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tv   The Things We Keep  Al Jazeera  November 3, 2018 9:00am-10:05am +03

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rest mostly roads a quiet not much transport is available i see b.b. is a pakistani christian woman condemned to did eight years ago after an argument with their muslim neighbors led them to accuse her of insulting islam this new priem court overturned her conviction this week saying day wasn't enough evidence but reaction in some quarters was a few. somebody one of. we did not accept the supreme court's one sided verdict at least we request the supreme court reviews its judge part of its constitution largent bench to hear this case again we're focused on here prime minister emraan khan insisting he were not allow what he calls religious hardliners to cripple the country damaged property and fight with police this goldman has taken a stand and i hope it's just sort of wise that the stand and he takes on and then takes effective measures to deal with these miscreants and restores laws
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because people of pakistan who are peace loving they are really fed up with these people who abuse the illusion for their own small neural net maybe a sense now it seems the prime minister has succeeded that decision by the ultra conservative group that he can lead. to call off a street protest followed you know for d.d. being struck with the government. but it's too soon to judge rated that signal is long term reform of pakistan's blasphemy laws or just a short lived compromise to restore order a moderated al jazeera islam off. so official break here and al-jazeera when we come back donald trump appears to tell you turn on his threats the military would shoot at migrants trying to reach the u.s. plus. you think you go all the way you have the numbers you're. starting to find sri lanka's ousted by a minister says he's not going anywhere more than
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a stay with us. through trying to rape you and you. don't mean it seems and it's in going to. head over there remains of a typhoon a still with us over the southeastern parts of china just the remains now they just this area of cloud here they certainly brought us some heavy rain though particularly over parts of taiwan it is all disbanding though and over the next few days it will continue to dry up so just a little bit of what weather they appear in the day on saturday by sunday it should be fine and settled shanghai not to warm up at twenty one degrees at the moment it is warmer in hong kong will be up at around twenty seven even further towards the south and the showers have been fairly subdued over the philippines recently but they all set to return so i expect more of them as we head through the day on saturday but it's sunday that's not the way today and particularly across the
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central belt it is looking fairly soggy more wet weather as well further towards the west so for some of us in southern parts of thailand all the way down through so much of it's looking pretty soggy at times as we head across toward india and pakistan in the north we've seen a fair amount of cloud that's working its way across us so do expect quite a bit of snow they are in the day on saturday for the south it's only in the fossil impulse of india and sri lanka we've got more in the way of trout and a few more showers as we head into sunday and they will see more of those just push a bit further north looks like mumbai will catch one or two as well. the weather sponsored by qatar and nice. wish the world innovation summit for health one community of two thousand health care experts in of ages and policy makers from one hundred countries. one experience sharing best practices and innovative ideas.
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one goal hopefully a world through global collaboration. apply now to attend the twenty eighteen wish summit. welcome back a quick reminder the top stories here on al-jazeera turkey's president says he is convinced the order to kill them all came from the highest levels of the saudi government the turkish investigator has told al jazeera the saudi journalist body was dismembered and dissolve the nasa after he was killed on october the second. trumpet ministry at the top of ministrations re-imposing sanctions on iran that were lifted and the twenty fifteen nuclear deal the measures will begin on monday
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and u.k. russia france china germany and the e.u. of all condemned the move. and blasphemy protests in pakistan have been called off after a deal between the government and conservative muslim groups began on wednesday when the supreme court overturned the death sentence of a christian woman accused of insulting islam. a saudi amorality coalition has launched new offensives in yemen it's begun an operation to retake the port city of her data which is under the control of who the rebels the coalition has sent in thousands of troops to the area this week and on friday it also attacked international airport and an adjoining airbase the u.s. and u.n. have both called on both sides to stop the fighting and begin talks to end the war . well the u.n. is again warning of a humanitarian crisis in yemen's second general antonio terence said a cease fire must be reached and that there are glimmers of hope that a political solution is possible the u.n.
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and our partners are already feeding eight million people in yemen without urgent action up to fourteen million people fully whole the population could be out of it risk in the coming months to avert imminent catastrophe several steps are urgently required first violence must stop everywhere with an immediate halt around critical infrastructure and densely populated areas and they welcomed a strong constructive engagement from many member states in recent days joining their voices to the un's repeated appeals for the suspension of those the abilities and supporting my special envoys efforts yes president donald trump has backtracked from his earlier threat that troops would shoot migrants at the mexican border if they threw rocks he made the comments on thursday referring to essential american people making their way in a caravan attempting to reach the u.s.
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without documents but now he's backed off from that threat. what they did to the mexican military is a disgrace they had him with rocks some were very seriously injured and they were throwing rocks in their face they do that with us they're going to be arrested there's going to be a problem i didn't say shoot i didn't say here but they do that when. they're going to be arrested for a long time well immigration and the economy are major issues in the midterm elections four days away it's seen as a referendum of trump's presidency and spending the last weekend before the poll campaigning for republican candidates in six states americans with voting to elect members of the house of representatives some senators and governors republicans county control both houses of congress. for the president barack obama's olds a busy on the campaign trail having to boost the democrat vote he told a crowd in the swing state of florida that the future of the country is at stake.
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america is at a crossroads. that health care of millions is on the belt. making sure working families get a fair shake is on the belt. but maybe most of all the character of our country is on the ballot and the all the open in the closing weeks of this election we have seen repeated attempts to divide us. with rhetoric designed to make us angry and make us fearful. mike hanna has the latest now from washington d.c. . well the democrats have brought out their heavyweight campaign our former president barack obama he's been going from campaign rally to campaign rally the basic message he's giving is that the nature of the country has changed very seldom mentioning president trump by name he does make very clear though that this
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character change within the country is due to the failed policies of the trumpet ministration he's been joined by vice president joe biden at a number of campaign rallies but conspicuous by their absence former president bill clinton and former presidential candidate hillary clinton they've taken no part in the campaign rallies at this particular point president trump to an absolute flurry of campaign rallies in these last few days his message has been on look all the time immigration the threat of immigration the fear of immigration characterizing the so-called caravans coming across mexico as an invasion sending soldiers to the border in what his critics contend is sheer fear tactics calculated to drive republicans to the polls a very key detail some one third of the electorate are self described independents these are the people that the democrats will be turning to hoping that they can be
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galvanized by the trump presidency to go to the polls president trump is not a candidate but certainly this is an election is a rift referendum about the president himself eyesores says it was behind the attack that killed seven coptic christians in egypt a gunman fired at two buses on their way to a ministry in the city of minea two hundred sixty kilometers south of cairo six of the dead were from the same family president of the fatah and sisi is promising to punish those responsible i saw him on several attacks on coptic christians in the last few years. dozens of palestinians have been injured during protests along the border with israel at least two hundred ten people have been killed since the weekly friday demonstrations began in late march gazans are demanding the right to return to ancestral lands and the lifting of israel's told their blockade on the strip are a force that has more from the gaza israel border. well there was word on thursday here in gaza after the intervention of an egyptian delegation they met with the
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committee that runs these protests there was word that they were going to be scaled down in size and turn and if i just get out of the way i think we can see that that is pretty much come true this is a smaller in number protests than we've seen in recent weeks also as promised it seems there are no incendiary devices kites and balloons being lit and launched towards israel a very small number of tires being set on fire to try to provide screening and in response the israelis are using the prevailing winds which are coming from israel this friday and using a pretty large use of tear gas in terms of the proportion of people it is being used against so largely people are being kept back from the fence what's interesting are the politics which are underlying all of this this addiction delegation which is still in town and has visited the process sites at a different site are up slightly north of here along the border that's part of a wider scale effort both to try to reconcile the palestinian factions fatah which
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dominates the palestinian authority in the occupied west bank hamas which controls gaza trying to broker some kind of longer term truce between the israelis and hamas there is talk of israel facilitating potentially fifteen million dollars a month of funding for non fighting staff members or people who work for hamas here in the gaza strip they're already facilitating the qatari fuel which is drastically changed the electricity supply in the strip as well and so after weeks where we've seen things get very close to a major military escalation on a number of occasions there is a different atmosphere this weekend here in gaza and we're seeing it not least in the scale of this protest. lanka's ousted prime minister has told down to zero democracy in the country's under threat ronald wickramasinghe is refusing to quit after being fired last week by the president he's been replaced with manda
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rajapaksa two time president is accused of a power grab but it smith reports from colombo for the past week run a wickramasinghe has refused to leave the prime minister's official residence here in the capital it's become a symbol of legitimacy he tells me after being fired by the president in what critics are calling a constitutional two day the third of a london democracy in the last presidential election parliament religion we came forward on the basis that parliament is supreme that the president must act according to the. when they are nineteen the amendment to the constitution was drafted on that basis now what has happened is the president is trying to override the power of the parliament present my three policy say in a swore in mahinda rajapakse as the new prime minister last friday rajapaksa was president for two terms and scrapped term limits and twenty fourteen to try and stay in power but then lost the election he called a year later rajapaksa says he's
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got enough support in parliament to confirm his position but m.p.'s can't quote because presidents are saying or a suspended parliament why the delay you think in recalling palm and why they haven't the numbers where the number because parliament initially thought. we have the numbers here it. with we hear a lot of talk about persuading m.p.'s to join rajapaksa side how might they be persuaded what are you what are you hearing about what's going on with our funding member and their ministry sheeps and sometimes money the speaker has warned of the risk of a bloodbath if this is allowed to continue do you share those views of the speaker that there can be an appeal because people are getting the two granted by the we voted for parliament democracy we why we asked for a different set up and all of sudden we find the even worse then two thousand forty
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. defending a principle and the fact that the made during the war. in two thousand and fifteen to a poor democracy and if you lead them down their gloves to be i and a singer says it's that desire to uphold democracy that's brought him support from a wide a section of society than just his traditional support base when parliament is recalled prime minister wickramasinghe says he'll leave his official residence here at temple trees to go and vote until then he's staying put. colombo. russia and china are being blamed for blocking international efforts to create the world's largest marine reserve in antarctica the word l.z. is thought to be home to thousands of undiscovered species but the antarctic commission to conserve marine life couldn't agree on plans to create a no go zone for fishing mining and drilling under thomas reports from hobart for.
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the proposal was to create another marine park in antarctica this time five times the size of germany an area of pristine ocean protected from fishing mining drilling almost all human activity. the weather l c is an icy wilderness and one of the world's last marine protection would have kept it that way but in hobart delegations from twenty four different countries with an interest and i talked to as well as the european union which led the pot proposal needed to reach consensus where exactly where the parks boundaries be would any fishing be allowed how reliable is the science supporting the need for complete protection how many decades with the protection lost for they couldn't agree after two weeks of talking behind closed doors the head of india's delegation revealed no consensus had been reached. and.
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the standing is not. unfortunately standing is not that much in twenty six the same delegates in the same building were able to reach agreement to create another marine park and talk to. that one covering the road was supposed to create momentum for more but an attempt to create one in east antarctica last year failed the failure on friday to create one in the wood del see the sense of gloom for conservationists and of course extremely disappointed that this meeting was unable to reach consensus it's been a campaign that's really engage people and people want to see and talk to give or take it and to see it failing at this meeting is of course very disappointing delegates meet in hobart every year there will be more chances to create marine parks in future for every year that passes means what is ultimately protected will be a little less. in the end i'm told it was a disagreement about the quality of the science behind the need for a new marine protected area that led to the lack of consensus with two countries
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china and russia refusing to sign up now in the past those same two countries have come around to proposals that in previous years they'd opposed but only after those have been signed off by the highest level of politics in those countries the president the hope sorry if that in time the same can happen with this proposal and to toss out is there australia. time for a quick check of the headlines here this hour turkey's president says he's convinced the orders to kill jamal khashoggi came from the highest levels of the saudi government. a turkish investigator has told al-jazeera the saudi journalist body was dismembered and dissolved in acid after he was killed a month ago on october the second one fishes more from istanbul we always knew the turkish government knew more than they were making public know senior figures are
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telling is that they think that the so-called hit team the fifteen people who arrived from saudi arabia just hours before jamal khashoggi appointment had done this before which explains the professional nature of the operation that he could kill someone so quickly and essentially dispose of his remains so that even four weeks on turkish investigators still found no trace of jamal khashoggi body the trumpet ministrations re-imposing sanctions on iran that were lifted in the twenty fifth day nuclear deal the measures will begin on monday the u.k. russia france china germany and the european union have all condemned the mood's eight countries will be allowed exemptions from sanctions should they do business with tehran. blasphemy protests in pakistan are been called off after an agreement between the government and conservative muslim groups that began on wednesday when the supreme court overturned the death sentence of a christian woman accused of insulting islam. yes president donald trump has
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backtracked from his earlier threat that troops would shoot migrants at the mexican border if they threw rocks he made the comments on thursday referring to central american people making their way in a caravan attempting to reach the u.s. without documents but now he's backed off from that threat. what they did to the mexican military is that straight they end up with rocks very seriously injured and they were throwing rocks in their face they do that with us they're going to be arrested they've got to be brought up i don't say here i didn't say here but they do that when. they're going to be arrested for a long time sri lanka's ousted prime minister has told down to zero democracy in the country is under threat rana wickramasinghe is refusing to quit after being fired last week by president makes the policy was santa has been replaced with mahinda rajapaksa a two time president is accused of a power grab. ok those are the headlines the news continues.
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after inside stories. exactly a month ago she came to istanbul he was killed in istanbul one month on turkey and saudi arabia are now at loggerheads investigation into his death is going no place this is inside story.
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hello and welcome from turkey today inside story coming to you from istanbul exactly a month ago today. the saudi journalist walked into that building behind me to collect some paperwork he was just about to get remarried instead of getting a stamp on a form and walking out of the building to meet his fiance the teacher instead he was tortured and brutally killed there are three questions to which we have yet to receive. who ordered the killing who carried out the killing and on top of that where is the body of jamal khashoggi there are two other questions as well is there a broader issue here is there a broader malays across the region and saudi arabia crossed a rubicon has it done something that it thought it could get away with which it may not get away with we'll get to our guests in just a moment first charles stratford sets up our discussion today. oct the second four fifty seven am local time in istanbul security camera footage shows
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him and his fiance hoodies each angus' entering the building of his recently acquired istanbul apartment hours later the couple arrive at the saudi consulate for her shows his appointment it's thirteen thirteen they stand at the barricades close by the shows he gives her his two mobile phones they have agreed that if he doesn't reappear they should call the turkish government official who is a trusted friend. in an interview with turkish t.v. had he just said that although they were both nervous about her shows his appointment he had told her the consulate staff had treated him well during a previous visit on september the twenty eighth to does this imply a trap had been sent to virtual gave to. the. jamal a smiling when he came out of the consulate he was very happy with the welcome he received he said the consulate staff and come to introduce themselves and offered
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him something to drink he was told that the documents he wanted would be ready in a few days' time at thirteen fourteen he enters the consulate never to be seen again for a quarter hours later at seventeen thirty three can be seen anxiously waiting outside she had already made the call but it's too late turkish and saudi investigators now agree that her show by this time was already dead more than one let me up almost a month as i'm making these calls i'm thinking to myself am i too late is something happening could i prevent something from happening to me. according to friends jamal khashoggi didn't like being called a saudi dissident in an interview which he gave to a canadian t.v. channel in june he explains why he fled to america i list because once you got to know the space i had was getting no work and began to feel the pressure so i just
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decided to leave before it used to do it and just a couple of months that i had a lift feelings of mind where many people i know. saw a sense goodness that i did that otherwise they were pleased i would have been told at my home by no bun from trouble at least i missed it and that's the thing i want in in my entire minute i am sixty years old and they want to enjoy life and they want to be thirty just be quoted make and it seems your shows he was killed in this building for trying to do exactly that speaking freely for the good of a country that he said he loved his murder by men some of whom are described as being either close to or even parts all saudis in the circle leadership shows just how dangerous that endeavor was tall strafford the inside story stumble.
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ok let's get going with our conversation here today on inside story let's introduce our three guests today they are. the. english language newspaper here in istanbul for she is an international strategist and see. the university let's just come to you first. will we ever see the body or what's left of it the body of jamal khashoggi well if we if we look at. what has been said by a turkish official washington post i'm afraid it's not likely that we're going to see mr g.'s body because one of the sources told the washington post that it was actually melted and so if that's the case or if the body has been dismembered and the spores in a in a way that we are not able to put it together you know i'm afraid it's going to be very unlikely that we're going to see the body fortunately. but if it is
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otherwise i think that's an question that riyadh needs to answer at this point because the prosecutors have invested have dig into the incident and investigation has been you know weighed concluded by the turkish prosecutor saying that the body was dismembered and disposed so we don't know where the body is at the moment if riyadh is not going to tell us i'm afraid it's a question that at least from the turkish perspective it is very hard to answer at this point so one month today he walked into that building the consensus is built over the last months saying that this probably goes all the way to the crown prince mohammed bin that's the consensus that's the assumption i'm using the words very very delicately here because new on everything in the story in your mind is the consensus right. well it seems that starting from two thousand and seventeen
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prince all money was interacted into the you know the top of the poverty of the caribbean governments so he is you know kind of restructuring the national security. priorities and so subvert so it is unlikely that we think so somebody else so if this is kind of an operation it is ill. ill organized and ill execute it and hopefully that our nation's security agency as song old post apartment has you know bring in that from the darkness into our very. own knowledge but at the end of the day it doesn't necessarily have to be prince or somebody else we should be focusing on what type of a state can do this kind of thing bridging human rights bridging all the
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international law ridging be there we end of quote mansion and still cold state it is absolutely impossible i mean we can i do call it as a cause a state or a state with no institutional capacity or no rule of law that's all. there identified one to one of the key elements of this that internationally presidents and prime ministers diplomats have to carry on addressing and it's it's a function of the way that president the one for example is a phenomena of the well experienced politician who's going up against a saudi crown prince he's got a colossal lack of experience because he's never been a politician he's never been a successful businessman he's always just been a prince. well yeah there's a difference of experience
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a gap which doesn't work very well for saudi arabia obviously. but i think what sell was just said about the institutional capacity also plays its part here turkey is managing this crisis this international crisis wary well in a way that it's for visits from turning into a bilateral issue so it's not like pitching prince oman against the turkish president apply pressure them on what turkey is actually doing very successfully in that i should mention is internationalizing the issue multilateral izing the issue and this corner saudi arabia and whoever is responsible within the saudis system for this hideous murder of. in a very bad position to say the least so how does mr erdogan keep calm internationalizing it he spent two weeks leaking information basically somebody to
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probe predominantly via the daily stop a newspaper these language version but it is something he needs to keep it going he's delivered those two very strong speeches he was very presidential he clearly signaled i will work with king solomon i cannot work with the crown prince but how does he keep it in the headlines well i think it's. you know his own character and bill it see too many to process but own couple of that it's also the ability an institutional kept us to build the foreign political my set of turkey i mean. that we are running into a very different period of time so the. structure is absolutely changing and this is the same international system that we used to have let's say to the case sick-o. the great bells is. changing the international institutional kept us the is
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decaying unfortunately so in a very. hectic period of time and the very troubled some region like middle east cannot to live aid another problem all topple that you know mr hard ons. i think and i believe it's my own perception that he is trying to keep the balance is in the way that it won't be creating another turmoil or another disaster within the region ok another term a lot of exhausted from the region that's interesting isn't it because so much of the death of one man feeds into the of the big issues in this region mike pompei of the u.s. secretary of state in the past twenty four hours talking about sanctions surely not going to happen this side of the u.s. midterm elections and nobody's giving us a timeframe for about. that is i think one of the one of the key results emerging from
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a very close and intense intimate relationship between crown prince miss prince mohammed bin salon and washington so that's one thing on the one side but i just want to elaborate with one with what seles said with regards to the regional turmoil and the implications behind that i mean this situation we are saying that mr though on it has been able to keep it at an international level but this is not an incident a simple criminal incident that happened in turkey this has this by it's nature it's an international issue so the fact that he's a columnist at washington post makes it an international issue the fact that he's a saudi citizen. and killed saudi citizen in a saudi consulate makes and makes it an international issue this is you know it has very small details that could affect turkey saudi arabia saudi arabia relations
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directly so mr are the one wants to move away from that this is not an issue. you know in a way that just has happened between turkey and saudi arabia this is a this is an incident has regional dimension. because i mean we know is saudi arabia's. unsaid agenda with regards to turkish influence in the region and also it has an international mission because this is a figure that was a critical who was a critical critical critical to riyadh and who was a dissident journalist and so it has an international dimension in the sense that there is more to say and values that are crashed by this incident so it's not a one dimensional issue and i mean it's very hard to see with regard to your question it's very hard to see a quick outcome with regards to washington. sanctions on mohamed bin someone i mean i think the fact that he makes a lot of mistakes makes him
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a better figure for washington that washington can put its support behind. as far as mr erdogan is concerned he can carry on exerting pressure however he will he's clearly highly skilled at court he's dumb since a month ago since the events of one month ago but he can't go so far surely he fractures the relationship. with riyadh because then nothing happens. that is correct absolutely and turkey is definite there verify that while trying to eliminate mom had been so mun that is why president is on this trying to keep king solomon close and keep the doors of dialogue open in that regard. because turkish decision makers and mr added on is pretty much everywhere of the fact that the regional turmoil that we have been going through. in the middle east
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. requires an necessitates cooperation in man way or the other from. an area of party no one country is able to so say this syrian civil war no one party is available to dissolve the tensions in the gulf no one party is able to so what would come after the speeding up of the iranian sanctions regime by the united states and turkey and saudi arabia despite at all on many of the issues that concerns the region are two heavyweights in this region and any way any leverage that turkey or saudi arabia can provide to their agendas from the other would largely enhance their positions that is why this becomes a game of strategy and edging on the side also. jamal is fiance to teach a just in the past twelve hours or so writing
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a very strong article one of the english language newspapers out of europe saying there must not be a cover up but this kind of plays to the general donald trump's son in law's reaction to it saying account of the precise quote but he basically said we need a truth we can work with and when he said that ten days two weeks ago people were outraged but everyone is moving to that position where they have a truce that they can work with. but it might not actually be the truth of what happened because they have to deal with the truth of what happened and some imaginable and the consequences would have to be so much harder fortunately these says the as my professor of middle with says that international relations has a cold face right this is you know realities in poland takes and also the truth sometimes it's called lights to each other. you know let's remember a little bit about hall does us saw the relationship because there chook countries
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exactly the opposite to each other the regimes are completely different the values are completely different democratic values doesn't ever existed in. how come this two countries come together and create a strategy get lines in the middle east. in one part united states have the poverty of the dollar and in one part there be a have the poverty of the energy so this to poverty actually lead to no itself time to time in order to settle down the relationship either in the region or in the global scale. maybe we don't touch too much but we are very old the fact that china is very silent about this case for example i mean in the event that u.s. put some sanctions in the event that until the agent comes from the area then the oil prices and this energy business will go into a true loyal and it's the next run the saudis would like to prove further maybe to
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price oil not in u.s. dollars but in the yuan because there is the market up or running and growing day by day only last year four months after the shanghai oil market has grown at least seven person or so in the global crude turnover this is a huge thing you know the it unfortunately. vagrants alert is not about the fact that everybody was playing the game on the moral grounds because there are interests and there are strategies and also the design says will create a final decision i guess. what has just said because master of english language my dear aren't nor coming out of washington but we should all remember. when he wrote that there was no virtue like necessity and this is the
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burning oil behind all of this it's the smoke that is why. this workable truth rhetoric gets out that. the consciousness of the people who are private or even watching this case revolting to the fact that we need the truth that we could work with. it is actually the name of the game in many capitals around the world nowadays and we are seeing signs of that actually with what is happening in denmark with iranian operatives being charged with trying to eliminate some iranian dissidents in denmark so it's just like saudis are doing that and iranians are doing that so the not harm the agenda. the bigger political agenda ok you're talking about agenda you're talking about interests and strategies management is the strategy or the agenda for mr eartha one that he wants to
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reposition turkey to be the regional superpower i don't think this discourse about our go on utilizing this case to to reaffirm it's his regional influence is very it's very it's a very weak narrative i think because i was scared was approach to this case is basically just seeking the truth at this moment it is in a way we can see that you know this will shift. alan says but this is not because i don't is using this case to reach that point this is because riyadh has put itself in a position after spending billions of millions of dollars to for their for their image of repairing the region and globally the fact that they have to really and in a brutal way executed at dissident journalist so this is not about whether i do one will use this case to to make his position more concrete in the region but this is about the fact that some of the areas. influence which president on has also
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praised previously in for example in the case we're going to cut to the crisis with france our he said you know so here is the older brother in this region but this is a case where saudi arabia's role is diminishing. because our dawns discharge on approach to this situation is simply seeking the answers that will shed light to dismiss this brutal murder so solve we being a little bit naive if we want to assume that no one is trying to get a position of definitive truth and therefore questions of moral ambiguity have to be abandoned perhaps but he maybe he needs to get to another acceptable from now i mean turkey demonstrated a way that is possible in the international system which is you can do and moral polis say and also make you'll regional influence accordingly at the same time you know moral it's
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a national interest doesn't have to be called like every so i'm right so this is the state traditions tradition of but time to time you know we got or turkey got problems to express what they're doing exactly but in this case i mean this is not about turkish position or turkey's searching a person ford it's roots this is about what what is going to be the us foreign policy from now on in the middle east and if. the prince song on with all this you know absolutely unbelievably you know harsh and wilder position in fulsome making room going to be survived in the in the future i think. this is much more important for me i guess that change cannot become from the political it's that change should become from top to bottom to let's just boil that down you've got three very very
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powerful individuals here comes the one donald trump people talking about and they're mccrum friends out of those three men those three people which one is the most politically dextrous here. well definitely gone f. and mr dunn is the more able guy in running such a crisis though there are different capacities year when it. comes to political dexterity mr add on is definitely the one with the political acumen when it comes to pass the and influence i would say that mr trump has the most. and when it comes to the role of energy and regional back doors along with been sell month seems to be yearning for morning fluence but amongst those three i would say that the moment in selma as that is the least apt
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to deal with this crisis and it is showing off in the way that the crisis is unfolding right now and that seems to be an appropriate thought on which to end our discussion thank you all very much to our guests. political news that it's a. international strategist at casting from the. university and thank you to you two for your company over the last half hour if you want more on the debate of course you can find it on our facebook page for talks on twitter it's at a.j. inside story or you can tweet me i will tweet you back i'm at peace it will be one everyone on the team here on this special inside story in istanbul thanks for watching thank you for your time all season by.
