Skip to main content

tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  April 1, 2016 7:00am-9:01am EDT

7:00 am
a storm system as tornadoes
7:01 am
hit areas. welcome to your world this morning 34 million people around 13 states are going to be affected by the severe weather they're part of the same storm moving through the south africa injuring seven people in oklahoma. our correspondent has more. >> reporter: the strongest storm hit oklahoma where there were reports of in multiple tornadoes. thousands of people had their power knocked out. trees completely uprooted and many homes and vehicles destroyed. others were reported in parts of the area. in pervir winds toppled trees and power lines. near the alabama astate line at least a dozen homes were damaged. >> reporter: we were out in the shop and all of a sudden my wife called me and said you need to
7:02 am
come in. i didn't hear the sirens going off. when we came out of the shop, there was some tin flying off the top of the shop there. it's nothing i've seen or been in. >> reporter: crews also rescued a 16-year-old after he and his truck got stuck in a ditch. two twittererss hit in alabama aleaving thousands of the power but no-one was hurt that is fortunate, but that risk of severe weather continues today. nicole mitchell has more. >> reporter: yesterday widespread severe weather reports. here is a look of those. especially through the south, but even north, especially the orange pannings, those are wind damage reports. they went all the way to the great lakes. the activity mostly through the south. the oklahoma was the day before wednesday that we were seeing bad and we also saw storms in
7:03 am
kansas, arkansaw, loouz. this is how all of that moved through and you can see that just pinging along. we still have a widespread area of moisture starting to push through the east coast. taking a closer look at all that. the stormy side is the south-eastern section of this and with the front lingering back, you can pick out thunder storms in places like texas this morning. we will have that risk through the course of the day. also white spread concerns because this is dumped down so up rain that it moved through that a lot of rivers were cresting or will continue to crest for the next few days. we've in roads washed out, things of that nature. be very careful. through the rest of the day and the next 24 hours more of this hits the east coastline will also start to see by later today and more into tomorrow, another kind of clipper coming through the north and that will blend in the north-east and keep most of
7:04 am
the area wet until saturday. in terms of that risk, so today's risk not as high as it was yesterday, but we're still going to look for some of those problems anywhere from the mid at lan take all the way-- atlantic all the way through the south east. not out of the question for a tornado or two. temperatures still warm topped. there are dramatic drops. some will drop 20 to 30 degrees over the next couple of days thank you. this morning south korea saying that north korea has fired another ballistic missile saying its military is analysing the path. it was fired from the north east coast and went into the sea coming hours after president obama along with leaders from south korea and japan vowed that they will ramp up pressure on pyongyang for the nuclear summit in dc with a number of moves, the
7:05 am
top u.s. defense official believes the threat from north korea is becoming serious and credible. our correspondent reports, the country may soon be able to threaten not just neighbours but also the u.s. >> reporter: pyongyang has long been known for its rhetoric, but it's latest propaganda offering was over the top video posted on a north korean website that threatened the u.s. with a nuclear attack and featured an animated depiction of a ballistic missile strike on washington's mall. a decade ago such war talk coulding dismissed, but now the claims of north korea's leader of developing a miniaturised nuclear war head and a new mobile inter continental ballistic missile, although unverified, must taken seriously. before the summit opened, obama held private talks with the leaders of south korea and
7:06 am
japan. the two american allies closest to the north >> it's not surprising that one of the topics most on our minds is the issue of north korea and we are united in our efforts to deter and defend against north korean provocations. >> today's meeting has led to indementdz discussions on what companies should do together to stop north korea from upgrading its capabilities >> reporter: later obama met separately with committee, president of china-- president xi jinping. he called coordination with the u.s. effective and said both countries are committed to the denuclearisation of korean peninsula. meanwhile, even though the north's boast in january of an underground nuclear test was deemed by the u.s. as an unsuccessful attempt to detonate
7:07 am
a more powerful hydrogen bomb, the north technology and capabilities are improving. america's top general says that is complicating war plans >> if you any about a conflict with north korea, you have to factor in not only ballistic missiles, cyber capabilities, space capabilities, in addition to the traditional conventional threat that we confronted on the peninsula the soul surviving suspect in the november 13 paris attacks could soon be extradited to france. salah abdeslam was arrested in bull gem this month days before the deadly bombing in brussels. his lawyer says he is willing to cooperate with french authorities. the transfer could take place in the next ten days. 130 people were killed in the i.s.i.l.-connected paris attacks in politics bernie sanders holding a rally in new york city last night and hillary clinton says it's her home turf.
7:08 am
that happened after a wild 24 hours. >> thank you south bronx. >> reporter: fresh off six big victories in the last seven contests, bernie sanders hopes to replicate what he has done in wisconsin. after a string of large ram ease, the win kon sin poll indicates sanders is leading hillary clinton 49% to 45 >> when we stand together there is nothing we cannot accomplish. but gaining on clinton in new york her own backyard, may not be so easy. >> you are meeting the next president of the united states of america. >> reporter: clinton has a large number of powerful political allies. in an harlem coffee shop >> i've been to the house. >> reporter: at the famous theater this man and at a rally
7:09 am
with west county where she lives, she pledged that new york is hers >> serving as your senator for eight years was one of the greatest honors of my life. >> reporter: in a sign of the heightened tensions and importance of the new york race, sanders supporters protested and interrupted at the clinton event. >> i know the bernie people came to say that. we're very sorry, you're leaving >> reporter: you should vote bernie >> reporter: in the republican contest, donald trump now appears to be losing one of his highest profile defenders, conservative ann colter lashed out on a radio show >> do you realise our candidate is mental? it is constantly having to bail out your 16-year-old from prison. >> reporter: and that was before trump's comments wednesday on abortion. >> the answer is that there has to be some form of punishment
7:10 am
>> to the woman? >> yeah. it has to be some form >> reporter: trump's campaign called it a misspeak and said he would actually only punish doctors. >> thank you. >> reporter: david shuster as for donald trump, he is hoping to bury the hacht with the republican party as he hedges closer to that nomination. he met with previs on thursday. on his twitter page he called the 30-minute meeting nice and it was called productive. it follows his declaration at that cn town hall that he is taking back his pledge to support the nominee if it is not him new york is the latest state to push for a higher minimum wage. como and leaders reached a budget deal to up wages to $15 an hour. in new york city that change will happen by 2018, but increases will be slower across the rest of the state. some counties won't reach the $15 march until 2022 and in california, a plan to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour is
7:11 am
now headed to the governor's desk. understand that plan wages will go up to $10.50 next january and will gradually increase $r to $15 by 2022. over two million workers will be affected a trooper is dead after a shooting at a bus station in richmond. he was dying in that shoot out with the state police. they were holding a routine exercise. at the richmond bus station when they heard shots fired. the suspect pulled the begun, shot one of their troopers they have yet to identify them. ferguson miss our has a new chief. he is black. our correspondent tells us he has his work cut out for him >> reporter: once when he was growing up in miami, two officers stopped and are frisked him and called him racial slurs. hoo he said he decided right there to become an officer himself >> i wanted to provide to my community better service than i was getting. >> reporter: after a three-month search, the 32 year veteran has
7:12 am
been chosen out of 54 candidates to serve the community of ferguson missouri. as it's first ever full-time african american police chief. >> reporter: ferguson was torn apart by months of clashes between police and protesters after the fatal shooting of 18-year-old michael brown by darren wilson. here is what he had to say about the ferguson unrest at the time >> one of the things that we've done in miami, and i think it's been a great thing, is we have made sure that the department is not only reflective of the community, but a lot of the police officers are from the very community that they protect. >> reporter: when brown was shot, the ferguson police department had only four african american officers serng a predominantly african american city. in march of last year, tom jackson resigned after accusations that his officers escalated the violence following the shooting. a six month department of justice investigation found that
7:13 am
ferguson officers routinely used unreasonable force and used traffic stops to generate revenue for the city. >> change doesn't come easily, but i think i'm ready for that challenge >> reporter: he will be tasked with further changing the culture of the ferguson pd to one that is less adverse airal and one that the community trusts. >> if we're listening and communicating, we stand a great chance of moving forward he had set to retire after spending most of his career as media officer. i can tell you he had a reputation as calm, level headed holdened fair it's interesting that they picked someone with pr experience p but what conventional police work? >> he has a bit of that. he pounded a beat, worked undercover. he worked on a variety of violent crime investigations as a member of the miami pd's elite
7:14 am
homicide unit. a very experienced choice and he comes with a cool head. that's his reputation miami not immune to up rest among the citizens as well >> that is true thank you very much chicago activists say they're furious after the city's police union hired the officer charged with shooting mcdonald. jason van dyke will work ace january for tore the union. it is the union's way of giving the officer financial assistance. the shooting in 2014 was captured on camera chicago's teacher said to walk off the job today. they have been working put without a contract since last summer. the walk out is illegal and some teachers are now asking if their union is going the right thing. >> reporter: if chicago teachers walk off the job as planned friday, 400,000 school kids will lose a day in the clash room.
