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tv   BBC World News  BBC America  August 11, 2014 6:00am-7:01am EDT

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i'm alice with bbc world news. our top stories. iraq's highest court upholds maliki for new government. many voice concerns. >> there will be little international support from anything that deviates from the legitimate constitutional process in place and being worked on now. as a three day ceasefire in gaza continues, an israeli
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delegation is in cairo for talks of a longer term solution to the conflict. the prime minister confirms victory in the first direct presidential election calling for a new period of social reconciliation. u.s. motorsports officials question nascar champ tony stewart after a crash that killed another driver. a warm welcome to you. we begin iraq where the highest court has ruled maliki in a dispute. the court said mr. malaki could retain his position. the president must ask him to form a new government or he risks violating the the
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constitution. this comes as iraq battles. >> another u.s. air drop to those in desperate need sheltering exposed in northern iraq. americans have completed four such missions to deliver urgently needed supplies. those on the mountain are from the community that fled the latest sunni advances and have refocused international concern from the threat of the fighters known as the islamic state. meanwhile on the streets of iraqi capital, baghdad heightened security. that it seems because the political crisis has deepened. iraq's prime minister announced he's taking the president to to court as he struggles to hold his job. >> today i'll file a legal complaint to the federal court against the president of the republic for committing a clear
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constitutional violation for sake of political goals. i'm preferring narrow interest over the interest of the iraqi people. >> the latest report from baghdad that the court has backed mr. malaki and the president must ask him to form a new government. all this will dismay the americans. the u.s. secretary of state john kerry currently visiting australia has urged malaki not to stoke intentions. many see the iraqi prime minister as forming the base in baghdad vital to confronting the islamic state threat. >> one thing all iraqis need to know, there will be little international support of any kind whatsoever for anything that deviating from the legitimate constitutional process that is in place and being worked on now. they need to finish that and give a new government an opportunity to be voted on and
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move forward. >> on the front line in northern iraq, kurdish fighters ready to defend city of irbil, it's said they've retaken two towns from air strikes. now it's said washington is supplying the kurds with weapons. >> there are reports militants that captured the town northeast of baghdad after weeks of fighting with kurdish fighters. the seizures comes after a suicide bomber killed ten will there. the authority in northern iraq have appealed for more military aid. two towns were taken back sunday tolli i two towns. earlier i asked her to describe
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the situation there. >> right now the streetsof irbil is bigger than usual. you have people who are kurds. not all people have rooms to stay n. they're in churchyards, in the streets. security wise, it feels fairly stable. there's a police presence in the streets, but it's not over the top. it's nothing like what you see in some areas to the side of erbil where are security is less stable. defining characteristics is a lot of people on the move. at least 1.2 million are on the
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move. it's a fluid situation. >> very. and meanwhile the fighting continues. we've been getting reports the kurdish forces have retaken two towns from isis militants. what are you hear on that? >> indeed. it has been confirm had the kurdish forces have retaken at least one town yesterday afternoon. that town was held for several days by islamic state fighters. now it is back in kurdish hands. i'm hoping to go there this afternoon. >> and of course we had three days of u.s. air strikes now. how is that affecting the region? >> well, in a couple of ways. i think there's a sense i'm hearing from people, okay the rest of the world hasn't
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forgotten us. there's that. additionally when you look at the areas they're retaking, what i'm hearing not formally but inform willy from fighters is that they're retaking areas because the air strikes have given them a window to operate in. then yesterday i heard from a group of people who have made it off the mount and to two shrines. they said the only reason they could escape was because the air strikes gave them time the islam fighters were distracted. they were able to creep down the mountain. they claim the air strikes are the reason they're alive today. >> sarah williams from times of london earlier in erbil.
