Skip to main content

tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  March 9, 2016 7:00am-9:01am EST

7:00 am
a pivotal night in the race for the white house. bernie sanders lands an upset in michigan while donald trump tightens his grip on the republican nomination vice president meeting netanyahu in israel under scrutiny the f.b.i. investigates its own in the fails standoff with oregon occupier leroy finnicum george martin, the beetles producer dies >. >> this has been a fantastic
7:01 am
night in michigan. we are very grateful for all of the support that we have gotten from the state it is being called one of the biggest upsets in modern political history, bernie sanders pulling off an improbable win. good morning welcome to your morning bernie sanders' victory is breathing a new life into his white house bid. the win was close 50% to 48%. that's despite every poll showing hillary clinton with a double digit lead heading into the context donald trump was named the winner in hawaii, that topping off a big night for him. david shuster has the details. >> reporter: with a conquering hero, donald trump claimed the michigan and mississippi primaries by double digits. >> i don't think i've ever had
7:02 am
so many horrible, horrible things said about me in one week. 38 million dollars worth of horrible lies but that's okay. it shows you how brilliant the public is. >> reporter: donald trump thanked his supporters who were not swayed by an all out attack against him with mitt romney coming into tuesday primaries >> we started off with 17, we're down to four. of the four they're pretty much all gone. pretty much. they didn't do so well tonight, folks. i'm not going to say anybody didn't do well. they didn't do well. there's only one who did well to tonight and that's donald trump. >> reporter: no-one had a wos night than marco rubio, the favorite candidate of the republican establishment. marco rubio walked away entry handed, finishing last in mississippi and michigan in the single digits despite help from
7:03 am
romney. on the democratic side a huge upset. hillary clinton saw her double digit lead in michigan ee evaporate. bernie sanders took the state with just over 50% of the vote. >> what tonight means is that the bernie sanders campaign, the people's, the revolution, people's revolution that we are talking about, the political kalt revolution, we're talking about-- political revolution we're talk about is strong in every part of the country. frankly we believe that our strongest areas are yet to happen. >> reporter: clinton pulled off a decisive win in minneapolis with more than 80% of the vote there and she leads the overall delegate count by a wide margin. ida hshg o turned in their votes in the ted cruz. donald trump, but with three more states in the donald trump column and momentum on his side, donald trump had a message for
7:04 am
those in his place looking to take him out >> let's come together. i say let's come to go >> reporter: david shuster al jazeera's correspondent joins us live from detroit. obviously a lot of attention always on donald trump, but bernie sanders' win in michigan was a sprays. what drove that and what has been the reaction there? >> reporter: good morning to you. so many many polls had hillary clinton beating bernie sanders, a lot of people across the country are stunned. sanders did say a few days ago that there was high voter turn out that he would win. to put this into per speck tiff, yesterday more than two million people turned out to the polls that is a break record since 1972. one poll said that [indistinct]
7:05 am
that gives you an idea of how important it was for people to come out and cast their ballots, but overall a huge win for bernie sanders and donald trump here in michigan despite her narrow loss there, clinton did win mississippi. >> reporter: show eshe spoke after winning miles per hour mississippi, but she didn't address running-- she said it should be about delivering results for american people. some say bernie sanders win in michigan show that his message is getting across to voters and that it will likely be that hillary clinton will start to look into what went wrong here according to exit polling bernie sanders pulled in independent voters there in michigan. on the republican side, it seems like john kasich really about
7:06 am
put a lot of his hopes on doing well in michigan. marco rubio as well. what's next for those candidates? >> reporter: it was a much win situation for john kasich for him, but despite finishing third he did hold on to the number two spot for quite a bit last night. he told supporters, about 200 people here in michigan last night, he said he is going to win the great state of ohio next week. so he is not throwing in the towel. as for marco rubio, some say his days on the campaign trail are numbered thank you for that > today the public get to say goodbye to nancy reagan. she wanted to be buried as close as possible to her husband.
7:07 am
our correspondent has more. >> reporter: it was nancy heagan's wish to be laid to rest against her husband here before the private funeral and burial on friday. the public will have a chance to honor and say their final goodbye to the former first lady. she will lay reposed in the casket. >> reporter: this morning a motorcade will arrive here. every detail of her funeral has been made by the first lady herself. >> everything from the poll bearers to the members and family par advertise panels. to the people who actually are invited and the flowers. we know we're carrying out her wishes. >> reporter: as the nation remembers and prepares to say goodbye to an iconic first lady,
7:08 am
her life is significant here in california. from the movie studios to the state capital she was a first lady long before she arrived in washington vice president joe biden is in israel this morning. a short time ago police shot dead two palestinian drivers after the men allegedly opened fire on a bus in east jerusalem. speaking this morning along the israeli prime minister he said the violence must end. >> this has not become an accepted he did you say operandi. -- modus operandi there is violence in the west bank as well where a palestinian was shot dead after attempting to stab an israeli
7:09 am
soldier. our correspondent has the latest. >> reporter: two palestinian men were shot near a check point that went up on tuesday. that was after reports that at least one of them had tried to attack a member of the israeli border police. we're now hearing that one of those palestinians has died of his wounds and he has been named locally as an sammy ismahhee a 16-year-old teenager from the occupied west bank. not long before that in east jerusalem, what happened first of all was that two palestinians travelling in a car fared towards an israeli bus. no-one was hurt in that incident, but the israeli police gave chase and during that chase the palestinians then fired at a man and they actually wounded
7:10 am
that person before then being shot dead by the israeli police. on thus there were incidents not just in occupied east jerusalem, but in israel itself, including notably in the port city of jaffa where a man committed several stabbings before being shot, a palestinian attacker responsible for several different incidents. one of his victims an american tourist died of his wounds. that happened just down the road from where the u.s. vice president was holding a conference with the former president of israel after he had just lantd in the country u.s. has condemned the stabbing attack which left that american tourist visiting israel dead. he was a management student and a retired army officer
7:11 am
there are new details this morning in contention with the killing of an armed protester by law enforcement in oregon. a cover up is accused by the wife of the man who was shotted by the police. >> reporter: the f.b.i. has released video from inside the truck that he was driving in the moment before police shot him dead. >> go antidepressant and shoot me. >> reporter: he was the spokesman for the armed protesters who spent weeks inside a wildlife reserve earlier this year. police say the new video sin chronnised with over ahead vie shows him goading them before reaching for a concealed gun. >> i declare the six fires
7:12 am
fires shot were justified. >> reporter: there were eight fires shot. they say two came from f.b.i. officers as he stepped from his truck >> go ahead and shoot me. >> reporter: they missed him. now the justice department and sheriff's officer are checking where they came from and why the f.b.i. didn't list the shots >> i can sure you that the director of the f.b.i. found that each and every employee who was working in the county wanted this situation to end and violence in violence and death >> it was an ambush on a blind curve along a lonely stretch of highway, a dead man's blockade. my husband was murdered intentionally with mall ice.{enter} q. she disputes that he reached for a loaded gun >> translation: he was walking with his hands in the air a symbol of surrender. he was reaching to the pain of
7:13 am
having been shot. >> reporter: the justice department probe is focused on five unnamed f.b.i. agents no word as dwret on what the fallout would be if the justice department's investigation uncovers any wrongdoing on the part of those five agents. some if he was hailed with shots from hipped. how is that justified? >> reporter: police say there was an officer in front of him armed with a taser and out of fear that's why they had to open fire and kill him by the way they say they did recover a 9 mm handgun also a man wanted in connection with the shooting of a pastor has outside the white house. the agency says he was throwing objects over the white house fence. he say former marine. he is accused of shooting pastor six times outside his church. he is in hospital recovering from his injuries
7:14 am
more severe weather could hit texas today as the state tries to recover from deadly storms on tuesday. there were lightning flashes and tornado that destroyed some homes. several were hurt across the state texas not the only place to be seeing some severe weather today. good morning kevin >> reporter: we're seeing a big tap of moisture in this region. look at the big picture this is a water vapour shop. the green is the wet atmosphere. where you see the orange that is a dier atmosphere. across the gulf states that is where we're getting quite a bit of that moisture to fuel those thunder storms. over the last several hours you will notice here across much of texas we're doing with the flooding problem. going back to where that tornado was located. right there just to the west of fort worth.