7:15 am
forcing their parents to make alternate plans. >> do you think this will be an inconvenience for some parents? >> yes. i mean, for my daughter, she is a single mum but she has me, so i will keep josh home on friday. there's not much we can do >> reporter: this teacher says she doesn't want to walk the picket line but thinks it's necessary >> we're just showing that this is an urgent matter and that our schools need to be funded and we can't take any more cuts here >> reporter: the planned walk out is part of an ongoing feud over funding between the mayor and the chicago teachers union. that started three years ago when the city closed 50 public schools. the latest battle involves a new union contract, the old one expired last spring. by law the teachers can't strike until may when a fact-finding period is completed. but last week union delegates voted for a one-week walk out by a four to one margin citing
7:16 am
unfair labor practices. the city wants to stop raises based on teach areas experience or education level. the president claimed many delegates who voted no want a full-blown strike >> you just feel like why don't we just do it now, a real strike now and be done with it. >> reporter: chicago public schools the eo says if there is a strike friday, the teachers will be breaking the law >> we will look at our legal options. we will continue to talk to our lawyers about how we pursue those legal options >> reporter: chicago public schools say teachers who don't show up to work on friday and don't have legitimate excuse will be docked a day's pay, but if they do want to come to school and they cross a picket line, they could get in trouble with the union. teacher gym thinks the union is putting the teachers in a very difficult situation >> i think the legality of it is the number one reason that most teachers feel apprehended by doing it.
7:17 am
>> reporter: he shouldn't sure if he will picket outside his school. the illinois educational labor relations board could decide if the strike is illegal and what actions, if any, could be brought against the union and chicago's 27,000 teachers coming up in our next hour, we're going to be talking to the vice president of the chicago teachers union a controversial new study is racing questions about racial bias is u.s. classrooms. researchers followed more than 8,00010th graders and found white teachers had negative opinions of the black students. they found white teachers were 12 mrs more will likely than plaque students to say their tsunami wouldn't finish high school. on the other hand, black teachers had similar estimations of both their black and white student. white teacheser thought black male students were less likely to graduate high school than their black female counterparts. the battle for a texas board of education seat is making
7:18 am
headlines national wide. it strems one p from one candidate's views of sexual orientation and the president of the u.s. >> reporter: she is outspoken. >> reporter: she is one step away from shaping what children in tax's and potentially around the country learn in public schools for years to come. >> if you're going to teach [indistinct] >> reporter: she is running for a spolt on the texas state board of education. the former kinder garten teacher and counsellor of 36 years received the most votes but came in under 50%. now the race is heading to a may run off. if she wins, she would join 915 member void and have a voice in the curriculum standards that guide the content of the textbooks >> we have five million kids in our schools.
7:19 am
if we teach them things that are not sound educational philosophies or sound scientific facts, we're setting them up for failure >> reporter: the issue is greater than texas. due to the power with publishers, those same textbooks may also be sold and used in other states. >> some the things she says are rightfully frightening to think of somebody having a microphone and having the status of an elected official in texas >> reporter: he is a state board of education vice chair. as a moderate republican he owe poses her candidacy >> she has got some views out there that aren't necessarily mainstream. most notably she believes that our current p.m. was once a male prostitute to pay for his drug habit >> reporter: she posted a comment and took it down. she did not respond to a request for an interview. her friend and supporters say she is in touch with voters >> she knows what the parents want. she will be able to speak to those values an concerns. >> she has said that school
7:20 am
shootings in the u.s. only began after schools started teaching evolution in the classroom. to link those two things has created a lot of controversy. >> i think that really what needs to be said is that the further we get away from the founders ideal for education in our state and their ideal for our very government, christian values, the further we get away from those values, the more we're going to have things not like throwing spit wards and chewing gums in the classroom but today we have shootings >> reporter: the board of education is not new to controversy. in 2009, 50 scientific organizations criticise the board. since then voters have elected more moderate board members >> i will tell you the circus that was there prior to my rival
7:21 am
is nothing like she would bring to the board >> reporter: it would mean putting beliefs over facts some belief a power vote in myanmar the country's parliament creating a new post that will cement aung san suu kyi's role in running that government and an arrests in india for those who may have been responsible for a deadly bridge collapse.
7:22 am
7:23 am
police in india are holding five people to play in connection with that deadly over collapse they're trying to figure out what caused it to fall. at least 24 people are confirmed dead. more than 80 people injured. now officials say there is no chance of finding more survivors. >> reporter: this one end of the flyover that snapped off. as you can see it has fallen on to not only construction vehicles but also a truck. we're told that the driver of
7:24 am
the truck mlgd to esdap unhurt, but further down people were trapped in vehicles, auto rickshaws, cars, and that has been the focus of the search and rescue operation over night. it was pain stakingly slow because it is a very congested area. the flyover is surrounded by commercial and residential buildings. >> translation: it was a really difficult task to move these huge steel girders. we had to physically cut them into pieces. only then could we manage to clear them. >> so the clean up operation is taking place with volunteers working alongside the army and fish rescue workers, but there is little hope of finding survivors, although we're told that people are still missing. what is also disturbing is that crowds have gathered again just metres away to watch all of this and further down under the bridge it is business as usual with people setting up stalls, and vehicles parked below turkey's president is
7:25 am
heading to a city in the country prepare dominantly kurdish south east. a car bomb killed seven police officers there last night. 27 more people were injured in the blast near a bus tran porting officers. no-one has claimed responsibility but the government blames kurdish rebels myanmar's parliament approving a role for aung san suu kyi. more from myanmar's capital. >> reporter: this was an easy win for aung san suu kyi, a large majority here in the upper house has just accepted this very crucial bill which will give her far-reaching powers. she was barred from running for presidential. the constitution says a person with children who have foreign narcotics can't be the president president president-- nationalities can't be the president. some compare it with a position of pry minister, especially it's called state councillor and it
7:26 am
means that she is not only advising the government and not only advising parliament, but also advising the judiciary. she is basically above all these parties, but when i was asking the parliament members here does it mean she has more power than the pretty, they really don't want to officially admit that-- than the president. it seems like she will have. she has already four ministers' posts. she was sworn in on wednesday as the foreign minister, the education and emergency ministers, the head of the president's office. how she is going to combine these crucial posts here at this very crucial moment, that is going fob a question bulb some people are telling me she will probably resign from these posts and will focus completely on this state counsellor position that is our correspondent reporting from the capital of myanmar straight ahead, the equal pay debate being waged in soccer the world champion u.s. women say they make a fraction
7:27 am
of what their male counterparts earn. now they're suing about it using genetically modified mosquito to fight the zika virus and our viruses.