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the three day ceasefire in gaza between israel and hamas appears to be holding. now there's growing hopes of a long term deal to end the fighting. the diplomacy remains dependent continuing to last. joining me live now from jerusalem is the bbc. these talks continuing in cairo. just bring us up to speed for the situation currently on the ground particularly in southern israel. >> well those communities around the gaza border which were peppered by rockets and morters over the last month are now during a period of calm, people start to return. they will be weary. several have been injured there. after the last ceasefire when they thought it was safe to return rockets and morters resumed. there's a great deal of
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uncertainty. the overriding concern is allow an extended long period of calm in southern communities. the israeli delegation has gone through talks in cairo. it's debatable whether the long term issues can be resolved. there's political decent in israel. right wing members think israel should have continued the job in gaza as they put it. defeated hamas or tried to defeat it even though such a campaign would have cost more lives both on the palestinian side and israeli side. some concern here in israel that this ceasefire won't last. if not beyond the three days than certainly in the long run. this is the fourth conflict israel has fought over gaza in ten years. unless long term issues are dealt with, many people in those communities in the south expect the hostilities to resume. >> for now, many thanks. always good to get your views,
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live in jerusalem. our correspondent is in following talks in cairo. >> in fact there's an uncertainty concerning the possibility of a break through of these talks. israeli arrived and under talks with officials who made the point of view with the palestinian delegation who's been here a couple of days now. but the fact that both sides can reach a compromise is still highly uncertain. i've spoken to a number of palestinian officials specifically from the hamas movement. they said we are sticking firm to our demands. israelis have to agree to these demands. we cannot go back to where we were before the war. that blockade has to be lifted. it's the israeli taking firm
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position. the hamas point of view. on the other hand israel insists on demilitarizing gaza asking hamas to lay down weapons, a demand hamas totally rejects. when i've spoke ton palestinians over last days, a break through is unlikely given the fact no party is willing to make con sessions. in fact the arab league is having discussion. the ongoing talks are to see if there's a possibility to reach a break through or not. >> for us there in cairo. the newly elected president of turkey said that he wants to start a new era of social reconciliation. mr. erdogan is now looking to appoint a new prime minister to replace him after the unprecedented three terms. he told thousands of supporters
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that his victory was for all turks. >> translator: i many dear brothers and sisters, i speak are from my heart. today is the day we initiate a social reconciliation process. please leave a side the old discussions, old disputes, old tensions in the old turkey. let us leave all the virtual problems and conflicts in the old turkey. >> okay. time now to catch up with the latest business news. aaron is here as usual. good to see you. sanctions in russia? >> exactly. $16 billion, what the eu shifted to russia last year. they've got to find somebody to buy all that stuff experts from 28 eu countries are holding a
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meeting to discuss and analyze the impact of this russian ban on eu food imports. eu agricultural commissioner, there he is now seen last year, he's setting up and leading this task force. as you may though, moscow banned most food imports from united states, canada, norway and australia in the last week in retaliation for western sanctions imposed for russia's actions in ukraine. we're going to bring you latest information from here. barely a day goes by without a hack attack on a company. businesses around the world find it almost impossible to stay safe in the face of growing threats. i'm not sure what she's doing. many firms are tackling the problem head on, not by hiring children but seeking out and hiring the best and brightest hacker. could learning to be a hacker be
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a smart career move? that's what she's doing. okay. our technology reporter dave lee travelled to las vegas to the big convention. we have that on "gmt" many in over an hour's time. let's end with wine. in particular, australian wine. it's my favorite, not really. for producers it's been a rocky few years. soaring australian dollar hurting competition from other new world producers for sales has taken a toll, in particular on treasury wine. the world's biggest listed wine maker. it's in the middle of a bidding war by investors to take over the business. it received a second multibillion firm that wants to remain confidential. this comes from the private
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equisearty firm bid. follow me on twitter. tweet me @bbc aaron. what's my handle? i've been trying to prod you. it's called research. >> see you soon aaron. i think he's bbc aaron. he knows. stay with us on bbc world news. lots to come a side from aaron. we did not abandon our son. that's the australian couple accused of turning their back on a baby boy born in thailand with down syndrome. they're giving their side of the story. and that became our passion. to always build something better, airplanes that fly cleaner and farther on less fuel. that redefine comfort and connect the world like never before. after all, you can't turn dreams into airplanes
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♪ ♪ all the goodness of milk, all the deliciousness of hershey's syrup. this is bbc world news. the latest headlines. iraq's supreme court upholds
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prime minister malaki's prime court to form a new government. the court said he could retain his position. as a three day ceasefire in gaza continues, israeli delegation is in cairo for talks on a longer term solution for the conflict. the australian couple accused of abandoning their baby with his thai surrogate mother have given their first tv interview. they deny allegations and said they felt they had little choice to leave thailand with the healthy twin sister. there's lack of delegation over sur ga say. >> baby gammy's surrogate mother has excused his parents of turning their backs on the child with down syndrome and returning to perth with his healthy sister
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pipih. not so say the couple that allege the thai surrogate refused to let them take him home. >> we wanted to bring him. things were happening that we couldn't bring him. >> we asked her can you please give our boy? we want our boy. she got very, very angry. >> since they left thailand in a panic fearing they might not be able to leave with gammy's twin sister. >> the surrogate mother wanted to take our girl. we were scared we were going to lose her, so we had to try to get out as fast as we could.