7:15 am
of course, one tornado reported down towards parts of houston. that's where we had one casualty us because of the flooding situation there. the ef torn go, winds between 86 and 110 miles per hour. we do have one tornado warning. it just popped up. this is only valid for the next 15 minutes. we are going to see more tornado warnings, in effect, but it's really the flooding that is going to be extensive, look at these regions. these areas, anywhere between 10 nach to 12 inches of rain already. we expect to see almost another foot of rain in that same region. as you can expect the flooding is going to continue. even when it does stop, we are looking at very high river and creek levels across that area. we're going to see that. for the next few days, thursday and friday, we're looking at
7:16 am
that severe weather. so this threat is not over yet thank you when we come back ramping up the rhetoric north korea's leader makes claim of miniaturised nuclear warhea warheads and the man behind the music, the produce of the beetles george martin.
7:17 am
find fantasy shows. when it comes to the things you love, you want more. love romance? get lost in every embrace. into sports? follow every pitch, every play and every win. change the way you experience tv with x1 from xfinity. hey how's it going, hotcakes? hotcakes. this place has hotcakes. so why aren't they selling like hotcakes?
7:18 am
with comcast business internet and wifi pro, they could be. just add a customized message to your wifi pro splash page and you'll reach your customers where their eyes are already - on their devices. order up. it's more than just wifi, it can help grow your business. you don't see that every day. introducing wifi pro, wifi that helps grow your business. comcast business. built for business. we could learn more this week about one of the obama administration most secretive program the drone strikes the white house is planning to release drone strikes and how many they've killed. >> reporter: as many as five thousand people accused
7:19 am
terrorists and innocent civilians have been killed by u.s. drones or other air strikes in recent years. until now there was no way to know if that number revealed by a member of congress a few years ago was accurate. the white house is promising to provide a fuller accounting in the name of transparency >> we know that not only is greater transparency the right thing to do, it is the best way to pain obtain the legitimacy of our counter terrorism actions and the broughted support of ar allies. >> reporter: the american civil liberties union which has filed a lawsuit against the obama administration says the u.s. should not just release the raw numbers of how many were killed but also the internal memos that supply the legal basis for drone strikes >> i think it matters because what we're talking about here are people that are outside a recognised battle fields. places where the u.s. is not at war in the same way that we've been at war in iraq or afghanistan. these are places where the ewe
7:20 am
mighted states has not engaged at that level gentleman african-american warn weinsten were unmistakenly killed last april, president obama promised to be more forthcoming about drone strikes as well as the proceed colonels used to approve them >> mistakes, sometimes deadly mistakes, can occur. but one of the things that sets america apart from any other nation are the things that makes us exceptional is our willingness to confront square our imperfections and to learn from our mistakes >> reporter: now almost a year later, the azio venezuela is still has more questions than answers and says the reality that u.s. could target individuals by remote control is something the world hasn't really come to terms with >> i think this technology is still new. it is a place where i think our ethical concerns about it, our debate on the morality of it in
7:21 am
a country that hasn't fully taken place. >> reporter: jamie macintyre the f.b.i. says it has revised the rules for how the bureau searchs for information. the bureau has acted on concerns the group had about moum agents used the data. the guardian received confirmation about the change but details are not being made public. they're a step towards enhancing privacy new threats from the leader of north korea. they have miniaturised nuclear warheads that can be placed on missiles >> reporter: the statements by him have apparently been made by a visit by the north korean leader to work on his country's nuclear program meeting with scientists and technicians. it also accompanied by a photograph being carried in the main north korean newspaper showing him with what apples to
7:22 am
be the device in question. he has been quoted as saying that his country now has the technology to miniaturise a nuclear war head and put it on top of a ballistic missiles. these are not knew claims. they are view offed with scepticism by south korea and u.s. the interesting thing from south korea's part is north korea does now seem to be recycling some of its claims as a way of keeping up the stream of rhetoric and now attributing the claim to the leader. this is a time of heightened tensions on the korean apeninsula. we have the sanctions imposed by the u.n., unilateral sanctions from south korea and beginning this week military exercises between south korea and the united states. so this does seem to be the latest response to all that from north korea that is al jazeera's rob mc
7:23 am
bride reporting from seoul. in january north korea carried out a nau clear test said to set out after hydrogen bomb. iran has fired two more missiles after sanctions against the country. also firing missiles on tuesday. they are designed to hit israel it said. the businesses and individuals that were linked to missile program over a test conducted last october. >> reporter: our lan standing concerns with the program have been well written. even earlier this year the united states put in place sanctions against iran because of their ballistic missile activity the white house says those tests are not a violation of the agreement. they say sanctions will not stop them from developing ballistic missiles signs of recovery in
7:24 am
north-eastern nigeria after issues with boko haram. an area closed for years and it is returning to normal after being attacked by boko haram over a year ago. central market is busy than before the attacks. forces have cleared many areas that were held by boko haram fighters. a court in japan has ordered two nuclear reactors to close over safety concerns of the a reactor at the plant had been off line after a technical problem this week. the ruling will now force the plant to shut down a secretary reactor. it was five years ago this week that an earthquake and tsumani caused a meltdown. a major ruling in the freddie grey case when we come back we will talk about how a decision by the highest court could shape the trial of six police officers one of the greenist cities in the u.s. portland oregon.
7:25 am
7:26 am
7:27 am
>> that harmony, that politeness and that equilibrium that japanese people call "wa". at the other side of history, fukushima's heroes were not enough. people have lost their trust, especially in the authorities. the myth of nuclear energy, of it being economic, safe and clean has been swept away. >> "fukushima: a nuclear story," narrated by willem dafoe. >> if you work for me and if you vote for me, i will work my heart out for you.
7:28 am
i will work every single day to make a difference in your lives presidential candidate hillary clinton celebrated her victory last night in mississippi. bernie sanders pulled off an improbable win showing every poll showing hillary clinton will win. final tally sanders 49%, clinton 48%. both will walk away with a few. bernie sanders victory is breathing new laf into his campaign >> what it means is that the bernie sanders campaign, the people's revolution, people's revolution that we are talking about, the political revolution that we are talking about is strong in every part of the country and frankly we believe that our strongest areas are yet to happen meanwhile donald trump rolling over his republican competition winning big in
7:29 am
hawaii michigan and mississippi setting him up for a decisive date next week. >> we started off with 17. we're down to four. of the four they're pretty much all gone. pretty much. they didn't do so well tonight. i'm not going to say they didn't do well. they didn't do well. only one person did well tonight. donald trump a professor of campaign management at new york university joining us this morning to talk about this win by sanders in michigan yesterday. as we say, they're handed out proportion lip. bernie sanders is 65, hillary clinton 58. does his win in michigan keep the race super competitive? >> it keeps it alive and keeps his campaign alive.
