight. earlier we spoke to brazil's health minister. they say fumigation, controlling the spread of the mosquito is key right now.
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they have a megaoperation involving 200,000 people, including brazil armed forces to control the spread of the mosquito. he also told that you say they're meeting with the united states officials to try to develop a vaccine to try to fight against the zika virus, but we've spoken to uruguayan officials here who are very, very worried. they say this virus has already spread, that it's going through the borders. one of the reason to worry is there are people who have symptoms and others do not and that's one of the things that worry many of the officials here. all of them are telling us that regional cooperation is important here and measures they take to control the spread. president obama today will make the first visit of his presidency to a u.s. mosque. he'll sit down with muslims at the united society of baltimore that houses a mosque and school. the white house said the
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president will focus on the need to speak out against bigotry and promote religious freedom. the number which hate crimes against american muslims has spiked in recent months after the attacks in paris and san bernardino, california. for millions of americans as the sun comes up this morning, they will be digging out from another major blizzard from colorado to the dakotas. parts of the south still under the threat of severe thunderstorms and flash flooding this morning. several tornadoes touching down in mississippi and alabama on tuesday causing only minor injuries and some property damage. in tennessee, the high winds damaged homes. schools in crockett county will be closed today. >> that system will bring heavy doses of rain as it moves east. >> that's our biggest concern today. there's still a slight weather risk and we saw that yesterday but the rain is causing us problems with the flooding.
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here's that massive system, so still snow in the northern tier. a lot of it in the east coast is rain. this has been pretty significant and this was expected, but as it wentual, the red are the tornado reports. we had about nine of them yesterday, power lines, limbs down, some home damage, so people will go back through that today and see how extensive that is, and then even more wind reports, not a lot of hail associated with this system, it's mostly been that wind that we're concerned about. that's what we'll see the concern for today. this is a much lower risk than yesterday, we are more concerned about look at all the heavy and slow moving rain that's been moving through this area, so some places could see several more inches today, some coming down as quickly as maybe an inch an our or so. all the areas use that in green are flood watches and warnings and the most severe ones are
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red, especially overnight, it's hard to see how much that floodwater is, so there are a lot of concerns in the overnight period with it. it slowly crawls off the coast into the day tomorrow. we could still see a little bit along the coastline. the other problem, it's been very warm, even northern parts of this line, with the rain, the beginnation of the warm air, 50's and 60s with the rain and all the snow on the ground, that's going to melt quickly. there could also be flooding in pennsylvania. the candidates who want to be president are focused on new hampshire this morning. there is five days to go before the primary there. democratic bernie sanders plans to air more than a million dollars worth have t.v. ads this week. he and hillary clinton will take place in a televised town hall meeting tonight. ted cruz on the republican side is trying to build on his win in iowa while his competitors look for an opening. the state department now saying john kerry while he was a
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senator used a private email account to send an email to then secretary of state hillary clinton on her personal server. the mental contained information that is now said to be classified. officials say there was no indication that the information was classified at any level when it was sent. the threat inside syria that could end the piece talks. >> the opposition accuses the government of undercutting a chance at peace with its move to retake syria's largest city. bill cosby could find if the case against him is going to go forward. we'll be live at the courthouse with more.