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history has called it the great war in the first episode conscription troels hundreds of thousands of our of troops into both sides of the conflict their story is rarely told but had a huge impact on the course of the. world moonwalk through the body's own knowledge is even on november sixth the united states will vote will president donald trump gain or lose growing will be live in the white house and pier on capitol hill as the results come in join us for special coverage of the u.s. make tamil actions on al-jazeera.
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we understand the differences and the similarities of cultures across the world. so no matter where you call home al-jazeera international bringing the news and current affairs that matter to. al-jazeera in the eighteen seventies hundreds of all genes were banished to the foggiest corner of an empire where their descendants still live today. my grandparents died with a heavy heart they left everything behind. and don't adhere we would claim argyria an identity it's always present inside as this french territory in the pacific prepares to vote on independence al-jazeera world tells the story of exile in new caledonia.
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al-jazeera. where every. along daryn join in doha with the top stories on al-jazeera turkey's president says he's convinced that the order to kill jamal khashoggi came from the highest levels of the saudi government a turkish investigator has told al-jazeera the saudi journalist body was dismembered and dissolved in acid after he was killed a month ago on october second ellen fisher has more from istanbul. president takes
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a stride in some would say aggressive tone in this opinion piece he's written for the washington post he says that saudi arabia has three key questions to answer first of all where is the body of jamal khashoggi secondly who is the so-called local cooperative who helped the saudis dispose of the body and thirdly who ordered the hit as he calls it on jamal khashoggi now he says he's sure that king solomon was not involved in the operation but he said the decision was taken at the highest level of saudi circles that would identify only a handful of people including crown prince mohammed bin soundman president says what happened in the consulate behind me was a clear breach of the vienna convention dictates how countries behave in diplomatic posts and he talks about the people who are currently being held in connection with the killing of jamal khashoggi in saudi arabia he asks why the consul general is not one of these people here was a man he says who stood in the consulate and lied through his teeth about what
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happened to the washington post writer he also talks about the offer by saudi arabia for turkish investigators to go there to interview these people he calls it a desperate and deliberate stalling tactic he says the what happened to jamal khashoggi was not just an attack on a journalist but essentially attack on a nation he says that other nato countries would not stand by and let this happen and says there must be a response to this and he also says that while many countries would like this to go away this diplomatic breach this diplomatic incident suddenly to be healed this was a problem that was not going to simply go away. the u.s. is reimposing sanctions on iran that were lifted in the twenty fifty nuclear deal the measures will begin on monday the u.k. russia france china germany on the european union have all condemned the move eight countries will be allowed exemptions from sanctions should they do business with
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tehran u.s. president donald trump has backtracked from his earlier threat that troops would shoot migrants at the mexican border if they threw rocks he made the comments on thursday referring to essential american people making their way in a caravan attempting to reach the u.s. without documents and now he's backed off from that threat. what they did to the mexican military is that straight they end up with rocks were very seriously injured and they were throwing rocks in their face they do that with us they're going to be arrested there's going to be a problem i don't say here i didn't say here but they do that when. they're going to be arrested for a long time immigration is a major issue in the midterm elections four days away trump is spending the last weekend campaigning for republican candidates in six states democrats are hoping to take back control of the house of representatives last may protests in pakistan have been called off after a deal between the government and conservative muslim groups that began on
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wednesday when the supreme court overturned the death sentence of a christian woman accused of insulting islam i still says it was behind the attack that killed seven coptic christians in egypt gunman fired at two buses on their way to a ministry in the city of minya two hundred sixty kilometers south of cairo six of the dead from the same family president abdel fattah el-sisi is promising to punish those responsible. and sri lanka's ousted prime minister told al-jazeera democracy in the country is under threat rana wickramasinghe is refusing to quit after being fired last week by the president he's been replaced with mahinda rajapaksa a two time president. russia and china are being blamed for blocking international efforts to create the world's largest marine reserve in antarctica member countries of the antarctic commission to conserve marine life wrapped up that week meeting in hobart australia well those are the headlines the news continues here after
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al-jazeera correspondent stench of absolutely awful. in some ways alaska is nothing less than a promises. in the summer the constant sun might suppose so beautiful it seems a crime to look away. from a distance the tundra looks like a muted patchwork. only when you bend towards the ground to check if the berries have ripe and if the mushrooms have come up after rain can you see the spongy cosmos it contains. in the rivers salmon move powerful leaf like
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together. and in the times between night and day when even the salmon seem to still we were taken by the raw force of a landscape stripped of its summer in a style to. my name is america. africa tired after america and. and my mom's side of the family is native boston. i'm an online journalist for al-jazeera and. my mom's village has one of the last subsistence salmon cultures in the world but their way of life could disappear. for an hour persists and i feel really grateful to be a part of it. if
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people ask i usually same from qatar or the middle east. my dad says that when he was growing up the lifestyle in qatar was very simple and sometimes i wish i could have seen what that world looked like. the peace of life a slow everybody knew everybody. and there's just one place to get your vegetables and fish down at the coastline. oil and gas completely transformed the country. and even my lifetime the city has dramatically changed. there's this glittering skyline that developed almost overnight and we have all this wealth now . people are usually shocked when i tell them my mom is from alaska my dad is from qatar and they always always ask how they met but the story is pretty boring really they just met in university and at the time they still had to see if they can make
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things worse this is not fun. coming to town half of the first time i was excited to come and see the country because. you know it's just someplace new and different you're a little scant. if someone is under want to adopt a situation where you think this is going to be home for you know i'm i think i'm almost the thought of wants to learn. about different cultures and religions to come the only adult away from moscow all the way through the fault of the war there never been here and just lived on promises here taking the woman both of them. what did you promise the parents of the fairness to bring her back of do you know this. but. picking two of them for the first time i think i was probably. pretty nervous about what he would think those are going to experience
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even landing out there or to know what can gravel on the way you can see this huge like cross shaped runway and then you're looking all around the country to be like what's here where is it because i mean he was like from a urban situation and stuff and i just thought man he's probably going to think that he's coming to absolutely nowhere you know but. it all worked out in the end he adapted to village life easily. but you have to survive you have to do it yourself you have to go catch your own food you have to build your own children and i think the altar was around them isn't for me i know what part so it's coulter. coulter and i often called her did you want your kids to know if your cultural hoses are doing a good falls to things and of course that's paris ruined the best hope of both we just wanted you to be able to experience everything things that you didn't have
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a chance to experience here i mean formal education obviously went to school here and then through the family you learned all the traditions you know of even ramadan and all the you know all the family celebrations whereas yes in alaska you have got like twenty one hours of daylight you were free to roam around and do things that you wanted to do you. feel more american here and that more air in the us. i think that's just. the nature being half of one thing half of the others yes or no outside of things.
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since i was born we've tried to fly back each year to help my grandma with the salmon run i just remember being so excited to go to every software as an adult i forget how much i miss it until i'm there the only way to get to the village is on a ninety day or plane flying forty five minutes out from anchorage which is the nearest city. i mean good family. the community that my grandmother lives in is actually two villages one is called early on and one is called the hill and the hill in is at the mouth of the river that feeds into lake. lake is part of this broader water system that produces forty six percent of the world's sockeye salmon. salmon return to the
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place that they're hatched so they're hatched they go out into the ocean and stay there for a few years and then fight their way back to lay their own eggs. we probably should come to the back door can we just walk through oh yes because i want to see. my gramma around about a breakfast here for at least twenty years pretty much the same as you remember and your member when your kids planted all those trees they got so big you can see the lake hardly disappear so scared of this of like run. yeah isn't this the room where we found the interns and. yes. miss america here down here the memories here are so wonderful. it's going to stay here in this place was so formative for me even though i only came here during the
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summers this is where i sort of envision a lot of my childhood. you've got to explore it you've got to make mistakes you get independence. i come back here in the summer right this is a summer home for me. but when this is a home home for people there's just such a fundamental attachment to the land. for many including my family fishing and hunting is vital to survival here. i think it's hard for people to envision places that do do this out of necessity so it's not just a cultural thing or a traditional thing people need to do this because finding out. groceries their supplies is so expensive. people need salmon and other wild foods to have enough protein for the year. while there are people out. so in
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smokehouse let's go in. and i help with anything any cutting and getting ready. i don't want you to get i don't think you have another. as a kid i really love the heart of the salmon on the heart comes out it's often still beating so i would take the higher end run around to nearby fishermen and show them the persistence of the it's incredible the current is going against the bears are trying to get fishermen prox nuts and then you find. it on the fish table it's wriggling you kill it and his heart is still beating. so how has processing change versus when you're growing up or before you even have freezers. in the lake city where we just saw the first
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before. the put them in like a customer yes we. only ever used of us luke you're going to require the same thing i know but. where to put it is going to . tell you. there's a service companionship around the fish table. men aren't typically around because they commercial fish serve work other seasonal jobs in the summer it's mainly women who it's the i really love. talking or gossiping joking making fun of each other. you know i've never done it because. it's just really fun you feel really supported . you know you do it i think we say doing this because there are so many things that you do to the fish you.
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know how to. cook and as a kid i would help empty the gut bucket and hang fish up to dry and canned salmon but now i work at the fish table. even when the weather's bad and your hands are freezing and your back is tired there's nothing more satisfying than doing fish. it's been really cool going to all the different fish tables. and everyone's quite particular and maybe of all snooty about the way they do it's because i think everyone thinks they do their fish the right way. when you have a camera full of water and these heavy chairs it really move and then they start
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they don't see the custard crooked. that they did big ups or even fishline if you leave it on here it won't see them. remember that remember you used to do this i remember your mom always taking pancho we travel with cans back home yeah just because it's. there is no matter where you come from. i mean it's just a different life for me four six eight ten twelve fourteen sixteen eighteen ok. time to care and just the knowledge you need to have takes a lifetime to acquire so when you're talking to an elder it's just like opening up an encyclopedia but to call it really good so don't get caught or what are these are these are just are small prints not i use birch to smoke. kind of early in the
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spring and let it so don't be so strong or might have been rough on me want to hear how do you start it so that smoking and not a fire i still haven't learned this arts i was teaching you how to play. which was rough for the movement you know. you just feel like such a so they so good. i would die very short about. us me answer. this is ball flies see the eggs to me got a knife to take yeah. so i just smash them yeah and smash i think just a couple more hours. of the songs of official the other day and they kept the fins on because they said that the weight of the top official of the eskimos
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and the indians do things differently. and chorus sandy and think we know better but. it's just. the way things are. these two villages are sort of at the interface of two different tribes one is a people in the other. you know. where police then are you know. what percentage of new him is native i gotta say at least nineteen i guess is maybe nine hundred yeah but at least there's just you know maybe ten people here that might not be and what is the population of. about one hundred eighty and right now. we're just kind of having some problems with jobs but we have
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a lot of our people here in new healing working and they're working peple right now . is this proposed copper gold and molybdenum mine that would if approved to be located less than twenty miles away from million. it's really valuable they could generate between three hundred and five hundred billion u.s. dollars over its lifetime and provide jobs for the community. but it could also pose serious threats to the ecosystem. if it's pollutants got into the surrounding area they could possibly ruin the salmon run in a way of life that has been around for millennia. to try if we have a contract with pavel they're doing the studies here this summer it's providing jobs for people at short term. and next week might end in august so it's just like everybody wants to work because this is the only place to make the money right now when they're not here it's pretty bleak they want them to be
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around want right now the tribe is twelve fish is important to our culture fish it's important for us to you know provide for our family but we still have to work what other way are we going to survive you know we can't pick up our families and move to h.r. or wherever the jobs are and we don't want to. give up people. and support sufficiently. so you think coming up for fifteen years of a fifteen idea keep coming up. it's so beautiful work around it's so many places to go and different style of fish and every place. we've got a lot that. already. there.
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will be the last one so funny how fishing can be so important to so many people but the way that it's important and so radically different. there might be people who come up here every single summer for twenty five years not really you know a local name. of the place a huge part of their life. your story i guess thanks very green to talk to me oh you're welcome how long have you been in the sports fishing and hunting industry new young i started in the mid eighty's and i've been doing that pretty much every sentence for years that was the best kept secret there was only a handful of lodges in the area while the word finally got out couldn't be kept secret lodges have gotten so exclusive with the flying. very
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personalized high end foods and everything a fishing trip that a premier a lodge an a syria today the nine thousand dollars for a week might have been you know of three or four thousand dollars in the mid eighty's they want the big money people and they get it what's the relationship between. lodges and the local community you know i think historically there was a lot of animosity between locals and that are struggling to make ends meet and then these high and rich lodge owners that come in for four months make a bunch of money. but it's gotten a lot better over the years to try to hire more locals and involve the community more and i've seen it what is the argument that lodge owner will give for not hiring locals because it seems like that would be cheaper than flying an entire stuff than to stop the bloodshed every season i don't know if i'm know it
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absolutely makes nothing but i mean they could they can go catch fish for themselves and hunt never thing but it's a whole different thing being a guide for paying us local natives they were raised to survive to be a sports fishing somebody that you've brought in you know what they're doing every minute of the day they're not out drinking or getting in trouble the local person that works here might crashes and break his ankle and can't come to work tomorrow somebody is thing at the lodge isn't going to do that. so since abuse is quite foreign to me having grown up in qatar where drinking is not part of the culture. but it is a familiar story having gone back to alaska year after year and has definitely
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affected my family here. i think it's one of those things that can be quite baffling if you don't look at the bigger picture. when there's no job to look forward to is you know. we haven't really heard so much about that drugs but we've heard you know they're here everybody that i know that's work and they have a reason to get up a you know it's making them feel better they're doing something and not just staying home watching t.v. or you know not doing anything that's also the scary thing is having no law enforcement to see here yes what do you do if you need it to i mean well we have would call we have an eight hundred number and he does respond he comes in from myself so many hours away and that's like the next flight the next morning. but we had to respond to a couple homes and we don't go by ourselves. of
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work for the social service department. that's called the indian child welfare act . some helping our tribal enroll members that are. having trouble with substance abuse something i don't have a cheaper or so they call us for everything that happens like of somebody who's junk and i'm driving they call us a somebody who's. feiten they call us i mean it doesn't happen that often but when it does you know where they call us first. and majority of the time it's just my sister and i that run off to the hospice what is it like working on
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this issue which can be a sensitive and sort of a small community it's very hard time related to everybody here it's like one of the worst jobs in the village because they blame you first because you're the first one to respond. doesn't necessarily need to be at numbers but how. widespread is. the issue in terms of substance abuse in this community. for alcohol abuse that's pretty i like when i was younger i every time i came back oh you know it's time to have a shot of a shot i've been to over for about six years now and that's a whole different world for me. just that people are sent out of their communities for treatment like that must also be difficult right like i said this is a very small community that's come a makes them feel ashamed of themselves that
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they had to leave that mandy. thank you. insult career around two million dogs are eaten every year but now animal rights groups want the ancient tradition they cannot the main one used to rest a good career dog or on al-jazeera. a career reporting to the world ruin it here one journalist documents life beyond the headlines. that certain stories can change us in the easiest least when you know you need. to change anyone a unique journey into what it means to be human the things we keep a witness documentary on al-jazeera.
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newsstand the differences. and the similarities of cultures across the world. al-jazeera. at sixteen cush who is living her dream of being a journalist but her father has his own dream for her to follow tradition and be married as her investigations bring her face to face with the ill fated some of india's young women her father's search for suitable husband continues can both their dreams come true almost one overcome the other. deadline part of the viewfinder asia series on al-jazeera. the latest news as it breaks the saudi's narrative contradicts the information that turkish officials have been giving for the past two weeks with detailed coverage this whole fluff area of mud
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with shops and houses and it was completely washed away along with the people who were inside from around the world the government doesn't call this a detention center but it's surrounded by barbed. wire fences and its exits are manned by armed guards. and i'm down in jordan doha with the top stories on al-jazeera turkey's president says he's convinced that the all of the killed jamal khashoggi came from the highest levels of the saudi government a turkish investigator has told al-jazeera the saudi journalist body was dismembered and dissolved in acid after he was killed a month ago on october second and fishes more from istanbul we always knew the turkish government knew more than they were making public know senior figures are
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telling is that they think that this so-called hit team the fifteen people who arrived from saudi arabia just hours before democracy appointment had done this before which explains the professional nature of the operation that they could kill someone so quickly and essentially dispose of his remains so that even four weeks on turkish investigators still phoned no trace of jamal khashoggi body the u.s. is reimposing sanctions on iran that were lifted in the twenty fifteen nuclear deal the measures will begin on monday the u.k. russia france china germany and the european union have all condemned the move eight countries will be allowed exemptions from sanctions should they do business with tehran last may protests in pakistan have been called off after a deal between the government and conservative muslim groups that began on a wednesday when the supreme court overturned the death sentence of
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a christian woman accused of insulting islam. says it was behind the attack that killed seven coptic christians in egypt gunman fired at two buses on their way to them on a street near the city of minya two hundred sixty kilometers south of cairo six of the dead were from the same family resident abdel fattah el-sisi is promising to punish those responsible sri lanka's minister told al jazeera democracy in the country is under threat runnel wickramasinghe is refusing to quit after being fired last week by the president he's been replaced with mahindra rajapaksa a two time president who's accused of power grab. russia and china are being blamed for blocking international efforts to create the world's largest marine reserve in antarctica and the countries of the antarctic commission to conserve marine life wrapped up the two week meeting in hobart scientists think they will see is home to thousands of undiscovered species. those are the headlines the news continues here
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on al-jazeera after al-jazeera correspondent stage of the water buffalo. so very going to end then which is the liam and helen and dalton i like to call it was started by a few of the residents here and now powers three villages around. it also provide some of the only steady jobs in the area. during the winter in alaska it can be so cold that not having heating can be really dangerous having some form of electricity is really important and going to make it up that's when quite a few years just been up here yeah that's the thing just work keeps getting in the way that darn work i go you want making a living. it really sucks. tell you get the paycheck a lot of people look at a hydroelectric plant and think all that's super cool you're getting free
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electricity going over the falls how nice they don't see how hard of work it is sometimes to keep it going. they don't see the two o'clock in the morning when the turban trots down earth one goes down they both go down and to keep from burning diesel fuel we saddle up and head up there and figure it out. how much do still of this plant save every year. if we were on full being full power we'd be burning about a quarter of a million gallons a year so from two hundred fifty thousand to three thousand to four thousand gallons and here. amazing how many people those who like to call up employ one two three four or a little. small but mighty. so this is the intake. all the water comes through here how big is the tube i want to say it's like four feet people came up here biologists to make sure that wasn't harming any of the
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bottom like the fish of course i think there should be a lot more of these in the world because we have a lot of water and instead of using whatever nuclear power and diesel and coal and all that stuff which is you know very polluting as you know it would be nice to use stuff like this. i'm pretty proud. i like my job like that it's hydro it's our earth friendly. most natives we take care of the earth take care where we're from take care of the fish in the water. being able to do that and help my people. i'm very proud to be able to work here. there's a lot of people here that were born and raised here and don't want to leave you know i've lived in hawaii i lived in the states i've lived in anchorage. why would you want to live anywhere else.
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now. there are parts about native culture that i don't really know about yet but i also don't think that's an uncommon thing and i'm trying to learn more of the summer and here's my sewing room this is my happy place in the wintertime my mom did lead a hand sewing this is what she used to do. is this what is the calfskin this is the part that would be the hardest because she used to use are some nail and her teeth. how do you harden the other like this is so you don't
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can them so much that they get soft. they're pretty who are discussed bugs most women around here i feel like it's not just like a big thing or done a nothing or it's yeah i think all of the people pretty much everyone in alaska wears and so i've always wanted to coast parker doesn't know if. all. everyone that want to cuss book even half arabs your mom's from here you can wear to and if you have a sweater like a loose weight or you can bring it to me and i can make one really yeah. or the prick got some fabric ok. where to go up i was actually born and raised
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a question river my mom used to save salted eggs for fishing because our ice in the winter when i. did dog started barking we had it my dad had a dog. it was like to clock in the morning no i was so scared my teeth dirty chattering my mom just has to bear down the beach was eating my mom's arm self to the eggs my dad god is ready for and he killed her bear and then when i was twelve we moved over here. the cuffs will be kind of loose he didn't mind tad. here it. chipped in pretty pink they're. so beautiful. thank you. erica. and so cited here
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and i should have to stand before you leave the front not burn unit you know. my gramma grew up with her native language until she was about six but then she lost it and there aren't many native speakers left here the village is now fighting to get back its language and dance but there's still a lot of pain i think when it comes to what was lost. when you hear someone speaking a language that's dying it just feels so beautiful because it's so rare.
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true names and he's made your name i asked. and yes they'll speak you pick. you still speak you pick yes you do you speak at work. my grandkids see i born with it and i never forget my language. and when i went to school i did no one in the assured. they knew she need to worry and then what happened were. every time you may need you in my native language they teach you you say stand me right by her
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just to speak my own language. it was not because we are language is only english here we did leave a note in your how we usually. i get tired of standing beside a teacher in a corner one day just saying and i'm not going to try to ever use my navy for language again and i never did i even i could standing by teaching more. and some kids take it by a yardstick just to you sure are native language yes you're laughing but it seems. laughing but it seems quite sad. i never see
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your kind need to spank i didn't see that when i was growing up father through he said it was. devils who are cool and no no no good for church russian orthodox. before they started. when would they do it or when gay got or. you know like like car no no just like that if you don't know watch tape. we're going to watch tape that i'm over the whole year with teams doing a very lucrative. to people pay a little bit to have what people are. coming in. are you know are you
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in there yes i mean very. well yes. people are not here anymore do. you see sheen now dears hardly you know people and gay have been. was.
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one. of washing lot of young people stay or come back even if it is difficult because this is their home and there's just a different priority here. that. the past year been for the last one and. you know much is one thing. said that she you know i got my job when i start walking ten months. later remember freeplay think of there on your way out already i think i remember one summer time. there were a couple school this. last year before.
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resigning. because those proved. too stressful. just couldn't do more. than any until i fall. for them i don't know. i mean my jobs permanently is just only for the rest. of it all find. full time job here thank you i don't know. as. i don't really like to city. but i know too many people. and only smiles we. are. trying got pregnant with her and have her.
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like limited to what i can do. and. like goes out to harm eats and provides for. whole family. gets would so howard to feel if this person is gone. probably sad because its owner grew up and my. and aren't just. home. birth harmed. by the bomb.
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factories. kids here are encouraged to go away to college but their families also hope that they come back home. and if you go to college there's a chance that your classroom will be larger than your entire village that you grew up in which can be really difficult and overwhelming. the system is working out public. helicopter. so after you graduate oh you're ok you think you are after you graduate. i fired to go to college and all right now i want to be wildlife biologist if you want to try something new why don't you go to a boarding school like a disco or in a city like being in a city i kind of like well ok go ahead. i don't like being in
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a city i don't know it's just too busy for me and i'm always like well in the quiet . you can't really do this. you know i do have a sense of belonging in terms of people. but i'm sort of an v.s.o. people who feel like they're and and i believe without question belong to
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a place someone told me that you moved away. yeah we went to alabama. i wasn't i didn't like it there's a big village yeah but how many. about seven hundred people. what did you miss most from here the wider the wider clear that's really pretty here where you're working right now now i think there's a new job so our only for. and i'm my guests. it's everybody got a job back there think of the long tired because some of my family members work there i don't want to go up against them as soon that mine up but that god my. son what it did. altis care to tap at.
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our cellar to sleep. and rather have no trouble then kill our guests. i'm going to pomona tomorrow. i'm nervous. and just want to make sure i ask the community's questions directly to the mind. and just hope we all have a clear understanding of. what might be in store for us. good or bad.
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i think we're going to go over on this side right now. but that's what i was going to be today but i will hit up a good series a bit of a late up a look at our set up after pretty much every and every critic around at the last. thirty beautiful talent as a stage i suspect one of the arguments to last because i have stated i think if i was how would such a fast. three hundred sixty five million acre. be able to support itself economically so the challenge for alaska how do we get to have an economy.
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that's a state that's balanced with that with the environment around. here what type of style over a. truck along on the top of the other hill or oh you're out here well it's got to bahrain a lot of people are going through. the pebble. can you talk about what's under under our feet yep under our feet there's a world. discovery of copper gold a lived in the silver rhenium and palladium many other states now have access to rail or power roads we've got none of that here now yet the product from where you acquire it to to the place where you can transport it to market is a big deal talking about portage around yeah so one bridge crossing over upper tawara that that extends down to the north shore of the lake will have a ferry terminal it will be able to load the concentrated minerals onto icebreaking ferry transport across the lake so be along to i will have one crossing there but
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yeah it will go kind of a round told. because time because the spawning area yeah there's that it just happens to have more potential sockeye productivity than the other two drainage is also for us is how do we get sufficient energy brought in so that we can run our facilities in our case we're looking at about one hundred eighty mile natural gas pipeline that will then provide the power for a power plant here can generate electricity to support all of our our infrastructure out here it's a great challenge to ask people to. look around them and identify the minerals that they use so i to use the prop of the i phone fifty two different minerals that i follow at the culprits are.