7:30 am
the thinking was if he loses in a place where he should have been okay, his campaign would be over. he won so he can keep going. the maths is it is very hard to come backment we saw this in 2008 with president obama was ahead in the delegate count but hillary clinton started doing better and winning big states. as long as he was getting 40/45 it's hard to catch up. so for bernie sanders that remains a problem but i think his win last night says something about hillary clinton's challenge if sympathy becomes the nominee and if donald trump becomes the nominee what happens to that race in the fall bernie sanders is calling for a revolution. he won but hillary clinton has that sizeable lead. is the democratic party now sending its self up for a conventional battle and what will happen to the bernie
7:31 am
sanders supporters if he lose $the nomination? >> i don't think right now they're setting themselves up for a fractured convention or a battle at the convention because they do have super delegates that is part of the math. we know that super delegates are not popular, but they are the vast majority for hillary clinton. they could change their minds. that is something to keep in mind. right now most are supporting her. that is part of the math. it is difficult again to imagine that he could catch up at this point. unless she has some signed of catastrophe in her contain and certainly something like that could happen i want to go back to what you said about you said about
7:32 am
>> she has to be aware of donald trump being the nominee versus ted cruz because he is playing to that same base with the same populace message. if he does well in the rust belt and he very well could, that could pose a significant challenge to her. she has to figure out how to address issues like free trade. >> a lot of independent voters went for sanders last night. could some of those voters end up going for trump in a general? >> they could and he's doing well with catholics, with moderates, with independents at least in the republican caucuses, and they could, if he can put together and really rally this reagan coalition, he could be a formidable challenger to her. we still have to look at the fact that he does significantly worse with la teen knows, hispanics, african-americans and women. those are key constituencies he's going to have try to win over. >> we keep talking about la teen
7:33 am
knows and black, the electorate is mostly white, angry. what does that say for a trump and can a sander win? >> that's true on the republican side, not necessarily the democratic side if you look at the south. it depends on the states and the party. that's where the republicans concern has always been, right in the general election, the demographics changing in this country do matter. to your point, yes, if he can pull in the moderates, if he can pull in independents, if he can rally a big base of support and increase turnout as we've seen him do not primary -- >> but he keeps doing it. >> he says he keeps -- he is doing it, you're right, but has he to do it in much more significant numbers in a general election. let's not forget what they're comparing the turnout to now is to 2012, to 2008. it was depressed on the republican side in 2008 because
7:34 am
the party in office is always the party with depressed turnout in the primaries. that's partly what's happening to the democrats and primary turnout does not necessarily translate to general election turnout. >> when we look at the gop field right now, kasich and rubio, neither of them are talking about dropping out at this point. if one of them did, we have a better understanding of who the real front runner is, whether it is donald trump or ted cruz is emerging as a real alternative. if you look at the delegate count, there's not much space between the two. >> trump last night once again 3-1, he does much better, you know, in a diverse number of states. i think that is to deem's point what they have to watch out for. you're winning in mississippi, you're winning in michigan. those are two diverse states but as this field narrows and i think certainly it's not by march 15 or march 16, kasich and rubio are going to get out and we will have a better sense, but
7:35 am
cruz is doing much better. the question is can he push this, where else does cruz win. >> does that trend a built-in bias. the question is how do you stop trump. trump is winning and he is winning because the people are voting for him. should we more be focused on what the voters are saying and what they want as opposed to the fact that they have picked this man as their candidate? >> i think we should and i think that's where the republican party has significant trouble for many, many years. you had a base of your own party that you didn't understand, and i think the fact is, the media and many of us watching haven't understood the amount of anger there and trump has built on that. i do think it is significant and the fact that the republican party could go to a fractured convention would really highlight to enormous divide between the quote unquote establishment and the base. and while wee focus on that
7:36 am
division, we should be focuses and what is frustrating so many voters and getting them to the polls. next tuesday will be another super tuesday of sorts. five states will hold both democratic and republican primary contests and all five have a considerable number of delegates. lets look at the map. voters in florida, ohio, illinois, north carolina and missouri will cast ballots on march 15. 800 delegates are up to grabs for democrats, 350 for republicans. three of those gop contests are winner take all. >> there is a democratic filibuster taking place in the missouri senate, going on now for 40 hours, no end in sight. it involves a bill related to same-sex marriage. that law proposed by republicans would stop the government from penalizing religious organizations and wedding vendors who don't want to participate in gay weddings. it is meant to give legal protections to opponents of same-sex marriage. mississippi, opponents are taking new steps to take a
7:37 am
confederate symbol off of the state flag. jonathan martin has our story. >> in mississippi, calls to remove the confederate symbol from the state through are intensifying. >> it must come down! >> on the steps of the capitol in jackson tuesday, ministers and community leaders rallied, urging the governor and lawmakers to change the flag. local attorney carlos moore filed a federal lawsuit against mississippi and the governor, arguing the flag is discriminatory and racist in nature. >> i have to stand flatfoot and tell the governor enough is enough is enough. >> there's been momentum to remove the banners since south carolina legislature voted to take down the flag from its statehouse last year. that came after the shooting of nine black shooters in charleston. the shooter had posted pictures
7:38 am
of himself with the confederate flag. >> it's time for mississippi to grow up. that confederate flag is a symbol of white supremacy, and white supremacy is the biggest lie that satan ever told. >> people don't understand. >> mark allen, a leader with mississippi sons of confederate veterans said it is a sign of reconciliation. >> they called it the reconciliation flag because they attempted to reconcile the difference between the old south and new republican in an effort to bring it together and that's what it is. >> several speakers at the rally focused on the presidential candidates and their positions only issue. >> i want you to be mindful of the fact that not one republican candidates has spoken to the confederate flag going down. >> jonathan martin, al jazeera, jackson, mississippi. prosecutors in married are moving ahead with cases against
7:39 am
six police officers accused in the death of freddie gray. >> maryland's highest court ruled that officer william porter can be forced to testify against five of his colleagues. his own trial ending in a hung jury last year. following this, al jazeera's john terrett joins us with more. remind us how we got to this point. >> good to see you guys in the studio for a change. history lesson for you. remember, last april 19, freddie gray died a week after being tonsported in the back of the police wagon. there were terrible riots in baltimore, not the worst we've seen in the united states but very, very bad. there were six indictments of the six police officers involved in his arrest. at the trial of william porter, the first of those officers last november, it collapsed, the jury was hung. they couldn't decide whether or not he was guilty or not and the second trial was that of the driver of the wagon, officer cease sasha goodlettson. that started in january, and porter had transferred the blame in his own trial to caesar
7:40 am
goodson, a murder trial. that ended because the team backing william porter were unhappy that their client was asked to be giving evidence against caesar goodson. they went all the way to the maryland court of appeals and they have to decide whether officer porter road be forced to be a witness against his five colleagues or not and that's how we got to this point. >> tell us more about the decision itself. >> first i wants to that those who have been watching this case very, very closely were surprised at the speed with which the court came back with a decision. they only heard evidence on thursday and came back with their decision yesterday, so it was remarkably quick. they ruled that officer porter must testify in the cases of his five colleagues, so they backed the prosecution effectively and the porter team lost. what was it the porter team was to angst about, they were concerned about his fifth amendment rights, which is a boring way to put that, it's boring. the porter team had done a deal whereby he will not be
7:41 am
prosecuted for any evidence that he gives on the stand against the five other officers, but he has not done that deal with the federal authorities, so down the road, he could be prosecuted by the feds and they're very concerned about that. we know he is going to be accused of being a liar because he transferred the blame in his own trial last year to the driver, caesar goodson. the prosecution will accuse him of being a liar and in this day of social media they are concerned he won't be able to get a fair trial with the jury. >> presumably now, the trials will go forward. >> i think so, just very swiftly, they might take this to the supreme court of the united states in washington, d.c., may very well. if not, the trials will be rescheduled, massive victory for the local prosecutor. >> john terrett for us, thank you very much, good to see you in studio, by the way. seattle is looking to break new ground for workers rights. the city passed legislation two
7:42 am
years ago raising the minimum wage to $15. members of the city council want to give the workers consistent schedules. >> first it was the $15 an hour minimum wage, now some seattle city council members want to legislate how employers schedule their workers. it's an idea many in the restaurant industry say is desperately needed. >> what happens is you'll close on an evening and then you'll be back to open the next morning. >> the proposed legislation would likely restrict those so-called clopenings. it will require worker schedules to come out two weeks in advance. those who study labor issues believe it will affect the employer's bottom line. >> it is going to make it more difficult for business owners to find a way to make a profit. >> it should head to the full council this summer for a vote. al jazeera, seattle. a potential settlement in
7:43 am
the momentum depot data breach case. the store has agreed to pay nearly $20 million to end a class action be suit, including money to reimburse shoppers and provide identity protection. if you live in the northeast and your office is relatively empty this morning, it is a good chance your coworkers called out sick. >> hey, it's a great -- it's going to be a beautiful day. i want to give you more information that has just come out. this winter, december, january, february was the warmest winter on record and records go back to 1895. >> that's not them good news. >> no. we like it in the short term but not the long term. these are the temperatures yesterday, new york got up to 67, washington got up to about 79. this morning, we are a little bit cooler, but actually, these numbers use that for the
7:44 am
mornings, this is what we should have as our high temperatures for the whole day, but this is what our high temperatures are going to be like today. 77 degrees in new york, that is 30 degrees higher than average, is it going to stay? as we go towards thursday, pretty much so. we are going to stay about 75 but down towards washington on thursday, we are talking more 8. that's pretty much going to be the highest we are going to be seeing. after that, guys, we are looking at temperatures slowly coming back down. ok, kevin, thank you. >> portland oregon considers itself to be one of the greenest cities in the country, but the forest service says there is a danger underground with high levels of heavy metals. catherine barrett has more from portland. >> in the moist, mossy rain belt that is the pacific northwest, string planting usually comes early, but not here, not this year. >> i don't think so, i'm really worried about planting in my
7:45 am
garden. >> health authorities are advising portland residents not toe grow food in areas closest to two hot spots where moss and air monitors revealed high areas of heavy metals linked to cancer. the sources of the contamination are two companies that make colored glass and another that manufactures metal parts. all three companies were within current laws. officials called the gardening ban a caution. some recent soil tests have come back safe, but jealous da apple gate raising two children one a mile of one toxic hot spot doesn't feel safe. >> i am worried. i was tested 10 years ago with really high levels of arsonic, dangerously high levels. >> portland environmental activists say the pollution has a regulatory agreeing down.