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those u.n. brokered talks about syria are in jeopardy add syria's army escalates fighting on the ground. troops are moving to cut off opposition supply lines to the north. the attacks on syria's largest city bringing those talks now to a halt. >> with the bombardment in aleppo intensifying, peace talks have come to a complete stand still today. nobody knows what is going to happen in the hours to come and there is a lot of diplomacy going on right now with the u.n. trying to put pressure on both sides of the syrian negotiating teams to make sure that they stay in geneva. one member of the h.n.c., the main opposition negotiating team here telling us earlier today the russians aren't just bombing aleppo, they're also bombing these geneva peace talks. that's the level of frustration we're hearing from the opposition. they are in a very difficult position right now, because of
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bombardment in aleppo has continued, they feel that their negotiates position here has substantially weakened. they feel if they stay here, it will just look bad. they feel they can't enter into any negotiations unless there is some good faith effort put forth by the syrian regime unless some human aid is delivered, unless the bombardment stops, unless the prills nurse are released. they don't trust the apposition. they continues to that very specific procedural matters have not been accomplished and because of that, they can't enter into these negotiations as of yet in earnest. it's a very complicate, tricky situation here. the talks have really come to a complete stand still and nobody really knows what's going to happen in the day ahead. >> that is muhammed in geneva, the secretary of state john kerry condemning the recent outbreak of fighting in syria says the situation on the ground is unspeakable. world powers from europe and the middle east are asking for
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$9 billion to help syrians affected by the war. pledges are not the problem, getting the money is. last year's appeal only brought in about half of the $7 billion pledged, cutting federal food aid. jordan's kings said the pledges will ease the situation in his country. the situation is at a boiling point. in an interview with the b.b.c., he said this week is important for jordanians to see is there going to be help for syrian refugees and for their own future, as well. the u.s. has been the largest international dope nor, four and a half billion dollars for syrian aid so far. my question is no matter how much money is raised, at this point, if government and opposition forces are besieging
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towns, how much of that money in the form of aid, food, medical supplies gets to the civilians? >> i've actually been speaking to people under siege for the past few days and asking them how they feel about the london donors conference. there's very little optimism. the money goes to funding the u.n. aid effort but many haven't seen u.n. aid in years. the real question is if we raise all this money, is it going to go to people under siege and the answer is no. the only way to get it to people under siege i guess if the u.n. decides to stop waiting for assad regime permission and deliver the aid to the towns and cities that need it most. if their trucks can't officially go through, they must consider dropping aid from planes to starving towns and cities. >> when we talk about air drops, the russian have made some air drops of supplies.
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i believe we have some video from the russian defense ministry of one of those drops. obviously the russians there at the invitation of the assad government. the u.s. has said they are hesitant to do aid drops, air drops because they could be subject to syrian anti missile defense systems. in other words, u.s. planes could get shot down. is it worth that risk? >> i think that that risk is absolutely overblown. u.n. aid drops have been conducted before on mount sinjar. the idea that russian anti aircraft missiles would shoot down a u.s. aircraft is very, very hard to believe. i think the u.s. and world governments must do everything in their power now to you keep people from starving. we see the images from madaya and the starving town.
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starvation is spreading in the towns. they can't just sit back and watch this happen. there needs to be real action now. >> mount sinjar is in iraq, the u.s. has been dropping aid in iraq. i want to talk about this, the people that do get out, including the many many children that are refugees in places like lebanon, where you are and places like jordan, 700,000 school aged children who are refugees are not currently in school. places like lebanon and jordan are already under strain. you heard king abdullah saying his population is under a boiling point. how can the west help aid in those countries? is that where the aid needs to go at this point? >> the money needing to inside and outside syria. the suffering is intense in both places but obviously more inside syria where people are dying under siege. they need to work with host
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countries like lebanon and turkey and make sure money is going to these children but they need to be sustainable programs. they need to open schools and make sure children allowed to go to school, that their exam count for something. there's been so many bureaucratic complications, they're not giving syrian children a fair chance. they need to put their money where their mouth is. it's going to cost money to educate these children, but we can't afford a lost generation. it leads to radicalism. >> a lost generation are how a lot of people are describes it. when we talk about internally displaced people, you talk about the millions of syrians within syria and there are many towns to are desieged, the aid that does go in, is that being used as a bargaining chip? are you hearing that forces are using that aid for political
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gain? >> absolutely. i mean, both opposition and government are using siege as a bargaining tool, but by far, the most sieges are being held by the syrian regime. what's being done is that they'll say we are going to take this government and you have to surrender it, we're going to take this area and you're going to have to surrender your weapons and then they take the town. it's the most terrible war tactic, but that's how it's being used, being used to take back territory. >> joining us from beirut, this morning, thank you for your in sights. >> the world has been here so many times before and here we are again. >> we are talking about millions of people displaced within syria. >> when we come back, we'll talk about going before congress over a water crisis in the u.s. >> flint officials on capitol hill this morning. we speak to one resident about what they are doing to get by. president obama going to a
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mosque in the united states today after that rise in hate crimes against muslims.