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the frustrating part of the tour it is like where all the fault. you know there's a real problem. in the mines and. the mine is. a symptom of some problem with the way we approach the land the way that we consume things. like topic. it's a lot about. being an economic necessity but i also think this erna can hide the first lady living off the land it's a necessity of here. we have fundamental issues with a relationship to the planet have there been lots of instances that i've seen where indigenous communities just have a better model. just because they might be a smaller number of people it doesn't make it a less valid way of life. i do really care about this place and my family some here
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about the end of the day i am also another person that comes here during the summer and leaves so you like to take the. not really sure what i can. see there the eggs are kind of loose so when we start cooking and we just pool is stuff off. i make my grandma happy when i come back i help her with fish so that makes me feel like i belong in that way. you. are so silly they're not. all right. really but if you look good for her. will she pick the covers oh i go oh my gosh that's beautiful i don't know i feel
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like i'm going to cry. it's so pretty you know wall will look at it. and i'm biased but this is the produce cost but given. that it was yours. and i shared a. love of. gratitude like you so much. well you. you can there we can trade for our brick here and you said you had fabric over to the safe called the soup which is like a traditional market and they have a bunch of. different fabrics and stuff so yeah yeah you can pick out fabric from me we have a fun project to do back and. i feel like if you give yourself permission to care about
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a place you also need to give yourself permission to belong to a place and i have a hard time doing that. but i also know what it's like to be repeatedly drawn to somewhere to love a community and a people and to want to honor their way of life. and maybe i can draw others into this place too on. a journey of personal discovery about how the soviet rule has shaped the present day georgia if you people who shoot your past you will never have a future in government buildings and then more new ones they seem to inspire you doors always them in your own people they are small algis there is time i love our show let me it's a examines the cultural influences of the soviet union al-jazeera correspondent the soviet scar travel often. by tranquil forty's and purple
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forests near broad level. talks of only. by icons landmarks valleys and scotland's. live for adventure. discovery shops because far away places close to. going it's just to get his cattle i always. hello there we've got lots of wet weather over parts of north america at the moment
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the satellite picture is showing that area of cloud that's making its way across the eastern part ahead of it it was dragging in some quite warm weather but behind it it's a lot fresher so a maximum in new york of seventeen degrees there which is sixty three in fahrenheit and for washington d.c. we should get to around fifty which is fifty nine in faran high as that system plays out the way another one is forming behind it and that will gradually works its way eastwards as we head into sunday snow on the northern edge as it hits that cold air but plenty of rain for the south all the way down through texas and as that one works its way away from us another one is making its way in from the pacific so for us there in seattle do expect some more rain as we head further south we can also see some of that weather over north america is affecting us in mexico to his stretching down that area of cloud so turning cooler for say mexico city a maximum temperature just of around eighteen or nineteen degrees over the next few days everywhere to the south of that area of what weather well there's some shine but there's also some showers and do expect some of those showers to be rather
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heavy even as we head through sunday as we head down towards south america while it's paragon of the northern parts of argentina on the southern parts of brazil where we have the heaviest of the rain for saturday. you need to understand the very different. al-jazeera. hello i'm daryn jordan this is the al-jazeera news hour live from doha coming up in the next sixty minutes president insists that the orders to kill the germs. came from the highest levels of the saudi government and demands the public monsters be
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revealed. ramping up the pressure on iran the u.s. re imposes sanctions on tehran targeting its oil and financial sector. protests called off a deal is reached and demonstrations against a christian woman accused of blasphemy. you think. we have the numbers here. remaining defiant sri lanka's ousted prime minister says he's not going anywhere. now it's been one month since saudi journalist walked into his country's consulate in istanbul never to be seen again his death remains a mystery but turkey has revealed more details about what it believes happened investigators say he was strangled as soon as he entered the building and his body dismembered a turkish senior official has told al-jazeera that the corpse was then dissolved in
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acid and that the saudi hit squad that killed has carried out similar operations before the turkish president is convinced the order to kill him came from the highest levels of the saudi government but he does not believe that king solomon ordered the hit fisher has more from istanbul. president the one takes a stride and some would say aggressive tone in this opinion piece he's written for the washington post he says that saudi arabia has three key questions to answer first of all where is the body of jamal khashoggi secondly who is the so-called local cool operator who helped the saudis dispose of the body and thirdly who ordered the hit as he calls it on jamal khashoggi he says he's sure that king solomon was not involved in the operation but he said the decision was taken at the highest level of saudi circles that would identify only a handful of people including crown prince mohammed bin soundman president everyone
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says what happened in the consulate behind me was a clear breach of the vienna conventions which dictates how countries behave in diplomatic posts and he talks about the eighteen people who are currently being held in connection with the killing of jamal khashoggi in saudi arabia he asks why the consul general is not one of these people here was a man he says who stood in the consulate and lied through his teeth about what happened to the washington post writer he also talks about the offer by saudi arabia for turkish investigators to go there to interview these people he calls it a desperate and deliberate stalling tactic he says the what happened to jamal khashoggi was not just an attack on a journalist but essentially attack on a nation he says that other nato countries would not stand by and let this happen and says there must be a response to this and he also says that while many countries would like this to go away this diplomatic breach this diplomatic incident suddenly to be healed this was
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a problem that was not going to simply go away or turkey's putting the pressure on saudi arabia to explain what exactly happened. the kingdom's crown prince mohammed bin soundman has met evangelical christians in the u.s. as he tries to brush off accusations that he was involved in the killing of bar reports from istanbul. the saudi crown prince in riyadh welcoming evangelical christians from the united states a rare gathering in the muslim world most conservative country the kingdom's keen to repair its international reputation damaged by the killing of. the saudi journalist disappeared a month ago in istanbul after two weeks of denials saudi leaders eventually admitted the journalist was accidently killed then we pete earley changed their account of what we really happened saudi allies are worried about further
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repercussions of the international outcry and for the first time israel has commented on the killing voicing its concerned about possible destabilisation of the kingdom and the region what happened. and will consulate was horrendous and should be doing. yet at the same time i say. it's very important for the stability. of the region and of all that saudi arabia remain stable and i think that a way must be found to achieve both. hotshot jews murder has solved relations between turkey and saudi arabia. frustrated over what they describe as evasive saudi attitudes the turks are keeping up the diplomatic pressure on the kingdom. that's a memorial service in washington d.c.
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her decision is her succes fiance is grappling with her loss even though a month has passed since jamal's murder his body has still not been given to his loved ones and his funeral prayer has still not taken place this is the smallest thing that one can do after a loved one has passed in the religion of islam and we still haven't been able to do that and our pain is still as fresh as the first day turkish investigators have brushed aside a saudi offer to fly to riyadh for more concerted ations they blame the saudis for stalling the investigation and turning it into a coverup they are also demanding the extradition of eighteen saudi suspects to stand trial in istanbul it's been a month to the day since jamal has just disappeared and every day since then turkish investigators have been trying to piece together what happened to him they say now they know what not where his remains are and saudi officials continue to
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deny allegations the royal family is involved. it's double or david kay is the un special rapporteur on the right of freedom of opinion and expression he's reiterated the call for an independent investigation into what happened. i don't myself have the power to initiate any kind of investigation but the secretary general has that power the un security council has the power the human rights council has that power and my case and colleagues in the un system have been calling exactly for that an independent international investigation into the circumstances of jamal khashoggi his death turkey although it has all of the tools available to conduct an investigation has politics involved here too and so it's very difficult for for me to see how there can be an independent incredible investigation that comes from this other than one that's authorized by an
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international body like the un ending the war in yemen ending the embargo of cutter i mean those are absolutely important things that must happen but those things must not happen by sacrificing the idea of accountability for this terrible crime that's left a journalist dead murdered in a consulate of saudi arabia. these murders highlighting the dangers facing journalists around the world the committee to protect journalists says forty three reporters have been killed whilst doing their jobs this year united nations has dedicated november second as a day to end impunity for crimes against journalists from london is to help anti corruption journalists definitely count on. killed when a bomb exploded under her car in multan one year ago. palestinian photographer shot by israeli forces during a mass demonstration along the gaza border in april. and at least eight journalists
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murdered in mexico so far this year their profession now categorized as high risk in that country and getting riskier almost everywhere else this year seventy five journalists at least have been killed roughly two a week and yet nobody gets punished for these crimes so what we want are buying international norms in the form of a united nations convention to would tress the question of impunity because impunity doesn't just affect the journalists or their families it affects the whole of society because the implication is that if you can get away with killing a journalist more people are likely to attack and kill journalists and in that way more journalists end up self censoring in certain societies where they're under threat in one thousand nine hundred seventy eight told a day not unlike this one bulger in dissident and journalist yogi markov was murdered on london's waterloo bridge allegedly by
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a member of his country's secret service the weapon of choice a poison tipped umbrella. attacks on journalists are nothing new they've been going on bryza long as the powerful about something to hide from the people but the silencing of free speech is no less shocking for that whether by bombs by bullet or other insidious means. the two thousand and eighteen version of the umbrella murder on waterloo bridge the alleged strangulation and dismemberment of exiled saudi journalist jamal khashoggi inside the country's consulate in istanbul the middle east is at the louis rank of the. reporters without borders index for freedom of press it is the woods please to be a journalist we know of cases where journalists are. just one in many in syria in palestine in egypt across the region in the gulf this is a pattern that has gone on for far too long what chance of justice for her and the
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great many others the u.n. notes that in nine out of ten cases the killers go unpunished jonah how al jazeera london. the trump administration says it will reimpose sanctions on iran that were lifted as part of the twenty fifth a nuclear deal the u.k. russia france china germany and the e.u. have all condemned the move to go in as the latest from washington d.c. . it's probably fair to say u.s. foreign policy has never been announced like this but this is an actual tweet from the u.s. president meant to look like a movie poster warning that sanctions are coming and the president later addressed that on the south lawn sanctions are starting on iran. you know rand is to get a very big get his top aides including treasury secretary steve minutia and talking tough as well at a conference call with reporters the treasury department will have more than seven
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hundred names to our list of blocked answer to this includes hundreds of targets previously granted sanction for leave under the j. c.p.o. i as well as more than three hundred new jack nations this is substantially more than we ever have previously done but they are giving waivers to eight countries allowing them to continue. with the promise they will reduce that amount over time the u.s. is breaking the international deal and the rest of the signatories say they want to stay in it proponents of the nuclear deal say this move will isolate the u.s. russia was abiding by it the chinese were abiding by it the europeans were abiding by it and most importantly the iranians were abiding by it's now the united states that is in breach of that agreement and is now actually going so far as to punish countries that are abiding by a u.n. security council resolution you really can't get more pariah than the european
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union created what they hope will be a work around to still do business in iran u.s. officials are brushing off its potential but are warning allies they could face a actions as well right now talking tough while the world waits to see if it will be more than words petty calling al-jazeera washington. well hussein askari is from george washington university he says the u.s. can impose sanctions but it cannot stop iran's nuclear ambitions. what america has done and really is the united states is the only country that gets away with this type of action it uses second resign actions in this way that it tells a company that if you do business in iraq that you can't do business in the united states it is find some banks for instance a fine b.n.p. party but i think ten billion dollars. and said if you want to do business in the united states you have to pass that before you do this so as you can imagine most companies and most entities are rather reluctant to sacrifice the u.s.
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market for iran the united states once has twelve demands what exactly saudi arabia did and is saying you've got to do these things and there are three on at the top of them this one is to say iran has to end its support for terrorism but iran is has not supported terrorism for many many years that is off the table it says iran has to end its missile program well iran is not going to stop that iran faces israel with nuclear war that the united states is surrounded iran on all sides and you want iran to just say ok we're not going to do anything with that is not going to happen and then the third thing that's very important is they want iran to stop its operations in syria and the iranian view on that is very simple syria was the only country that supported iran during the iran iraq war when the united states
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and the europeans gave out both chemical weapons to iraq to use some iranians and so iran has two thousand new choice but to say for sources come on the news hour including donald trump that there's a bill u. turn on his threats the military would shoot migrants trying to reach the u.s. illegally. like. rubbing against alloca how young people in thailand are using music to push a police. message and sport another joke which gets this twenty first win in a row and reaches the sunday finals of the paris masters who behave the sport a little bit later in the program. the u.s. and turkey are lifting sanctions on each other's countries after the release of an american pasta last month and drew bronze and was jailed in turkey and accused of being involved in the failed military coup in twenty sixteen since return to the us
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so i'm concerned as more from ankara for there are actually two good news for turkey today one of them is lifting the sanctions over imposed over a turkish ministers along with the u.s. ministers both sides by later lifted those sanctions plus turkey received a waiver on u.s. sanctions that are targeting iran which means that turkey is exempted from these sanctions as turkish petroleum is trading it with iran in terms of oil these are very good news and this was welcomed by the investors mostly and turkish lira which has been suffering for the last three months is now performing its strongest level against the u.s. dollar gaining one point seven percent at least it today of course these are not the only topics that that we can count as a positive development between washington and ancora we have been seeing that these two countries have been exchanging information over germany murder case in
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a very firmly diplomatic way plus we see that turkey and u.s. has has come to an agreement over. and it's the northeast and syria and turkey and u.s. have begun their joint patrols so this week is actually a gain for ankara in terms of bettering the relations with the united states and its program already by. he is a professor of international relations at the high university joins us via skype from washington d.c. all right so turkey and the u.s. have lifted sanctions against each other's government officials but does this signal a real full intentions what is turkey using the killing to open broader issues with washington. well it is it is not a real opening of turkish american relations i mean those those sanctions were symbolic that really didn't mean anything they were mostly designed to send
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a message to the turks a guiding castle gunson but let me remind you that there are three different consular officials from the state department consular officials who object to citizens who are in jail in turkey and those have not been good least and this is a actually he continues to be a major irritant injection american nations and we should not underestimate how angry people on the hill on their own in congress and the state department are for the tension of these people fall more than a year now and then there's also the fact that in syria the turks are firing on syrian kurds who are. allies of the united states in the fight against the islamic state and the syrian kurds have basically said today that they will stop fighting the islamic state in order to the group and to defend themselves against the turks so here is that was a deal on the on mum beach and the turks and americans have been talking for a long time and the americans are not very happy with where to do nothing they want
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to do it but they went along not to hold do to increase tensions with the turks so take a listen ship is actually very very tense when it's not one of the last station and i would say as i said there are tensions of assyria but they're all still some big outstanding issues between both nato allies i mean turkey wants the u.s. to extradite the tuna doonan the man the turkish president says masterminded the twenty sixteen coup but that's not likely to happen that is it. no it's not likely to happen because the turks have not provided sufficient evidence to be to prove that mr goulden was involved in the cool there's nothing d.s. government can do when he comes since tradition on my turkey. prison time cannot order. addition of somebody unless the coach find him guilty but the checks have not provided evidence to satisfy america and the american
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judicial system may also you mind you there's also the issue of the turkish decision to buy for the russian missiles that will jeopardize the f. thirty five top of mind american fighter jets buying and the congress has also promised simple sections and events that the turks go ahead with that purchase and intercept the other me the purchases going on that will go in twenty one thousand will happen just a final thought from you what about this troublesome issue of regional turkey saudi arabia rivalry i mean turkey has saudi arabia on the defensive at the moment but that's not likely to last because it. but that's a good question i mean the united states wants a construct here fair to be dissolved but this is bad as you pointed out that if a larger saudi turkish dates for regional leadership i mean the saudis where we're kind of the king of the region the turks and challenging ramps and in many ways
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a question again. are they going to do it's actually trying to sharon's but the americans the prefer the saudis of the tracks on this issue but they're caught in between because you have to do do something about the murder but on the other hand they do not want to see the stabilize and did not want to text attempt the upper hand on this issue because if you also look at turkish rhetoric on the united states it's actually pretty vehement and pretty anti-american that's a moment so the turkish president and all the churches she has to present being attacking the united states and our jews in united states all going to a single cool well organized you know tax on the turkish there so this is not to. relationship to any is on the men's only poppy thank you very much for talking to al-jazeera thank you protests in pakistan against the release of
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a christian woman had been called off after three days of violence the government's reached an agreement with conservative muslim groups on wednesday the supreme court overturned the death sentence of the woman accused of insulting islam come all high reports. have. happened. but it is danced in jordan who throws. for three days the protests over the yard their baby gate shut down parts of everybody thirty fifty would head man of out of the whole city is filled with fear and no one is coming out to the situation of unrest mostly road to quiet not much transport is a violent. i see b.b. is a pakistani christian woman condemned to did eight years ago after an argument with their muslim neighbors led them to accuse her of insulting islam this new priem court overturned the conviction this week saying there wasn't enough evidence but
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reaction in some quarters was you. so what he wanted. we did not accept the supreme court's one sided verdict at least so we request the supreme court reviews its judge part of its constitution largent bench to hear this case again we're focused on here prime minister emraan khan insisting he were not allow what he calls religious hardliners to cripple the country damaged property and fight with police this goldman has taken a stand and i hope it's just sort of lives that the stand and he takes on and then takes effective measures to deal with these miscreants and restore his laws because people of pakistan who are peace loving they are really fed up with these people who abuse allision for their own small neural net maybe a sense now it seems the prime minister has succeeded that decision by the ultra conservative group that he can lead. to call off
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a street protest followed new for d.d. being struck with the government. but it's too soon to judge where did that signal is long term reform of pakistan's blasphemy laws or just a short lived compromise to restore order amal i did al jazeera islam. yes president donald trump has backtracked from suggestions that the military sent to the border with mexico would shoot migrants if they throw rocks at troops he made the comments on thursday referring to a central american migrants were trying to enter the country without documents but now he's back tof from that threat. what they did to the mexican military is a disgrace they end up with rocks very seriously injured and they were throwing rocks in their face they do that with us they're going to be arrested there's going to be a problem i didn't say whew i didn't say here but they do that when. they're going to be arrested for
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a long time for immigration on the economy on major issues in the midterm elections which are four days away it's seen as a referendum of trump's presidency and spending the last weekend before the poll campaigning for republican candidates in six states americans will be voting for members of the house of representatives some senators and governors republicans county control both houses of congress. this election will decide whether we build on the extraordinary prosperity that we've only nobody can believe what's happened or whether we let the radical democrats take control of congress and take a giant wrecking ball to our economy and to our future. america now has the best economy and the history of our country and we want to keep it that way. mike hanna joins us live now from washington d.c. mike so we've seen former u.s. president barack obama on the campaign trail for the democrats what impact is he
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having like. well he certainly the democrats heavyweight he's been sent out there to galvanize the crowds at a number of rallies the other democrat heavyweight that's been sent out his former vice president joe biden also very popular at these campaign rallies former president obama has been careful in his speeches not to mention president trump by name however he continually implies that this is a referendum about the trump presidency while he may not mention the name he makes very clear who he's talking about and the basic thrust of president obama's speeches as being that the nature of the country has changed and the nature of the country has changed because of the president of the past two years oh america was at a crossroads. the health care of millions is on the belt. making sure working families get
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a fair shake it's on the shelf. but maybe most of all the character of our country is on the about the look in the casing weeks of this election and we're seeing repeated attempts to divide us. with rhetoric. designed to make us angry and make us fearful some might just walk us through what's really at stake here with these midterm elections. well what's at stake is control of congress control of the house of representatives and control of the senate the republicans of being in control of both parties right through the trauma presidency but democrats are certain that they can get a majority in the house of representatives at least they need to flip twenty three seats in order to achieve that they need to flip two seats in the senate to get control of the senate but this would be deeply significant in terms of the president trumps the last two years and presidency he'd have to act in
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a very different way with congress at no longer supports him blindly as a republican congress has done to the state the key issue here is the number of voters who define themselves as independents they've measured some one third of the electorate and it's these voters who the democrats are hoping will come to the polls this time galvanized by their anger at the trump presidency democrats are confident the polls indicate they will get the house of representatives but we've seen what opinion polls have done back in two thousand and sixteen all right mike thank you tom for a break here al-jazeera when we come back from crisis to opportunity suggestions of the huge influx of that is when refugees into colombia may have a silver lining and no water for eight million people find out why one of the world's biggest cities is turning up the taps on a sportsman biles wins gold again snagging her thirteenth will title and one else in her sport for that status.
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by the skyline i mean the range in harbor or off the coast of the italian riviera. hello there there remains of our typhoon a still with us over the southeastern parts of china just the remains now though just this area of cloud here they certainly brought some heavy rain though particularly over parts of taiwan it is all disbanding though and over the next few days it will continue to dry up so just a little bit of what weather there during the day on saturday and by sunday it should be fine and settled shanghai not to warm up at twenty one degrees at the moment it is warmer in hong kong will be up at around twenty seven even further towards the south and the showers have been fairly subdued over the philippines recently but they all set to return so i expect more of them as we head through the day on saturday but it's sunday that's looking like the wet today and particularly
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across the central belt it is looking fairly soggy more wet weather as well further towards the west so for some of us in southern parts of thailand all the way down through so much of it's looking pretty soggy at times as we head across toward india and pakistan in the north we've seen a fair amount of cloud that's working its way across us so do expect quite a bit of snow there during the day on saturday for the south it's only in the fossil impulse of india and sri lanka we've got more in the way of trout and a few more showers as we head into sunday and they will see more of those just push a bit further north looks like mumbai will catch one or two as well. there with sponsored by the time these. stories of life and inspiration. oh well i will a series of short documentaries from around the world that celebrate the human spirit against felix. golden globe
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the world there. around you serious and acts express yourself. hate violence revenge an increasingly alienated generation is finding new outlets to vent it sang. in a new series al-jazeera takes an unflinching new at the allure of radicalized organizations to young people revealing their inner workings and the often brutal consequences for those drawn into their extreme ideologies radicalized youth coming soon on al-jazeera.
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welcome back a quick amount of the top stories here on al-jazeera tough as president says he is convinced that the older children. came from the highest levels of the saudi government turkish investigators told al-jazeera the saudi journalist body was dismembered and then dissolved the asset after he was killed on october the seventh . trumpet ministrations for imposing sanctions on iran that were lifted in the twenty fifth to nuclear deal the measures will begin on monday eight countries are received waivers to continue buying oil from tehran the u.k. russia france china germany and the e.u. have all condemned the moods. and protests in pakistan have been called off after a deal between the government and conservative muslim groups demonstrations began on wednesday when the supreme court overturned the death sentence of a christian woman accused of insulting islam. the saudi immorality coalition is known as new offensives in yemen it's begun an operation to retake the port city of
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her data which is under the control of who the rebels coalition sent in thousands of troops to the area this week and on friday it also attacked some international airport and an adjoining air base the u.s. and u.n. have called on both sides to stop the fighting and begin talks to end the war and the u.n. is again warning of a humanitarian crisis in yemen second to general antonio good ted has said a cease fire must be reached and that there is a glimmer of hope that a political solution is possible. the u.n. and our partners are already feeding eight million people in yemen without urgent action up to fourteen million people fully healthy the population could be out of its risk in the coming months to avert imminent catastrophe several steps gently required first the violence must stop everywhere. with an immediate halt around critical infrastructure and densely populated areas
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and i welcomed a strong constructive engagement from many member states in recent days joining their voices to the un's repeated appeals for the suspension of those the abilities and supporting my special envoys efforts thousands of palestinians have been injured during protests along the border with israel at least two hundred ten people have been killed since the weekend friday demonstrations began in march gazans are demanding the right to return to ancestral lands and the lifting of israel's toll the a blockade on the strip. sri lanka's ousted prime minister has told down to zero democracy in the country is under threat runa wickramasinghe is refusing to quit after being fired last week by the president he's been replaced with mahindra rajapaksa a two time president who's accused of a power grab when a smith reports in colombo. for the past week run away from a single has refused to leave the prime minister's official residence here in the capital it's become
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a symbol of legitimacy he tells me after being fired by the president in what critics are calling a constitutional two day the third. in the last presidential election parliament religion we came forward on the basis that parliament is supreme that the president must act according to the human the nineteen the amendment to the constitution was drafted on that basis now what has happened is the president is trying to override the power of the parliament present my for a policy to say in a swore in mahinda rajapakse as the new prime minister last friday rajapaksa was president for two terms and scrapped term limits and twenty fourteen to try and stay in power but then lost the election he called a year later rajapaksa says he's got enough support in parliament to confirm his position but m.p.'s compote because president syria's cena suspended parliament why the delay you think in recalling
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palm and what they have in the number where the number because of parliament initially thought you think. we have the numbers here it. with we hear a lot of talk about persuading m.p.'s to join rajapaksa side how might they be persuaded what are you what are you hearing about what's going on with our founding member and their ministry ships and sometimes money the speaker has warned of the risk of a bloodbath if this is allowed to continue do you share those views of the speaker that there can be an appeal because people are getting the two granted by the we voted for parliament democracy we why we asked for a different set up and all of sudden we find it even worth two thousand fourteen. defending a principle and the fact that the media of the world. in two thousand and fifteen to a poor democracy and if you lead them down their gloves to be i and we cram
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a single says it's that desire to uphold democracy that's brought him support from a wide a section of society than just his traditional support base when parliament is recalled prime minister wickramasinghe says he'll leave his official residence here at temple trees to go and vote until then he's staying put. al-jazeera colomba. venezuela's crumbling economy has forced millions of people to leave more than a million of them have gone to neighboring colombia the world bank says that influx comes with its downsides but it could be good for columbus economy. as more from the border city of. the world bank calls it an unprecedented exodus in latin america one more akin to a full blown refugee crisis then people searching for a better life it's one conclusion of a report by the international financial institution to assess the impact that the
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venezuelan exodus is having in neighboring colombia the speed and number of migrants escaping the country coupled with their vulnerable condition makes the venezuelan crisis one of the world's worst yet many believe it's not getting enough attention. people go crazy over the caribbean and central americans entering mexico trying to reach the u.s. five maybe six thousand migrants so many week every four days. for their french. a shelter and services for migrants in the border city of. hundreds of been. up for assistance bailey they receive mules for fifteen days and at thirty dollars bonus for three months. at the end of three months they're in the same desperate conditions as they were before hungry lacking a roof in need of medical attention jobs that we can't remove the world bank says the crisis this year alone has already cost colombia one point two billion dollars
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. the report praises columbia's open arms policy and its efforts to register the new arrivals to cope with the emergency yet few manage to find proper jobs. there she bellows been here for eight months with her husband and children they're selling on the streets. my husband and i are trying to get hired but it's difficult because we are immigrants far illegally but there's a silver lining in the report the world bank says that in the long term the arrival of so many young migrants could be beneficial for the colombian economy. act fast. and needs more young workers legalizing the new arrivals in creating jobs could reap benefits in coming years the government says it agrees with the suggestions that implementing them requires money they don't have it. is making
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a huge effort in the middle of major fiscal restrictions we need the international community to understand what's happening and lend a hand. international donors have promised one hundred thirty million dollars for colombia only turned two million has arrived so far with the crisis expected to continue in likely getting worse the entire continent this with the consequences alison the. eight million people living in mexico city are looking forward to having their water supply restored on saturday after a three day enforced drought supplies were turned off for maintenance work on one of the world's biggest pumping systems. as more. authorities say that as many as three million of mexico city's eight million residents have already been impacted by water cuts the city's water system director has urged residents who still have water to use it sparingly he said quote take extreme care of the water this means
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no washing clothes this means taking baths with small buckets and no washing dishes in the sink a lot of the public schools here in mexico city have also shut down for the duration of these water cuts giving families an opportunity to leave town some of the wealthier parts of the city have their own private cisterns but we're talking about upscale restaurants upscale hotels and at many of the shopping malls a lot of the the businesses in the city have shut down for the duration of these water cuts and it could be until november eighth that full service is restored but water shortages are not uncommon in mexico authorities have been preparing for this for several weeks now setting up large tankers in strategic parts of the city filling up cisterns with possible water in the event of an emergency but again though the water table underneath mexico city has been exploited for many many years so this is not a new problem for authorities in fact it's one of the reasons that many of the historic buildings in mexico city are sinking by an average of about twenty centimeters every year so this maintenance being done is very important it's believed that as much as forty percent of possible water is lost through leaks in
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these faulty pipes so this is a much anticipated maintenance project by the city of mexico city drug regulators in the u.s. of approve the pain killer that's ten times stronger than sentimental the powerful opioid responsible for thousands of drug overdoses it's happening as the country grapples with an opioid epidemic which health workers blame on the widespread availability of painkillers and in twenty seven teen drug overdoses were responsible for two hundred deaths every day in the u.s. a rise in the use of sentinel which is fifty times more powerful than heroin has been linked to the increase in deaths u.s. president donald trump has called it a public health emergency and has promised to fix the problem. young people in thailand are using music to send a political message several on to government movements determined to get noticed between now and february and that's when the country will hold its must delayed first election since the military coup four years ago has
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a story in the capital bangkok. it's hugely popular on you tube and the military government doesn't want anyone. but. the video condemning the nation's leadership made by a group called rap against dictatorship has had more than twenty million views in just two weeks. which has created some of the first big waves of political controversy in the run up to the much delayed elections scheduled for friday the. prime minister has said thais who watch share even like the video will share the responsibility of the damage it does to the country. one of the rappers in the video known as jacoby thinks that the government's reaction to the song is one of the reasons for its popularity. object maybe we don't have a fix go on what we want to see but we want the song to spread like
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a contagious disease and engage people into expressing their opinions for me this is considered as a success. he expects that he is and will continue to be watched by the government intelligence and security agencies. have younger people now will be voting for the first eligible. and this is a new voice. activated socialize through the media technology social media and so on so we're seeing them taking more action. to tempt walks about here was the leader of the protest movement that shut down bangkok and ultimately led to the coup four years ago now he's leading a more traditional political movement as things were. before the planned elections he has publicly denounced the rap video. another group of young artists hoping that their voices will be heard the song. a punk band called n r t but die
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for anarchy. they're worried that the police will shut down their concerts but insists that expressive criticism of the government is a basic right the band members don't reveal their names and cover their faces. we don't intend to incite people at all we are angry with the government we do satirical rants against what the government called return to happiness when compared to the rap as we all punk and when we could we could we express our hatred . the hope for the n.r.t. pad thai band members is that someday soon they can perform their music that carries their message freely without covering their faces got out of al-jazeera bangkok. time for a little break here when we come back but i will a sports including the pain of too much for a ball boy in the chinese soup and a poor story in the sport of the bright morning.