7:46 am
it all started with this and two forestry researchers who raised the alarm. >> so basically, moss is, you know, a primitive plant. it has little stems, little leaves, absorbs all of its newt recent from the atmosphere sort of like a little sponge. basically pollutants can get accumulated right in the cells of the moss. >> moss is easy and cheap to collect and test. the researchers say it's a great air monitor and that their method could be applied in many parts of the country. >> regulations aren't written in terms of, you know, micro grams of heavy metal for moss. you need to confirm these results with an air quality monitor. we have so few of them. what we really see our role is pointing the finger and saying look, this is an area of concern. >> concern is something of an understatement. the moss test results have been a stab to the heart of portland self image as a clean, green, eco city. citizens have held pro tests and
7:47 am
hundreds attended community forums. >> it comes as a shock that this issue has been discovered and that heights been happening for a long time, so i think what it's exposed beyond just the concerns that people have about their children and their garden and their families is really what's been in place or what are the policy gaps that have allowed this to happen and to continue. >> those policy gaps may not be unique to oregon. >> it really took this moss study to identify how much wasn't being tracked. >> in a statement, the environmental protection agency it is it asked regional offices to gather information on similar art glass plants across the country. all three identified sources of heavy metals here in portland. precision cast parts and bully glass were operating within the letter of the law.
7:48 am
now both glass companies have voluntarily agreed to stop using cadmium, arsonic and chromium. >> it plans to install an industrial emissions filter within a month, but lawyers won't wait. the class action lawsuit against bully was filed this week. catherine barrett, al jazeera, portland, oregon. still ahead, falling into darkness. >> a rare sight in the sky turns day into night. a private space company revealing when tourists might be able to blast off and see the stars. find fantasy shows.
7:49 am
7:50 am
when it comes to the things you love, you want more. love romance? get lost in every embrace. into sports? follow every pitch, every play and every win.
7:51 am
change the way you experience tv with x1 from xfinity. hey how's it going, hotcakes? hotcakes. this place has hotcakes. so why aren't they selling like hotcakes? with comcast business internet and wifi pro, they could be. just add a customized message to your wifi pro splash page and you'll reach your customers where their eyes are already - on their devices. order up. it's more than just wifi, it can help grow your business. you don't see that every day. introducing wifi pro, wifi that helps grow your business. comcast business. built for business. >> beatles fans are mourning the man behind their sound, producer george martin who died at the age of 90. >> as hermela aregawi tells us, his impact on the bases and music word was profound.
7:52 am
>> george martin became known as the fifth beatle, a producer who signed the original fab four in 1962 at a time when many other british labels has passed, he was behind two dozen number one singles in the u.s. and 30 in the u.k. martin suggested the beatles replace their studio drummer with ringo starr and ringo shared the news of his death via twitter. david cameron also took to twitter to commemorate martin. he was born in london and grew up playing piano. after serving in the royal navy, he chose the industry as his career, first working for the bbc and then becoming a producer. he was also a composer. he conducted the string section for eleanor rig by and suggested strings be added to yesterday. >> when we did it, paul
7:53 am
scribbled on it, he said i've got my name on it, here it is, here. he wrote on it on the top here, by paul mccartney, john lennon, george martin, esquire, and mozart with that the reference that it was kind of a classical piece of music. >> the song became one of the most covered of all time. martin produced for other artists, ella fitzgerald, carl lie simon and elton john. he was knighted by the queen and inducted into the rock and roll hall of fame in 1999. he composed the score on a hard day said night, the documentary about the beatles. he was nominated for an academy award for his work on that film, quite the career. the co director of the famous matrix trilogy announced
7:54 am
he is transgender. he made the announcement on tuesday. her sister and directing partner lena came out as transgender two years ago. in a statement, lily said she was at risk of being outed by the media. amazon is promising a big delivery, blue origin expects to launch humans into space next year. he has been compete, space x to do it. thousands have possible space travelers have expressed interest. while millions got to see something spectacular, a total solar eclipse. it was a sunny afternoon, but millions experienced total darkness as the moon passed in front of the sun. we have this report from a beach on indonesia. >> waiting for the moment when the moon is between the sun and earth, the spectacular solar
7:55 am
show brought people together from all over the world. for some, it was their fifth total econtinues. most indonesians have never seen one before. >> i can see the total eclipse for the first time in my life. second, i will share my experience with all my friends and family. i will make them envy. >> traditionally, many believe something bad will happen during a total solar eclipse. before the last in 1983, the government appealed to everyone to stay indoors. 33 years later, many came out to watch how day turns into night for two to three minutes. [ cheering ] >> slowly now, night is turning into day again here. it seems to be a bitter reright now after all the cheering and excitement, people are kind of quiet, like they're in awe of
7:56 am
what they witnessed here for the first time in their lives. >> i can't expression it, but looks like wow! yeah. >> daniel from the united states was worried he would miss his third total eclipse because of the clouds blocking the view. the supreme moment is where the corona, the golden glow from the sun draws a circle around the moon. >> when there is no clouds, the corona goes out and out and out, it's amazing. i still have goose bumps and heart pumping the adrenaline. >> indonesia uses the total eclipse to promote tourism. next year, it's the united states turn to be amazed. >> ahead in our next hour, surprise wins for bernie sanders and ted cruz in primaries last night. we'll talk about why those wins may reveal weak insists they may not have time to overcome. >> syria rebels plan to talk
7:57 am
again with the government but has the door now slammed on thousands of refugees that we keep reporting on every day who desperately need that war to end. we are back in two minutes with more of your world this morning. >> pushing the boundaries of science. >> we are on the tipping point. >> we can save species. >> it's the biggest question out there. >> it's a revolutionary approach. >> we are pushing the boundaries. >> techknow is going to blow your mind. >> our experts go inside the innovations, impacting you. >> this is the first time anybody's done this. >> i really feel my life changing. >> techknow, where technology meets humanity. only on al jazeera america.