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>> welcome back to your world morning. a gas company in southern california defending its actions this morning now that it has been criminally charged in that massive gas leak. the company so cal gas violated health and safety laws by failing to report and contain the leak at porter ranch that forced 13,000 people from their homes since october. an international meeting is underway in uruguay where health officials are trying to figure out how to you contain the zika virus. this as doctors in the accident say a case of the virus there was likely sexually transmitted from someone infected in venezuela. the c.d.c. urges americans to use condoms. >> a congressional committee will hear testimony today about flint's water crisis. the former emergency manager that was appointed by the state won't be there. darnell early's attorneys saying his client can't comply with a subpoena only i should last night. the executive director of my brother's keeper in flint joins us. thank you for being with us this
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morning. for you, this is personal. first of all, i want to ask, how are you and your family doing? >> we're doing ok. we're using bottled waters. we have been using bottled waters for several years now. the shelter is using bottled waters and filters on all the faucets and we are using bottle water by the gallons to clean the food and prepare the food and the shelter. >> you and others say you have been flooded with bottled water, you say and filters coming in from donors all across the country, but you say you want something done now. what would that something be? >> absolutely. we are being flooded with bottled waters and filters from across the country. i want to see the pipes cleaned. i want to see the infrastructure being repaired. this is what we want in the city of flint, measure, we want the water to come out of our facets. anything else is demoralizing.
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>> you have the ear of congress today. you already have the ear of the governor but so far have not seen him there handing out water. do you think something is going to happen and if it does, will it happen soon enough? >> it's not going to happen soon enough. soon enough should have been several years ago, before we got into this situation. i do believe it's going to happen. i do believe it's going to happen fairly soon now that we have national attention and we have prevailed a lot of things that have gone wrong with the water. i do believe it is going to happen. i respect and admire mayor karen weaver or her job being done on the national level. i do respect what she's doing and the drive of the citizens
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standing behind her, rallies behind this cause. i know something is going to be done. i know it's going to be done soon. >> ms. hayes, you have said this is discrimination by zip code. why? is it because flint is predominantly african-american and poor? >> flint is predominantly african-american and the problem is that it is in the impoverished areas. whether it's discrimination or not, to me, it was compartmentalized to those areas, so there is something to be looked into with that. >> we have been following this story almost since day one. i've heard it said by guests that houses in flint are worthless because of the crisis. is there a fix that can make flint livable and also attractive to young couples again and what in your opinion would and should that fix be?
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>> i think that flint is on the rise. i think i can say that from working downtown, we have the university of michigan, we have community college, baker college, we have a lot going on in flint that will and is attracting young couples to flint. yes, we have high level of crime, yeah, we have a dilapidated housing, so to clean up these areas, it's going to attract more people into the city of flint. >> you say you want the pipes fixed. if congress is listening right now to this interview, when do you want those pipes fixed and when will it be i guess too long to wait? in other words, how soon does congress need to act in order to make you happy?
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>> i think to make me happy, by 5:00 this evening, we should see excavators coming into the city, digging up one neighborhood at a time, replacing these pipes. anything short of that, it's not going to really help flint. flooding flint with water and filters is not actually the fix for this. we need to be able to, again, draw water from our house. that is what we want. this is what the citizens of flint is demanding, so whom ever is listening to this, we need heavy trucks, heavy artillery to come ainto town to start digging up the infrastructure and replacing it with what needs to be done and that is the fix for flint, michigan. >> ms. hayes, will you com comek with us after the hearing tomorrow? >> i will. house republicans are pledging to press on after their latest effort to end obamacare failed. they couldn't muster enough
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votes to overturn a veto of legislation ending key parts of the affordable care act. the house needed a two thirds majority to overturn the veto. it failed with a final vote of 241-186. bill cosby ahead to court in an hour for the second day of a hearing on sexual assault charges. more testimony will be heard after a former prosecutor said he gave cosby immunity more than a decade ago. we are live outside the courthouse. that former prosecutor made his case for why cosby should not have to go on trial. >> theirs. good morning, steph, good morning, dell, as you know, this is a very modern case but at its roots, events that took place well over a decade ago. strip everything else away and at the voluntary core is a dealing between the then district attorney and bill cosby not to prosecute the comedian.