7:28 am
7:29 am
welcome back to your world this morning. coming um on 7.30 eastern. top stories, a violent storm system is pushing across the south. tornadoes have hit alabama a, loouz and missipi. 34 million across 30 states could be impacted by the severe weather seoul has launched a missile into the sea. it was fired from the north-east coast at that nuclear summit in washington leaders from south korea and u.s. and japan vowing to ramp up pressure on pyongyang a ferguson missouri has a new police chief who has worked for the miami police department
7:30 am
since 1984. he will replace ferguson's former police chief who resigned in the wake of the fatal police shooting of michael brown chicago teachers walking off the job today. these are pictures of a demonstration that took place just a short while ago. teachers have been working out without a-- walking out. the government is preparing for a potential outbreak of the zika virus the method is experimental and controversial. jonathan betz reports. >> reporter: in the fight against mosquitos, soon these tools may no longer be needed. >> you could spray this all night long and it wouldn't kill them key west florida could be
7:31 am
the first in the nation to test a new method of killing mosquitos, not with chemicals but with other mosquitos. >> it's a paradigm shift from blanket spray that kills lots of things to one mosquito that will kill another. >> experts are turning to a controversial idea so that when they breed, their offspring die. bugs like at florida international where scientists are leading the research. >> this mosquitos is very hard to kill sometimes with inse insecticide and is becometion more resistant. we need new ways to control the population. one way is to use genetically modified mosquitomosquitos. >> the idea is getting new urgencies with the zekea outbreak.
7:32 am
80% drop in their population now, the food and drug administration is considering whether to make a subdivision near key west the first testing ground in the u.s. appear idea some neighbors are fiercely fighting? >> we don't feel like it's necessary. >> that's mess with nature and with the choice of the people. >> homeowners, this is something i am not going to have a choice about. i don't get the opportunity to say: i don't want a genetically modified mosquito to inject into my body. the fear is, i have no idea. the fear is nobody has any idea. >> the company behind the modified mosquitos says the fears are unjustified. it only intends to release males which don't bite. in early reviews, the f.d.a. said the mosquitos don't pose a threat to people or the environment. >> we need to make extra efforts
7:33 am
hear this is one of the ways that i am convince asked a positive use. >> critics worry it's opening a new frontier between the walk between man and mosquitos. >> jonathan betz,as, key west florida. >> i will talk about some of the short-term responses now with dr. saline gaunder. yesterday we got news it's not just this one type of mosquitos that can potentially transmit zika. to local and state local health departments in these affected places have the recess sources at this point to prevent zika? >> after the 2008, 2009, they suffered massive funding cuts. about 25% of public health staff
7:34 am
that were fired, let go at that time. they have not been replaced. your funding for public health activities comes partly from the fred recall government and about half from state and local municipalities. some are wealth yes or no others and fighting an infectious disease, you are only as strong as your weakest link. >> it seems like the numbers are going in to fall and we are going in to summer. should our awareness be increasing? >> that's right. the mosquitos season is in the summer. that's what you are going to see transmission of the zika virus. brazil and latin american countries have seen the peak for the season probably whereas we are heading in to that now. >> it seems like a lot of people don't understand who was affected by zika, how it works, that it breeds in standing water, that it can be transmitted sexually. how much does a public education campaign need to be part of the
7:35 am
summit today? >> that's one of the key areas the c.d.c. going to advise state and local health departments about, specifically communication and education of the public. harvard had a survey they released looking at american knowledge of the zika virus. 40% of americans think if a woman gets zika virus, any pregnancy afterwards will be threatened by the virus. that's false to be very clear. once she recovers, she can have a normal healthy pregnancy but there are a lot of myths going around. >> everyone few years, there was the public health story. last year ebola, bird flu. put this one in perspective for us. >> we have to remember who is the group, which is the group that is really at risk here. pregnant women and women who are trying to get pregnant and i would add to that list, women who might have unintended pregnancies. that's the group we need to be concerned about, that we need to be providing resources to so
7:36 am
that they can do active screening. >> if you are one of those women, how do you know? >> how do you know? >> that you might have been exposed to zika? >> if you live in one of these areas where we might see zika transmission, in the united states, those are most likely to be florida, texas and florida if you have had symptoms of rash, joint pain red eyes, but there are a number of people who will get the zika virus and you will have to go based upon what's the local transmission rate. >> where are we in being able to link causally, micro ceph lee we are seeing in babies and the other sinned drom that has come up? >> i think we are 99% our policies, funding allegations are based on the idea that this
7:37 am
is the true link. >> the bottom line we can go on line these days and read. thank you for being with us today? >> my pleasush. >> grease starting moving hundreds of refugees busing them from athens nearly 6 people, most from syria, iraq and afghanistan, stuck there, spending weeks sleeping out in the open. tensions have flared over food and phone charges. refugees or migrants are among 51,000 people after balkan borders were closed this month. some families in the u.s. struggle to go gain acceptance in new surroundings but finding a warm welcome until new york's dairy country. a look at a program training refugees to milk cow mvpzs on local farms. >> work on the farm is loud and smelly. but purna is grad to have this
7:38 am
. as a refugee he couldn't work for 20 years. >> the new system of milking was a little challenging but now everything is easy. >> hi boss is a 6-generation dairy farmer with reliable workers hard to find she jumped at a chance to hire him. >> they bring a stable worker it is a job they enjoy, a lock term employee. >> miz ray. he was one of 1,000 butanese forced from their homeland. many feel a lot home on the farm. >> the united states resettled 85,000 since 2008.
7:39 am
in 2012, more refugees came from butan than from any other country. >> in the refugee camp, ray's family lived in a hut. now, they have a 5-bedroom house partially subsidized by a state grant. >> it's a good step because the american workers really are not that interested in working on farms. >> pat standish runs a community group helping the butanese learn computer skills and english. some women have gotten johns natural. >> for ray and his family, coming to the united states was a turning point. >> i believe that if we have a will that i believe the opportunity to grow and have our dreams come true. >> while he didn't feel comfortable in a city, in rural
7:40 am
america, they feel welcome at right at home. christian salomey. the stars of u.s. women's soccer are speaking out against incomeinequality. five have filed a federal discrimination complaint. they say despite generating more revenue than the men, they are earning far less than their male counterparts. roxannena has more. >> reporter: after a thrilling world cup win against japan in 2015, the u.s. women's team was honored with a ticker tape parade in new york city. more than 23 million viewers watched the game making it the highest rated soccer match in u.s. history. >> win along with four olympic gold medal did is a record for a women's soccer team, unmatched by any other nation. their unprecedented success is generating revenue for the u.s.
7:41 am
soccer generation. according to a discrimination complaint filed by five members of the team, it is not translating into equal pay for the women's team. >> every sing day, we work just as much as the men, endure just as much physically and unknowinglies smoels and our fans really do appreciate us every day for that. >> the complaint filed with the u.s. equal employment commission says players earn $72,000 a year for a minimum of 20 matches a year. for every match they win, they are paid a bonus of $1,350. even though the u.s. men have been far less successful for the same number of games, they make $100,000 or $5,000 a game. they get paid more for games against higher ranked teams and can make more than $17,000 a game if they win. the women's lawyer says the disparity violates u.s. pay equity laws. >> when they ask for the same treatment as the men, they were told it was irrational. >> may be a good answer in 1816.
7:42 am
it's not an acceptable answer. >> the u.s. soccer federation expressed disappointment in the action and said it's committed to negotiating a new agreement with the women's national team when the current contract expires at the end of the year. but getting pay he cequity even based upon merit could be an uphill battle. >> the women in the past have agreed and signed the offer from u.s. soccer that has paid th themlen the men. they are taking a stance and they do not want to be paid differently from the men add this action today is the result of u.s. soccer saying we will not pay you equal to men even in the future. >> roxanna salbury, al jazeera. >> fan duals are suspending with the ncaa. after this week's college basketball game, the men's basketball tournament is the
7:43 am
last significant that will ends with monday's championship game. >> lease a klein is joining. george washington is this year's ni t-20 champs. 76-60 last night on the championship game. george washington's first nit championship, the fourth straight win against a higher ceded team, gw notching a school record for wednesday in a season. >> congratulations, lisa. >> a storm causing severe weather will bring a change in temperatures. let's bring in nicole mitchell for what's expected on that. >> morning. happy april fools day to you. >> be aware through the day today. sadly, this is not an april fools forecast because a few are not going to enjoy this. rain has moved in to the east coast. the trailing boundary through the south that will include severe storms that we were talking about and storms even this morning in places like georgia and south carolina noire
7:44 am
clipper blind this over the courts of the weekend, early into the weekend will reinforce that. we are going to have some changes. in the meantime, we have to get to the rain. not only the banding today takes it a little bit -- a awhile to clear out. look at this around the great lakes. another shot of moisture that's going to kind of add to this. so for the northeast, the moisture lingers a little longer than we were hoping through a lot of the day on saturday. we can see that. look at how much of the rest of the country is dry, though, by the time we get to saturday an especially into the day on sunday. so a lot of the country not doing too bad but there have been some significant changes. this is just from the last 24 hours. somewhere like chicago, our temperatures are almost 20 degrees cooler than they were yesterday at this time. if you look at it over a couple of days, not just 24 hours, some places have dropped 20 or 30 degrees. those changes will be spreading. ahead of the front, we have had
7:45 am
really some mild air, 70 did all the way up the coastline. enough of that heat to feel the severe weather that we have had behind it. temperatures have dropped dramatically a lot of places in the 40s and 50s. and we will see those changes for the coastline. cooler air here otherwise temperatures start to rebound. look at this for somewhere from new york, from the 70 did to the 40s by sunday and there could evening a flake of snow that goes by someplaces in the northeast. >> we were talking about lease a klein. she told us today was saint patrick's day. >> got ufrnlths joke is on us. >> hyper berric chambers are usually used to treat doo deep sea divers for things like the bends. but the largest is diving into new territory. the sea turtle filled with gas who needs the chamber's health.