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in the united states the religious right is on the we were always hunting for the guy who would take our script and read it their goal is to take control of one of the parks and they've effectively done that phone lines examines the trumpet ministration special relationship with the religious right what did he get out of it the presidency and what evangelical support means for the future of the country . on al-jazeera when the news breaks on the story it's the fight against isis is still continuing in the desert when people need to be helped. out and the story needs to be told by families in the us. status and wealth has benefited from their choice translated people al-jazeera has teams on the ground to bring you more award winning documentaries and live news on air and online.
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topical support his poll. thank you very much well some on balls is at its again she's already secured her spot as the best gymnast in the world but keeps rewriting history every time she competes later harding has more from the world championships in cats. it's impossible to coverage of nasa expand not talk about some own bias she spent more time at the top of the podium than any gymnast in history male or female the twenty one year old flippin superstar only has to beat herself to break more records she has thirteen world titles to her name. it's kind of insane
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once you think of it as like that number it's like wow she's ancient maybe he needs to stop this for about really i haven't been in the international field too long so that makes me feel better. on ball she opted for an easier routine at least for her after falling an all around the day before this time she hopped on her landing and still came out on top winning by of canada and mexico followed behind. on an even bars and events mon says is her worst she brought home silver. gold gym's mina darwell is the first gymnast out of form bio so far and brought home gold a first for her country bars was also the first time simone won a world met. an apparatus and now has a world medal in every event the first american to do so. i. feel really good because during that time back in the sport i have especially worked really hard on bars so i'm very thrilled and i'm thankful that i have learnt
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as a coach and to see as well after sweeping the board so far she still has two more shots at gold on saturday as she takes on the balance beam and floor routine the sport has simply never seen an athlete like her she keeps rewriting the judging skills leaving the other gymnast playing catch up. with a hearty al-jazeera. novak djokovic has served to the paris must the semifinals after coming back from a set down to beat croatia's mar in church on friday the service on a blistering run of famous he awaits his coronation i was world number one in the next few days is four six six two six three victory was his twenty first in the world. jock which takes over the top from the ball after the spaniards hold out of paris with an injury. history dominic team will be catch nobs opponent team how to come from a set down against defending champion jack sock in paris four six six four six four
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the final score saw his title defense come to an end at bessie. the stalls of w w e wrestling took to the ring in saudi arabia on friday despite outcry over the event going ahead in the wake of the jamal khashoggi killing well wrestling entertainment had been under pressure to council the event in riyadh but merely said they were monitoring the situation after to merge the journalist had been killed in the saudi embassy and istanbul. well vince mcmahon's company has come under fire from many fans calling for crown jewel to be counselled but there's a lot of money on the line this year and today a decade decade long tail to stage events with the saudis reportedly worth four hundred fifty million dollars some u.s. politicians have been critical but one of them is actually wrestling mayor of knox county tennessee glenn jacobs known to w w e funds as cain is part of the main
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event that w.w. has also gone into the deal knowing that it's women wrestlers are not allowed to perform in saudi arabia and the biggest star john cena isn't there he refused to work the show according to reports others wrestlers though saying they need the money. all right i didn't know we pulled out or i was able to get sued so most of us here still go public with almost the rest we're we're we're at the airport only you can do you can get a lot of publicity for us because i'm with all ga five kids right we're going to go make that dollar they want me in saudi i'm going to saudi get respect get married all right now have a safe trip to europe well earlier we spoke to adam clary the managing editor of entertainment wrestling website what culture dot com he said wrestlers pulling out to events like this was incredibly unusual. john xena's absence from the show is a huge deal but perhaps not so much for the show itself as it is behind the scenes
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like for the actual show don't we w.-e. of offset his loss with their huge star the kadian to take a shawn michaels later expecting whole coding to be on the show so him not being on the show itself is possibly not that damaging for them but behind the scenes i think it speaks to the huge level of controversy surrounding this wrestlers pulling out of these events is just simply not something the ever tends to happen so the fact that he's seemingly free to do this and daniel bryan as well without any real consequences i think is an acknowledgement from that they don't particularly want to force people to do this if they don't feel overly comfortable i think primarily the problem joey going to have is how far this this disenchantment with the show spreads whether or not you want to go for doing them in the future because once except president for one wrestler not going read about is johns you know or otherwise all of a sudden it becomes a problem to try and get other people there but i expect going forward if they decide to any more of the shows in saudi arabia that we'll see a lot more of this kind of thing go fund rising star nasa how to ok has made an
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impression that the l a p g a japan classic the japanese teenager hit one of the shots of the day with a super approach to the eighteenth green inches short of an eagle how to ok trail so young raju of south korea fired one shot thank you. alex rins topped the time sheets after friday practice ahead of the malaysia moto g.p. but not by much rins was fastest with a best time of woman at fifty nine seconds and rid of it zero so just nine tenths of a second back on the champ for her lorenzo slowest as he recovers from injury. is saying bolts quest to become a professional footballer has suffered a major setback after his trial with the australian club central coast mariners came to an end the eight time olympic champion joined the club in august for an indefinite training period i was hoping to win a contract but talks failed the jamaican scored two goals in a friendly last month but never played in
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a league game former arsenal eventis and denmark striken nicklas bendtner has been sentenced to fifty days in prison for breaking a taxi driver's jaw the thirty year old who now plays in norway admitted hitting the man in copenhagen in september he says he was acting in self-defense though and has appealed roman dread will play their first league or much since their five one humiliation against barcelona when they host via delayed on saturday since then they've sent their coach. a lot of attention has been on gareth bale who some real fans don't think is doing enough to replace christiane or naldo bale scored in last season's champions league final victory but has been off the boil since the summer . now most people who have followed a football team through thick and thin know the pain of relegation but perhaps they haven't quite felt it is keenly as this ball boy you're about to see in the chinese
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superleague forced to watch his his beloved greece use each tumbled to the second division at least the disconsolate lot have the players on hand to comfort him though proved all too much for the fans to this was only grew to second season in the top flight. and i will have more later on. thanks very much now russia and china are being blamed for blocking international efforts to create the world's largest marine reserve in antarctica but what they'll see is thought to be home to thousands of undiscovered species but the antarctic commission to conserve marine life couldn't agree on making it a no go zone for fishing mining and drilling under thomas reports from hobart. the proposal was to create another marine park in antarctica this time five times the size of germany an area of pristine ocean protected from fishing mining drilling almost all of human activity. the weather l.c. is an icy wilderness and one of the world's last marine protection would have kept
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it that way but in hobart delegations from twenty four different countries with an interest and i've talked to as well as the european union which led the pot proposal needed to reach consensus where exactly where the parks boundaries be would any fishing be allowed how reliable is the science supporting the need for complete protection how many decades with the protection lost for they couldn't agree after two weeks of talking behind closed doors the head of india's delegation revealed no consensus had been reached. and. standing is not. unfortunately standing is not that much in twenty six the same delegates in the same building were able to reach agreement to create another marine park and talk to. that one covering the road
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was supposed to create momentum for more but an attempt to create one in east antarctica last year failed the failure on friday to create one in the would delve of the sense of gloom for conservationists and of course extremely disappointed that this meeting was unable to reach consensus it's been a campaign that really engage people and people want to see and talk to get a ticket and to see it failing at this meeting is of course very disappointing delegates meet in hobart every year there will be more chances to create marine parks in future for every year that passes means what is ultimately protected will be a little less. in the end i'm told it was a disagreement about the quality of the science behind the need for a new marine protected areas that led to the lack of consensus with two countries china and russia refusing to sign up now in the past those thank you countries have come around to proposals that in previous years they'd opposed but only after those proposals have been signed off by the highest level of politics in those countries
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the president's the hope is that in time the same can happen with this proposal and the talks out of their australia all right well that's it for me for the news agency begins up next with more of the day's news thanks for watching but i. travel off to. my tranquil void space and forests a bright line rule. books of knowledge. i call landmark valleys and scotland's. list of adventure. discover it. because faraway places closer thing going still getting these cats are always. what adequate housing was adequate who decides.
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housing is not just about four walls and a roof it's about living in a place where you have peace security and most importantly dignity un special rapporteur. talks to al-jazeera. fresh perspectives. possibilities. finless journalism. debates and discussions how can you trust them a lot about how can work again with a man like she seems to be saying it affects all of us and we just don't know or care enough al-jazeera is award winning programs take you on a journey around the globe. only on al-jazeera. in many countries pregnancy and childbirth a still extremely dangerous for mothers and babies most of the mothers dying from the infection rate being they were dying from high blood pressure al-jazeera travels to my maoi and looks at how rural communities
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a challenging tradition in order to reduce child in the toilet and improve maternal health. care is too strong lifelines between life and death on al-jazeera. some of the like. turkeys president insists that the order to kill journalists from all the shoji came from the highest levels of the saudi government and demands that the puppet masters be revealed. hello i'm adrian from again this is al jazeera live from doha also coming up the
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u.s. re imposes sanctions on iran targeting its oil and financial sector. a deal is reached in pakistan to end protests over the release of a christian woman convicted of blasphemy. you think. we have the numbers here. and remaining defiant sri lanka's ousted prime minister insists he's not going anywhere. it's been a month since saudi journalist was killed at his country's consulate in istanbul turkey as president one is convinced that the orders given to the saudi team responsible came from the highest level of the kingdom's government but he does not believe that king solomon ordered the killing alan fischer reports from istanbul. president the one takes a stride and some would say aggressive tone in this opinion piece he's written for
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the washington post he says that saudi arabia has three key questions to answer first of all where is the body of jamal khashoggi secondly who is the so-called local cool operator who helped the saudis dispose of the body and thirdly who ordered the hit as he calls it on jamal khashoggi he says he's sure that king solomon was not involved in the operation but he said the decision was taken at the highest level of saudi circles that would identify only a handful of people including crown prince mohammed bin soundman president says what happened in the consulate behind me was a clear breach of the vienna convention dictates how countries behave in diplomatic posts and he talks about the people who are currently being held in connection with the killing of jamal khashoggi in saudi arabia he asks why the consul general is not one of these people here was a man he says who stood in the consulate and lied through his teeth about what
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happened to the washington post writer he also talks about the offer by saudi arabia for turkish investigators to go there to interview these people he calls it a desperate and deliberate stalling tactic he says the what happened to jamal khashoggi was not just an attack on a journalist but essentially attack on a nation he says that other nato countries would not stand by and let this happen and says there must be a response to this and he also says that while many countries would like this to go away this diplomatic breach this diplomatic incident suddenly to be healed this was a problem that was not going to simply go away. talking continues to pressure saudi arabia to explain was exactly happened to her show she the kingdom's crown prince mohammed bin solomon has met evangelical christians from the u.s. as he tries to brush off accusations of involvement in the killing of a serious national but are reports now from istanbul that the saudi crown prince in
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riyadh welcoming evangelical christians from the united states a rare gathering in the muslim world most conservative country the kingdom's keen to repair its international reputation damaged by the killing of. the saudi journalist disappeared a month ago in istanbul after two weeks of denials saudi leaders eventually admitted the journalist was accidently killed then we pete earley changed their account of what we really happened saudi allies are worried about further repercussions of the international outcry and for the first time israel has commented on the killing voicing its concerned about possible destabilization of the kingdom and the region what happened is the book consulate was horrendous and it should be. saying.
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it's very important for the stability. of the region and of that saudi arabia remain stable and i think that a way must be found to achieve both. hotshot jews murder has solved relations between turkey and saudi arabia. frustrated over what they describe as evasive saudi attitudes the turks are keeping up the diplomatic pressure on the kingdom. at a memorial service in washington d.c. . hostilities fiance is grappling with the loss even though a month has passed since jamal's murder his body has still not been given to his loved ones and his funeral prayer has still not taken place this is the smallest thing that one can do after a loved one has passed in the religion of islam and we still haven't been able to do that and our pain is still as fresh as the first day turkish investigators have
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brushed aside a saudi offer to fly to riyadh for more concerted ations they blame the saudis for stalling the investigation and turning it into a coverup they are also demanding the extradition of eighteen saudi suspects to stand trial in istanbul it's been a month to the day since jamal has just disappeared and every day since then turkish investigators have been trying to piece together what happened to him they say now they know but not where his remains are and saudi officials continue to deny allegations the royal family is involved as. he stumbled. the trumpet ministration is three impose sanctions on iran that were listed as part of the twenty eight fifteen nuclear deal the u.k. russia france china germany and the e.u. have all condemned the move pretty culhane reports now from washington. it's
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probably fair to say u.s. foreign policy has never been announced like this but this is an actual tweet from the u.s. president meant to look like a movie poster warning that sanctions are coming and the president later addressed that on the south lawn sanctions are starting on iran and. you know rand is to get a very big get his top aides including treasury secretary steve minutia and talking tough as well at a conference call with reporters the treasury department will have more than seven hundred names to our list of blocked answer days this includes hundreds of targets previously granted sanction for leave under the j c p o as well as more than three hundred new designation this is substantially more than we ever have previously done but they are giving waivers to eight countries allowing them to continue. with the promise they will reduce that amount over time the u.s.
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is breaking the international deal and the rest of the signatories say they want to stay in it proponents of the nuclear deal say this move will isolate the u.s. russia was abiding by it the chinese were abiding by it the europeans were abiding by it and most importantly the iranians were abiding by it's now the united states that is in breach of that agreement and is now actually going so far as to punish countries that are abiding by a u.n. security council resolution you really can't get more pariah than the european union created what they hope will be a work around to still do business in iran u.s. officials are brushing off its potential but are warning allies they could face a actions as well right now talking tough while the world waits to see if it will be more than words paddy calling al-jazeera washington. the u.s. and turkey are lifting sanctions on each other after the release of an american pastor last month hundred brunson was jailed in turkey and accused of being
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involved in the failed military coup in twenty sixteen simcoe see only reports from ankara. there are actually two good news for turkey today one of them is lifting the sanctions over imposed over turkish ministers along with the us ministers of both sides by later lifted those sanctions plus turkey received a waiver on u.s. sanctions that are targeting iran which means that turkey is exempted from these sanctions as turkish petroleum is trading it with iran in terms of oil these are very good news and this was welcomed by the investors mostly and turkish lira which has been suffering for the last three months is not performing its strongest level against the u.s. dollar gaining one point seven per cent at least it today of course these are not the only topics that that we can count as a positive development between washington and ancora we have been seeing that these
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two countries have been exchanging information over jamaal. case in a very firmly diplomatic way plus we see that turkey and u.s. has has come to an agreement over. northeastern syria and turkey and u.s. have begun their joint patrols so this week is actually again for ankara in terms of bettering the relations with the united states protests in pakistan against the release of a christian woman i've been called off after three days of violence the government has reached an agreement with conservative muslim groups or wednesday the supreme court overturned the death sentence of the woman is accused of insulting islam from all hider reports from islam about. but since i did stand state jordan schools closed. for three days the
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protests over the last year p.b.k. shut down parts of several pakistani cities. the whole city is filled with fear and no one is coming out to the situation of unrest mostly roads a quiet not much transport is a pilot i see b.b. is a pakistani christian woman. did eight years ago after an argument with the muslim neighbor led them to accuse her of insulting islam this new priem court overturned her conviction this week saying there wasn't enough evidence but reaction in some quarters was a few. somebody one of. we did not accept the supreme court's one sided verdict at least so we request the supreme court reviews its judge part constitutes a larger bench to hear this case again we're focused on here prime minister emraan khan insisting he would not allow what he calls religious hardliners to cripple the
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country damaged property and fight with police this goldman has taken a stand and i hope it's just sort of lives that the stand and they take song and then takes effective measures to deal with these miscreants and restores laws because people of pakistan who are peace loving they are really fed up with these people who abuse the illusion for their own small neural net maybe a sense now it seems the prime minister has exceeded their decision by the ultra conservative group that he can lead. to call off its street protests followed you know for d.d. being struck with the government. where did that signal form of focus on the meat at all or just. well get a weather update. donald trump is to making threats to shoot undocumented
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migrants at the border. and rapping against anneke how young people in thailand are using music to send a political message. hello there we've got lots of wet weather over parts of north america at the moment the satellite picture is showing that area of cloud that's making its way across the eastern part ahead of it it was dragging in some quite warm weather but behind it it's a lot fresher so a maximum in new york of seventeen degrees there which is sixty three in fahrenheit for washington d.c. we should get to around fifteen which is fifty nine in fahrenheit is that system clears out the way another one is forming behind it and that will gradually works
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its way eastwards as we head into sunday snow on the northern edge as it hits that cold air but plenty of rain for the south all the way down through texas and as that one works its way away from us another one is making its way in from the pacific so for us there in seattle do expect to see more rain as we head further south we can also see some of that weather over north america is affecting us in mexico two you can see his stretching down that area of cloud so turning cooler for say mexico city a maximum temperature just around eighteen or nineteen degrees over the next few days everywhere to the south of that area of what weather well the sunshine but there's also some showers and do expect some of those showers to be roll the heavy even as we head through sunday as we head down towards south america well it's paragraph of the northern parts of argentina on the southern parts of brazil where we have the heaviest of the rain for saturday. insult career around two million dogs are eaten every year but now animal rights
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groups want the ancient tradition taken off the menu want to an east investigates korean dog. food on al-jazeera. al-jazeera where every you. again this is al-jazeera the main news. president says that he's convinced that the order to kill jamal came from the highest levels of the saudi government turkish
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investigators told al jazeera that the saudi journalist body was dismembered and dissolved in acid off he was killed on october second. jump administration is re imposing sanctions on iran that would lift into the twenty fifty nuclear deal the measures will begin on monday the u.k. russia france china germany and the european union have condemned the move. and the u.s. and turkey lifting sanctions that the imposed on each other ties were strained over the american pastor andrew bronson who is accused of being involved in turkey's failed coup in twenty sixteen he was released last month. the coalition has launched new offensives in yemen it's begun an operation to retake the port city of her data which is under the control of who's the rebels the coalition sent him thousands of troops to the area this week but on friday it also attacked international airport another joining airbase the u.s. and the u.n.
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of call on both sides to stop the fighting and begin talks to end the war well the u.n. is again warning of a humanitarian crisis in yemen secretary general antonio said that a cease fire must be reached and that there's a glimmer of hope that a political solution is possible the u.n. and our partners are already feeding eight million people. without urgent action up to fourteen million people fully hold the population. in the coming months to avert catastrophe several steps. first the violence must stop everywhere. with an immediate all to round critical infrastructure and densely populated areas and they welcomed a strong constructive engagement from many member states in recent days joining their voices to the un's repeated appeals for the suspension of those theses and
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supporting my special envoys efforts u.s. president donald trump has backtracked from suggestions that the military sent to the border with mexico would shoot migrants if they throw rocks at offices he made the comments on thursday referring to central american migrants who are trying to enter the country without documents but now he's backed off from that threat what they did to the mexican military is a disgrace they had him with rocks were very seriously injured and they were throwing rocks in their face they do that with us they're going to be arrested they've got to be a problem i didn't say here i didn't say here but they do that with us they're going to be arrested for a long time. immigration and the economy are major issues in the midterm elections four days away now it's seen as a referendum on trump's presidency he's spending the last weekend before the poll campaigning for republican candidates in six states americans will be voting for
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members of the house of representatives some senators and governors republicans currently control both houses of congress on his ear as mike hanna reports now from washington. well president trump is not standing in the selection but he's certainly putting a lot of effort into it he's attended rally after rally his message fear of immigration in particular and labeling the caravan that's crossing across mexico as an invasion sending troops to the border and what his critics contend is merely an election tactic but along with that fear of immigration president trump is also stressed economy economy he claims that his presidency has turned around this election will decide whether we build on the extraordinary prosperity that we've unleashed nobody can believe what's happened or whether we let the radical democrats take control of congress and take a giant wrecking ball to our economy or to our future. americans
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now has the best economy in the history of our country and we want to keep it that way many observers contend it was under the previous president that the economy started to turn around and president obama's out a nice campaign rallies as well the democrats heavyweight to galvanize the masses to go to the polls to cost their votes with democrats in support of this well by former vice president joe biden but a parochial bomb has been very careful in his language during the campaign very seldom referring to president trump by name but making very clear the implication that under this president the very nature of the society has changed oh america was at a crossroads in. the health care of millions is on the bell. making sure working families get
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a fair shake it's all about. well maybe most of all the character of our country is on the ballot. in the closing weeks of this election and we have seen repeated attempts to divide us. with rhetoric. designed to make us angry and make us fearful the democrats need to flip the twenty three republican seats in the house of representatives to achieve a majority that they need to flip to republican seats in the senate to take control of that body for the first time president trump may be facing a congress that isn't entirely republican controlled certainly something he hasn't had to contend with in his first two years opinion polls indicate the democrats do stand a good chance of taking control of the house of representatives not that good a chance of getting control of the senate however opinion polls back in two thousand and sixteen told us that president trump couldn't possibly win i source
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says that it was behind an attack that killed seven coptic christians in egypt gunmen fired at two buses on their way to a monastery in the city of minya two hundred sixty kilometers south of cairo six of the dead were from the same family president of the father of sisi is promising to punish those responsible islands' launched several attacks on coptic christians in the last few years dozens of palestinians have been injured in protests along the border with israel at least two hundred ten people have been killed since the weekly friday demonstrations began in late march and just an instant demanding the right to return to ancestral lands of the lifting of israel's twelve year blockade on the strip of syria's harry forsett reports from the gaza israel border. well there was word on thursday here in gaza after the intervention of an egyptian delegation they met with the committee that runs these protests there was word that
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they were going to be scaled down in size and turn and if i just get out of the way i think we can see that that has pretty much come true this is a smaller in number protests than we've seen in recent weeks also as promised it seems there are no incendiary devices kites and balloons being lit and launched towards israel a very small number of tires being set on fire to try to provide screening and in response the israelis are using the prevailing winds which are coming from israel this friday and using a pretty large use of tear gas in terms of the proportion of people it is being used against so largely people are being kept back from the fence what's interesting are the politics which are underlying all of this this addiction delegation which is still in town and has visited the processed sites at a different site up slightly north of here along the border that's part of a wider scale effort both to try to reconcile the palestinian factions fatah which dominates the palestinian authority in the occupied west bank hamas which controls
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gaza trying to broker some kind of longer term truce between the israelis and hamas there is talk of israel facilitating potentially fifteen million dollars a month of funding for non fighting staff members or people who work for hamas here in the gaza strip they're already facilitating the qatari fuel which is drastically changed the electricity supply in the strip as well and so after weeks where we've seen things get very close to a major military escalation on a number of occasions there is a different atmosphere this weekend here in gaza and we're seeing it not least in the scale of this protest. trying because ousted prime minister told i was zero that democracy in the country is under threat from a singer is refusing to quit after being fired last week by president lots of power so the cena has been replaced with mahinda rajapakse a two time president who's accused of
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a power grab bernard smith reports from colombo for the past week run away from a single has refused to leave the prime minister's official residence here in the capital it's become a symbol of legitimacy he tells me after being fired by the president in what critics are calling a constitutional two day the third. in the last presidential election. we came forward on the basis that. is that the president must act according to the. the nineteen the amendment to the constitution was drafted on that basis now what has happened the president is trying to override the power of the parliament present my three policy is say in a swore in mahinda rajapakse as the new prime minister last friday rajapaksa was president for two terms and scrapped term limits and twenty fourteen to try and stay in power but then lost the election he called a year later rajapaksa says he's
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got enough support in parliament to confirm his position but m.p.'s compote because president serious cena suspended parliament why the delay you think in recalling pollen meant they haven't the numbers where the number. initially thought you think you have the numbers it. with we hear a lot of talk about persuading m.p.'s to join rajapaksa side how might they be persuaded what are you what are you hearing about what's going on with our founding member and their ministry sheeps and sometimes money the speaker has warned of the risk of a bloodbath if this is allowed to continue do you share those views of the speaker that there can be an appeal because people are getting the two granted by the we voted for parliament democracy we why we asked for a different set up and all of sudden we find even worse than two thousand forty and
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defending a principle and the fact that the made during the war. in two thousand and fifteen to a poor democracy and if you lead them down their gloves to be i and a singer says it's that desire to uphold democracy that's brought him support from a wide a section of society than just his traditional support base when parliament is recalled prime minister wickramasinghe says he'll leave his official residence here at temple trees to go and vote until then he's staying put. al-jazeera colomba. young people in thailand are using music to send a political message several anti-government movements are determined to get noticed between now and separate when the country will hold its much delayed first general election since the military coup four years ago. the reports from bangkok.