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the issue is was that deal meant to be forever. >> entertainer bill cosby arrived at court looking every one of his 78 years. in the courthouse, only one issue, might a 2005 non-prosecution agreement with a previous district attorney rule out prosecuting cosby. the case stems from a complaint by andrea constan in 2005 in which she claimed cosby drugged and sexually assaulted her. there were several reasons the prosecutor did not go after him, including that she can be not report the incident promptly, waiting a year to go to police by which time there was no opportunity to collect traceable evidence. the fact that she contacted a civil attorney before going to police hurt her case and he said she mate inconsistent statements. on cross examination, coster made it clear he thought cosby
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had inappropriately touched her but thought the admissible and credible part of her evidence didn't add up. all these things created a situation where she'd ruined her credibility and would not be believed by a jury. he also said his decision not to prosecute cosby meant the comedian couldn't take the fifth, forcing him to testify in her civil case which he thought might bring her some measure which justice. she later accept add settlement from the entertainer. this case is watched carefully by gloriaal dread who release 50 women who say cosby assaulted them. >> i find it a bit ironic that mr. cosby would seek to exclude evidence that he in fact gave quaaludes to women when that was his testimony. does he want to exclude the truth? i thought mr. cosby always
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wanted to have his day in court. now he appears to want to dismiss a day in court, that criminal case. >> bill cosby has repeatedly denied any wrongdoing. >> as you join me back here live in norristown, pends, the helicopters up, which means mr. cosby's arrival is imminent for the hearing which will begin at 9:30 this morning. >> what do we expect to happen at the hearing today? >> remember, this is not a trial, it is a pretrial hearing and everything that you saw in my report revolves around discussions involving the judge, defense and prosecution. today there will be more of that. the judge will make a ruling today. he has three choices available, either dismiss the case, or allow the casing to head including his 2005 deposition or for it to go ahead without that. >> john, thank you.
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a record number of americans were cleared of false convictions last year. the national registry of exonerations finding 149 people con rated in 2015, 139 were cleared the year before. many of these who were exonerated were convicted of drug crimes but you a third convicted of homicide, five sentenced to death. the people behind the list say many cases involved official misconduct on the part of prosecution. president obama visiting a mosque today in baltimore, his first visit to a religious site in the u.s. i talked to the president and founder of the republican muslim coalition. i asked her what she thinks about president obama's decision to make this trip. >> he is finally visiting a mosque, i think president bush visited a mosque during his first year of presidency. it's sad to see that it's taking his last year of presidency to step into a mosque, but i am looking forward to having him, and i'm excited that he's
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finally reaching out to muslim americans and meeting you guess at our place of worship, just like he's gone to churches and synagogs before, but it's finally time to see presidential candidates and the president show up at our mosque. >> you mentioned the word finally three times. it seems that there is a bit of irritation that he has not gone to a mosque. how much does it bother you that this is the first time that he has gone to a mosque and that it is now being made such a big deal? >> well, it bothers me a lot. i think, you know, he is using his last ditch efforts to reach out to muslim voters and i think trying to gather up support for the upcoming elections for democrats, but i think represent presidential candidates also ought to start visiting their local mosques, candidates at all levels need to reach out to their local muslim community to get over their fears oaries lamb and get minority voters. >> not one democratic candidate
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has said ban all muslims. you wrote an article inviting donald trump, who said that all muslims should be banned from coming into this country. you invited him to visit a mosque with you. you did so in december. did he write you back? >> we are still talking to his campaign. i've talked to his campaign manager a few times and we are working on setting up a visit for him to visit a mosque later this year, but i think, you know, trying to target donald trump and getting him to actually attend a prayer service at a mosque is going to take some time, but we're actually -- >> why -- >> through a lot of -- >> just because of their anti islamic sentiment floating around. although he has worked with muslims all hills life and has properties all over the middle east, i think he has been
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advised, but we would like to see him change his perspective. if he wants to win the white house, he has to reach out to muslim american voters, as well. >> she has not heard personally from donald trump, president obama visiting a mosques in his past including as a child growing up in indonesia but has not gone to one during his time in office. we will bring you the penalty's remarks live around 12:15 eastern time. one mosque in wyoming is causing controversy with neighbors. a handful opened the center and say they now face intimidation and a lock of acceptance. we have the story. >> we had a new mosque open in town. there had never been one. people contacted me through the militia group i belong to. >> when the all white predominantly christian hometown in wyoming haled its first mosque open in late 2015, he started a facebook page called stop islam in gym let.