7:58 am
7:59 am
8:00 am
>> this is a campaign of the people, by the people and for the people! >> a stunner in michigan, bettee sanders beats hillary clinton but it may not keep her from getting the nomination. the vice president insisting the ties with israel are strong but an iranian missile test
8:01 am
reignites a bitter divide. welcome to your world this morning. i'm stephanie sy. >> i'm del walters. bernie sanders celebrating a big upset, victory in michigan taking home 50% of the vote. in there to know had 48%. that is despite almost every poll showing clinton with a double digit lead going into the contest. >> since michigan awards delegates proportionately, both walk away with quite a few. clinton still holds a commanding lead in the delegate count. for the republicans this morning, donald trump was named winner in hawaii, capping a big night for him and pushes him closer to the gop nomination. david shuster begins our coverage. >> with the swagger of a
8:02 am
conquering hero, donald trump claimed the michigan and mississippi primaries by double digits, defying his challengers and anti trump republican establishment. >> i don't think i've ever had so many horrible, horrible things said about me in one week. $38 million worth of horrible lies, but that's ok. it shows you how brilliant the public is. >> trump thanked supporters who were not swayed by an all out attack against him led by former presidential candidate mitt romney coming into tuesday's primaries. >> every single person, we started off with 17, we're down to four. of the four, they're pretty much all gone. ok? pretty much. they didn't do so well tonight, folks. i'm not going to say anybody didn't do well, they didn't do well. there's only one person who did well tonight, that's donald trump, i'll tell you. >> no one had a worse night than marco rubio, the favorite candidate of the republican
8:03 am
establishment. rubio walked away empty handled, finishing last in mississippi and michigan, in the single digits, despite help from romney. >> i'm calling on behalf of marco rubio. >> on the democratic side, a huge upset, hillary clinton saw her double digit lead in michigan evaporate, bernie sanders took the state with just over 50% of the vote. >> what tonight means is that the bernie sanders campaign, the people's, the revolution, people's revolution that we are talking about, the political revolution that we are talking about is strong in every part of the country, and frankly, we believe that our strongest areas are yet to happen. >> clinton though pulled off a dies i have win in mississippi with more than 80% of the vote there, and she still leads the overall delegate count by a wide margin. idaho voters turned in their votes for ted cruz in the hawaii
8:04 am
caucuses, republican's favorite donald trump. with three more states in the trump column and momentum on his side, donald trump had a message for those in his party looking to take him out. >> i say lets come together, folks, we're going to win. i say let's come together. >> david shuster, al jazeera. >> let's go live to bisi onile-ere in detroit. a lot of attention on trump, but sanders win in michigan, a big surprise. people waking up to that news. what's the reaction so far? >> well i can tell you, dell, considering that so many polls had hillary clinton winning michigan, there are a lot of people who are stunned by last night's events. some people are even shocked. now sanders did say a few days ago that if there was a high voter turnout that he would win michigan, more than 2 million people turned out at the polls yesterday, and michigan's primary breaking a record set in 1972.
8:05 am
it was so busy at one polling precincts that they ran out of ballots. overall, a huge win as you mentioned for bernie sanders and donald trump here in michigan. >> bisi onile-ere, how did he do it? why was sanders able to overcome what seemed to be like almost insurmountable adds going into the primary? >> well, it's interesting, you know, it's important to know that although sanders won michigan, he's actually projected to get 65 of the delegates here and 58 for clinton, so because he did well here doesn't guarantee a nomination. clinton leaves with about 200 delegates, so there's still a long road ahead. clinton did win a majority of the black vote here, but bernie sanders actually narrowed that gap. it's also important to note that bernie sanders outspent hillary here in michigan and that is a point that hillary's camp is stressing this morning. >> also on the republican side, it seems like john kasich
8:06 am
pinning his hopes on doing well in michigan, marco rubio saying the same. what's next for them? >> yeah, well, you know, for ohio governor john kasich, michigan was a must-win, but it's important to note he held on to the second place spot for the majority of last night, but clearly it was not enough. yesterday, he told a group of about 200 supporters that he's not giving up, not throwing in the tall and has his sights now set on ohio. as for rubio, as many political analysts that i've talked with say that his days on the campaign trail are numbered, because he just didn't do well last night. >> numbers three and four but trying harder, thank you very much. tailed the public gets a chances to goodbye to nancy vaguen. viewings for the former first lady start this afternoon at the reagan national library. her funeral will take place
8:07 am
friday. mrs. reagan wanted to be buried as close as possible to her husband. al jazeera has more. >> it was nancy reagan's wish to be laid to rest alongside her husband here, at the ronald reagan presidential library. before the private funeral on friday, the public will have a chance to say their final goodbye to the former first lady. >> she will lay in repose in the reagan library. >> this morning, the casket will arrive here at the library. every detail has been meticulously planned by the first lady herself. >> everything from the actual pal beerers walking with the casket to the family members and people participating in the ceremony, they are hollywood people, they are government people, they are friends of the family, to the people who actually invited, the flowers, so we know we are carrying out her wishes.
8:08 am
>> as the nation prepares to goodbye, her life and legacy is especially significant here in california. from the movie studios in hollywood to the state capital in sacramento. nancy lady was a first lady long before she arrived in washington. a man wanted in the shooting of an idaho pastor has been arrested outside the white house. the secret service arrested kyle andrew odom last night. he was throwing objects over the white house fence. he is a former marine, accused of shooting pastor tim remington. remington is in the hospital recovering from injuries. the group focused on getting aid to syria is meeting in geneva details before talks on permanent appeals are set to begin. diplomats say progress is crucial to keeping the peace process loy. as james bays reports, the
8:09 am
syrian government and opposition are notably absent. >> it's worth noting that this day was supposed to be the start or the restart of the stalled syrian talks. this was the official date given by the u.n. envoy, staffan de mistura, but neither of the two main parties are here in geneva. the government side saying principles are coming, the opposition side saying they have concerns about whether to attend. some of their concerns are about aid getting to the besieged areas. that's a point i put to the humanitarian coordinator. >> the imperative is to reach people trapped in these settings, irrespective of who is laying the siege around the places they live. isil is besieges 200,000 people. al-nusra are besieging about
8:10 am
20,000 people june both places have had aid. >> indeed and that is something that we have been able to do starting in october, but really gaining momentum recently. >> you know why i'm asking these questions, because it's become politicized and the opposition say that they're fulfilling their part of the bargain, letting aid in and the government aren't. >> everybody has a lot more to do, and one thing that should not be done is to reopen humanitarian principles for political discussion. these are not for discussion. these are enshrined in international human law. >> one item of concern and i think follows what the opposition have been saying, there are many violations by the syrian government side and by that the russian air force, is a report in damascus province, the west of damascus province in the last 24 hours of the most sustained attack using barrel bombs. we've seen anytime during the
8:11 am
cessation of hostilities, which has now lasted or been in place for over 10 days. >> that is al jazeera's james bays for us in geneva. a new report by save the children saying at least a quarter of a million children in syria are living in constant fear and deprivation without regular access to food or medicine. >> many are stuck at border crossings trying to reach western europe. macedonia shutting their borders, slovenia with new restrictions. thousands are camped out in tents at the border. they are piling up on the greece-macedonia border. some people have been out in the cold for a week. threw threats in my north korea leader kim jong-un. he said his country has
8:12 am
miniaturized weapons. >> the statements by kim jong-un have been made by a visit by the north korean leader to see work on his nuclear program, meeting with scientists and technicians, accompanied by a photograph being carried in the main north korean newspaper with kim showing what appears to be the device in question. kim is quoted as saying that his country now has the technology to miniaturize a nuclear warhead and put it on top of a missile warhead. these claims are not particularly new and treated with skepticism. they believe this north korea is working on the technology but is not there yet. the interesting thing from south korea's part is north korea does now seem to be recycling some of its claims as a way of keeping up the stream of rhetoric and now tributing the claim to the leader kim jong-un. this is a time of heightened
8:13 am
tensions on the korean peninsula. we have the sanctions imposed by the u.n. unilateral sanctions from south korea and of course beginning this week, military exercises between south korea and the united states, so this does seem to be the latest response to all of that from north carolina. al jazeera's rob mcbride reporting from seoul. in january, north korea carried out a nuclear test claiming to set off a miniaturized hydrogen bomb. many said the blast was too small to back up the claims. a court in japan ordered to nuclear reactors to close because of safety concerns. they had been off line after a technical problem. the ruling will force the plant to shut down a second reactor. it was five years ago this week that an earthquake and tsunami caused a meltdown at the
8:14 am
fukushima nuclear plant. there was lightning and tornadoes over fort worth. in stevensville, at least one person was killed, several others were hurt across the state. those storms making for a wet morning in louisiana, dozens of homes flooded. police had to use boats to rescue the residents. others are being told to evacuate ahead of expected flooding. >> it is not over. there is still a flooding danger this morning. let's bring in kevin corriveau for more on that. >> today, tomorrow and probably thursday and friday. >> wow. >> friday, as well, and saturday. the reason being is that an upper level low and that is really not moving too much across this area. as it spins, it's pulling in the moisture from the south and the gulf. as long as that stays there and has that energy, it is going to rain and we are going to have the severe weather across the accident, louisiana and arkansas. this is what it looks like now. you can see a lot of areas in the accident getting that very
8:15 am
heavy rain. we are picking up some of those line of thunderstorms that are severe. we're going to be watching those carefully. they're embedded in that larger area of rain. i want to show you all of the activity we have seen in the last 24 hours. >> this red dot to the west of dallas is the tornado. notice all the green dots in louisiana. that is all the flood damage we have seen in the last 24 hours. fear thunderstorm warnings in effect right now for parts of houston, as well as down towards the border, but it's really the flooding that's going to be the big problem for the next 24-72 hours across this area. where you see the red flash flood warnings are the most severe parts, because that means flash flood is eminent or occurring right now. over the next 24-72 hours, we are going to see another foot of rain. i think we're probably going to see more by the time it is all out. rain in this area of northwestern louisiana, there are some locations that have
8:16 am
already seen up to a foot of rain. you add another foot of rain on top of that, we're talking two feet of rain or more. the rivers and streams are going to be having a big problem over the next several days. we're talking about localized flooding on the river banks and it's just going to be a real mess. >> that is a lot of rain, kevin thank you very much. repairing the relationship. >> after benjamin netanyahu cancels his white house visit, there are concerns that even vice president biden can't bring the white house and jerusalem back together. the f.b.i. investigates itself over mysterious shots fired during a standoff which left an oregon occupier dead.