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it's hugely popular on you tube and the military government doesn't want anyone. but. the video condemning the nation's leadership made by a group called rap against dictatorship has had more than twenty million views in just two weeks. which has created some of the first big waves of political controversy in the run up to the much delayed elections scheduled for. prime minister has said thais who watch share even like the video will share the responsibility of the damage it does to the country. one of the rappers in the video known as jacoby thinks that the government's reaction to the song is one of the reasons for its popularity. object we don't have a fix what we want to see. to spread like a contagious disease and engage people into expressing their opinions for me this is considered as
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a success. he expects that he is and will continue to be watched by the government intelligence and security agencies. younger people now will be voting for the first eligible close to ten percent of the electorate and this is a new voice. activated socialize through the media technology. and so on so we're. taking. to tempt walks of on here was the leader of the protest movement that shut down bangkok and ultimately led to the coup four years ago now he's leading a more traditional political movement as things ramp up before the planned elections he has publicly denounced the rap video. another group of young artists hoping that their voices will be heard. a punk band called an artist but die for anarchy. they're worried that the police will shut down their concerts but
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insist that expressing criticism of the government is a basic right the band members don't reveal their names and cover their faces. we don't intend to incite people at all we are angry with the government we do satirical rants against what the government called return to happiness when compared to the rap as we all punk and when we could we could we express our hatred . the hope for the band members is that someday soon they can perform their music that carries their message freely without covering their faces. bangkok. it is kids everywhere the slope a dream fitting in here in doha the headlines and al-jazeera turkey's president says that he's convinced that the order to kill jamal has shown she came from the highest levels of the saudi government a turkish investigator has told that the saudi journalist body was dismembered and
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dissolved in acid he was killed a month ago on october second alan fischer reports from istanbul. we always knew the turkish government knew more than they were making public know senior figures are telling is that they think that the so-called hit team the fifteen people who arrived from saudi arabia just hours before jamal khashoggi appointment had done this before which explains the professional nature of the operation that they could kill someone so quickly and essentially dispose of his remains so that even four weeks on turkish investigators still phoned no trace of jamal khashoggi is body the u.s. and turkey lifting sanctions that they've imposed on each other thais were strained over the american pastor andrew bronson who was accused of being involved in turkey's failed coup in twenty sixteen he was released last month but the u.s. is really imposing sanctions on iran that were lifted in the twenty fifty nuclear deal the measures will begin on monday the u.k.
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russia france china germany and the european union have all condemned the move eight countries will be allowed exemptions from sanctions should they do business with terror on a bus from a protest in pakistan have been called off after a deal between the government and conservative muslim groups they began on wednesday when the supreme court overturned the death sentence of a christian woman who's accused of insulting islam. eisel says that it was behind an attack that killed seven coptic christians in egypt gunmen fired at two buses on their way to a monastery near the city of media two hundred sixty kilometers south of cairo six of the dead were from the same family president sisi is promising to punish those responsible and trying because ousted prime minister has told us a zero that democracy in the country is under threat rather wickramasinghe is refusing to quit after being fired last week by president by three power siddhis a now. those are the headlines on board use of you right after what i want to east
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next. on counting the cost the usa white still the largest on regulated gun market in the developed world who pays it brags it goes wrong plus the seychelles leads the way in eco finance with the world's first blue farm. counting the cost on al-jazeera. and. there. are. clearly dog shit on the menu for centuries with around two million dogs eaten every year or about letting a maid as long and it takes
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a woman ages. to the. pool c.f.c. a little. put strict government regulation and a growing animal rights movement are cracking down on the industry look at this look at that. but i'm. going to give ten. dollars they lead to down and with the younger generation seeing dogs more as pets then food demand is declined i love living or close to do all the good will and a lot of the from the films you've got. i'm steve cho on this episode of one easts we investigate the fight between those who love dogs and those who love to eat them. getting now. in
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downtown seoul it's a place where you train it's like going to pit dogs with poultry and it's like beating. it's the end of something and for some it's the best time to eat the traditional dish. meat soup. in korea it's called top. official about this who had a movie in the film that i mean this all formed by women but i can tell you that it has been well i think it's been that has been the pinout long run you know the young f.l. health who they did all thing you know. is purported to have a variety of health benefits. to london on the little milk tuna to. the bottom of the here today. so they get the whole you don't know me on
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monday you know what about a one on one visit and that's it cannot just kill don't kill it in my. one saying i'm over less. these dinah's are aware of careers reputation as a nation of dog peaches but a growing number of koreans are finding this notion to swallow. these days cindy to see it koreans say they don't eat dog. and growing numbers are engaging to rick battle against the meat industry. like activist. who's desperate to save dogs from slaughter. so when he hears about a struggling dog he steps into. somebody in.
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the. headlines on three new i'm going to kennel dog come on i was told no but i was about wes all. of you get all whole. body could make each other mushy think i wanted to gorge on the bumps on the on the general's office. at first the family won't let out a camera inside. i walked in and out a couple of times what i can tell you is that there is rats and maybe everywhere flies. and a lot of other good dogs. the family finally lets me in once i agree not to identify him. over the problem. it's easy to see this family's business is on the skids. the cheerleaders on the flight.
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here noted for the good you go shooting not you for. this place like many small farms can't afford to meet strict government regulations around racing dogs these farms are being forced to close. what it was the job of an illusion of a bigoted and then. good luck. so he's feeding the dogs which. i'm taking to see the cages there are about six metres long and it's actually running through three four five six seven rats him hey just. did dogs in cages with living ones. it's obvious this guy can no longer look after his dogs. but he's not prepared to give them up.
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you can't. really. know whether i get. the look on there's a. new wants to rescue a few dogs immediately but the family is wary and is holding out for at least some cash before he hands him a dog. is going to have to raise the funds and come back another day. well activists like gina and a growing number of koreans are trying to stamp out the dog meat industry the president of the meat. eating meat is a part of. the problem with.
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the follow government regulations. he says business is booming. we're told on. monday you're quite out of the book on that i. really couldn't. tell you. well some got my money's on them. leaving my money and then i thought it was. just shifting the. president kim jong so introduces me to pharma kim jong il who grants me rare access to his industrial scale dog ok so we have a look around. it's a far cry from the struggling famine just seen. i'm told this place complies
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with government regulations goes through two tons of chicken per week and has a feces processing plant with over half a million dollars. kim jong il explains that his several thousand meat dogs atos us the type of master and the not the same as pits. told to do with all the time a day. how do you believe yeah i'm talking. about them doing a. pretty good in the pilot. we did it. too on a ship but no matter how. often you know. as we walk across a wide river of dog poop i start to get an idea of the scale of the spot. maybe all of this is fairly new cages a dying yeah. but there's one thing i can't film and that's the dogs this is as
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close as i'm allowed it does that healthy and nice why can't we film them even ironically one of them so good to do stand out that it will get to a head on a new thing when the gun. will be. this is apparently a showcase for. but the korean parliament may soon vote on legislation that would make dog meat illegal so the farmers are understandably a bit touchy about how we'll patrol what's going on inside. thanks for showing me. some of it anyway. travelling to give. an area with so many farms and it's not just don't. meet activists who do manage to negotiate the release of dogs from farms bring them to places like that's.
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just like our dogs yeah. dogs. yeah. he lives so. they were all supposed to be drawn in paul. you know i personally cannot save all the dogs but i. do this because yes. canada and. some bone. and. me since dogs over seas because the most
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reluctant to adopt so cool. oh this is me. meaning that i need. their. yes. there are you do see on the other side of the. used. car ok nami is a former university professor who gave up a day job and dedicated her life to shutting down farms and rescuing dogs which if you think you. should. there was. a dog is a dog there is no such
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a ten minute dog packed up. i don't want to see that size of. anymore in this country that's why i am striving for. you know dogs they've never been elected. you love them while they love you back for a. while now many fights to save one dog at a time right now there's legislation before the national assembly that would declassify dogs as livestock. at the moment under the law dogs the treated the same as chickens pigs. but if the new norm is it could ban fams from breeding dogs for human consumption. but this group of activists isn't willing to wait that long. they're taking matters into their own hands by raiding dog slaughter houses in the dead of night.
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activists genius is joining them and i've been warned things could get violent. to . this dog slaughter house has taken over the corner of a public park the activists believe it flouts regulations by processing sick dogs in overcrowded crew conditions that he had to document the killing and reported to authorities. who it also says on all the snow on. the personal private home just elude me for something awful awful throughout all this because i'm looking for you to be implicated in. telling. you. just. go along the ball. the ball so you can tell the boss amid all. the.
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rubbish. not. long before you get the money to do something else we're not. getting any money but if you don't learn something that is life threatening. that's what you're going to get if you don't load. it up to get a good. goddamn was you know the other night it just got strangled and he still he still has no use to surround it will take place there. his eyes are not even close. and he's still really war. next door. tension rises as the activists discover an incredibly cruel some side this is where the recently killed dogs are being torched but their fur and budget is very. good at.
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what. you get to give. it a little. bit of that it was. good to get people to do that she was told that. was. the slaughter house manager so enraged she comes out to attack one of you have to. sleep. on the if you will. even for an experienced activist like tonight's scene was horrific.
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and then they're. all coming. to. us from. this kind of activism has been bad for business here at moore and market which was once the bustling hub of the dog meat industry. i'm here to try and talk to the last remaining dog butcher at the market but he's not too pleased to see me. eventually. grace to talk. even covers up the c.c.t.v. monitor of the cages before telling me that further legislation against the dog meat industry will ruin his life and the million people who work in it don't
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deserve to be singled out for the love of god close. to. tell you to look for the box. office for goodness or the jockey. recruiting would go to. mr sheen and his family have done well from the dog meat industry that's put his kids through uni and helped his family to live comfortably . if the ban does go through what would that mean for the working industry. money. and. i don't. i ask mr what he would do if the legislation passed couldn't he just find a different job. but
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how do you go to a. good. and little woman who. as you know well. i don't as you know. right. in korea everyone involved in this billion dollar industry is under pressure. and a couple of hours out of seoul one father has succumbed willingly handing over his dogs to the humane society to national. government regulation is making business tough for small scale farmers it's also the change in eating habits that helps him to broker. so what's the reason for the downturn in the dog farming industry. which i'm with
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holes and push him out war to. tell him that interaction return is a very long way to go on probably because who are on our economy when you're gone. the farmer is now trying to survive by growing chilies and hips but his financial burden has been eased by the humane society. r.j. want to give me that one yet. yeah today was dogs being vaccinated and prepared for adoption of a sees how. this is number. yet. many many ways it is. yes alone was the work. not all koreans are happy about foreigners interfering in their dog meat debate but the fama is happy to have the help of. realizing you heard from.
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some here when there was a video or john doe quoted. back in seoul the end of the book now dog eating fist pope is being mocked by candlelight vigil also eat it with concerned citizens have gathered to demand an end to the dog meat industry all. the politician pushing the bill to outlaw dog thumbing is here please send all he tells the crowd that modern korea should move on from its dog eating days huddling to the foreground i'm. really not in the rahm. emanuel who know. a little something the woman who will not want to open
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a new way to do what you want to be doing and it will. not be a move on the. easier it will be a little nudge to get you to give up your. also here are members of the meat dog association they've turned up to keep on proceedings. for several moments one of them to put out when they're going to go we all. hope you don't give it to the border without a photo of it you would think you'd want a trunk saw. a truck. we're familiar with the. it's
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an emotional issue and it's the n.t. dog farming legislation moves through parliament it looks like half the population will be devastated if it fails. the industry will be disappointed if it's passed. in their. backyard not make him shelter mina is getting ready for a new life in los angeles and then i had to think. really like you to understand it's quite natural. that. i'm nice clooney yet. we. see there's if. it's taken
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a month of vaccinations rehabilitation and planning to get me never got a fan there. that that this is the ticket for you to get the job yes. on. this one. one. they really get this. after all you know they need to make up for it. so i mean no waits for the plane and her ticket to freedom. three weeks later in los angeles lena has been booked to adoption. this is a bit like speed dating for dogs and potential onus on the competition is tough.
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mean is getting lots of pets but not potential matches. until melanie and scope arrive i would. be separate but not realistic to think of a lake they should up the dog holly as a us rescue and they seem to be getting along so they're going to take it to the next stage because there was. a neighborhood. of a building with well the love affair that actually in the beautiful is true that. it looks good through no fingers crossed she's found the fruit of a beautiful. in twenty twenty tokyo will host the paralympic games when the nation has
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a troubled history caring for people with disabilities when used examines japan's disability shame on al-jazeera. on november sixth the united states will vote for president donald trump gain or lose ground will be live at the white house and pier on capitol hill as the results come in join us for special coverage of the u.s. but terrible actions on al jazeera. eighty percent of the visually impaired could be cured without access to treatment. and where there is a will there is a way of training state of the art hospital covering over seventy seven countries how many of these patients we see today every role and in pakistan one learns passion provides flea treatment for over one million patients a year to cure a revisiting which is iraq.
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we understand the differences. and the similarities of cultures across the world so no matter how you take it al-jazeera will bring you the news and current affairs that matter to you al-jazeera. a career reporting to the world oh i did hear one journalist documents life beyond the headlines. but certain stories can change us in the easiest coolies used to it well you know you need. to change anyone a unique journey into what it means to be human the things we keep a witness documentary on al-jazeera. the most memorable moment of al-jazeera was when i was on air as. with the crowds in tahrir square toolkit.
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if something happens anywhere in the world al jazeera is in place we're able to cover muse like no other news organization. were able to do it properly. and that is our strength. president insists that the order to kill the journalists came from the highest levels of the saudi government and demands that the puppet masters be revealed. this is al jazeera live from doha also coming up the us re imposes sanctions on
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iran targeting its oil and financial sectors. a deal is reached in pakistan to end protests over the release of a christian woman who was convicted of blasphemy. and no water for eight million people find one of the world's why one of the world's largest cities is turning off the taps. it's a month since the saudi journalist was killed at his country's consulate in istanbul turkey as president. believes that the saudi assassination team was given orders from the highest level of the kingdom's government but he doesn't believe that king solomon ordered the killing for more on this let's go live now to istanbul and zeros in a honda is outside the saudi consulate in the city president making these comments
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in an editorial he's written for the washington post saying what did he say. well they're keeping up the pressure and the message is turkey is not going to let this go this is not going to go away and of course writing in the washington post the same newspaper that the contribution to this is a message really the audience is the the americans the international community because there's a lot of frustration here in turkey that the u.s. administration is not putting enough pressure on saudi arabia to cooperate or to go on saying that he believes the order to kill she was given at the highest levels of government like you mentioned but he doesn't say who he believes carried out this order or who made this order but he mentions who he doesn't believe it was involved and that is king salmen turkey really has been very very careful not to damage the relationship with saudi arabia a relationship was which was cordial even before this crisis began so he's treading
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carefully and at the same time showing that they have no faith in the saudi justice system or this investigation because he even mocks the fact that the saudi consul general a was not questioned the man in charge of that diplomatic mission the man who was inside that mission when. she was killed that the turkish president also asking the same question that has been asked for the past months where is the body . or should we say the body parts after is the chief prosecutor said that they believe his body was cut into pieces after he was strangled to death so turkey really keeping up the pressure showing that it feels that saudi arabia is not cooperating or the gun pointing to the visit of the saudi top prosecutor to istanbul earlier this week saying you know this is just another stalling tactic so this is turkey telling the world that they're not going to let this go this problem is not going to go away but the world needs to do much more so many thanks i was it
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was a holiday in istanbul as i was saying turkey continues to precious audio. to explain what exactly happened to a shock when the kingdom's crown prince mohammed bin solomon has met with evangelical christians from the u.s. as he tries to brush off accusations of involvement in the killing. reports now from istanbul the saudi crown prince in riyadh welcoming evangelical christians from the united states a rare gathering in the muslim world most conservative country the kingdom's keen to repair its international reputation damaged by the killing of. the saudi journalist disappeared a month ago in istanbul after two weeks of denials saudi leaders eventually admitted the journalist was accidently killed then we pete earley changed their account of what we really happened saudi allies are worried about further
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repercussions of the international outcry and for the first time israel has commented on the killing voicing its concerned about possible destabilization of the kingdom and the region what happened. is the book consulate was horrendous and should be. saying. it's very important for the stability. of the region and of new that saudi arabia remain stable and i think that a way must be found to achieve but. just murder has solved relations between turkey and saudi arabia frustrated over what they describe as evasive saudi attitudes the turks are keeping the diplomatic pressure on the kingdom. that's a memorial service in washington d.c.
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her disease end is hostilities fiance is grappling with the loss even though a month has passed since jamal's murder his body has still not been given to his loved ones and his funeral prayer has still not taken place this is the smallest thing that one can do after a loved one has passed in the religion of islam and we still haven't been able to do that and our pain is still as fresh as the first day the turkish investigators have brushed aside a saudi offer to fly to riyadh for more concerted ations they blame the saudis for stalling the investigation and turning it into a cover up they are also demanding the extradition of eighteen saudi suspects to stand trial in istanbul it's been a month to the day since jamal has just disappeared and every day since then turkish investigators have been trying to piece together what happened to him they
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say now they know but not where his remains are and saudi officials continue to deny allegations the royal family is involved. it's them both in the course of justice from around the world have grown louder with every detail that emerges but saudi arabia is refusing to extradite the suspects diplomatic editor james spader's looks now at the international options for an investigation. will there be justice for jamal khashoggi the turkish prosecutor wants saudi arabia to reveal the whereabouts of the body and hand over the eighteen suspects but the saudi foreign minister has made it clear there will be no extraditions from his country but so are there other legal options experts believe the u.n. could set up an international panel but the secretary general antonio could terrorists who would appoint its members and maria fernanda espinosa the president of the general assembly one of the un bodies that could mandate it
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a well aware this is a political minefield we will wait to see whether we get a formal request from a government such as the government of turkey but if we get something like that we'll evaluate it and then and then. make a decision based on the requests that we receive they think we are going to send a process sill this is now a matter that sees in the hands of requests that we will receive the request could come from the body she heads the general assembly is she taking soundings of the wider membership of the general assembly or the conversations that she is having about this. cap ex we for her and the counterparts beyond a u.n. inquiry there are a number of other legal options and precedence former chad dictator his send our brain was eventually jailed for war crimes after first being prosecuted in belgium under what's known as universal jurisdiction the concept is controversial and the belgian law has since been repealed but international lawyers say as saudi arabia
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is a signatory to the un convention against torture it might face calls from other countries for extradition laws passed by congress in the us also might be relevant the magnitsky act passed in twenty twelve after the murder of a russian lawyer working for the american businessman bill browder could be used against saudi arabia there's also the possibility of private prosecute. stephen rapp who served as president obama's ambassador at large for war crimes issues says the saudi crown prince mohammed bin soma should watch his stand as early becomes to america and tries to go to the valley or anywhere or to enjoy the company of investors or others he'll find process servers. around the meeting so i don't he's not going to be able to do what he has done before so let me ask that question again will there be justice for jamal khashoggi it's not certain and there's
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a long road ahead but along that road saudi arabia and key figures in the country face fresh scrutiny bad publicity and reputational damage as well as the possibility of a prosecution. at the united nations the saudi emirates a coalition has launched a new offensive send yemen it's begun an operation to retake the port city of her data which is under the control of who think rebels the coalition sent thousands of troops to the area this week and on friday it attacked international airport and an adjoining air base the u.s. and u.n. of called on both sides to stop the fighting and to begin talks to end the war well the u.n. is again warning of a humanitarian crisis in yemen secretary general antonio gates has said that a cease fire must be reached and that there's a glimmer of hope that a political solution is possible the u.n. and our partners are already feeding eight million people in yemen without urgent
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action up to fourteen million people fully whole the population could be out of it three scheme the coming months to avert imminent catastrophe several steps urgently required and first the violence must stop everywhere. with an immediate halt of rounds kristie coming from a structure and densely populated areas. and they welcomed a strong constructive engagement from many member states in recent days joining their voices to the un z.p.g. the bills for the suspension of most of the beauties and supporting my special envoys efforts in pakistan protest against the release of a christian woman have been called off after three days of violence the government has reached an agreement with conservative muslim groups on wednesday the supreme court overturned the death sentence of the woman who is accused of insulting islam kemal hyder reports from islamabad. road block
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but said their distance data stored in schools closed. for three days the protests over the austerity b.k. shut down parts of several pakistani cities what is that map of the whole city is filled with fear no one is coming out to do the situation of unrest mostly roads a quiet not much transport is a violent i said bibi is a pakistani christian woman. did it is a goal after an argument. led them to accuse her of insulting islam this group reem court overturned her conviction this week saying there wasn't enough evidence but reaction in some quarters would you. somebody would want to. we do not accept the supreme court's one sided verdict at least so we request the supreme court reviews its judge what constitutes
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a large and then to hear this case again we're focused on here prime minister emraan khan insists day he would an order law what he calls religious hardliners to cripple the country damage property and fight with bully there's goldman has taken a stand and i hope it's. survives that the stand and he takes on and then to takes effective measures to deal with these miscreants and restores laws or because people of pakistan who are peace loving they are really fed up with these people who abuse the lesion for their own small me nearly fifty cents now it seems the prime minister has exceeded that decision by the ultra conservative group that he can lead. to call off a street protest followed new order for d.d. being struck with the government. the judge rated that signal is long term reform of focus on blasphemy lords or just
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a short lived compromise to restore order to all our good old. islam a bar a weather update next year and i was zero then donald trump appears to before you turn on his threat to shoot undocumented migrants of the border. from crisis to office you can see the huge influx of venezuelan refugees into colombia may have a silver lining. from flowing on in winds to an enchanting dance that brings the wrong. more rain is developing across parts of the middle east at the moment in fact on the satellite picture you can already see the cloud we're seeing some pockets of bright white cloud there just by the red sea and that's an indication that the rain is already fairly heavy is pushing his way northwards though and as we had three sons today and particularly saturday night we'll see that system really begin to
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put itself together so by the time we get to sunday them we'll see that rain push its way through parts of iraq and into syria as well heavy downpours out of this and look at the direction of the wind is coming from the south so picking up a lot of dust as well so it will be a fairly hazy day for many of us too some of that time will be affecting us a bit further south as well so if we look at the chart across the arabian peninsula we can see lots of cloud there across parts of saudi and across parts of kuwait as well but it will slip its way further south as we had three saturday night and into sunday so they could just be the odd shower but for the south as well the main area of rain though is to the north for say muscat should be dry for us it's a temperature of a pleasant twenty eight degrees which is eighteen in fahrenheit for the southern parts of africa there's been lots of wet weather recently but it is now easing or just see a few showers there around the coast of mozambique and maybe a few. around parts of madagascar elsewhere it looks mostly dry in cape town but thirty five. the weather sponsored by cats peace.
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adequate house. adequate who decides. housing is not just about four walls and a roof it's about living in a place where you have peace security and most importantly dignity un special rapporteur. talks to al-jazeera. hello again this is al-jazeera the main news this out case president says that he's
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convinced that the order to kill jamal khashoggi came from the highest levels of the saudi government a turkish investigator told out zero that the saudi journalist body was dismembered and dissolved in acid he was killed on october second. evangelical christians from the u.s. have made a rare visit to saudi arabia they've met with crown prince mohammed bin solomon and government ministers the kingdom is trying to repair its international reputation following jamal. protests in pakistan have been called off after a deal between the government and conservative muslim groups demonstrations began on wednesday when the supreme court overturned the death sentence of a christian woman accused of insulting islam. u.s. president donald trump has backtracked from his earlier threat that troops would shoot like grunts at the mexican border if they threw rocks he made the comments on thursday referring to people from central america and central america rather attempting to reach the u.s.