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>> his story and claim and counter claim has another twist. the mother that gave birth to the twins in december is admitting she didn't let the australians take baby gammy because she feared they wouldn't look after him. >> translator: i never said i wanted to keep both babies. i did not allow gammy to go with them. that's the truth. they would put him many in an institution. i just hope my daughter is safe and they keep their word. >> authorities in western australia are investigating the safety and well being of baby pipah because of david's convictions of abusing young girls. he was jailed for a string of offenses in the 1990s. the 56-year-old father was rigorously challenged during the tv interview about his criminal past. he insisted he was no longer a
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danger to children. the case which is prompted a review of sur ga say laws in thailand remains smuggled in confusion. bbc news sydney. medical ethnic experts from the world health organization is meeting in geneva to discuss the possible use of experimental drugs to treat the ebola virus. no vaccine or cure has been developed to date. the disease continues to spread throughout west africa. the latest figure, death toll is nearly 1,000. we have the reports now from gene geneva. >> the mortality rate is up 90%. this is the worst outbreak ever spreading to four countries. the race is on to find a relike treatment. no one knows if the experimental drug given to two american aid workers really helped or now
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back in the united states they're improving simply because they're getting the best medical care money can buy. today the ethnics committee will discuss whether the drug never properly tested on humans should be tested more widely. >> we know it's public health measures that will stop the outbreak. it's breaking the chains of transmission through tracing of contract, getting people infected into medical care. >> the drug raises ethical questions. deciding against the accusation that a potential life saving treatment is only available to aid workers from wealthy countries. deciding in favor if the drug were to have major side effects lead to charges of the top
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public health body approved harmful experiments on the world's poorest people. the world health organization works worldwide to combat aids, polio. it can't afford to take a decision to undermine that trust. bbc news geneva. >> now one of america's best known racing drivers, tony stewart on the left has found himself at the center of a police investigation after another driver kevin ward jr. on the right died after being hit with his car. it happened at the motorsports park where stewart was taking part in a relatively minor race at a dirt track saturday evening. witnesses say his car was in collision resulting with the
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younger driver crashing out. later wards reported to have walked on the track in display of anger. stewart was in question by police who say he was visibly shaken. they haven't ruled out possible charges. they're not carrying out a criminal investigation. >> again, i want to make it very clear as we speak at this time, there is no evidence in hand or no facts that would support a criminal charge or criminal intent on the part of anybody. >> now such crashes are common in nascar racing where drivers fight for positions in speeds 300 kilometers per hour. tony was criticized on social media when he planned to compete
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in a nascar event sunday evening. his manager said he would not be racing immediately and was deeply upset by the incident. >> it's an unbelievable tragedy. our hearts go out to kevin and his family. our thoughts and prayers. this is a very tough emotional time for everybody. his family, our family, tony stewart. with that said, we feel as a group tony will not drive today. >> stewart is the most powerful man in the world amongst his fans. this is him beside president obama. whatever happens next will insure fame on the track. quick reminder of our top story on bbc world news. iraq 's highest court ruled in favor of the caretaker prime
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minister nouri malaki in the dispute with the president. the court said mr. malaki could retain his position. the president must him to form a new government or he risks violating the constitution. you're watching bbc world news. stay with us. did you get my e-mail? [ man ] i did.