8:17 am
8:18 am
8:19 am
vice president joe biden is in israel this morning for talks with israeli and palestinian leaders but that trip already marred by a series of attacks. speaking this morning alongside the israeli prime minister, biden said the violence must end. >> this cannot become an accepted modus operandi. this cannot be viewed by civilized leaders as an appropriate way in which to behave, even if it appears to be a benefit to one side or the other. >> there was violence in the west bank where a palestinian was shot dead after trying to stab an israeli soldier. we have the latest. >> two palestinian men were shot near a checkpoint that went up tuesday. that was after reports that at least one of them had tried to attack a member of the israeli border police. now, we're now hearing that one
8:20 am
of those palestinians has died of his wounds and he's been named locally as a 16-year-old teenager from the occupied west bank. not long before that, that incident in opened east jerusalem, what happened first of all was that two palestinians traveling in a car fired towards an israeli bus. no one was hurt in that incident, but the israeli police gave chase and during that chase, the palestinians then fired at a jewish israeli, and they actually wounded that person, before then being shot dead by the israeli police. on tuesday, there were incidents not just in occupied east jerusalem, but in other parts in israeli itself, including notably in the port city of i can't have if a just outside
8:21 am
tel-aviv, where a man committed several stabbings before being shot at a palestinian attacker, responsible for several incidents. one of his victims be a within american tourist died of his wounds. that happened down the road from where u.s. vice president joe biden was after arriving in the country. the u.s. condemned the attack which killed the american, taylor forest. he was a management student at vanderbilt and veteran of the iraq and afghan wars. a professor from northeastern university joins us now to talk about the latest developments. thank you for your time. the latest violence which ended in the death of an american veteran, how does it exemplify where the parties are in this conflict now? >> it just shows that really
8:22 am
there is no peace process, there's no trust between the two sides. there is a great deal of animosity. this is one of the lowest points there's been in recent years between two sides, so any kind of talk coming out of the white house about trying to resurrect negotiations or move the process forward, given the ongoing violence really seems like completely removed from reality. >> netanyahu, the prime minister of israeli canceled a meeting with obama that was to occur later this month. is he still bitter over the iran deal? >> i think he's probably got some lingering frustration witness that. i think he's largely put that behind him now, but clearly, netanyahu's relationship with obama is not good. they've had seven years now of squabbles and spats and slights and misunderstandings. i think the leaders aren't really interested in trying to repair that relationship. i think the fact that biden is
8:23 am
in israel and there are on going talks between the u.s. and israel over a new american defense package indicates that whatever the relationship is between obama and netanyahu, the underlying relationship between the united states and israel remains strong. >> "the new york times" is reporting that the obama administration at this point is sort of resigned to the fact that they will not be able to necessarily restart the peace process, but they may be considering whether to lay down some sort of outline of the contours of an agreement that they could present as a u.n. security council resolution. talk about what that might look like on the likelihood of that. >> well, i think the resolution would probably include the outcome of the talks that secretary of state john kerry convened between the israelis and palestinians. they were never published. essentially the revolution would co defy at least what the u.n.
8:24 am
understanding is on those agreements that is in the final status of that agreement. it depends on the pushback that president obama is going to get domestically. it could hurt the democrats in the elections if it is going to allow the republicans to see this as president obama is i plying pressure on israel. if the white house believes this is not going to damage hillary clinton's prospects in november, it is going to try to do something to push it forward. >> when i look at obama's legacy on this issue, he would not be the first president that sort of in the last part of his term tries to get the pros back on track. do you see any other signs of that especially given the sort of fraught relationship that
8:25 am
came about between obama and netanyahu over the iran deal? >> well, i think every president, as you said is at some point in their administration particularly in the waning days, they seem to be attracted by that the idea of trying to achieve the impossible, trying to, you know, resolve this long and bitter conflict between israeli and palestinians. i think obama is no different. he in particular is committed to doing so, because he came into office from day one, promising that he would resolve this conflict. i think what he's going to try to do is unilaterally through the united nations or through making his own speech to do something at least. he doesn't need netanyahu's cooperation only. he doesn't need the two leaders, netanyahu and abbas to talk directly. he simply needs to clarify what is the american position and that will lay down a marker for future american presidents, as well, just like do they accept essentially what will now be the
8:26 am
obama terms of reference or the obama peace plan. >> drawing waxman, thank you so much for joining us this morning. >> thank you. >> stephanie, as you point out, one of israel's big concerns in recent years has been that nuclear program in iran. overnight, iran fired two more ballistic missiles. iran's revolutionary guard also firing several missiles on tuesday saying they are designed to hit israel. earlier this year, the u.s. sanctioned businesses rinked to a program that happened previously. >> earlier this year, the united states put in place sanctions against iran because of their ballistic missile activity. >> the white house said the missile tests are not a violation of the nuclear agreement but they are concerned, a republican guard saying the sanctions will not stop iran from developing
8:27 am
ballistic missiles. michigan feeling the burn. >> bernie sanders could be gaining ground with hillary clinton's strongest supporters, minorities. an accused baltimore officer can testify against his fellow officers in the freddie gray case.
8:28 am
8:29 am
>> that harmony, that politeness and that equilibrium that japanese people call "wa". at the other side of history, fukushima's heroes were not enough. people have lost their trust, especially in the authorities. the myth of nuclear energy, of it being economic, safe and clean has been swept away.