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without documents but now he's backed off from that threat. what they did to the mexican military is that this great they hit him with rocks very seriously injured and they were throwing rocks in their face they do that with us they're going to be arrested there's got to be a problem i didn't take you i didn't say here but they do that with us they're going to be arrested for a long time. immigration and the economy a major issues in the midterm elections in the u.s. now only four days away it's seen as a referendum on trump's presidency americans will be voting to elect members of the house of representatives some senses and governments republicans currently control both houses of congress under serious mike hanna reports from washington. well president trump is not standing in the selection but he's certainly putting a lot of effort into it he's attended rally after rally his message fear of
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immigration in particular i labeling the caravan that's crossing across mexico as an invasion sending troops to the border and what his critics contend is merely an election tactic but along with that fear of immigration president trump is also stressed economy economy he claims that his presidency has turned around this election will decide whether we build on the extraordinary prosperity that we've unleashed nobody can believe what's happened or whether we let the radical democrats take control of congress and take a giant wrecking ball to our economy or to our future. americans now has the best economy in the history of our country and we want to keep it that way many observers contend it was under the previous president that the economy started to turn around and president obama's out a nice campaign rallies as well the democrats heavyweight to galvanize the masses
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to go to the polls to cost their votes with democrats in support of this well by former vice president joe biden but a parochial bomb has been very careful in his language during the campaign very seldom referring to president trump by name but making very clear the implication that under this president the very nature of the society has changed america was at a crossroads. the health care of millions is on the bell. making sure working families get a fair shake it's all about. but maybe most of all the character of our country is on the bow of the our the old in the closing weeks of this election we have seen repeated attempts to divide us. with rhetoric.
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designed to make us angry and make us fearful the democrats need to flip the twenty three republican seats in the house of representatives to achieve a majority that they need to flip to republican seats in the senate to take control of that body for the first time president trump may be facing a congress that isn't entirely republican controlled certainly something he hasn't had to contend with in his first two years opinion polls indicate the democrats do stand a good chance of taking control of the house of representatives not that good a chance of getting control of the senate however opinion polls back in two thousand and sixteen told us that president trump couldn't possibly win the u.s. is to reimpose sanctions on iran that will lift to dispose of the twenty fifteen nuclear deal restrictions on the shipping energy and finance sectors will come into force on monday the other parties to the nuclear deal have condemned the move spread eagle hain reports from washington. it's probably fair to say u.s.
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foreign policy has never been announced like this but this is an actual tweet from the u.s. president meant to look like a movie poster warning that sanctions are coming and the president later addressed that and the south lawn sanctions are starting on iran and you know randi thank you the very beginning his top aides including treasury secretary steve talking tough as well on a conference call with reporters the treasury department will have more than seven hundred names to our list of blocked answer days this includes hundreds of targets previously granted sanction for leave under the j.c. p.r.i. as well as more than three hundred new debt nations this is substantially more than we ever have previously done but they are giving waivers to eight countries allowing them to continue. with the promise they will reduce that amount over time the u.s. is breaking the international deal and the rest of the city. the tories say they
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want to stay in it proponents of the nuclear deal say this move will isolate the u.s. russia was abiding by it the chinese were abiding by it the europeans were abiding by it and most importantly the iranians were abiding by it's now the united states that is in breach of that agreement and is now actually going so far as to hunnish countries that are abiding by a u.n. security council resolution you really can't get more pariah than the european union created what they hope will be a work around to still do business in iran u.s. officials are brushing off its potential but are warning allies they could face a actions as well right now talking tough while the world waits to see if it will be more than words petty calling al-jazeera washington. crumbling economy has forced millions of people to leave with a million of them going to neighboring colombia the world bank says that the influx comes with sides but could be good for colombia's economy. p.s.
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he reports from the border city of. the world bank calls it an unprecedented exodus in latin america one more akin to a full blown refugee crisis then people searching for a better life it's one conclusion of a report by the international financial institution to assess the impact that the venezuelan exodus is having in neighboring colombia the speed and number of migrants escaping the country coupled with their vulnerable condition makes the venezuelan crisis one of the world's worst yet many believe it's not getting enough attention. people go crazy over the caravan of central americans entering mexico trying to reach the u.s. five maybe six thousand migrants many week every four days. whether french is. a shelter and services for migrants in the border city of. hundreds of been.
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up for assistance bailey they receive meals for fifteen days and at thirty dollars bonus for three months. at the end of three months they're in the same desperate conditions as they were before hungry lacking a roof in need of medical attention jobs that we can't remove the world bank says the crisis this year alone has already cost one point two billion dollars. the report praised the open arms policy and its efforts to register the new arrivals to cope with the emergency yet few manage to find proper jobs. there she bellows been here for eight months with her husband and children they're selling on the streets . my husband and i are trying to get hired but it's difficult because we are immigrants far illegally but there's a silver lining in the report the world bank says that in the long term arrival of
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so many young migrants could be beneficial for the colombian economy. act fast. and needs more young workers legalising the new arrivals in creating jobs could reap benefits in coming years the government says it agrees with the suggestions but implementing them requires money they don't have. monkeys making a huge effort in the middle of major fiscal restrictions with the international community to understand what's happening and. international donors have promised one hundred thirty million dollars for colombia only thirteen million has arrived so far with the crisis expected to continue in likely getting worse the entire continent this threatened with the consequences alison there are. dozens of palestinians have been injured in protests along the border with israel at least
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two hundred ten people have been killed since the weekend friday demonstrations began in late march palestinians in gaza demanding the right to return to land occupied by israel and an end to its twelve year blockade on the strip terry for support from the gaza israel border. well there was word on thursday here in gaza after the intervention of village a delegation they met with the committee that runs these protests there was word that they were going to be scaled down in size and turn and if i just get out of the way i think we can see that that is pretty much come true this is a smaller in number protests than we've seen in recent weeks also as promised it seems there are no incendiary devices kites and balloons being lit and launched towards israel a very small number of tires being set on fire to try to provide screening and in response the israelis are using the prevailing winds which are coming from israel this friday and using
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a pretty large use of tear gas in terms of the proportion of people it is being used against so largely people are being kept back from the fence what's interesting are the politics which are underlying all of this this addiction delegation which is still in town and has visited the processed sites at a different site up slightly north of here along the border that's part of a wider scale effort both to try to reconcile the palestinian factions fatah which dominates the palestinian authority in the occupied west bank hamas which controls gaza trying to broker some kind of longer term truce between the israelis and hamas there is talk of israel facilitating potentially fifteen million dollars a month of funding for non fighting staff members or people who work for hamas here in the gaza strip they're already facilitating the qatari fuel which is drastically changed the electricity supply in the strip as well and so after weeks where we've seen things get very close to a major military escalation on
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a number of occasions there is a different atmosphere this weekend here in gaza and we're seeing it not least in the scale of this protest eight million people living in mexico city and looking forward to having their water supply restored on saturday after a three day enforced drought. pollo reports. authorities say that as many as three million of mexico city's eight million residents have already been impacted by water cuts the city's water system director has urged residents who still have water to use it sparingly he said quote take extreme care of the water this means no washing clothes this means taking baths with small buckets and no washing dishes in the sink a lot of the public schools here in mexico city have also shut down for the duration of these water cuts giving families an opportunity to leave town some of the wealthier parts of the city have their own private cisterns but we're talking about upscale restaurants upscale hotels and at many of the shopping malls a lot of the the businesses in the city have shut down for the duration of these
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water cuts and it could be until november eighth that full service is restored but water shortages are not uncommon in mexico authorities have been preparing for this for several weeks now setting up large tankers in strategic parts of the city filling up cisterns with possible water in the event of an emergency but again though the water table underneath mexico city has been exploited for many many years so this is not a new problem for authorities in fact it's one of the reasons that many of the historic buildings in mexico city are sinking by an average of about twenty centimeters every year so this maintenance being done is very important it's believed that as much as forty percent of possible water is lost through leaks in these faulty pipes so this is a much anticipated maintenance project by the city of mexico city. it is good to have you with us hello adrian so you can hear the headlines and turkeys president says that he's convinced that the order to kill jamal has shown
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she came from the highest levels of the saudi government. wrote in the washington post that he's frustrated by saudi arabia's failure to cooperate with the investigation a turkish investigator told al jazeera that the journalists body was dismembered and dissolved an acid so he was killed a month ago so in a honda reports from istanbul. turkey is not going to let this go this is not going to go away and of course writing in the washington post the same newspaper that the contribution to this is a message really. of the americans the international community because there's a lot of frustration here in turkey that the u.s. administration is not putting enough pressure on saudi arabia to cooperate or to go on saying that he believes the order to kill she was given at the highest levels of government evangelical christians from the u.s. have made a rare visit to saudi arabia they've met with crown prince mohammed bin solomon and
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government ministers the kingdom is trying to repair its international reputation following. but the u.s. is re imposing sanctions on iran that were lifted in twenty fifteen's nuclear deal the measures will be in will begin on monday the u.k. russia france china germany and the european union have all condemned the move eight countries will be allowed exemptions from sanctions should they do business with tehran blasphemy protests in pakistan are being called off after a deal between the government and conservative muslim groups they began on wednesday when the supreme court overturned the death sentence of a christian woman who's accused of insulting islam i source says that it was behind an attack that killed seven coptic christians in egypt gunmen fired at two buses on their way to a monastery in the city of minya two hundred sixty kilometers south of cairo six of the dead were from the same family president fattah el-sisi is promising to punish those responsible. are the headlines these continues to talk to our own zero next.
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and historic day for the but i mean he every returning brings a series of breaking stories told through the eyes of the welds john in a sense these two voices journalists were one of the few journalists that were actually doing investigative black listening post as we turn the cameras on the media and focus on how they report on the stories that matter. the rights to those stories but then he never publishes their stories their listening post on al-jazeera. you can. see. it's the one riddle that seems almost impossible to solve look at any major city regardless of political or economic system and the chances are it's not solved the basic issue for its citizens how to strike
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a balance between supply and demand for housing and in that dilemma lies a real human rights problem at least according to the un special rapporteur to adequate housing leylandii for how she was appointed in twenty fourteen and the picture she's painting of this difficult situation isn't pretty given how persistent and pervasive it is around the world a natural question to ask is is there any solution and any particular or easily identifiable calls. we discussed this real and complex question with. on talk to al-jazeera. before her special rough put on the right to adequate housing thank you for talking to al-jazeera we'll have a discussion about the global housing and homelessness problem but first let me ask you about that title special report. explain to us what that means what you
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do and who you report sure i was a. pointed by the un human rights council which is pretty much the highest human rights body within the u.n. system and i am appointed as a kind of global watchdog at least that's how the media presents me and my job is to monitor and assess how people are doing with respect to their right to housing in countries around the world so it's a global mandate and i look at things like homelessness the adequacy of housing the affordability of housing forced evictions those sorts of things my job is also to kind of develop the right to housing to some degree to right thematic reports to help states understand what does the right to housing actually mean and how can it be implemented in a practical way. i also try to hold states accountable to their human rights obligations not an easy task but certainly
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a really important one and in this day and age let's start with the basics you talk about the right to housing where is it written down that everyone has a right to housing yet so it's in the universal declaration of human rights for example article twenty six everyone has the right to an adequate standard of living including adequate housing it's an adult human celebrates his seventieth birthday right now that's right exactly so you know that is the main articulation and i like that articulation because it sits there amidst all of the human rights you know and that's the way i view housing it has tentacles into every other human right practically think about the right to life and security of the person but it's in a whole host of treaties the most recent recent treaty took to come into being the one on persons with disabilities it includes the right to adequate housing it's in an articulation of economic social and cultural rights a treaty of both those rights it's articulated there it's actually one of the most
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articulated economic and social rights out there so there has been a lot. of writing in activism on the right to housing the right to adequate housing difficult word isn't it what isn't adequate who decides what is adequate yeah so it's funny because it's so obvious what might be adequate housing what we say is that under international human rights law and there is a un committee that has talked about this through what they call a general comment that housing is not just about four walls and a roof it is about four walls and a roof but it's not just about that it's about living in a place where you have peace security and most importantly dignity and once you start playing with the idea of dignity well you can imagine what that means it means living in a place with proper sanitation and basic services toilets running water it means living in a place that's close to employment so that you can actually generate an income for
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your for your family or household it means living close to health care services child care services it means having security of tenure and that's a cornerstone cornerstone of the right to housing in other words you should not be fearful that you're going to lose your home like that. those are that you know the basic tenets it means living in a place without experiencing discrimination having access to housing without discrimination so adequacy is actually fairly well defined and in this you know right now affordability is a key component of adequate housing and the way affordability is defined is based on what a household income is so it has housing has to be affordable to people based on their actual income not based on what the market can bear you to find it very clearly let's now talk about how many people in the world do not have that now i preparing to talk to you been trying to read all the statistics you are an expert
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on this i've been trying to get up to speed it seems to me the last time a really big global survey. it was done was a long time ago two thousand and five when they came up with figures of one hundred million homeless worldwide and one point six billion people lacked laffing adequate housing that's some time ago over a decade ago yes as the situation got worse or better yes i mean i suspect the situation has only got worse if i look at my daily reality in my email inbox i can only say that there are so many troubling issues on in the area of housing right now so i think those figures are probably outdated and things have probably got worse we do know for example that approximately nine hundred million people that's a quarter of the world's population are living in informal settlements informal settlements slums that is without all of those elements of adequacy that i was talking about with often without basic services certainly without security of
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tenure so i mean it's a it's a huge percentage of the world's population right this is a very very urgent and serious matter if you have whatever figures of homelessness and how you define homelessness even if you just look at street homelessness tell me a city you've been to where you haven't seen street homelessness right you talk about these informal settlement slum shanty towns that some called him call him because some of the people there see that this is a community and they don't actually want to move from those places to that that's exactly right and one of the things that i find fascinating about informal settlements is the dual nature on the one hand. people are experiencing extreme violations of human rights in those informal settlements or slums right no no toilets and no sanitation i mean the horror of that we can all imagine no showers crumbling structures of fear of the vixen all the time so that's on the one hand the reality on the other hand i've visited many informal settlements the vibrancy.
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in those places the sense of community the way they will even though they don't have a paved road they will name their streets they will give each house a number they will ensure there's a community center where people can meet and talk and discuss there is a vibrancy there and people do want to remain in their homes of course some people have lived in informal settlements for decades and generations so of course they don't want to leave and in fact under international human rights law that's the standard upgrading should happen in an ensuite two or as we say on site way in other words don't remove people from their homes unless there is absolutely no other option i've been looking at some of the figures or trying to find some of the figures for some of the key countries and obviously the problem is going to be worst in the places where there are more people particularly more people living in urban areas and it's difficult to get the real figures nigeria i've seen estimates
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of twenty four point four homeless people estimates in india an official figure of one point seven seven million but then the mess to much of seventy eight million the figures vary widely even here where we are right now were in new york in the u.s. official figures much smaller than the rest much of up to three point five million homeless do you believe this problem is seriously under reported and if so. you can decide that homeless population is people living rough on the streets and then you're going to get one figure you're going to go around and do a count on a single night how many people do you count on your street that's going to be a small figure you could then say no my definition is on the streets and in shelters so then you're going to get a slightly bigger figure but what about all of those people who are couch surfing living with family friends or relatives etc because they have no other place to go
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that's a population that is almost impossible to measure we know. no that that in every country that there is that population out there we know that and so the the estimates are going to vary widely based on definition i don't think that homelessness has been viewed as the human rights issue that it is the i don't think it's been given the sort of urgency of political will of social policy that it deserves and so i think that's also part of the problem let's talk about the life of someone who's homeless and why the definition whether it's in an informal settlements rushy living on the streets how does it affect someone's life not just not having somewhere to live one of the ways to save the fact that for example the hells. this is a population that is deeply traumatized you can imagine. a day on the street it would be completely traumatizing for us in light of you know where where or how
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we're positioned it might imagine a week on the street imagine a year imagine five years it is a completely traumatizing experience and what we find is that the that experience can actually trigger psychosocial disability people are always like oh the people who are homeless or they're all crazy they're all going to have some psychological problems many many people who hit the streets are completely of sound mind it's the trauma of being on the street that can trigger psycho social disability the trauma of living on the street is what often leads people to do things like drugs right it's to numb the experience i've talked to many people in the united states in particular i was out in california and just saw some harrowing situations people with gainful employment working in hospitals working in animation studios living on the streets and telling me that the trauma of that has
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led them to undertake activities they never thought that they would be doing you mentioned life and expectancy one figure so can from the u.k. from the national health service in the u.k. the average homeless person has a life expectancy of forty seven use now if you go back to the wider population of the u.k. you have to go back about one hundred use for that to be the average life expectancy this is shameful isn't it i think it's shameful and you know you gave figures of homeless rates in different countries and you said you know what of course in the bigger countries there's going to be more people who are homeless but the way in which we deal with that sort of an analysis of homelessness is not so much based on population size and ratio but we look at the wealth and resources of a country and then we look at housing and home inadequate housing and. homelessness because of course there's there should be a correlation wealthy nation largest g.d.p.
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in the world you might expect to see less homelessness per capita cetera or no homelessness but that's not what we're seeing if you look at north america if you look at europe what are we seeing rising rates of homelessness in the richest countries in the world that to me is where we get into extremely shameful territory extremely shameful why is that how is it acceptable that you know g.d.p. is are increasing all the time hopefully and homelessness is rising all the time so is the main reason that cities as they grow as a nation takes place have become an affordable for most people one of the things is this very new phenomenon we've seen since about two thousand and eight that very special year where we mark the global financial crisis. housing has changed housing has become basically the hottest commodity around and at the same time
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housing is supposed to be a human right and so what we have is. investment in housing as a commodity as a place to park capital and grow wealth and that has changed the way in which housing operates it means you know if you think about it if you have investors private equity firms vulture funds buying up paos ing who are who is their principal concern it's their investor and if they're using housing to satisfy their investor interests what do they have to do with that housing if it's rental housing . it's obvious they have to increase their rents so what do governments do about the problem of homelessness because some are only dealing with that part of the problem hungry for example has come up with a new law or it's made homelessness effectively a crime it's bound for you to live on the streets they say people should go to
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emergency shelters is that going to help a policy like that it's it's i think it's cruel and i think it's completely misguided and obviously it's out of step with international human rights and human rights obligations it's out of step with the sustainable development goals there are places that are doing some good works in the area of homelessness if you look at the housing first study it is it is which actually sits nicely within a human rights framework the idea of housing first finland is where the model was first developed and it's where it is most successful finland and norway are the only places in europe where we haven't seen an increase in homelessness in the last year. and the housing first model is just that you say we will provide this population with housing first and then we will provide all of the services and supports that those households need in order to make
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a go of things and that's not time delimited and that's where the success lies in finland for example so in other words it's not a we'll throw services and supports at you for twelve months and then hate to pull up your socks and make your own way it is services and supports until that household really can be autonomy us and survive and thrive so that is a model that is working on the homelessness front but that doesn't address affordability issues and these bigger macro things that are happening that i that i've touched on you've mentioned your visits you've mentioned your very recent visit to egypt you were allowed to go in many of the human rights defenders have not been allowed to visit egypt the government there is to. going to make efforts to provide new housing are you concerned though that they are also trying to move populations away from the areas where they have the luxury. yeah my trip to egypt is very fresh i just got back. i think that the government is making
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a concerted effort to deal with some of their housing issues they've prioritized people living in what they call a life threatening situation so you know to close to a railway line underneath power lines that kind of thing underneath rocks that could fall and i think that that's really important obviously we want to save lives . i am a little bit concerned about the model in egypt because it's not people centered and a human rights approach to dealing with in formality or dealing with inadequate housing and i should say forty percent of the population in egypt is living in informal housing or what people call slums. in the human rights approach should be human centered you should really ensure that the population is part of the process every step of the way. it's an understanding that communities actually have knowledge expertise about their own fate and their own futures and their own
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communities and you have to empower those communities provide them with the resources to come up with their own plans another one recently i think worth raising is kabera in nairobi where there was an informal settlement shanty town slum whatever you want to call it to build a new road they got rid of the homes of some thirty thousand people what was interesting there i think i don't know whether you saw the photos taken by a reuters photographer there while the demolishing of the homes in that shanty town next door on the green of a golf course and there are golfers watching the destruction of these. it really sums up doesn't it in the quality center of the. the kibera situation is also deeply alarming to me and again i spoke out about that situation thirty thousand people facing homelessness. that mean that's the reality completely
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contrary to international human rights law and kenya's own constitution which protects the right to housing and has provisions around for steve actions. you know as i said the standard. for these situations is that you know force eviction is one considered a gross violation of human rights no community should be victim unless there is absolutely no viable alternative i have seen situations in thailand where in bangkok where the government wanted to build an off ramp from a highway right into a community an informal settlement and the community rallied and managed to figure out a way that that off ramp could in fact come down and the community can remain intact these things are possible i may not want to live underneath her around but that community wanted to stay and that was possible in bangkok surely there was another way in combat or it's the largest informal settlement in nairobi it's it's mind
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boggling to me i think the understanding of home has been lost i think people are viewed as dispensable i think as you say it's this inequality some people's lives matter and some don't seem to but how do you stop what has become all over the world i mean it's the result of urbanization globalisation and speculation how do you stop this trend because it's their rich investors look and they go where am i going to put my money today stocks baldwins i'm going to put it in gold oh no the safest bet is to buy property even if i don't want to live in it now. so huge it is absolutely a huge problem and i love that you mentioned you know should i put my money in gold versus housing and i can tell you everyone is going to housing and not gold. housing residential real estate is now valued at one hundred sixty three trillion
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dollars which i mean i can't even get my head around i'm not a numbers person i can't get my head around that one hundred sixty three trillion dollars is the value of residential real estate if you take the value of all gold that has been mined seven trillion right so so people are going for residential real estate for sure. how do you curb that that is the question of the day i think that some governments are doing some interesting things around this if you take singapore they have an eighteen i think eighteen percent tax on foreign owned property so that's a trying to you know it's using a tax system to sort of keep that it a little bit or at least keep it in check things like that can happen. you have a law in cata luny aware. they're trying to make it such that
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no mortgage foreclosure should result in even action that that would be even into homelessness that that would be legal so there are these small attempts at curbing this what do the single attempts to look at the way the world is run even look at who's running the world right now the united states of america is being run by a property developer yes absolutely and i'm glad you mention that too because that's not often talked about and what does that mean and when president trap originally had that advisory group i mean who did he have in that advisory group this is the c.e.o. of blackstone the largest private equity firm that is buying up properties real estate residential real estate around the world and really. creating an affordability everywhere they go it is almost like a price fixing situation right you mentioned blackstone what about reaching out to
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companies like that to see if they can help solve the problem that perhaps the creating yeah well yes i have actually reached out to blackstone and have tried to meet with them because i actually see them and my present position as raptor as. somehow related they are becoming well they're one of the larger third largest landlord in new york largest landlord in the united states they own i think something like three hundred thousand units worldwide right there a major player in the housing sector i'm a housing person on the global scale we should be talking it hasn't happened yet and i would really welcome that conversation because i'm not sure that they're aware of all of these human rights standards i don't think it's in their in their mindset it's not in their business model that's for sure but could it be i'm open i
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mean i'm open to having that conversation you mention that goal these are the goals the u.n. set to improve the world by twenty thirty let me just remind you what it says by twenty thirty ensure access for all to adequate safe and affordable housing and basic services and upgrade slums everything you've told me is the goal of the ones may be going well everything is going backwards we're not going to reach that goal in twelve years are we look we have to strive to reach that goal in twelve years states have that obligation they've made that commitment i think if states and cities took it seriously and decided to adopt human rights based housing strategies and i've written a report about that and what that might look like i think that huge strides could be taken. that's what i think that's my that's my. ambition is to see
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states take this very seriously and actually adopt strategies that you know focus on the most vulnerable that change the way decision making is made that ensure accountability of governments to the people that ensure equality those sorts of things big principles if that was guiding housing policy maybe we would inch toward that twenty thirty deadline and that that commitment. thank you for talking to us thank you. eighty percent of the visually impaired could be cured without access to treatment . and where there is a will there is a way of training state of the outof spittle covering over seventy seven countries how many of these patients are you seeing today every little and in pakistan.
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provides flea treatment over one million patients and yet the cure revisited which is iraq. nov on al-jazeera radicalized you a new hard hitting series comes face to face with the hatred and violence of militant groups that attract young people around the world on november fifth the u.s. will impose additional sanctions on iran targeting the oil sites we'll look at the impact that may have when migrant lives are in danger and see who should come to their aid people in power investigates the united states is getting ready for the u.s. midterm elections on november sixth join us for live coverage and analysis and a listening post continues to examine global media coverage and look behind the headlines november on al-jazeera. insult career around two
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million dogs are eaten every year but now animal rights groups want the ancient tradition taken on the main one when he's depressed a good korean dog or on al-jazeera. case president insists that the order to kill journalists came from the highest levels of the saudi government and demands that the puppet masters be revealed. this is al jazeera live from doha also coming up the u.s.