7:46 am
>> an unwitting melaminier getting treatment in a setting designed for two-legged types. >> we can have a chamber over here that can put up to eight people or if they are in gurneys, it will be a little bit less. >> the biggest hyper barrick chamber on the west coast. >> emergently, we treat the bends and carbon monoxide after that, diabetic foot wounds that don't heal and radiation injury. >> this patient is different. this has never been done before. tucker is a 70-pound, olive ridlek sea turtle rehabbing at the seattle aquarium. >> we are looking at the water level in the shell. we want him to be able to fit at the bottom of the tank without any effort. >> he was found near death in december on an oregon's n beach and has bounced back. >> we are happy with his condition right now. when he came in, he couldn't move. he couldn't breathe on his own. he was a very sick sea turtle.
7:47 am
>> he is doing better now. tucker has a problem: a gas problem. internal bubbles that upset his equilibrium and boyiance see and prevent him from diving properly, a fairly important skill set for a sea turtle? >> it means they can't eat like they would and avoid predators. they have to watch out for our boats as well. >> if they can't dive, they basically become food? >> they do. >> aquarium vets hooked up with doctors at village mason medical center to get tucker a two and a half hour session under high pressure breathing 100% pure oxygen. >> this is the first time i have ever treated add sea turtle or any animal. >> the goal, to break up those gas bubbles which keep tucker from doing what see turtles do? >> it's exciting if anything we can help. we don't know whether we help or not but the options are quite limited for this turtle. >> cat scans and behavior should show whether deep dives are back in his repertoire.
7:48 am
he may need more hyper barrick sessions and the humans involved hope he will be back in the ocean by late summer. alan schaffler, seattle. >> wonder if insurance pays for th that. >> remembering queen of curve. >> plus tesla's new take on the affordable new car. the model 3 is out. stay with us.
7:49 am
7:50 am
7:51 am
al jazeera america. she was called visionary, acclaimed architect zaha zid. she was 65 years old. >> she combined mass and imagination to create creative. >> a fire station in germany. al cultural center. a railway stop in austria.
7:52 am
works of architecture and works of art brought together by the brilliance of zaha zadid. she did not just reimagine shapes and structures. born in baghdad, educated in beirut and london, she broke the glass ceiling in an industry long dominated by men. there was no denying her genius or the gender bias that she and other gender bias women architects faced . >> i am not and it may be tevenlt would change. >> thanks to her, changes is coming. you see it in the buildings she created. the london olympics aquatics center, an opera house in china. this bridge in abu dhaibi, a high-rise in hong kong. using math, computer models and boundless creativity, she transformed neighborhoods and sky lines. she was a trailblazer, becoming
7:53 am
the first woman awarded the prestigious prize for architecture, one of countless honors on a woman who was named a dame commander of the order of the british empire. her company's actext have a presence in 55 countries. there are works in progress, future plans and commissions like this residential building in manhattan. she is gone, but her legacy is soari soaring. bmw saying it wants to use the cloud for late models can get their smart phone and apple watch alerts telling them to leave early due to traffic, get walking directions after they park and the new app is powered by microsoft's cloud, it works 22014 and newer versions. if you have wanted a tesla but the price tag freaked you out, now may be your chance. the model 3 is unveiled, costs
7:54 am
about $35,000 and can go 215 miles per charge. the founder says consumer excitement is already building. >> this is kind of crazy, but i just learned, was told that the total number of orders for the models 3 in the past 24 hours has now passed 115,000. >> this is tesla's first electric car aimed at mainstream auto buyers. production won't get underway until next year. jacob ward has a closer look. >> the people you see in line here behind me are not just fans, just here to sort of see the car for the first time. they are actually here to each put down a thousand dollars in cash to reserve a car they will not be allowed to get for another year at least. the new tesla model 3 makes sense, however, to all a lot of these folks. it's not a luxury car although it competes with others at a starting price of $35,000 plus all of the incentives, rebates and government bonuses you get.
7:55 am
it becomes quite affordable. here in california, it gets you in to the hov carpool lane which here in southern california selannenormous boon. it makes a tremendous amount of sense for consumers. for tesla as a company, it represents sort of the big challenge for this company. this company obviously marched through several models, roadster, the model s, the model x. each was a life or death proposition. this one raises the stakes again because tesla up until now has been getting by on a sort of luxury segment of the market. now, it's trying to repeat with regular auto makers, auto makers that price their cars in the 20 to 30,000 dollar range. unlike those auto makers who can sell boatloads of cheap affordable cars in order to sort of if you wanted the research they do into electric vehicles, tesla does not have that luxury. so this is definitely a turning point with a company trying to be sort of basically trying to earn its place ranked among the highest valued auto makers in
7:56 am
the world. >> jacob ward reporting. tesla says the model 3 car will do zero to 60 in less than 6 seconds. >> my wife wants one but here is what's interesting, the first 200 sell get about 7,000 dollar tax break. >> that may be why the preorders have reached $115 million. they have made that. car is not even out now. >> the tale of two shaz. the u.s. sending a message to mosc moscow, trying to work on a deal on syria. can the balancing act work? >> a teacher strike in chicago's public schools. we talked to a top union official about what they are willing to defy a court order about? we will be right back. pau of color, the police department won't care. >> i'm more scared of the police than a burglar. >> this is really really unfair how we're being treated. >> i think what's important is that we're having a discussion
7:57 am
about it. >> what took place here 60 years ago...the murder of emmett till is to this day an unsolved crime. >> i wanted people to hear the true story of till. >> never thought that he would be killed for that. >> that was the first step in the modern civil rights movement. >> ferguson has a...asking for assistance with crowd control... >> we're live in ferguson, missouri. >> these young people deserve justice. >> this is a target you can't get rid of. >> they were so angry, because it could've been them. >> there's clearly an issue and we have to focus on how we bridge that. >> they say they did it because they were trying to protect my children. they didn't protect my children, they traumatized them. >> we're just the average person, trying to go to work, provide for our families, and do what we can in this world. >> don't get lost in a sea of despair. >> i'm interested in getting us to a place where we're feeling something that looks more like freedom and justice. >> check which ethnicity - i check multiple boxes.
7:58 am
>> this is who i am. >> were you here 50 years ago? >> yes to support the cause for voter's rights. >> we've come a long way. we've got a long ways to go. >> al jazeera america - proud to tell your stories.
7:59 am
8:00 am
testing the world's resolve, north korea purportedly fires a missile. on hillary's home turf, bernie sanders trying to take on hillary conton. >> lay makers in two of the largest states on the brink of implementing the highest minimum wage on record. >> damage in the south high winds and tornados sweeping through several states. the threat not yet over.