8:30 am
>> "fukushima: a nuclear story," narrated by willem dafoe. another set of presidential contests in the books, donald trump once again submit cementing his status as the republican front runner, named winner in hawaii, capping a huge night to use his words. trump also winning in mississippi and michigan. on the democratic side, bernie sanders pulled off an improbable win in the michigan primary, topping hillary clinton despite the polls giving her a strong edge before voting began. clinton holds the delegate edge. >> it was the win he was waiting for, the u.s. state of michigan, where young democratic voters there overwhelmingly backed presidential candidate bernie sanders. >> i just want to take this opportunity to thank the people of michigan who kind of repute 80ed the polls that had us 20-25
8:31 am
points out a few days ago, who repudiated the pundits who said we weren't going anywhere. >> he vows that take what he calls his political revolution all the way to this summer's presidential nominating convention. ♪ >> it was a big night too for republican front runner donald trump, who also defied the wish of the political establishment, picking up wins in mississippi and michigan, proving his broad appeal is strong among conservative voters. >> i actually think it's the biggest story in politics today. i hope that the republicans will embrace it. we have, don't forgot, dentist coming over, very importantly, we have independents coming over. if i win, and if i get to go against hillary, polls are showing that i'd beat her. >> in idaho, it was ted cruz that came out on top, marco
8:32 am
rubio not winning a single state. it's a result so poor, there are questions about whether he'll drop out between the march 15 vote in his home state of florida. he says no way. >> because we're not just going to win the florida primary, we are going to win florida in november and we are going to turn this country around. >> democratic front runner clinton still leads in the democratic race and did pick up another southern state, mississippi, thanks to overwhelming support for african-american voters. she thanked her supporters and took aim at the campaign being run by her republican opponent. >> every time you think it can't get any uglier, they find a way, and as the rhetoric keeps sinking lower, the stakes in this election keep rising higher. >> in one week, both parties will vote yet again. delegate rich states like ohio, florida and illinois will be up for grabs. it could offer donald trump the opportunity to cement his republican front runner status,
8:33 am
and also give bernie sanders the chance to close the gap on hillary clinton. one of the things that seemed to resonate in the exist polls is people who have lost their jobs and that seems to be the theme, they don't like free trade agreements in michigan, they don't like nafta, they don't like the t.p.p., what does that say going forward for bernie sanders, that is his message, i have to bring america back to you and keep your job from going overseas. >> that explains a lot of what happened in michigan. in every entrance and exit poll, people are incredibly worried about the economy and jobs. in michigan, you see six out of 10 of people who live in michigan saying that the free
8:34 am
trade agreements like nafta have taken their jobs and moved them overseas and bernie sanders is the candidate if you compare the two of them -- >> that's a similar message that trump has. >> in terms of clinton and sanders, sanders has put his entire campaign on the issue of restoring the equality that we need in terms of our jobs and economic future. donald trump make the same message and appealing to the same type of voter on the other side. >> does that mean we are becoming isolationists as a nation? >> i don't know if it means we're becoming isolationists but i do think it means people are saying look, when nafta, we remember the fights that occurred over nafta, look at fights that are occurring over the t.p.p. >> we should say that clinton has made it clear she doesn't support the t.p.p. although she did at one time. >> that is what i think is really dogging her. >> her past. >> and bill clinton's pushing of
8:35 am
nafta. she is not personally responsible but it's hard to divorce the two. >> sanders appeared to narrow the gap when it came to african-american voters in michigan, despite clinton repeatedly going to flint, michigan and talking about that water crisis on the stump. what does that say to the clinton camp? >> this is such a significant change for sanders, who has been struggling with the african-american vote and here we see he takes 30%, three out of 10 and that helped him narrow the gap. if he hadn't done that, she wins in mississippi, if she had come anywhere close to that in michigan, she would have probably won the -- >> it could dog her in ohio. >> in ohio and elsewhere in the rust best. she has to be careful, because african-american vote has been her firewall. if she starts to lose there, that does not bode well for her going forward, although we should say bernie sanders has significant leaps to make in the delegate count to catch up to
8:36 am
her. >> you guys are scratching your heads and i've got to ask the question. >> you love to point this out, del. >> what does it say that a socialist, albeit a democratic socialist is winning and scoring victories on the democratic side and donald trump is surging and doing well on the republican side? >> the world is all jump side down for us analysts, political scientists. it does defy much of what we expect. we thought we knew you need the support of the party to do it and that that proven not to be true. on the democratic side, more true than on the republican side, obviously. if you look historically, the republican party is in a period of realignment and i think that that is going to continue. parties do that about every 40 years and that can can explain part of it. >> we're not going to blame you for it. >> he likes to blame me for this. >> no, no, no. >> ted cruz didn't have a bad
8:37 am
night, actually. when you look at the contests he has won, he has won in all four regions of the country a caucus. he had wins in maine, the midwest, south and also in the west. what does that say about his momentum, look at the delegate count, it's not huge. >> this continues with his narrative. he has seven wins from a variety of areas in the country and can rightly claim that he is the one person who can bead donald trump. >> he didn't pick up a single delegate last night. >> kasich had a very bad night and ted cruz can say i am the one person who can compete to donald trump and win. this is something, if you look at this, this is a two-man race at this point, unless rubio or kasich picks up their home states on the 15th and then does credibly well somewhere else. i think this is a two-man race. >> you were right in pointing out that donald trump was saying last night, let's go on to win
8:38 am
the senate, let's go on to win niece gubernatorial races on the ballot. how concerned is the establishment with what they saw last night? >> very concerned, because they have less than a week to try to stop donald trump if they can, otherwise go to a fractured convention, which is going to be very tough. i thought it was really important that he mentioned as you said the downed ballot ticket. he got a phone call from paul ryan and praised powell ryan. i think it does show donald trump pivoting to say i am a supporter of this party and want us all to win which is a new message for him. >> he is looking at the general. >> he is looking at the general and he should. a democratic filibuster in the missouri senate has been going on for about 40 hours, no end in sight there involves a bill related to same-sex marriage. it was proposed by republicans, and it would stop the government from penalizing religious
8:39 am
organizations and wedding vendors who don't want to participate in gay weddings. it is meant to give legal protection to opponents of same-sex marriage. there are no details in the killing of an armed protestor by law enforcement officials in oregon. he was shot dead in january, his wife is accusing the f.b.i. which a cover up. as al jazeera's john henry smith tells us, the f.b.i. and police say that's not the case. >> the f.b.i. has released video from inside of the truck la vow finecum. >> go ahead and shoot me. >> he was the spokesman for the armed protestors in oregon earlier this year. the new video, synchronized with overhead video shows him goading them before reaching twice for a concealed handgun. >> i have concluded all six
8:40 am
shots fired, the three into the truck and three that struck him are justified. >> but their reports list a total of eight shots fired on january 26. oregon police say the other two came from f.b.i. guns, as he stepped from his truck. >> go ahead and shoot me. >> those shots missed him. it is being investigated by the f.b.i. didn't list the shots on their report. >> i can assure you that no one, the director of the f.b.i. found that each an everyone employee who was working in harney county wanted the situation to end in violence or death. >> it was an ambush involving a road block on a blind curve along a lonely stretch of highway, a dead man's blockade. my husband was murdered intentionally deliberately and with malice. >> she disputes that he reached
8:41 am
for a loaded gun. >> he was walking with his hands in the air, a symbol of surrender, when he reached down to his left, he was reaching to the pain of having been shot. >> the justice department probe is reportedly focused on five so far unnamed f.b.i. agents. john henry smith, al jazeera. this morning, prosecutors in maryland are moving healed with the cases against those six officers accused in the death of fred degree. >> we have been waiting for this ruling. the ruling is that he can be forced to testify against five colleagues. his own trial ended in a hung jury last year. jab terrett joins us now. remind us how we got to this point. >> remember freddie gray died april 19 last year a week after being arrested and transported in the back of the police action. there were riots in baltimore, not the worst we've seen in the united states over the years, but they were very, very bad and shortly after that, six
8:42 am
baltimore police officers were indicted. the first trail began in november, for william porter. the jury was hung. in that trial, he labeled the blame for freddie gray's death squarely at the door of the driver of the police wagon, caesar goodson, whose trial began in january and porter was a witness in that trial. it was halted because porter says defense team said this is not fair that our client who is going to be tried again has to be a witness in somebody else's trial. they took it to the highest court that you can take it in the state of maryland, the maryland court of appeals and the judges were asked to decide whether or not porter should be compelled to testify or not. that's the point we've now reached. >> take us behind that particular decision. tell us more about it. >> the first things to is those of us watching this closely from the beginning were utterly shocked the court returned a decision so quickly. they only heard evidence on thursday last and the decision was handled down yesterday.