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hello. i'm with bbc world news. our top stories. iraq's highest court upholds prime minister's malaki's calls to form a new government. the u.s. voices concern over the process. >> there will be little international support of any kind whatsoever for thinking that deviates from the legitimate constitutional process that is in place and being worked on now. as a three day ceasefire in gaza continues, an israeli delegation is in cairo for talks on a longer term solution to
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conflict. turkey's newly elected president, the outgoing prime minister calls for a new period of social reconciliation. we did not abandon our son, the australian couple accused of turning their backs on a baby born in thailand with down syndrome gives their side of the stor story. a warm welcome to you. we begin in iraq with the highest court ruled in favor of the caretaker prime minister nouri malaki in a dispute with the president. the court said mr. malaki could retain his position. president asked him to to form a new government or faces breaking
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the constitution. nick childs reports. >> another u.s. air drop to those in desperate need sheltering disposed in northern iraq. americans have now completed four such missions to deliver urgently needed supplies. those on the mountain are from the zity community and have focused international concern from the will threat of fighters known as the islamic state. on the streets there's heightened security. iraq's prime minister announced he was taking the president to court as he struggles to hold onto his job. >> translator: today i will file a legal complaint to the federalle coufederal
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court against the president of the republic for preferring narrow interest over the interest of iraqi people. >> and the latest report from baghdad that the court has backed mr. malaki and the president must ask him to form a new government. this will did dismay americans. secretary of state john kerry has urged mr. malaki not to start tensions. this is seen as an obstacle to forming the broad base unity government in baghdad they say is vital to confronting the islamic state front. >> one thing iraqis need to know is there will be little international support of any kind whatsoever for anything that deviates from the legitimate constitutional process in place and being worked on now. they need to finish that and give a new government an opportunity to be voted on and
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move forward. >> on the front line in northern iraq, kurdish fighters ready to defend the city of erbil. it's said they've retaken two towns since the u.s. air strikes. it is said washington is supplying the kurds with weapons. >> now we're getting reports that islamic state militants have captured the town northeast of baghdad after weeks of clashes with kurdish forces. the see which you are of jalawla comes a day after a suicide bomber killed ten kurdish fighters there. with me in the studio, bbc arabics to talk through the situation in iraq. let's begin with that court ruling in favor of nouri maliki. i understand at the moment details are unclear. >> yes because this court ruling was announced on tv which is a channel controlled by the maliki
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government. in the last few minutes, we've heard denial of that from the spokesman of the court saying that they have suggested to the president that the biggest block should form the government. they say this is not the biggest block. there's a confusion about this. we need to treat it with caution. >> we also hear about deployment of troops in baghdad. what would you say is significance of that mr. maliki trying to insure force. >> mr. maliki has been under pressure recently from inside and outside iraq from the american administration or other parties. he is insisting that he wants to form the new government and get a third term. there are many voices from even within the shiite community and political blocks inside iraq which want to see a replacement.
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he is accused of adopting sectarian policies that favor shiite on the expense of sunnis. he's blamed by these opponents as being the reason why isis made these gains. he denies this and portrays himself as the leader who's protector of the country against the islamic state military. >> he's accused of alienating in the past. i was just reporting on the supposed capture of the town by the islamic state militants. what do you make of that? >> it's another situation of the fluidy of the situation. militants belong to this group, islamic state, picking and choogz targ choosing targets. they have captured in the past few days several towns in the
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north. sinjar and biggest christian town hundreds of thousands fleeing. the kurdish forces backed by the american airplanes have launched counter attack capturing back two towns. we now hear the report of islamic state capturing jalawla. it's a fluid situation in baghdad. americans say the sooner we have a solid government that is inclusive of sectarians in iraq, the ability of government to confront this security threat from the militants. >> the situation on the ground very fluid. many to have your analysis. thank you. israeli negotiators are in
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cairo for direct talks aimed at finding a long term solution. the three day ceasefire appears to be holding. let's bring you live pictures of gaza if if we can. actually these are the latest pictures we're hearing, not live. these are the latest pictures from gaza. as you can see, there are signs of normal life returning to the streets after weeks of fighting. the ceasefire should allow more humanitarian aid in the territory where thousands have been left homeless. there's growing hope for long term deal to end the fighting. the diplomacy in cairo depends on the current ceasefire lasting on the ground. figures suggest more than 1900 palestinians have been killed in gaza in a month of fighting with 67 israelis losing their lives. many israeli homes near to gaza were r evacuated in the last few
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hours. some are taking advantage of the ceasefire to return. for more on the situation in gaza, you can of course always head to bbc news website. full background and analysis. go to bbc.com/news. let's have a quick update on the situation in ukraine where fighting we're hearing is continuing between government forces and pro russian rebels in the east of the country. this is donetsk in the last few hours, shortly after a ukrainian military spokesman said government forces were preparing for the final stage of recapturing the city, seen as a key rebel strong hold. the spokesman said donetsk was now cut off from the rebel held area around luhansk. we'll bring you more on this developing situation as soon as our correspondents report to us here at bbc world news. moving to turkey where the
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newly elected president erdogan says he wants to start a new era of social reconciliation after becoming the country's first directly elected head of state. mr. erdogan has already served three terms with the country's prime minister. he told thousands of supporters that his victory was for all turks. >> my dear brothers and sisters, i speak from my heart. today is the day we initiate a social reconciliation process. please leave a side the old discussions, old disputes, old tensions in the old turkey. let us leave all the virtual problems and conflicts in the old turkey. >> let's talk live now to bbc
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turkish service joining me in the studio. we just heard there from the new president erdogan claiming to be a president for all. do you think uncharacteristically reconciliation tone of voice you would say? >> yes, in previous speeches after election he made the same promises. many opponents believe this is social reconciliation with his presidential office. >> the other key question is how much power will a president erdogan really have? in the past this has been a largely ceremonial role. >> yes, it is. before the elections he was excited to have more public than the previous president in turkey. now everybody is expecting and just waiting, what is he going to do?