8:01 am
good morning. welcome to your world this morning. i am del walters? >> i am stephanie cy. south korea e is accusing north korea of firing another ballistic missile today. it comes hours after president obama and leaders from japan vowed to up pressure at a nuclear summit in d.c. jamie mcintire reports they are concerned the nuclear capabilities are becoming a serious threat. >> pyong yang has been known for rhetoric. the latest was an over the top video posted on a north korean website that threatened the united states with a nuclear attack and featured an animated ballistic attack on washington's
8:02 am
mall. al decade ago, such war talk could be dismissed as bluster. now, the claims of north korea's leader of developing a miniat e miniaturized nuclear warhead and the new mobile missile, though unverified must be taken seriously. before the nuclear summit formally opened, president obama held private talks with the leaders of south korea and japan. the two american alleys closest to the north. >> it's not surprising that one of the topics most on our minds is the issue of north korea and we are united our efforts to deter and defend against north korean provocations. >> today's meeting has led to in-depth discussions on what our three countries should do together in order to stop north korea from upgrading nuclear capabilities and alter misguided calculus. >> later, obama met separately with the president of china, the
8:03 am
country thought to have the most influence with north korea. he called it effective and said both countries are committed to the denuke collarization. >> meanwhile even though the north's boast of a test was deemed as an unsuccessful attempt to deton ate a hydrogen bomb, they are undeniably improving. america's top general said that is complicating things. >> you have to factor in ballistic missiles, cyber capabilities, space capabilities in addition to the conventional threat that we con fronted on the "penguins of madagascar." torn. >> today is the final day of the
8:04 am
summit. he hopes it will lead to lasting changes around the world. >> this is the fourth and final nuclear security summit of the bara barack obama career in the white house. the president is trying to figure outweighs of having the work of the summit continue after he leaves. however, one thing that barak obama has been trying to do throughout this summit is to try to get countries to work together on things such as improving the physical security of nuclear materials whether it's at a hospital, at a clinic o, or at a power reactor facility. now, one area that is very much a concern to the world leaders who have gathered here in washington is the idea that someone with nefarious intentions could get his or her hands on radioactive material and use it to build what's called "a dirty bomb." apparently there was some concern that some of the suspects in the brussels attack
8:05 am
may have been trying to do surveillance on facilities to do just that. so that is very much a topic of conversation. >> al jazeera's ross cylinder jordan reporting from washington. china is criticizing the u.s. over its stanchion notice disputed islands in the south china sea. white house officials saying they are concerned that china might create an air defense zone over the islands pending the out itcom in an enter naushl case by the philippines. taiwan and vietnam claim to have a stake in that island chain. >> the sole surviving suspects in the paris attacks could be extradited back to france. he was arrested in belgium this morning days before the deadly bombing in brussels. his lawyer says he is willing to cooperate with french authorities. it could take place over the next 10 days. 130 people were killed in those isil-connected paris attacks. >> in politics now, the democratic frontrunner caught on
8:06 am
camera having a heated exchange over allegations that her campaign has certain money from the fossil fuel industry. >> when you talk about climate change, did you accept fossil fuel money? >> money that work i am so sick of the standard campaign lying about this. i am sick of it. >> the activist had backed writing, i do not work for and am in no way affiliated with the sanders campaign as clinton seemed to suggest in her response to prove to people that she's really serious about keeping fossil fuels in the ground, she needs to stop taking that money today. end quote. greenpeace saying ver mobts senator bernie sanders rejected fossil fool money but clinton and the republican candidates did not. greenpeace alleging the super pacs supporting her have received more than $4 million from the fossil fuel industry. >> bernie sanders is trying to
8:07 am
make inroads here in new york, his hometown but most recently clinton's home turf. he held a rally after a wild 24 hours for both nomination races. al jazeera's david schuster reports. >> reporter: >> thank you, south bronx. >> reporter: fresh off six victories, bernie sanders hopes to replicate in new york what polls suggest he has done this week in wisconsin. after a string of large rallies, the latest poll ahead of tuesday's primary indicates sanders is now leading hillary clinton 49% 30 to 45. >> when we stand together, there is nothing we can not accomplish. >> but gaining okay clinton in new york, her own backyard, may not be so easy. >> you are meeting the next president of the united states of america. >> clinton has a large number of powerful political alleys.
8:08 am
in a harlem coffee shop, representative charlie rangle? >> i have been in the house 26 years. >> at the famous apollo theatre, charles schumer. at a rally in westchester county where she lives, clinton pledged that new york is hers. >> serving as your senator for eight years was one of the greatest honors of my life. >> reporter:a in a sign of the heightened tensions and importance of the new york rates, sanders supporters protested and interrupted at the clinton event. >> i know the bernie people came to say that. we are very sorry you are leaving. >> you want to vote democratic and you are a true democrat, vote bernie. >> donald trump now appears to be losing one of his highest profile defenders, conservative commentator ann coulter. >> do you realize our candidate is mental? it's like constantly having to
8:09 am
bail out your 16-year-old from prison. >> that was before trump's comments wednesday on abortion. >> the answer is that there has to be some form of punishment. >> for the woman? >> yeah. there has to be some form. >> trump's campaign called it a misspeak and said he would actually often punish doctors. >> thank you. >> david shuster, al jazeera. trump is trying to bury the hatchet as he inches closer to the nomination. he met with r & c chair reinc reince prebius. he called the 30-minute meeting very nice. the rnc called it productive. the meeting followed trump's declaration where he is taking back his pledge to support the nominee if it's not him. >> there is a violence storm system pushing across the south today after a tornado hit alabama, mississippi as al jazeera's herm illa explains, 34 million people in 13 states could be affected by that severe
8:10 am
weather. >> the strongest storm hit oklahoma where there were reports of multiple toranados. thousands of people in the tulsa area had their power knocked out, trees uprooted and many homes and vehicles destroyed. other toranados were also reported in parts of mississippi, louisiana, and northern alabama. heavy rain in the mississippi delta caused widespread flooding and prompted some evacuations. in the southern town of purvis, high wednesday toppled trees and power lines. further north, near the alabama state line, at least a dozen homes were damaged. >> we are out in the shop messing with my car. all the sudden, my wife called me and said, you need to come in. the siren is going off. yes here the sirens going off. when we come running out of the shop, there was some tin flying off the top of the shop there, you know, just it's nothing i have ever seen or been in. >> reporter: crews also rescued a 16-year-old after he and his truck got stuff in a ditch.
8:11 am
in alabama, at least two twisters hit, leaving thousands without power but no one in the state or in louisiana was hurt. herm illa algowy, al jazeera. >> let's bring in nicole for the latest? >> yesterday, definitely there was toranados we were talking about but more widespread was all of the oranges that you see on this map and they go all the way up to the great lakes. high wind and damaging wind reports, a lot of power lines, trees down, other damage, sometimes wind damage, which is considered straight-line winds can be as do you believesom as some of the tornaddic impact. here is how this went along. you can see these popping up through yesterday evening in some cases into the overnight and we still this will morning have some of that lingering. up and down the east coast is where we are getting the rain. a high risk for some of the stronger storms as we get toward the southeast and back along the gulf coast because we have the frontal boundary. pick that out. stretching through the region.
8:12 am
>> could be enough to fire off a couple of more storms. the risk isn't as high today but it is still definitely high. so through the area, all of the areas of heavy rain have caused problems with flooding. that's something that well still watch for, for the next couple of days because as i said, the front is still in the area. >> could produce more rain. otherwise, the coastal rain, that somewhat clears through today. we have this other area moving in from the great lakes that's going to enhance what goes on in the northeast t will take us a couple of days here to clear out of everything, depending upon where you are. the severe weather risks anywhere from the mid atlantic to the gulf coast, not as high as yesterday. so yesterday, we saw well over 100 reports, probably not as many of those through the day today. definitely still something we are going to go have to monitor for. the other side of this storm really warm weather that supports the severe weather. big changes coming. and i will have more on that coming up. >> that's not an april fool's. nicole, thank you very much.