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we imposes sanctions on iran targeting its oil and financial sectors. no eight million people we find out why one of the world's largest cities is have to turn off the taps. and remaining defiant sri lanka's ousted prime minister insists he's not going anywhere. it's a month since the saudi journalist was killed at his country's consulate in istanbul turkey as president. believes that the saudi assassination team was given orders from the highest level of the kingdom's government but he does not believe that king solomon ordered the killing let's go live to istanbul. outside the saudi arabian consulate in the city turkey's president making these comments in an
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editorial he's written for the washington post newspaper and what more did he say. well yes turkey's president staying on the offensive keeping up the pressure his message is we will not let this go and this is not going away saying that he believes turkey believes that the order to kill she was made from the highest level of the saudi government but he didn't mention who he believes made that order but he mentioned who he doesn't believe made that order and that is king solomon and this is not the first time gone really has mentioned the king sound man since this crisis began he has been very careful not to rupture the relationship and already cordial relationship if you like between riyadh and ankara he's trying to prevent you know damage to this relationship even said that this killing really is not a problem between two countries also erdogan making it very clear that you know
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saudi arabia is not cooperating he's mentioning the visit of the top saudi prosecutor earlier this week to istanbul you know saying that that meeting really was was not fruitful there was no tangible outcome and also asking why aren't you questioning the saudi consul general the man who was in charge of that diplomatic mission the man who was inside the diplomatic mission when she was killed and the turkish president asking the same question that has been asked over the past month where is she is a body or should we say body parts now that stumbles prosecutor says that they believe she was strangled to death and his body was cut into pieces so are discarded really keeping up the pressure writing in the same newspaper that she contribution to trying to speak to the international community to tell them that saudi arabia is not cooperating in this investigation the washington post as you say the newspaper the she used to write for as has once again raised this issue on members of the crown prince mohammed bin someone's personal security detail being
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part of this hit squads of that came to istanbul time a small. yes very few people really believe this saudi narrative that this fifteen man hit squad came here to convince. to return to saudi arabia so they are saying that members of this hit squad are members of muhammad bin so man the saudi crown prince a security detail something turkey revealed weeks ago when they identified all these men some of them of course saudi agents mahar much of it for example he was seen in photos with this is with the crown prince and the number of countries he does travel with the saudi crown prince so there's many who believe that the order was given by muhammad and that the saudi you know we have to remember saudi arabia blamed after the last series that deputy head of the intelligence so i. can start on who is the advisor of mohamed bin so man saying that they were the ones who sent
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the men to try to convince him out she to return to saudi arabia but many believe these two men cannot operate or take any order without the haven't been so man's knowledge now people in istanbul many dissidents live here and there is fear really about their safety and some of them are friends of she and they spoke to us. t.v. a dissident voice raised from turkey would otherwise not be heard. of . this is an egyptian opposition channel which can't broadcast at home where the media is tightly controlled by the government it's one of a dozen television channels run by opposition movements across the arab world that broadcast from here. its chairman a minority who once stood as a presidential candidate in egypt and who spent time in prison for opposing longtime president hosni mubarak left his country in two thousand and thirteen
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after challenging the current president of the fatah his c.c. and what he called his to radical rule. the person who told me to come to turkey was my dear friend for thirty five years he said it's the safest country for me to live in he believes and sold the wife that president would never hand over opposition members in return for the deal so i took them as advice it seems turkey is safe for me but it wasn't for him. it's believed that she was murdered in the saudi consulate on october the second because he was a critic of crown prince mohammed bin salmen many arabs who spoke out against those in power and called for democracy and it up living in exile in istanbul this is one of the few districts where egyptians syrians yemenis saudis and libyans settled after escaping harsh crackdowns and repression at home. it was the arab spring in
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two thousand and eleven that forced many people to leave their countries syrians opposed to president bashar al assad members of egypt's now outlawed muslim brotherhood group they were forced to leave after the military coup in two thousand and thirteen they found safety in turkey until now. well dissidents have been threatened with death this presenter live on an egyptian pro-government channel named a minor war as one of those who should be killed. his friend was killed and along with him the sense of security in what was seen as a safe haven the brutality of the murder a reminder of what can happen when you confront power but these friends don't believe his death will be wasted. i believe god wanted jamal to achieve in his death what he wanted to achieve in his life which was to end or present whether military tribal or religious i think his death would be a turning point in the region to get rid of these regimes. he wasn't alone those
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who fought for new leadership have found a place in turkey which has been described by some as the last corner of the arab spring. death has weakened build their demand for change senator al jazeera is stumble and as we reported turkey continues to pressure saudi arabia to explain what exactly happened to her shortly the kingdom's crown prince mohammed bin salman continues to try to brush off accusations of involvement in the killing despite some of the assassination squad being members of his security team. reports from istanbul the saudi crown prince in riyadh welcoming evangelical christians from the united states a rare gathering in the muslim world's most conservative country the kingdom's keen to repair its international reputation damaged by the killing of. the saudi journalist disappeared
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a month ago in istanbul after two weeks of denials saudi leaders eventually admitted the journalist was accidently killed then with pete earley changed their account of what we really happened. saudi allies are worried about further repercussions of the international outcry and for the first time israel has commented on the killing voicing its concerned about possible destabilisation of the kingdom and the region what happened is the book consulate was horrendous and should be doing. the same. it's very important for the stability. of the region and of new that saudi arabia remains. a way must be found to achieve both. hostages murder has sowed relations between turkey and saudi arabia. frustrated
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over what they describe as evasive saudi attitudes the turks are keeping up the diplomatic pressure on the kingdom. at a memorial service in washington d.c. her disease and is hostilities fiance is grappling with the loss even though a month has passed since jamal's murder his body has still not been given to his loved ones and his funeral prayer has still not taken place this is the smallest thing that one can do after a loved one has passed in the religion of islam and we still haven't been able to do that and our pain is still as fresh as the first day turkish investigators have brushed aside a saudi offer to fly to riyadh for more concerted ations they blame the saudis for stalling the investigation and turning it into a coverup they are also demanding the extradition of eighteen saudi suspects to
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stand trial in istanbul. it's been a month to the day says jamal disappeared and every day since then turkish investigators have been trying to piece together what happened to him they say now they know but not where his remains are and sound if this will continue to deny allegations the royal family is in fort ash about what al-jazeera has stumbled immigration and the economy of the dominant issues in the u.s. midterm elections that are now four days away that being seen as a referendum on trump's presidency voters will be electing members of the house of representatives some senators and governors republicans currently control both houses of congress and a serious mike hanna reports from washington while president trump is not standing in the selection but he's certainly putting a lot of effort into it he's attended rally after rally his message fear of immigration in particular i labeling the caravan that's crossing across mexico as
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an invasion sending troops to the border and what his critics contend is merely an election tactic but along with that fear of immigration president trump is also stressed economy economy he claims that his presidency has turned around this election will decide whether we build on the extraordinary prosperity that we've unleashed nobody can believe what's happened or whether we let the radical democrats take control of congress and take a giant wrecking ball to our economy or to our future. america now has the best economy in the history of our country and we want to keep it that way many observers contend it was under the previous president that the economy started to turn around and president obama's out to nice campaign rallies as well the democrats heavyweight to galvanize the masses to go to the polls to cost their
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votes with democrats in support of this well by former vice president joe biden but the has been very careful in his language during the campaign very seldom referring to president trump by name but making very clear the implication that under this president the very nature of the society has changed so america is at a crossroads. the health care of millions is on the belt. making sure working families get a fair shake is all about. but maybe most of all the character of our country is on the ballot the only in the closing weeks of this election we have seen repeated attempts to divide us. with rhetoric. designed to make us angry and make us fearful. the democrats need to flip twenty
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three republican seats in the house of representatives to achieve a majority there they need to flip to republican seats in the senate to take control of that body for the first time president trump may be facing a congress that isn't entirely republican controlled certainly something he hasn't had to contend with in his first two years opinion polls indicate the democrats do stand a good chance of taking control of the house of representatives not that good a chance of getting control of the senate however opinion polls back in two thousand and sixteen told us that president trump couldn't possibly win a weather update next he announces zero then. the. line. wrapping against anarchy how young people in thailand are using music to send a political message.
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hello there more rain is developing across parts of the middle east at the moment in fact on the satellite picture you can already see the clouds we're seeing some pockets of bright white cloud there just by the red sea and that's an indication that the rain is already fairly heavy is pushing its way northwards though and as we had three sons today and particularly saturday night we'll see that system really begin to pull itself together so by the time we get to sunday them we'll see that rain push its way through parts of iraq and into syria as well heavy downpours out of this and look at the direction of the wind is coming from the south so picking up a lot of dust as well so it will be a fairly hazy day for many of us too some of that cloud will be affecting us a bit further south as well so if we look at the chart across the arabian peninsula we can see lots of cloud there across parts of saudi and across parts of kuwait as well that will slip its way further south as we had three saturday night and into
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sunday. day so they could just be the shower a bit further south as well the main area of rain though is to the north for say muscat should be dry for us it's up temperature of a pleasant twenty eight degrees which is eighty two in fahrenheit for the southern parts of africa there's been lots of wet weather recently but it is now easing or just see a few showers there around the coast of mozambique and maybe a few around parts of madagascar elsewhere it looks mostly dry in cape town but twenty five. a career reporting to the wound wounded here one journalist documents life beyond the headlines. that certain stories can change us in the easiest cleaves use to it well you know mr. cheney was a unique journey into what it means to be human the things we keep
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a witness documentary on al-jazeera. again this is al-jazeera the main news this out turkey's president says that he's convinced the order to kill the man who came from the highest levels of the saudi government a turkish investigator told al jazeera that the saudi journalist body was dismembered and dissolved in acid after he was killed walked over second. evangelical christians from the us a better rev is it to saudi arabia they've met the crown prince mohammed bin solomon and government ministers the kingdom's trying to repair its international reputation following. up on the us president donald trump has backtracked from his
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earlier threat that troops would shoot of migrants at the mexican border if they throw rocks he made the comments on thursday referring to people from central america who are attempting to reach the u.s. without documents. the u.s. is re-imposing sanctions on iran that were lifted as part of the twenty fifty nuclear deal restrictions on shipping energy and finance sectors will come into force on monday other parties to the nuclear deal have condemned the move as political hay reports from washington. it's probably fair to say u.s. foreign policy has never been announced like this but this is an actual tweet from the u.s. president meant to look like a movie poster warning that sanctions are coming and the president later addressed that on the south lawn sanctions are starting on iran. you know rand is they get a very big get his top aides including treasury secretary steve minutia and talking tough as well at a conference call with reporters the treasury department will have more than seven
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hundred names to our list of blocked answer to this includes hundreds of targets previously granted sanction for leave under the j c p o as well as more than three hundred new definitions this is substantially more than we ever have previously done but they are giving waivers to eight countries allowing them to continue to buy iranian oil with the promise they will reduce that amount over time the u.s. is breaking the international deal and the rest of the signatories say they want to stay in it proponents of the nuclear deal say this move will isolate the u.s. russia was abiding by it the chinese were abiding by it the europeans were abiding by it and most importantly the iranians were abiding by it's now the united states that is in breach of that agreement and is now actually going so far as to punish countries that are abiding by a u.n. security council resolution you really can't get more pariah than the european
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union created what they hope will be a work around to still do business in iran u.s. officials are brushing off its potential but are warning allies they could face a actions as well right now talking tough while the world waits to see if it will be more than words paddy calling al-jazeera washington the u.s. and turkey are lifting sanctions on each other to the release of an american pasta last month was jailed in kid accused of being involved. in the failed military coup in twenty sixteen sin and cos the early reports from lanka. there are actually two good news for turkey today one of them is lifting the sanctions over imposed over turkish men assume along with the us ministers of both sides by later lifted those sanctions plus turkey received a waiver on u.s. sanctions that are targeting iran which means that turkey is exempted from these
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sanctions as turkish petroleum is trading it with iran in terms of oil these are very good news and this was welcomed by the investors mostly and turkish lira which has been suffering for the last three months is now performing its strongest level against the u.s. dollar gaining one point seven per cent at least it today of course these are not the only topics that that we can count as a positive development between washington and ancora we have been seeing that these two countries have been exchanging information over jamaal. case in a very firmly diplomatic way plus we see that turkey and u.s. has has come to an agreement over. northeastern syria and turkey and u.s. have begun their joint patrols so this week is actually a gain for ankara in terms of bettering the relations with the united states
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trolling because ousted prime minister has told al jazeera that democracy in the country is under threat right now wickramasinghe is refusing to quit after being fired last week by president might a policy of saying no he's been replaced with mahinda rajapaksa a two time president who's accused of a power grab of zeros bernat smith reports from column. for the past week run away from a single has refused to leave the prime minister's official residence here in the capital it's become a symbol of legitimacy he tells me after being fired by the president in what critics are calling a constitutional two day the thirty three london democracy in the last presidential election parliament religion we came forward on the basis that parliament is supreme that the president must act according to the beaches of parliament the nineteenth amendment to the constitution was drafted on that basis now what has
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happened is the president is trying to override the power of the parliament present my for a palace or a say in a swore in mahinda rajapakse as the new prime minister last friday. rajapaksa was president for two terms and scrapped term limits in twenty fourteen to try and stay in power but then lost the election he called a year later rajapaksa says he's got enough support in parliament to confirm his position but m.p.'s can't quote because presidents are saying or a suspended parliament why the delay you think in recalling parliament where they haven't the numbers where the number be quite parliament initially thought you think if you go all the normal you have the numbers here. with we hear a lot of talk about persuading m.p.'s to join rajapaksa side how might they be persuaded what are you what are you hearing about what's going on with our founding member and their ministry ships and some money the speaker has warned of
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the risk of a bloodbath if this is allowed to continue do you share those views of the speaker that there can be an appeal because people are getting the two granted by the reward for parliament democracy we why we ask for a different set up and all of sudden we find even worth two thousand forty. defending a principle and the fact that the men during the war. in two thousand and fifteen to a poor democracy and if you lead them down their gloves to be i and a singer says it's that desire to uphold democracy that's brought him support from a wide a section of society than just his traditional support base when parliament is recalled prime minister wickramasinghe or says he'll leave his official residence here at temple trees to go and vote until then he's staying put. al-jazeera colomba . i source says that it was behind the attack that killed seven coptic christians
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in egypt gunman fired two buses that were on their way to a monastery near the city of media two hundred sixty kilometers south of cairo six of the dead were from the same family president c.c. is promising to punish those responsible eisel is launched several attacks on coptic christians in the last few years. young people in thailand are using music to send a political message several anti-government movements are determined to get noticed between now and february when the country's jews hold a much delayed first general election since the military coup four years ago scott hyla reports from bangkok. it's hugely popular on you tube and the military government doesn't want anyone. but. the video condemning the nation's leadership made by a group called rap against dictatorship has had more than twenty million views in
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just two weeks. which has created some of the first big waves of political controversy in the run up to the much delayed elections scheduled for friday. prime minister has said thais who watch share even like the video will share the responsibility of the damage it does to the country. something like. one of the rappers in the video known as jacoby thinks that the government's reaction to the song is one of the reasons for its popularity. object we don't have a fix go on what we want to see the song to spread like a contagious disease and engage people into expressing their opinions for me this is considered as a success. he expects that he is and will continue to be watched by the government intelligence and security agencies. have younger people now will be voting for the first couple. and this is
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a new voice. activated socialize through the new media technology social media and so on so we're seeing them taking more action. to tempt walks about here was the leader of the protest movement that shut down bangkok and ultimately led to the coup four years ago now he's leading a more tradin. no political movement as things ramp up before the planned elections he has publicly denounce the rap video. another group of young artists hoping that their voices will be heard. a punk band called an hour to die for anarchy. they're worried that the police will shut down their concerts but insists that expressive criticism of the government is a basic right the band members don't reveal their names and cover their faces. we don't intend to incite people at all we are angry with the government we do satirical rants against what the government called return to happiness when
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compared to the rap as we are punk and when we could we could we express our hatred . the hope for the n.r.t. pattaya band members is that someday soon they can perform their music that carries their message freely without covering their faces. al-jazeera bangkok. eight million people living in mexico city and looking forward to having their water supply restored on saturday after a three day enforced drought supplies were turned off for maintenance work on one of the world's largest pumping systems bringing water to a city that's more than two thousand meters above sea level. reports. what happens when a city of twenty one million people shuts off the water and. i was worried because we weren't prepared for. a resident of mexico city says he still has running water but he's been storing as much as he can just in case the faucets run dry we need to
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take notice should be predicted it's of utmost importance a few blocks away done to make a restaurant owner says he's been stocking up too even though the water never stopped running he says the media warnings of a mass water shut off have been blown out of proportion and have even ended up hurting his business. we purchased watches. and fortunately we didn't have any trouble but i think the problem has been exaggerated many people are not going to restaurants because they heard the news there was no water. faced with crumbling water infrastructure mexico city's water management agency has been working on repairs to the city's water systems an estimated forty percent of the city's portable water is believed to be lost in leaky pipes. this is an important project and the people have taken notice and as a precautionary measure the local government set up cisterns in strategic parts of the city and deployed water tankers in the event of an emergency this point in
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central mexico city serves as a water extraction source the water is taken directly from the ground to fill those tanker trucks from here it's sent to areas that are designated as vulnerable such as hospitals or nursing homes officials warned that as many as three million of the city's residents could be left without water when the repairs began preparations by city officials and residents however were enough to prevent a water emergency but. mexico city. it is good to have you with us again here in the headlines on al-jazeera turkey's president says he's convinced that the order to kill jamal khashoggi came from the highest levels of the saudi government. roads in the washington post that he's frustrated by saudi arabia's failure to cooperate with the investigation
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a turkish investigator has told al jazeera the journalist body was dismembered and dissolved in acid after he was killed a month ago saying the honda reports from istanbul. turkey is not going to let this go this is not going to go away and of course writing in the washington post the same newspaper that is the contribution to this is a message really the audience is the the americans the international community because there's a lot of frustration here in turkey that the u.s. administration is not putting enough pressure on saudi arabia to cooperate or to go on saying that he believes the order to kill him she was given at the highest levels of government evangelical christians from the u.s. have made a rare visit to saudi arabia they've met the crown prince mohammed bin solomon a government ministers the kingdom is trying to repair its international reputation following jamal has shown up u.s. president donald trump has backtracked from his earlier threat that troops would shoot at migrants at the mexican border if they throw rocks he made the comments on
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thursday referring to people from central america who attempting to reach the u.s. without documents the u.s. is reimposing sanctions on iran that were lifted in the twenty fifty nuclear deal restrictions on the shipping energy and finance sectors will begin on monday the other parties to the nuclear deal have condemned the move i source says that it was behind an attack that killed seven coptic christians in egypt gunmen fired at two buses on their way to a monastery in the city of minya two hundred sixty kilometers south of cairo six of the dead were from the same family president. says that he's promising to punish those responsible showing because ousted prime minister has doled out a zero that democracy in the country is on the threads running a wickramasinghe the is refusing to quit after being fired last week by president maestra part of syria cena he's been replaced with by mahinda rajapakse a two time president who's accused of
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a power grab. as the headlines more news off the cure revisited next in the united states the religious right is on the mom we were always hunting for the guy who would take our script and read it their goal is to take control of one of the political parties and they've effectively done that full lines examines the trumpet ministration special relationship with the religious right what did he get out of it the presidency and asks what evangelical support means for the future of the country church of trump on al-jazeera. a. player.
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playing. so is there a particular score that you have to get for you let loose on rotations on holidays a hundred such as. how many of these patients you see today everybody i'll say no i've got to last a set. of two hundred eighty five million people all blind or visually impaired worldwide and ninety percent of the us live in developing countries and yet with the right eye care and medical interventions eighty percent of vision impairments could be prevented if all kids. on drugs just lacey and i'm in zambia to meet the team of all this on the fly and on most of the oldest flying on hospital is an airplane has
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been converted into a fully functioning surgical and training hospital which travels to developing countries worldwide. the oldest team has been working here in zambia one of the least developed countries in the world since two thousand and ten. zero zero zero. zero zero zero zero. zero zero i get a. lot of my mother grandmother let me be there i think but i think it costs a little less guts and. the plane has a fully equipped operating room alongside laser treatment area. a multimedia classroom and an interactive training facility. richard has been brought in to have corrective surgery on a screen. this relatively simple operation will have a huge impact on richard's ability to perform well at school and therefore his prospects for the rest of his life. it also gives
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a local doctor. the opportunity to work alongside his mentor laurie benjamin one of the u.k.'s leading our surgeons so you see over there are microscope dr and bony doing the searches together with the dr benjamin it's it's amazingly well equipped the proper modern you know for long periods really expected when you come into the plane incredible. i want to show you another interactive feature only on the aircraft is this monitor over here so we have eighteen cameras onboard we have the opportunity a podcast and everything that's happening in the main operating theatre to the front classroom and as i can hear is a sergeant voice yes so that the surgeon doing the surgery as wearing a microphone so during surgery he's explaining the procedure step by step to the front from classroom and it also gives the ability of the participants in the training doctors to ask questions opens up a fair after another forty eight people in the course exactly mazie.
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the option by me which is just have your gratian how did it. do when. we were trying to correct this when to reach in here in terms of for your training had you done many years surgeries for you involved in all this actually most of the screens that we did during training was observatories is watching lots of what he was doing i see ok so these are really come with this. to date the drawing on a hospital team has trained medical staff some form surgeries in seventy eight different countries. one of the most important procedures that they teach is cataract surgery. cataracts occur when areas of the lens become opaque due to a change in the structure of proteins within this. prevents the normal transition
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of light through the lens making vision blurred or misty over time and without treatment the cataracts. leading eventually to blindness. this is one of the major problems that all the stills were in zambia essentially the problem is that you know the lens which sits just behind your people goes from being totally transparent to a bit cloudy and therefore impacting your vision is a nice way to demonstrate this so if at the moment of normal vision and then with the cataract. vision degrades to about so you can imagine the impact with this surgery when it returns to know. that you have another unique tool called a training program called a high simulator that might use it to get back to the head by heart and i started out really just right to you what later does ok hand track i'd love to go yeah here's my patient gets here's your luckily not real these these are icing
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a major you know you're going to grasp they're trying goals and put it in the center go too low you hit the lens and get the catch and. that means they're going to ok ok. if the countries that leaves it you know now that they don't have a chance to try this before i gave before going to a real i use that exact outsize in here. don you know in our closing you know and pull it out with drill and we're going to see your support ok . ok very nice. how do you know my sense a million or so is there a particular school that you have to get at least on the rotation oh hundred is a hundred before levi meets a group of women who have all had cataract surgery. sure she was totally gone she can see everything she couldn't squeeze my mind she would much rather than use in one way and then did she have surgery on the plane. yes yesterday are you the lady
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who was dancing just now here because because you're happy when you can you teach me to dance come on like i don't have anything that i was talking about my generation was. that there was only in. my. lifetime i. a key element of the old this program is to work with local medical staff using local facilities this ensures that even when the plane is gone the much needed specialist i treatment can still be provided in zambia this training is done it could to a central hospital where dr m. boney works our children and i problems vision impairment is not a big problem in zambia we have about fifty thousand children we did you get into
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the country since obvious came to keep it they provide what we needed to the ship they only give me a simple. this is the only i hospital children that hospital in zambia yes is there are. three young sisters have travelled over sixteen hours by box with their mother to receive treatment from the old his team. all three suffer from varying degrees of cataract blindness which has caused them to fall behind at school as i can see. two of the sisters are now recovering from the surgery. so we're just in the main hospital now just to go out and one of the wards to meet lucy who's the third child of the family who is having cataract operation this afternoon so from this way. motion me motion me lucy helen what lucy what's your favorite subject in school what you like
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to learn about this one issue of children in florida. so. how is your english lizzie one. that. you. haven't been tested. so the issue lucy has she has cataracts in both eyes and appears as though she has normal visual ability but in fact it's significantly impaired so much so that it's had a real impact on being able to go to school and her lifestyle at home so with the intervention this afternoon with the right medical treatment which may be able to make a real positive impact on that. i don't see. they don't want to have this surgery is another opportunity for doctors benjamin and bony to work together your age this kid. so they're all set to go in there to us
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now sort of sleep under general anaesthetic the surgeons are scrubbed and set to go so it's can see how they came out. during the operation the cataract is removed through a tiny incision in the on and a synthetic lens is inserted and i'll just use the pickup laser fifteen degree being frank here two point seven five. you see on the screen that that. is some better things as return the transparency to the people. and therefore should provide a good outcome for lucy. no new. york
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a few. feet. you see that feel that fit that's. yeah i. know. you have a good ear overall by the situation but we'll see what the assistant show is now trying to figure out for. certain but what are you looking for with this examination. just to see if that's the cornea. the eye not collapsing from the point it was your inserted could the new lungs. you. know. so if thought looks like a moron. and it is going to the smaller sized objects now. the improvement from
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pre-surgery test is dramatic it really is amazing. she was able to see just the set figures that's all she could recognize it before the operation ok and now she improved to be able to see this something credible we know we know and this guy. i'm doing my best i think she's very you know it's just my friends she's not just saying. i. saw it come to the end of my time in zambia and what's been wonderful to witness is this very special relationship between of us and its local partners and the success of this project has been plain to see in the stories of lucy and her sister and the hundreds of thousands of people worldwide have had their site saved and their lives change they see.
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the public health care system in pakistan as in many developing countries struggles with a lack of resources the result is that specialist medical treatment such as organ transplant is out of reach of many of the poorest and the most and. yet here at the sindh institute of your own agenda transplantation one man's passion means that today more than a million patients here receive top class medical treatment at no cost and the job that demand i mean kharaj in pakistan to meet the doctor who has spent the last forty years providing free health care to those who need it most. kidney disease is a huge health issue in pakistan compounded by poor diets and sanitation within the population. in one nine hundred seventy two dr added brisbane set up a small urology unit in karate to deal with this issue. inspired by the national
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health service of the u.k. his goal from the beginning was to offer this treatment absolutely free to everybody. but there is way out. nice to meet you here by you well then you a bitch how are you all right i'm great of excitement like you probably are as are you t. has grown from just an eight bed was to now offer six hundred fifty beds in nine separate centers across pakistan and today is the largest health organization in the country. sir took seriously yeah how many of these patients will be seen today able to vote i'll go on. garfield last year for. our patients from all over the country. and have been life in order to anybody. hoping. somebody comes through it. and he's coming to light. the people who come in real feeling i could the day you could. pay for this quietly
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disappear get. a few the lumber of the future here. if you could or flowing. with me. and i provided it with president and your to pay for it with the candidate well. i have to admit i'm actually shocked to see so many here and so is deliberately i want to yell. at age seventy five dr rizvi still work seven days a week to keep pace with the numbers of people expecting medical attention on a daily basis. what if it. condenses started here really in this room in which year i started feeling tonight but at that time was the only treatment in here for
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a challenge. even from the beginning although day one. how did you manage that makes barry steal a car or stay home. so you t. now receive some government funding but it relies predominantly on money and equipment donated by individuals and organizations from within the country and some from overseas so you're coming from first place frank used to thinking i really didn't have to become god i mean if i was going to be my editor they were supposed to be a doctor but try to be crowned home for me for the sake of my mother. by which. i became a dolphin so you're going to need is mine. i have one haven't got any mind. one patient who is currently on dialysis and in need of
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a transplant is thirty five year old asif who system has agreed to donate a kidney. as if works as a tailor to support his family in one of the poorest parts of karate city. i asked her about it are you getting hello everybody i got it like get out. how are you all you know we're going to hear she's off trees all right so i said what does it mean for you to be able to have this transplant. because. it knew very little a value spoke to lose but. that is what though that. you scared about to morrow. well no. you know i think the life. of me. want to tell lies. so
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much. about me doesn't. really. they said you didn't know what it was but you need to get back to work that's why this is very important was not how you feeling about to more than to get there with a little bit but it really will be like if you. forgive me maybe making it. among how do you feel about tomorrow larry until next week how you forgot to get me i'm going to i'm going to i'm going to manage to. and you won't i'm not going we are going to muster up enough. credit in charlotte so laura will be fired up no problem tomorrow.