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it soon attracted 400 members who shared his views that the mosque would foster islamic radicalism and incite terrorism. >> the issue with the mosque is we didn't know who was behind it, who was in it, where it came from. >> it was founded in a converted house. they make up almost all the muslims in gillette, 30 in all in a town of 31,000. >> we wanted a place to gather and pray and for kids to get taught slack scripture. >> the families roots are in pakistan, but the khan name in wyoming since 1906. none of that seemed to matter when protestors demonstrated outside the mosque. >> they thought that this mosque
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was going to lead to 2,000 syrian refugees moving into gillette and the culture was going to change, people wearing burqas everywhere and we were going to force extremism on gillette. >> the comments suggest vandalism and hint at violence. one easier wrote my hearse and i threw a bunch of raw bacon at it a few days ago. hope they don't mind our new favorite pass time. one said they deserve to be gull shot. >> a lot of people like to be keyboard warriors and talk crap on the internet that they won't back up in fashion or form. >> it's just fear. the san bernardino had just happened and i think people were just scared that it could happen
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here. >> marilu weis carter king issued a statement. neither threats nor declarations of haste would be tolerated in gillette. >> do you think there's any political risk to you for showing this kind of support? >> if there is, i don't care, you know. it's the right thing to do. >> the khan family said their mosque will remain open and are not afraid of threats. al jazeera, gillette, wyoming. expanding the role of women in combat. >> lawmakers question the military's commitment to get fully integrated units on to the battlefield. >> a powerful storm in the midwest, blizzard warnings threatening to shut down some areas.
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military leaders say it may take years before they can fully integrate women into combat roles. in december, the combat jobs were open to women. the implementation is proving to be complicated. >> much of the more than two hours of senate testimony concerned the marine corps controversy year long experiment at 29 palms california in which mixed gender units were found to be less proficient than all male units. navy secretary came under immediate fire from john mccain for dismissing the results without observing the training.