8:13 am
new york is the latest state to push for a higher minimum wage. governor andrew como reached a deal to up wages to $15 an hour. in new york city, that change will happen by 2018. increases will be slower across the rest of the state. some won't reach the $15 mark until 2022. in california, a plan to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour is now heading to the governor's desk. more than 2 million workers in the state would be affected. lawmakers say the raise is about fairness and comic equality. >> california's minimum wage must be a living wage. anyone who thinks $15 an hour is way too much should try living on it. >> under the plan, wages will go up to 10.50 next january and will gradually increase to $15 by 2022. >> ferguson, missouri has a new police chief, a veteran and he
8:14 am
is black. the department, mostly white as al jazeera's john henry smith reports, he has his work cut out for him. >> once when he was growing up in miami, two officers stopped and frisked him and then called him rachel slurs. he says he decided right there to become an officer, himself. >> i wanted to provide to my community better service than i was getting. >> after a 3-month search, the 32-year veteran of the miami police department has been chosen out of 54 candidates to serve the community of ferguson, missouri, as its first-ever, full-time, african-american police chief. ferguson was torn apart by clashes after the shooting of 18-year-old michael brown by ferguson officer darren wilson. here is what ferguson had to say at the time. >> one of the things that we have done in miami, i think it's been a defendant great thing that we have made sure that the
8:15 am
department is not only reflective of the community but a lot of the police officers are from the very community that they protect. >> when brian was shot, only 4 serving a predominantly african-american city. chief john acson resigned after accusations that his officers escalated the violence following the shooting. a 6 month department of justice investigation found ferguson officers routinely used unreasonable force and used traffic stops to generate revenue for the city. >> change doesn't come easily. i think i am ready for that challenge. >> he will be tasked with further changing the culture to one that's less adversarial and one that the community trusts. >> if we are transparent and are listening and communicating, i think we stand a great chance of getting -- moving forward. >> he had actually been set to retire after spending much of his career at the public
8:16 am
information officer for the miami pd. i worked in miami for five years. i can tell you he had a reputation as calm, level-headed, and fair. >> isn't he replacing another african-american chief in ferguson? >> technically, yes. andre anderson held the post on an interim basis for 5 months before he stepped down to go back to his day job, if you will, as the commander in the glendale pd. moss would be the first african-american to hold the post in ferguson full-time. >> john henry smith, thank you very much. also, chicago activists saying they are furious after the city's police union there hired the officer charged with shooting laquan mcdonald. jason van dyke now is going to be working as a janitor for the union as he fights first degree murder charges in court. officials saying the job is the union's way of giving that suspend would officer financial assistance. mcdonald's shooting back in 2014 was caught on camera and weeks of protest followed when that video was released last year. setting up a check on russian expansion.
8:17 am
>> moscow promising to respond as the u.s. deploys thousands of new troops to eastern europe. defying the system in myanmar. a workaround to give reins of power.
8:18 am
8:19 am
russia is warning of an
8:20 am
asemit trick response. >> the pantgon announced sending troops to the balkans. russia calls that a provocation. it says it will take all military measures necessary to counter balance the reinforced presence that it says is not justified. further fallout from russia's incursion in ukraine in 2013. joining us from d.c. is a former u.s. ambassador to ukraine, william taylor. good morning and thanks for being with us. move is meant to reassure. couldn couldn't this i putrk putin. >> our membership in nato means defense against any threat coming from any direction. and the threat that our nato allies feel is coming from the east, mr. putin's russia. they have reason to be worried
8:21 am
about this threat. russia has invaded two of its neighbors. in 2008, it invaded georgia. in 2014, as you just mentioned, it invaded ukraine and indeed annexed part of ukraine. it now illegally occupies a part of sovereign ukraine. so nato alleys have a reason to be worried. the u.s. commitment to nato and all of its alleys is, to to be sure we can defend them and ourselves against russian aggression. that's why it is clearly until our interest. >> nato's eastward expansion, though, is one of the justifications that putin and his apologists have made about his actions in ukraine. doesn't this just pray in to his narrative that nato expansion is threatening russia? >> let's be clear about what nato expansion was. nato expansion was the admission of it countries of their own
8:22 am
free will in to a defensive military alliance if these countries were convinced that they could be secure without joining a defensive military alliance, they would not have applied for membership. but they were worried. they were concerned that russia was a threat to them, and they have seen -- it has been proven, mr. putin has demonstrated, that russia is a threat to them. so, countries like the czech republic, countries like poland, like slovakia, romania, bulgaria, they had concerns about the russian threat to their security. so they voluntarily applied and the nato alliance took them in. this was no threat to russia. it did not provoke them at all. it was russia's threat against them that allowed them to choose to go in to nato. >> russia, as you know, boycotted the nuclear summit that's taking place in washington this week. was that a direct response to
8:23 am
nato's buildup in russian proximity? and what does that say about what to expect in the future in this relationship? >> what to expect in the future is hard to tell because mr. putin cannot be predicted. he has self-isolated. he is isolating himself. when he invaded ukraine two years ago, the west, the entire unified west, that is west -- europe, the united states, japan, australia, canada, we all put sanctions on this illegal international violation of law. we sanctioned russia. what did mr. putin do? he put counter sanctions on himself. he self-isolated. he self-sanctioned. he is doing the same thing now with this nuclear summit. the nuclear summit is designed to improve the security of all of thener states, and if he doesn't want to improve his own security, he is self-isolating. >> the russian response to the nato buildup so far has been
8:24 am
that they will have an asymmetric response. what do you think that means? >> we have no idea. what we have to worry about is our own execute and the security of our nato partners, our nato alleys. that's what we are doing. when he invades countries on his border, he makes other countries on his border, like the baltic nations, very nervous. the baltic nations are members of nato. we are committed, by treaty, by international treaty, do defend them. we are putting in place the capabilities to defend them if the russians attack again. >> ambassador william taylor, thanks so much for your time this morning. >> thank you, stephanie. >> stephanie, police in india now holding five people in connection with a deadly overpass collapse. they are trying to figure out what caused that bridge to fall. 24 people have been confirmed dead. 80 people in the hospital. workers clearing the rubble say they don't expect to find any
8:25 am
more survivors. myanmar's parliament approving a new governing post to give her a powerful role in running that country. al jazeera stephanie faucet has more. >> reporter: this was an easy win, a ladge margin here has just accepted this very crucial bill which will give her far-reaching powers. she was bard for running from president. the constitution says a person with children who have foreign nationalities can't be the president. so basically, she was looking for another way as she has explained it to be above the president. it looks like with this new bill, she will be above the president. some compare it with a position of prime minister. officially, it's called state counselor. and it means she is not only advising the government and not only advising parliament, but, also, advising the judiciary. she is above all of these parties. but when i was asking the parliament members here. does that mean she has more
8:26 am
power than the president? they really don't want to officially admit that. but it seems like she will have. the problem, of course, is that she has already four minister posts. she was sworn in on wednesday as a foreign minister, education minister, energy minister, the head of the president's. she will combine these crucial posts here in the country at this crucial moment. >> will be a question. some people here are telling me she will probably resign from these minister posts and will focus completely on this state counselor position. >> that's our steph lawson. >> chicago's 400,000 students will be without teachers today. the one-day strike that has the district threatening to take legal action. >> fair pay, america's top female players accuse u.s.a. soccer of discrimination. the organization says it's not so clear-cut.
8:27 am
8:28 am
8:29 am
>> pushing the boundaries of science. >> we are on the tipping point. >> we can save species. >> it's the biggest question out there. >> it's a revolutionary approach. >> we are pushing the boundaries. >> techknow is going to blow your mind. >> our experts go inside the innovations, impacting you. >> this is the first time anybody's done this. >> i really feel my life changing. >> techknow, where technology meets humanity. only on al jazeera america. welcome back to your world this morning. coming up on half past 8:00 eastern, a look at today's top stories. this morning, seoul says north korea launched a ballistic
8:30 am
missile, a short-range surface to air missile fired from the northeast coast. a north korean official told reuters the government will continue the program despite international pressure. >> bernie sanderred tried to make inroads on hillae clinton's turf. both campaigning in new york thursday ahead of state's primary on april 19th. donald trump meeting with reince prebius call that meeting very nice. the rnc calling it productive. >> workers in new york and california will become the highest minimum wage earners, labor fields to raise pay to $15 an hour. >> will happen by 2018 in new york city. in the rest of the state and california, the raise will happen by 2022. chicago's teachers are walking up the job -- walking off the job today. >> pictures of did demonstrations that took place a short while ago. the teachers have been working without a contract since last summer. the district saying the walkout is illegal.