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later in the week passes from the sun's out to tender and so are you t. for surgery. i'm a sucker throw you get really how you feeling. relaxed excellent ok good luck. to the store it's going to go into its own office where to harvest ok so she's going to have that s.e.z. on the table if it's if she's already been washed will go through. here a few teams of operating surgeons one team removed and some of that's done a kidney and the other implanted into the recipient as. her kidneys fail to waste products from the blood before converting them into europe the hope is that after transplant asif will no longer need dialysis to rid his body of waste your good. how are you ok you look nervous. ok.
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so at one point said trees are going to. talk to reason overseas both teams so back to it's not that it's. just exposing the kid. to that is the photo you know it's this. you know the socialist guys who exploited the keep in miami that recently while surgeons continue to work with most of that dr rizvi makes preparations for us if so peroration. it's. got to establish should the patient yes kind of liver threat this kidney and paste but you know if you think that i think. this is our truth. meeting is that it's also drinking and yes it's a tight. and that's the way. of our country of the dawn of good we're going to be
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hooked up with darky of the city and the green of the border linking the debian up but we see that a lot of good that you are to will be going to be the blare to three that. are your idea what. are you really. extreme directly. so it's free so let's kidney has been successfully removed and is now being prepared for acids transported how long is your ischemia time process there's not be more than hoping it will go. cold so this is we didn't wash all the blood out yes you'd be who you are pretty good so done with a body in mind we were going to use how many cases have you done so. that's you're going to have to wait. for all i know that's. number four thousand five hundred
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twenty five he remembers the number that he will forever leave his he could use getting high. for the deal was done oh i see i didn't that's just not ok. dr ritchie and his team carried out pakistan's first kidney transplant in one nine hundred eighty five. damien he did the president he did anybody we were tense because he had lost not when the leg there. will be blood that to you from the leg. the road the hard you know he wanted to bring her. in we didn't oppose him a little. you know started pouring. in some changes since then but a lot of pain to do but we tried to follow the technology and. one fifth of. the team what
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fausta connect my son that's kidney to asif spain and off for that in addition to the being. there when which is you're going to get to just go for now this is the kidney reproduce it means. the longer looks white or the blood is going through that right and if you're it's a good thing you were to look at the hives early you're in dripping out for this the kidney was. extremely good would. of course prefer the process of this could be didn't work it didn't have dialysis the survivor hole near to the he would have found this treatment anywhere else there was. in the design. to get. the following day asif and my son not to. covering in the post operation.
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so that's how you do it or find yeah the champagne. that's going to really be a little bit scared to look at a veritable. run over by. over here is how you're feeling as if you're going to market the shot learning a bit about your goods but does not read a line of. good now while. we're at it with the well being of the. call the execs are going like it's amazing and what about your mother my that that you never break up a six year old friend and. keep i want to. take care of by. asif and massage will join the list of thousands of transplant recipients and
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dearness who will receive lifelong support following best surgery. meanwhile dr rizvi and his team continue striving to keep up with the ever increasing demand for the medical treatments that i saw you tee off done so much already well i don't remember it so i don't know it and when we did. it my way but what i'm doing and my being i'm training decisions are better than me i still there will never be a break of. every human being. in this thread throughout this cause. he. just got he would be. the go to the right to access has. to be pretty neat.
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eradicating leprosy in cambodia relies on education and treatment in equal measure on and on him but he early you know disability yet jail the live evades until three year old four year more he'll have this ability to play east. and a normal wait for the next generation of antibiotics may just be way taking at the bottom of the ocean maybe this as it is hope so put your i revisited on al-jazeera . al-jazeera. and for your. history has called it the great war in the first episode conscription draws hundreds of thousands of our troops into or both sides of the conflict their story is rarely
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told what had a huge impact on the course of the war world war three bodies on al-jazeera i really felt liberated as a journalist was. getting to the truth as an eyewitness that's what his job. hello again adrian finnegan here in doha the top stories on our zero turkey's president says he's convinced that the order to kill jamal khashoggi came from the highest levels of the saudi government. wrote in the washington post that he's frustrated by saudi arabia's failure to cooperate with the investigation of the turkish investigators told al jazeera that the journalists body was dismembered and
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dissolved in acid after he was killed a month ago alan fischer reports from istanbul. president the one takes a straight in some would say aggressive tone in this opinion piece he's written for the washington post he says that saudi arabia has three key questions to answer first of all where is the body of jamal khashoggi secondly who is the so-called local cooperative who helped the saudis dispose of the body and thirdly who ordered the hit as he calls it on jamal khashoggi now he says he's sure that king solomon was not involved in the operation but he said the decision was taken at the highest level of saudi circles that would identify only a handful of people including crown prince mohammed bin soundman president says what happened in the consulate behind me was a clear breach of the vienna convention dictates how countries behave in diplomatic posts and he talks about the eighteen people who are currently being held in connection with the killing of jamal khashoggi in saudi arabia he asks why the
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consul general is not one of these people here was a man he says who stood in the consulate and lied through his teeth about what happened to the washington post writer he also talks about the offer by saudi arabia for turkish investigators to go there to interview these people he calls it a desperate and deliberate stalling tactic he says the what happened to jamal khashoggi was not just an attack on a journalist but essentially attack on a nation he says that other nato countries would not stand by and let this happen and says there must be a response to this and he also says that while many countries would like this to go away this diplomatic breach this diplomatic incident suddenly to be healed this was a problem that was not going to simply go away evangelical christians from the u.s. made a rare visit to saudi arabia they've met the crown prince mohammed bin salman and government ministers the kingdom is trying to repair its international reputation
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following the murder of jamal show sheen. u.s. president donald trump has backtracked from his earlier threat that troops would shoot migrants of the mexican border if they threw rocks he made the comments on thursday referring to people from central america attempting to reach the u.s. without documents what they did to the mexican military is a disgrace they hit him with rocks very seriously and they would throw a rock in their face they do that with us they're going to be arrested there's going to be a problem i didn't say here i didn't say here but they do that with. they're going to be arrested for a long time the u.s. and turkey lifting sanctions that they'd imposed on each other ties were strained over the detention of the american past andrew bronson who was accused of being involved in turkey's failed coup attempt in twenty sixteen he was released last month the u.s. is re imposing sanctions on iran that were lifted in the twenty fifty nuclear deal
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restrictions on the shipping energy and finance sectors will begin on monday the other parties to the nuclear deal have condemned the move but eight countries have been given a waivers to continue buying oil from iran. blasphemy protests in pakistan have been called off after a deal between the government and conservative muslim groups they began on wednesday when the supreme court overturned the death sentence of a christian woman accused of insulting islam i source says that it was behind an attack that killed seven coptic christians in egypt gunman fired at two buses that were on their way to a monastery in the city of minya two hundred sixty kilometers south of cairo six of the dead were from the same family the president abdul fattah el-sisi is promising to punish those responsible and so lanka's ousted prime minister has told al-jazeera that democracy in the country is under threat ronnell wickramasinghe is refusing to quit after being fired last week by president might a palace in a saying that he's been replaced with the head the rajapaksa two time president is
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accused of a power grab when he was an al-jazeera after witness next. week by president might the palace of a cena he's been replaced with the head the rajapaksa two time president is accused of a power grab when he is an al-jazeera after witness next. this
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week by president light a policy to cena he's been replaced with the head the rajapaksa two time president is accused of a power grab when he was an al-jazeera after witness next. week
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by president by the palace of a cena he's been replaced with the head the rajapaksa two time president is accused of a power grab when he is an al-jazeera after witness next. this week by president by the palace of a cena he's been replaced with the head the rajapaksa two time president is accused of a power grab when he is an al-jazeera after witness next. week
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by president by the palace of a saying that he's been replaced with the head the rajapaksa two time president is accused of a power grab when he is an al-jazeera after witness next. this
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week by president by the palace of a cena he's been replaced with the head the rajapaksa two time president is accused of a power grab when he was an al-jazeera after witness next. week
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by president by the palace of a cena he's been replaced with the head the rajapaksa two time president is accused of a power grab when he is an al-jazeera after witness next. this week by president by three policy to say that he's been replaced with the head the rajapaksa two time president is accused of a power grab when he was an al-jazeera after witness next.
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week by president might a policy to say that he's been replaced with the head the rajapaksa two time president is accused of a power grab when he is an al-jazeera after witness next. kids
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out what they will think it well what but now these are from it that if i found that sense on that well you don't think i began to see them clearly a little late that if i would so yeah julian. caught up with service up here in the. me just a bit to follow that up but of it hippo not that way with that and a lot lot of. she that can't buy neon parts to pull. kids and i were very different is energy was exhausting but also exciting he had
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the ready travel to many countries and could make friends anywhere. even whether they can fruit from the neighbor we're going to look i born in the ceiling. much lost my biggest fear and they're going to have without doubt that i know something you know but. also knew was. only. thought. well. i've got to something. to do to. get going to school again. whenever i was with kids and it seemed something would happen so i decided to make a short film about my flatmate and his life in pro. bowl because there's
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a bubble but. because he was working more and more and so george fast and slowly started to be interested in my video camera. i found jobs on field sense as an assistant director but this one as i had free time i was with my new friend. i want to dispirit to last forever but then when the took a job of it and was leaving for the middle east. suddenly there was an immense distance in between us and i was afraid we would lose
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touch. here it is then my video was going to you. my normal life and abnormal please. check out this random. like it is your. people and it could be you can see why everything clicked because it followed the stream older way to the middle east and me i also left rome and moved to berlin. to decent job at the rect in the commenter's for german television. and in my free time i could enjoy the boy email lifestyle of the scene from. his instead was sold was looking for something more something new. i need something
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that i can just. be climbing. his latest obsession was to be able to travel and work. through the difference between your friends. your friends you know your reference point. your friends your tribe. oh dass you're spending your time. there are you guys going. there and. there's like three group calls it's. like oh yeah i get.
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one day i received these package. there was only one short cannot finally working alone check out the stapes and keep them safe.
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al-jazeera is a place you can travel to the northeast of mali and met up with a group of migrants on the first leg of their journey across the some hard smuggling of people is a big business here and you couldn't risk filming in town that's why we're out here in the desert trying to meet up with the travellers already on their way to tell jerry this was an order mottram you know trip or two you would see on t.v. but he sent me hours and hours of peace a region of france age. something that would never be broadcast something he might never watch again and said.
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hope the smuggler's car shows up seems like you know we have a breakdown now. because it. didn't think you know but if it did i got what. i now find the live bled. thank. you a phone call in a sort of comment to my. good medical my son i'm going to get it he said you have to go digital it isn't the money just keep going because you're going to get the.
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well. it isn't that i'm any good get with it but a blog but a typically wanted he says he says he says be a bit of the. movie but the many men get to going to. the candidate defeated the don't go to that. they're covered with the shield of it don't go to find out does it look like they're going to move to you know going to sleep in a. room . like
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that no. i'm just. traveling on the smothers route we came across this broken down vehicle with about twenty guys inside all going to algeria and then on to libya and some even to europe. let me just give us a c. . o. it is. that it is it. the put it on film of. your call must. get off and on it is assumed that i got i'm thinking of. fighting for it to go away. on. venus if. not as in. don't know but i'm going to move on.
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when i was a little boy you know got a school then always sahara desert yeah i wanted to see this hour i guess at yet. good luck man thank you very much i'm coming with you ok so who is the other good those there out of those who are in the business that it is that you know that desert you go if you. want to get what you want and i'll find it is. wasn't about the on the. ball was
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about to. get on the moment left it up i'm above that you know it was just off easy up i was moved on out home up i thought about the. amount of. the benefit of the bend over the tears not just the mud but on the other took on. no let's look at the women who live here you don't want them and i'm going to come back on. something. ok feeling without a man no man no i'm here in burma co mali where many africans from the sub-saharan
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countries are stuck they can't move forward to europe and they cannot go back home . because there's only going to. kiva but if the they don't keep it in their interest system on don't fall back on to posit to the bottom of his lined heap when this is all sorted out chinese already made done so she should i know she would not i mean somebody could be didn't like the mom of large events you want to vomit that you for the truth that was not good news or truth is on how to get some kind of a not good on bush as i did and i shall see as it is upon muslim brotherhood. you know very well. that couple. of months one of the two feet of the stuff comes up in the front of the bible. yet about this time of the event itself.
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yes. i think. with. suddenly i felt i was with my friend again. like in those days in bro. i asked him to send me everything he was not using for the sort of parts. the film about my flatmates was becoming something bigger. than theirs.
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i. did that. joe mathieu more new cristal to be made animation classically had yeah since it on that it has
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a mother. but you are not supposed to be like on the ball and that is really a docking gaza story i mean they're usually i mean as the israelis are we say they're targeted airstrikes but of course the reality is that you know targeted strikes but you know if three missiles from the sky you're firing decisions there's always somebody around and i mean. ok that double blast was about five minutes before this moment.
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as well that. like each other. every. year. yeah yeah yeah bit yeah.
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the name is the medium of the. bus you will get out of an island and then you'll be.
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treated as have gone by since we both left rome is and i'm at the again back in the thirty's when visiting our families. well looking at the state that it needs to get in the fourth to come yet you have.
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to me it's time. you know it's time i was nineteen i was child and all these groups of west africans that were traveling up towards mali towards this help countries who are busy going on the scene trip that i didn't end of filming ten years later not the time i just thought they were just groups of. young nigerians traveling and some like that and these guys were going on a huge clan this beagle trip you know from country to country and i was just traveling with them i had no idea but in a way those experiences they helped me later on because you realize that you can just do it you know you can just travel and people you can move how they move and stuff like that and there are a lot more like you than you actually think. here
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she's the focus weight and it was queen i called her queenie and she was nigerian clue from nigeria so we connected because i'd just been a jury and you were home was she was the friend i made during the trip i mean she was the person i spent most time with these guys are taking life in their own hands and they're going for and these guys are furious you know. but the defense like them. i mean this is an important point i mean at the end of the day you can always you know relate. to people as much as you want to live with them and everything is for them but i mean let's not fool ourselves i mean you know i have white skin pastor and i haven't crossed any more and good you know most have to do is no good news for permission to use or pay some money to have. i found a way to cross the border and. and i never found out what happens people
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because as my team was too stupid to stay nothing to. a journey of personal discovery. more american here and then more air india al-jazeera is a mirror. highlights the struggles and resourcefulness of one native alaskan people trying to preserve their way of life. becomes one of those who could also know if. your mom's from here you can. al-jazeera correspondent we are still here and monday ported world on the. u.s. and british companies have announced the biggest discovery of natural gas in west africa but what to do with these untapped natural resources is already a source of heated debate nothing much has changed they still spend most of their
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days looking forward to full dry river beds like this one five years on the syrians still feel battered or even those who managed to escape their countries haven't truly been able to escape the uk. at sixteen cush who is living her dream of being a journalist but her father has his own dream for her to follow tradition and be married as her investigations bring a face to face with the ill fated some of india's young women a father son first suitable husband continues can both their dreams come true almost one overcome the other. deadline and part of the viewfinder asia series on al-jazeera.
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hello again everyone fitting in here in doha the top stories and i was zero turkey's president says that he's convinced that the order to kill jamal has shown she came from the highest levels of the saudi government richard rhodes in the washington post that he's frustrated by saudi arabia's failure to cooperate with the investigation a turkish investigator told i was zero that the journalist body was dismembered and dissolved in acid after he was killed a month ago saying the whole reports from istanbul turkey is not going to let this go this is not going to go away and of course writing in the washington post the same newspaper that is the contribution to this is a message really the audience is the the americans the international community because there's a lot of frustration here in turkey that the u.s. administration is not putting enough pressure on saudi arabia to cooperate or to go on saying that he believes the order to kill she was given at the highest levels of
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government evangelical christians from the u.s. have made a rare visits to saudi arabia they've met with the crown prince mohammed bin salmond and government ministers the kingdom is trying to repair its international reputation following jamal. u.s. president donald trump has backtracked from his earlier threat that troops would shoot migrants at the mexican border if they throw rocks he made the comments on thursday referring to people from central america who were attempting to reach the u.s. without documents. the u.s. is re-imposing sanctions on iran that will lift it in the twenty fifteen nuclear deal restrictions on the shipping energy and finance sectors will begin on monday the other parties to the nuclear deal have condemned the move but eight countries have been given waivers to continue buying oil from iran i source says that it was behind an attack that killed seven coptic christians in egypt gunmen fired at two buses on their way to a monastery near the city of minya two hundred sixty kilometers south of cairo six
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of the dead were from the same family egypt's president fatah el-sisi is promising to punish those responsible and sri lanka's ousted prime minister told as democracy in the country is under threat rather wickramasinghe is refusing to quit after being fired last week by president by three policy the sena he's been replaced by mahinda rajapakse a two time president who's accused of a power grab as the headlines not i was there let's get you back to witness. we have in. this study. we do and if you. met him on air for his and i were flatmates fifteen years ago in rome he became a journalist and was always traveling but we stayed in touch and he sent me his food page from around the world how do you feel to go to gaza again yeah just get
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a good kid back there. you know i'm going to church here. and i see that that was definitely not you know that's not allowed if you find if you're to go to. jail for what i thought i. was you know the word that you were. my. was was i was getting used to cases of your people and places but on that trip something changed. she said. oh
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what's going on like tree. trying to court yes i am going to gesture she days. just please yes well you know knows his history you know turned into one submission you want to do a story on. the children you need to get israel to get some kind of operation. it can't go they're not they're not allowed in the commission because actually their condition isn't that enough. oh. we'll be sure you have been through so i. hear it's not the last time that's time you know. so anyway i mean we're there getting to know each other and all that and weeding for this trip in israel and i
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was thinking within. this medical crisis in israel and the whole thing it didn't fit does the little boy start to get sick very quickly. the thought i mean i want just the console to have all the. more. ok but if you. i mean if you can come to their little bit of. oh yeah you hope you'll come back but you won't come back to me so i am one thing you'll buy by now here's what you put there but i think your thought and thought but i think you know i don't put or thought i had to have talked to him instead of just hopping in the ambulance and driving to the hospital like you would in any other country always send parents and the doctors and all that this big bureaucratic process started to just to get fit i was out of guys.
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oh we'll just. look at him. and then we can more often come up with him with that. and what. can you give us about sort of a certain sort of sub until. this or the implication of a push that shot him into. political you should probably nothing else in. the way of the devolution hi-lo i told him look we want to show sort of us the young. men who are the others and they are really but the little tin is going to start and started it was a bit humid you know they got us instead of on the radio when we do it with all the you know with all of well you know whether you're enough of the game that one of those all of the flow if you go to the medicine you'll know yes to get it ambulance
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you get to a hospital fast in this case jane we've got some sports. and. i'm limited in a lot so i'm positive body and then i'd better get that good about a mother that does. something with my mom who will. give you my. call to say the fit of. form with the from the lion fish on ice for example that all the things.
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i want to move this process is coming to an end. we've been hard to come up with. something that's sort. of almost the whole of. the how the humph. and then they got the phone call to a chair and immediately reached the hospital. oh . well that was the battle so. that without.
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the help. i know young women there now that i have known not only was. the love love love love love love. love i saw her for the right we'll go through all of them but you're not going to come on the one of them i'll tell you because you know you're going to be applied would you be willing to.
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we never talk about for us again. because it just kept working and working where was it here. i forget now well that basically nothing. at all i'm not. after after i'm coming out there.
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it's. so simplistic level to disempower you know so for i don't suppose it's. for to boast but it's. true of all. the stuff that counts a much less she sells them opportunities to the infinite. and to my to it but the
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other stuff. she said she said just. how much will somebody say citizens. of that cell ahead of me i'm. sure going there just the look the old it's. always the mother you knew that was a. saucy ever so disinterested was a. dream i can tell the stuff. in a lot of men. in the train only for me to help push up. the sympathy. sent to. the court of course there. are so many things.
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you'll. see on t.v. i grew up without put up with a. separate point of it doesn't do any good because you. see if you survive this if it were missed. a eg.
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i was having doubts of my own i couldn't tell if berlin was the right place for me anymore. i want to to be close to my father but the the noise i should move back home you don't need first it didn't need you had to it's your dad. your mom. i don't know i would just like to briefly beat maybe thirty and for a while he got me. with you where yes i mean you have me.
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like your grandchild and you know i have nothing. because i'm going to us saying. i don't know the but i'm scared wrong that's alice. right. here where in the shelter door this is where our ladies or whatever this is where we are sleeping bag and we've got the t.v. better than i ever did because. larry this is the. first yeah you asked me. my job i just travel around the whole world just doing just meeting people in talking to them i want to practice been a news reporter. some learning something new here comes.
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by the way so sorry did. you think. he's going to. south america there was one during a tornado and i guess he liked his job he was fine you say we were there for kids his job but they couldn't tell if he was even working he spent two days like this while genesis the little girl was getting closer and closer to him. i even thought it was as if they think but then he finally decided to make an interview really easy a little hands on every almost every single like him but i think highly of
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meat. in eight years and everybody probably. i don't know it's me or you. and i took me along all by myself a lot and you can say i think about a lot of stuff in my head like right now so things linking my head and me getting out. so i have to. please provide myself if i mean your book work coloring or writing something. if people are laying down in their eyes old man or something they just look over and see on my long hair they can see what i'm doing and i like to be in rome that's like a box. and our small area where i have my home i
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will stuff. no i just. didn't. insist. i went ahead and did it to question that of another tonight to do it. on the keep. on doing wouldn't be a good. thing when it's nice to. let it in. just you still believe you cease to be. ok to sponsor. the but. in the fight to mississippi the books you should see out.
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because you could get them into really nice liquor sooner. but shop. after many years i was about to leave bourbon. there was not much to bring back with me apart from the big bucks. spent the better. but i have this done no. good job of not. letting her know she. will be
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given the stone with it see some of the interest on ten time i think about it. but i. don't have to over there and i mean you have to live there it's a long letter you going places with your dad and it's actually happening something . that i didn't expect i mean you know my that i feel it's the first time in our life that we are talking you know about things about. he's asking me about you know my personal seeings about my job about girlfriend he's probably feeling that it's close to the end you know so it's. it touches me it's first time in my life i have my father. all you know like you always have here you have your camera when you when you guys hang out when you go visit in the stuff like that no no that's. that's
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a strange things because i. we're not filming and you know you know if it was you you will never think. i know i would like and i'm on the other side i'm completely block you know i mean. i cannot you know there's some kind of just like sometimes you know you film things and you film people in the film in situations that can be traumatic or uncomfortable and all that you don't exactly know why right and you end up realizing later that you know what you filmed in those situations even though it's tough. it's something that you keep then you know it's like something that keep it something you cherish something that's part of yourself. a few weeks later i get the surprise after a long time kids you send me again you see midges. i do
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not know. this yet oh yes i got that this give. us a few. minutes over that. side yeah. yeah you do this you wouldn't say this is your job but there was a god they. got married after that and you know. who can see you oh you. good good excellent it's good to be here you can see you. doc that you told me this before yeah i was. president and next. thing in.
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my. way. i've learned. to. take s c. m m's.
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on a lot of them. say she said. hey man it's hard to believe that this could be my last video from. i resigned so i'm going to be living here probably the next few months. you know i always film people just trying to live their lives and. knowing it try to just have in mind.
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for years ago at this point. i remember a time when all i wanted to do was get out of displace. and now book to me and kids it at leaving back in florence. because he asked me to keep the state safe many years ago. and they didn't. well now i feel is the right moment to give them back to my friends. just don't know. how to handle.
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stone bryant with tension between islamic separatists and pro russian. culture in the crossfire one man has a vision for the next generation empowering. to seek a bench away. with dagestan's peaceful warrior. on al-jazeera. and
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more rain is developing across parts of the middle east at the moment in fact on the satellite picture you can already see the clouds we're seeing some pockets of bright white cloud just by the red sea and that's an indication that the rain is already fairly heavy is pushing his way northwards that even as we head through the south today and particularly saturday night we'll see that system really begin to put itself together so by the time we get to sunday them we'll see that rain push its way through parts of iraq and into syria as well heavy downpours out of this and look at the direction of the wind is coming from the south so picking up a lot of dust as well so it will be a fairly hazy day for many of us to some of that cattle be affecting us a bit further south as well so if we look at the chart across the. in peninsular we can see lots of cloud there across parts of saudi and across parts of q.h. as well will slip its way further south as we had three saturday night and into sunday so they could just be the odd shower
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a bit further south as well the main area of rain though is to the north for say muscat should be dry for us the top temperature of a pleasant twenty eight degrees which is eighty two in fahrenheit for the southern parts of africa there's been lots of wet weather recently but it is now easing or just see a few showers there around the coast of mozambique and maybe a few around parts of madagascar elsewhere it looks mostly dry in cape town but twenty five. i'm a historian say for the birth of these people every weekly news cycle brings a series of breaking stories told through the eyes of the world's journalists these two reuters journalists were one of the few journalists that were actually doing investigative work join the listening post as we turned the cameras on the media and focus on how they were caught on the stories that matter immensely buys the rights to those stories but then he never publishes those stories they're listening
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post on al-jazeera. al-jazeera. where every. insult career around two million dogs are eaten every year but now animal rights groups want the ancient tradition taken off the main want to when he's dressed a good korean dog. food on al-jazeera.
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a turkey's president says the order to kill journalist jim our first sheltie came from the highest levels of the saudi government. on hasn't think of this is al jazeera live from doha also coming up the pakistani government is accused of caving in to conservatives that's after a deal to end protests over the acquittal of a christian woman convicted of by.