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>> you make the claims it was biased even though you didn't go see the study being performed. >> he argued the experiment wasn't a true test because the troops only had a pass a minimum fitness exam to take part. >> nobody had to meet a standard or these ground combat units. there were no standards in that. >> women's advocates, including may be military veterans say the marine corps's experiment was a thinly disguised way to justify excluding women from the infantry. among critics, new york senator kristin gillibrand. >> the design of the research overall was very flawed. first of all, these female marines were screened for the basic physical fitness test compete in large part with marines with years of experience and training and many in combat positions. >> critics of the gender integration plan accuse the pentagon of being too quick to dismiss the physical differences
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between men and women when it comes to performing brute tasks, a difference conceded by the marine corps top general who admitted in combat, size matters. >> being big, strong, having a certain body mass gives you an advantage. >> there was broad agreement that standards must never be lowered to accommodate women, but some senators remain highly skeptical that the promise will be kept in the face of political pressure to promote more opportunities for women in the military. >> it's hard to imagine down the road five years from now, 10 years from now if we don't have successful graduations in this physically demanding program, it's hard to imagine that this conversation won't take a different tone, and i don't see how we can guarantee that in the future the standards will not be diminished. >> the last thing in the word a woman needs is to join a unit
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with everyone looking over their shoulder saying well, you're not the same as we are, so i don't think anybody here think that is standards should be lowered. >> jami macintyre, al jazeera, the pentagon. >> during that senate hearing, two top generals suggest that had american women should be required to register for the draft. army chief of staff general mark millie and marine corps com donald miller bolt support that move. right now, only men ages 18-26 are required to register. there has not been an involuntary draft since the vietnam war. it is a dangerous day to drive in minnesota, roads closed after heavy snows. state officials are saying all of you out there on the roads, take it easy, be careful. >> the snow is moving east, as well as shutting down wisconsin. let's bring in nicole mitchell for more. >> a lot of travel advisories out. if you don't have to go, definitely the best idea. we can see on the radar that this is starting to wind down a little bit, not as much snow
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today. if you're getting it, you're most likely seeing it in wisconsin. the u.p. of michigan could get the most. yesterday we were talking close to a foot in a lot of cases. less snow today. the wind is driving us around and we have what is on the ground, so that three or four inches would be the new stuff, that's the very northern tier. a lot of this is lighter snow today. we still have wind as a concern because with this system. that is going to blow what is already on the ground. that is why we still have advisories up, including back to wyoming which is well out of the new snow. that is a ground blizzard with wind gusts of 60 miles an hour blowing it enough that you can't have that visibility. still treacherous even well after the storm. the other we are watching is into the northwest. that will be snow for the higher helevations and places like washington state toward the coastline, five or six inches not out of the question.
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>> thank you. still ahead, a midair blast 14,000 feet in the air. the scare that left a hole in a plane forcing pilots to make a quick landing. a landmark trade deal nearly done. why the t.p.p., what it means for the u.s. south of the border.
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>> an apparent explosion in a plane over somalia, two people
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were injured, the pilots quickly turned the plane around and landed safely. authorities are looking into what caused the blast. the t.p.p. or transpacific partnership will officially be designed in new zealand. 12 nations including the u.s. will sign representing half of the world's economy. mexico is one of them. there are homes and concerns about the impact of the deal. >> by signing the free trade agreement, it joins a trend. there are some 44 agreements in place. mexico amounted its economic planners hope by embracing free trade, they'll diversify their market. its main partner, the united states receivers more than 80% of all the exports from mexico because it's so close, so cheap
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for mexico and the united states to have this huge amount of trade every year. when you talk about free trade in mexico, one of the biggest players are car manufactures. that's because mexico is the eighth largest producer of cars in the world. most are for exports. auto industry helped mexico seed a small but growing middle class in parts of the country where these jobs are, mainly north of the country and center of the country. new plants open all the time. there are concerns in agriculture and small manufacturing that this t.p.p. like other free trade agreements isn't going to deliver the promised prosperity that planners say will continue to arrive in mexico. more than 20 years after the pass acknowledge of nafta, the north america free trade agreement, the largest free trade agreement at the time, millions of mexicans continue to live in poverty and this new trade agreement as big as it is,
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isn't going to deliver more prosperity than previous ones. >> after nations sign, they have two years to ratify the deal before it takes effect. history is going to be made in rio at the summer games. a u.s. athlete is going to be wearing a hijab. >> she earned a bronze medal at athens world cup saturday. the 30-year-old from new jersey started fencing when she was 13. she will compete as an individual and in the team events. that's it for us here in new york. i'm stephanie sy. your world this morning is back tomorrow morning at 7:00 a.m. eastern time. nor more, go to aljazeera.com. thanks for joining us.
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three palestinians shot and killed by israeli police in occupied east jerusalem. we'll have the very latest. hello, i'm in doha with the world news from al jazeera. also ahead, pulled from the rubble, the tiny survivor of the offensive in syria which could end the conflict. forces on alert, north korea over the proposed rocket launch. >>

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