8:31 am
as al jazeera's diane estherbrook reports, some chicago teachers are asking if their union is doing the right thing. >> if teachers walk off parents will have to make alternate plans. >> do you think this will be an inconvenience for some parents? >> yes. i mean for my daughter, she is a single mom but she has me so i will keep josh home on friday. there is not much we can do. >> 5th grade teacher erica waz kneeac says she didn't want to walk a picket line but thinks it's necessary? >> we are showing this is an urgent matter and our schools need to be funded and we can't take any more cuts. >> it is part of an ongoing feud between the mayor and the chicago teachers' union. >> started three years ago when the city closed 50 public schools. the latest battle involves a new
8:32 am
union contract. the old one expired last spring. by law, the teachers can't strike until may when a fact-finding period is completed but last week, union delegates voted for a one-week walkout by a 4 to 1 margin citing unfair labor practices. the city wants to stop. the union's president claims many delegates who voted no wanted a full-blown strike. >> we just feel like, why don't we just do it now? do a real strike now and be done with it. >> chicago public school ceo says if there is a strike friday, the teachers will be breaking the law. >> whether we get through this, we will look at our legal options and will continue to talk to our lawyers about how we pursue those legal options. >> chicago public schools say teachers who don't show up to work on friday and don't have a legitimate excuse will be docked a day's pay but if they do want to come to school and they cross a picket line, they could get in trouble with the union. >> teacher jim macioni thanks
8:33 am
the union is putting the teachers in a very difficult situation. >> i think the legality of it is the number 1 reason that most teamers feel apprehensive about doing it. >> i isn't sure if he will picket outside his school. the illinois educational labor relations board could decide if the strike is illegal and what actions, if any, could be brought against the union in chicago's 27,000 teachers. diane estherbrook, al jazeera, chicago. the c.d.c. is holding a summit to coordinate a response to a possible zika outbreak. so far, there have been 273 travel-related cases of the mosquitos-born virons within the 50 states but none have been locally transmitted. some scientists are using mosquitos as a secret weapon. the method is experimental and controversial. jonathan betz reports. >> reporter: in fight against
8:34 am
mosquitos, soon these tools may not a long herb needed? >> you could spray this all night long and it wouldn't kill them. >> key west florida could be the first in the nation to test a new method of killing mosquitos, not with chemicals but with other mosquitos. >> it's a pair dine shift from blanket spraying that kills lots of things to one mosquitos that's going to go out and kill one other mosquitos. >> experts are turning to a controversial idea to change the genes of a specific type of mosquitos so that when they breed, their offspring die. bugs built to last like at florida international university where signits are leading the research? >> this mosquitos is very hard to kill sometimes with insecticide and becoming more and more resistant. so we need new ways to control the population. one of the ways to control the population is to use genetically
8:35 am
modified mosquitos. >> the idea is getting new urgesency with the zika outbreak. other countries like brazil have released the genetically altered mosque eat odes and saw an 80% drop in their position. now, the food and drug administration is considering whether to make a subdivision near key west the first testing ground in the u.s. an idea some neighbors there are fiercely fighting. >> we don't really feel like it's necessary and it's messing withnate, messing with the choice of the people. >> homeowners worry they will be guinea pigs to an idea they feel needs more study. >> this is something i am not going to have a choice about. so i don't get the opportunity to say, i don't want a genetically modified mosquitos to inject its dna into my body. the fear is i have no idea. the fear is nobody has any idea. >> the company behind the modified mosquitos, oxy tech says the fears are unjustified. it only intends to release males
8:36 am
which don't bite. in early reviews, the f.d.a. says the mofkt eat owes don't pose a threat to people or the environment. >> we need to make extra efforts here to protect our students. this is one of the ways that i am convinced is a positive use. >> reporter: critics worry it's opening a new fronts tear between the foot between man and mosquitos, relying on science more than nature. jonathan betz, al jazeera, key west, florida. >> doctor saline goudry is an infectious disease physician. she told us during the 2008 recession, public health budgets across the country were slashed dramatically. >> your funding for public health activities compartmently from the federal government, about 20%, and then, almost half is come from state and local municipalities. some of those are wealthier than others which means they are better resourced than others. fighting an infectious disease, you are only as strong as your weakest link. >> one of the key areas the c.d.c. is going to be advising
8:37 am
state and local health departments about is specifically education and education of the public. harvard had a survey that they released this week looking at american of the zika virus. to give you an example, 40% think if a woman gets zika virus, any pregnancy afterwards will be threatened by the virus. that's false to be very clear. once she recovers, she can have a normal healthy pregnancy. there are myths going around. >> you have to remember who is the group, which is the group that is really at risk here so it's pregnant women and women who are trying to get pregnant and i would add to that list, women who might have unintended pregnancy. so that's the group we really need to be concerned about, that we need to be providing resources to so that they can active screening. if you live in . if you live in one of these
8:38 am
areas. dr. gowder told us doctors are almost positive at this point of that casual link between the zika virus and birth desktops. >> stars of u.s. soccer, 5 members have filed a federal discrimination complaint. they say despite more revenue than men, they are earning less than their male counterparts. here is more. >> reporter: after a world cup win against japan in 2015, the u.s. women's team was honored with a ticker tape parade in new york city. more than 23 million viewers watched the game. making it the highest rated soccer match in u.s. history. >> win along with four olympic
8:39 am
gold medals is a record for a women's soccer team. unmatched by any other nation. their unprecedented success is generating revenue for the u.s. soccer federation. but, according to a dim chris nation complaint filed by five members of the team, it is not translating into equal pay for the women's team. >> every single day, we sacrifice as much as the men. we work just as much, endure just as much physically and emotionally and our fans appreciate us every day for that. >> the complaint filed with the u.s. equal employment commission says players on the women's team earned $72,000 a year or a minimum of 20 matches a year. for every match they win, they are paid a bonus of $1,350 even though the u.s. men have been far less successful for the same number of games, they make $100,000, or $5,000 a game. they get paid more for games against higher ranked teams and can make more than $17,000 a game if they win.
8:40 am
the women's lawyer says the disparity violates u.s. pay equity laws. >> when they ask for the same treatment as the men, they were told it was irrational. now, that might be a good answer in 1816. it's not an acceptable answer. >> the u.s. soccer federation expressed disappointment in the action and said it is committed to negotiating a new agreement with the women's national team when the current contract expires at the end of the year. but getting pay equity, even based on merit could be an uphill battle. >> women in the past have agreed and signed the offer from >> soccer that has paid them less than the men. >> said, for their next collective bargaining agreement they are taking the stance they do not want to be paid differently from the men and that this action today is the result of u.s. soccer saying we will not pay you equally to the men even in the future. a little more on this, the u.s. soccer federation says female players get benefits that
8:41 am
are not available to men, including severance and health benefits. if they are injured, they receive 100% of their guaranteed salary and as grant said, the federation said the pay truck structure is based upon an agreement struck more than 10 years ago. draft kings and fan dual suspending activities on college campuses. all college contests will end after the college basketball games, the ncaa basketball tournament is the last significant for daily fantasy prior to football season. it ends with monday's championship game. >> george washington's university won 76 to 60 in the championship game. it is george washington's first championship and the fourth straight win against a higher seed. george washington also notching a school record for wings in a season 28. >> get your parkas back out because the eastern part of the country is cooling off this
8:42 am
weekend. my mouth is frozen. >> yes. i keep telling everyone, no. i 'm sorry. this is not an april fools joke. i wish it was. here is that front up and down the east coast today. a lot of rain. some of the storms especially through the south and mid atlantic. blind this, you can see a disturbance, not anything widespread. more enhanced over the weekend. here is how this shapes up. a couple of banned where we have the rain right now. >> as to flood concerns in the south and as i said, that potential for some of those stronger storms through the day. but we also have, it's cold enough behind this system to the next area as snow. so even as all of this clears out and most of it clears out at least by sunday, if not saturday, northeast has it more on saturday. but it will be cold enough that with that little disturbance, a couple of snowflakes could go by. around the great lakes, that could be an envelope or two of snow. late in the season for that. temperatures that have supported
8:43 am
these changes. some were chicago this morning, this is versus 24 hours ago. temperatures are 20 drivers degrees cooler this morning. if you take the last couple of days combined, would youedspread through the mid section of the country and into portions of the south, high temperatures have dropped 20 or 30 degrees in some cases all of that cooler air will shift eastward temperatures in the 70s down to the 50s in some indications by tommy. cool in the northern interior while the mid west warms up. from 70 to 40s on sunday with, as i said, it's just a slight chance but there are chance for snowflakes to go by. >> by the way, if you missed the sea turtle story, here it is. >> all right. hyperbaric chambers usually treat things like the bends. the largest facility is diving
8:44 am
into new territory. >> i will read this with a straight face. al jazeera's alan schaufller reports on a sea turtle filled with gas. >> a hard-shelled 4-fliperred test subject getting treatment in a setting designed for two-legged types. >> we can have a chamber over here that can put up to eight people or if they are in gurney did, it will be a little bit less. >> the biggest hyperberic chamber on the west coast. >> we treed the bends and carbon monoxide poisoning. the most common after that are diabetic food wounds and radiation tissue injury. >> this patient is different. this procedure in this kind of facility has never been done before. tucker is a 70 pound olive ridley sea tushlths rehabbing at the seattle aquarium wit him to hit at the bottom of the tank.