8:43 am
that's very, very swift for a court of appeals. they ruled that officer porter must testify in all five trials of his colleague, so his team lost, the prosecution very much won. what was it that the defense team was fighting for? they were very concerned that officer porter would have his fifth amendment rights violated. in other words, number one, he did a deal. they did a deal with the state of maryland that he wouldn't be prosecuted for any of the evidence that he might give on the stand in the trials of his five colleagues, but they haven't done a deal with the federal authorities. it's possible that the if he said could prosecute him for what he says on the stand down the are the. they are concerned about that. they are concerned that he will be called a liar by the prosecution when he comes up as a witness and in this day of social media are very concerned that means he will not get a fair trial from a jury when his trial finally comes round. we expect it will be sometime
8:44 am
soon. this could go to the supreme court of the united states. if it doesn't, the trials will begin in sequence and that will be a massive victory for the maryland prosecutor. the middle of the week is bringing some sunshine to a winter weary east coast. let's bring in kevin corriveau for more on that. >> we've had so much sunshine and warm weather that the parks democratic bumped up the dates just yesterday for when the cherry festival is going to be in washington. normally it would be march 31 to april 5. we are talking almost two weeks ahead of schedule because which these very warm schedules. washington saw 79 degrees. this morning, we are still quite cool but that's going to go up very, very quickly today and we'll see temperatures broken across the region with new york
8:45 am
seeing 77, washington seeing 84 degrees today. also that warm air is going to start to make its way to the north. we had a front that was kind of holding afghanistan, but now that front is moving up, and the rest of new england is going to enjoy it, as well. we're taking a look here as we go to parts of the other days. for friday, temperatures begin to come down, but we're still well above average across this region. normally for new york this time of year, you would see a temperature of 49, so on friday, we are still way above average. >> we like it. kevin corriveau, thank you very much. still ahead, he was the man behind all the legends. ♪ >> we'll look back at the life and legacy have beatles producer, george martin. we take you to a beach in indonesia to witness a total solar eclipse.
8:46 am
8:47 am
8:48 am
♪ the classic sound of the beatles and their producer george mar turn is the man behind the man. he died at the age of 90. >> my sister was screaming when that song played on t.v. as hermela aregawi tells us, martin said impact on the music word was profound.
8:49 am
>> george martin became known as the fifth beatle, a producer who signed the original fab four in 1962 at a time when many other british labels has passed, he was behind two dozen number one singles in the u.s. and 30 in the u.k. martin suggested the beatles replace their studio drummer with ringo starr and ringo shared the news of martin's death via twitter. david cameron also took to social media to commemorate martin. he was born in london and grew up playing piano. after serving in the royal navy, he chose the industry as his career, first working for the bbc and then becoming a producer. he was also a composer. he conducted the string section for eleanor rigby and suggested strings be added to yesterday. >> when we did it, paul scribbled on it, he said i've
8:50 am
got my name on it, this is it, here. he wrote on it on the top here, by paul mccartney, john lennon, george martin, esquire, and mozart with that the reference that it was kind of a classical piece of music. >> the song became one of the most covered of all time. martin produced for other artists, ella fitzgerald, carly simon and elton john. he was knighted by the queen and inducted into the rock and roll hall of fame in 1999. he composed the score on "a hard day's night," the documentary about the beatles. he was nominated for an academy award for his work on that film, quite the career. >> they worked together until the album let it be, phil
8:51 am
specter came onboard and it was a very contentious time. paul mccartney saying he was a true gentleman and like a second father. the co director of the famous matrix trilogy announced he is transgender. in a statement, she said she was at risk of being outed by the media. ammon is promising a big delivery. the c.e.o. saying his country blue origin expects to launch humans into space next year. it has compete with space x to be the first to do it. there wasn't be paying customers on the test flights, but thousands of possible space travelers have already expressed interest. millions of people got the chance to see something spectacular, a totally solar
8:52 am
eclipse. we have a report from indonesia. >> waiting for the moment when the moon is between the sun and earth, the spectacular solar show brought people together from all over the world. for some, it was their fifth total eclipse. most indonesians have never seen one before. >> i can see the total eclipse for the first time in my life. second, i will share my experience with all my friends and family. i will make them envy. >> traditionally, many in indonesia believe something bad will happen during a total solar eclipse. before the last eclipse in 1983, the government appealed to everyone to stay indoors. 33 years later, many came out to watch how day turns into night for two to three minutes. [ cheering ]
8:53 am
>> slowly now, night is turning into day again here. right now after all the cheering now after all the cheering and excitement, people are kind of quiet, like they're in awe of what they witnessed here for the first time in their lives. >> i can't express it, but looks like wow! yeah. >> daniel from the united states was worried he would miss his third total eclipse because of the clouds blocking the view. the supreme moment is where the corona, the golden glow from the sun, draws a circle around the moon. >> when there is no clouds, the corona goes out and out and out, it's amazing. i still have goose bumps and heart pumping the adrenaline. >> indonesia uses the total eclipse to promote tourism. next year, on august 21, it's the united states turn to be amazed.
8:54 am
>> you get the feeling nicole mitchell was somewhere on that beach. she likes that type of stuff. >> can you imagine how ancient people felt? they must have thought it was the end of the world. any insight? >> when they lit the sun, it was a great day, that's all i have to say. competing at the ends of the earth. >> battling the elements to put their skills to the test. major league baseball builds a brand new stadium for one game. we'll explain why.
8:55 am
8:56 am
8:57 am
thousands of the world's best athletes are competing in greenland today. they are designed to bring arctic communities together. >> sports options was limited in a country that is nearly all ice. helicopters, planes or boats are the only way to get between towns or tiny outposts like this. just 56,000 people live in this vast country, a third of them in the world's smallest capitol now hosting greenlands biggest sporting event. >> from up here, you really see just how isolated and inhoss pittable greenland is with a population that would fit inside an english premier football stadium in a country not much smaller than india. it's so rare that people across the arctic to be able to come together and meet in one place. >> that's where the arctic winter games come in.
8:58 am
medals completed for in sports for both summer and winter olympics, as well as traditional sports rarely seen outside the arctic circle. the real victory is bringing together young people who share the same cult u. but live thousands of miles apart. in places like canada and russia and scandinavia. it's been a hard fought victory with a storm closing the airport and stranding hundreds of athletes outside until just before the first day of competition. >> we were supposed to be here three days ago and were stuck back home. >> we are the arctic and we need to be somewhere where it's the arctic to experience our temperature. >> tommy carries greenland's hopes. his job as a pilot is vital in getting athletes to the game. >> it's not like denmark or any other country. you can just drive a car two
8:59 am
hours or three hours. here we need to spend a lot of money and up when get to see the other inuit from alaska and canada, it's nice to see even though we're isolated and think it's only us here in the north, we're not. >> then comes getting the competitors home, but only if the weather decides to play ball. al jazeera, greenland. mlb building a new stadium for the army at fort bragg. it will play host to the atlanta braves and miami marlins july 3. the game will be the first ever played at an active military base and after the game, the ballpark is going to be converted into a permanent softball field and multi-purpose center. that's it for us here in new york. >> your world he this morning back tomorrow morning beginning at 7:00 a.m. eastern time, have a great day. 74 degrees in new york, 84 in washington. wow.
9:00 am
no hope in sight, more bad news for refugees stuck in greece as slow introduces new border restrictions. this is al jazeera live from doha. also ahead on the program, seven palestinians killed. nearly five years after the took seem that disaster, the closure of more reactors ordered closed over safety fierce. >> in senegal, the practice of

55 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on