8:45 am
>> he was found near death in december and has bounced back. >> we are happy with his condition right now. when he came in, he couldn't move. he couldn't breathe on his own. he was a is sick sea turtle he has a problem, a gas problem bubbles that upset his boyian see and present him from diving, a skill set for a sea turtle. >> they can't eat like they would in the wild and can't avoid predators or both. they have to watch out for our boats as well. >> if they can't dive, they become food? >> they do they are trying to get tucker a two and a half hour session under high pressure breathing 100% oxygen. >> this is the first time i have treated a see turtle or any animal. >> the goal to break up the bubbles that keep tucker from doing what sea turtles do. >> it's pretty exciting if we can help. we don't know whether we are
8:46 am
ultimately helping or not. but the options are litted. >> cat scans and behavior should show whether deep dives are back in his repertoire. he may need more hyperberic sessions. the humans involved hope he will be back in the ocean by late summer. >> calling him tucker, the tooter? >> he is cute though. >> don't swim after him. >> i am not commenting okay your remark. >> the unemployment rate is up. >> there are positive signs the economy is on its way to a comeback. that's why we are smiling.
8:47 am
8:48 am
8:49 am
al jazeera america. >> the latest job numbers from the federal government were released. 215,000 jobs created last month. >> as for the unemployment rate, it ticked up a small percentage rate from last month, patricia sabgra to break down the numbers. >> okay. this was a pretty good jobs report. there was a lot that you could get very excited. not very excited but somewhat excited but also some negatives. let's break it down. the economy added 215,000 jobs
8:50 am
last month in line with at of estimates that were out there. the unemployment rate ticked up to 5%. this is a good thing. it ticked up for the right reason because the number of people who were either in work or actively looking for a job, that thing we call the labor force participation rate went up. >> means more are womcoming off the sidelines looking for a job. that's a good thing. in terms of the next of jobs, construction had a really banner month. it added 37 jobs but -- here is the downside. manufacturing lost 29,000 jobs. chock that up to buying abroad. the manufacturing sector getting hammered last month. miling, with the oil patch continues to shed jobs as well. they lost 12,000. the big thing is average hourly wages had a very decent month in march. they tick the up kreven cents. o year over, 2.3% it's moving in
8:51 am
the right direction. picking up steam. it's hardly robust. >> new york state lawmakers have reached a deal. they are going to raise the state minimum wage to $15 an hour. is that the key to rising wages across the board? >> some economists feel raising the minimum wage would kick up wages across the board. some disagree with that as well because they believe raising the minimum wage could actually lead to some job losses begin the pathetic state that hasn't been raised in years, states are taking the initiative. the other thing to point out is a lot of workers working for the minimum wage have families to support. that's not going to happen on $7.25. they need a living wage. >> a real campaign issue in the 2016 presidential race. thank you so much. you have seen her work as actually one of the architects
8:52 am
of some of the world's most iconic buildings. >> rebuilding the architecture world and expanding the reach. >> tesla unveiling it's affordable car to compete in a field already buzzing with excitement. tell critical and timely stories of race in america. >> i think since he was a person of color, the police department won't care. >> i'm more scared of the police than a burglar. >> this is really really unfair how we're being treated. >> i think what's important is that we're having a discussion about it. >> what took place here 60 years ago...the murder of emmett till is to this day an unsolved crime. >> i wanted people to hear the true story of till. >> never thought that he would be killed for that. >> that was the first step in the modern civil rights movement. >> ferguson has a...asking for assistance with crowd control... >> we're live in ferguson, missouri. >> these young people deserve justice. >> this is a target you can't
8:53 am
get rid of. >> they were so angry, because it could've been them. >> there's clearly an issue and we have to focus on how we bridge that. >> they say they did it because they were trying to protect my children. they didn't protect my children, they traumatized them. >> we're just the average person, trying to go to work, provide for our families, and do what we can in this world. >> don't get lost in a sea of despair. >> i'm interested in getting us to a place where we're feeling something that looks more like freedom and justice. >> check which ethnicity - i check multiple boxes. >> this is who i am. >> were you here 50 years ago? >> yes to support the cause for voter's rights. >> we've come a long way. we've got a long ways to go. >> al jazeera america - proud to tell your stories.
8:54 am
she was called visionary, dying of a heart attack on thursday, 65 years old. >> she combined mass and imagination to create unique buildings that will earned her the title "the queen of the curve." randall pinkston reports. >> a fire station in germany, a cultural center, a railway stop in austria. works of architecture and works of art brought together by the brilliance of zaha zadid. she did not just reimagine shapes, swoops and structures. she revolutionized them. born in baghdad, educated in
8:55 am
beirut and london, she broke the glass ceiling in an industry long dominated by men. there was no denying her genius or the bias she and other architects faced. >> maybe eventually it will change. >> thanks to hadid, change is coming the lon dozen aquitic center, an opera house in china. a high-rise in hon kong. using math, computer models and boundlets creativity, she transformed neighborhoods and sky lines she was a train blaze per, one of countless honors on a woman named a dame commander of the order of the british empire. her high art became a global
8:56 am
busy. architects has a presence in 55 countries and then they are the works in progress, the future plans and commissions like this residential building in manhattan. zaha hadid is gone. her legacy is scooaring. >> randall pinkston, al jazeera. >> become mw wants to use cloud technology to make life easier for drivers, drivers can get smart phone and apple watch alerts telling them to leave early due to traffic and get walking directions after they have parked their cars. it's powered by microsoft's azure cloud. it works with 2014 or newer bmws. and droid version is due later this year. >> if you wanted a tesla, unveiling the model 3, costs about $35,000 t can go go 15 miles on a charge elon muscsays excitement is building. >> this is crazy. the total number of hours for
8:57 am
the model 3 a in the past 24 hours has passed 115,000. >> this is tesla's first electric car aimed at the mainstream buyer al jazeera's tech correspondent jacob ward has a closer look these people are here to put down a thousand dollars in cash to reserve a car they will not be allowed to get for another year at least. the tesla model 3 makes sense, however, to a lot of these folks. $35,000 plus all of the incentives, rebates and government bonuses you get. it becomes quite aufrdable.
8:58 am
here in california. sort of fund the research they do into electric vehicles. tesla does not have that luxury. this is definitely a turning point for the company, trying to earn its place ranked among the highest valued auto makers in the world. >> that's our jake ward saying the tesla model will do zero to 60 in 6 seconds. >> aapr april's fool's day, lex
8:59 am
announcing velcro seats holding the driver in place. not even sure what that means. but the seats come with a special suit to wear. google's joke is a same-day delivery service that sends out products versus pair shoot and the open table announced getting a taste of the photo by loickin their mobile didvises. yum. >> yuk. >> happy april fool's day. that's it for us in new york. >> i am del walters. back on sunday morning eastern time. until then, have a great weekend.
9:00 am
hello, welcome to the al jazeera news hour from doha. the u.n. expresses concern about the welfare of refugees being sent back from greece to turkey. myanmar's parliament votes to give the prime minister more power unrunning the country. a collapse kills 24 people in india. the world championship

68 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on