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first he can change the constitution to have more. the percentage of votes he got may not be enough to change the constitution giving himself more power. >> you alluded to earlier he remains a power. there are many that are skeptical about what mr. erdogan will bring to turkey as president. >> maybe it's early to say that, but we will all see what is going to happen. now they should decide about the prime minister himself and ten month later have general election. it's a process for turkey. >> many thanks from the bbc turkish service. do stay with us on bbc world news. still to come, how uganda resisted outbreak of deadly uganda virus. and that became our passion. to always build something better,
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now to egypt's state news agency reporting talks between israeli and representatives have begun in cairo. they're brokered by egypt and aimed at trying to bring an end to the ongoing connecticfliccon. we'll bring you more as soon as we have it from correspondents on the ground in cairo. we have sally nabil here on bbc world news. stay with us. >> the ebola outbreak continues to spread many west africa with
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the nigerian authorities have been just confirmed a new case bringing the total number to ten. the virus kills between 50 and 60% of those that catch it. there's no known cure or vaccination. uganda is not affected by the current outbreak but has to deal with dozens of case as in -- cases in the last decade. on the lookout for ebola, authorities worry the outbreak in west africa could spread. another the international airport, passengers are screened for the virus. these peace keepers have just arrived from the democratic republic of congress. since 2000, uganda has had the highest number of outbreaks in the world. this history has made the country a hub for ebola experts. over 20 health workers are being sent to west africa to help with
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the escapidemic there. he has years of experience handling the disease and knows what needs to be done. >> you need to accept ebola with you at the beginning is very important. because then it spread out, we are going now to do fire fighting. >> an outbreak centered in the north of uganda in 2000 killed more than half of the people infected. like the epidemic in west africa, authorities found hit hard to react. that pick which you were has changed. in the first outbreak, some had to be sent to united states for ebola cases to be confirmed. now it takes 24 hours at this american funded lab.
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>> i'm in this airtight room. i'm not allowed to cross over. some of the most dangerous diseases are tested for including ebola. this lab is one of only a handful on the continent. >> a lead scientist here works on the 2000 ebola outbreak in ugan uganda. he thinks education is key. >> first ebola is real. you don't need to mystify it. once they have signs, they need to report to the health system. people can survive ebola. >> government complaints have raised awareness about the virus. you beg uganda isn't a wealthy country but uses resources.
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>> the ebola outbreak, worst ever, centered on liberia, sierra leone and guinea. it has spread to other countries in recent months. nearly a thousand have died all together. 1,800 have become infected. liberia's information minister admitted the country's health care system has been overwhelmed. with me here in the studio, a water and sanitation specialist with the medical charity. you just returned from liberia and spent a month in guinea. many thanks for joining us here in the studio. your organization has described the situation in liberia with regard to the health service there as falling apart. how did you find the situation in liberia? >> the situation is absolutely dire. the statistics don't go anywhere to show how bad it is.
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>> you were in guinea as well. describe your experience there and compare the two. >> the situation in guinea seems to be improving, not as many cases coming forward. in liberia, i went in july. there were only a few in the treatment centers. by the time i left end of july, they were overflowing with patients and didn't have enough beds for people. >> talk me through things you saw. what are people dealing with? >> i'm afraid there's great fear. some don't want to accept ebola exists. they're coming as a result late to the clinics. if they come early, there's a chance they can survive. the fatality rate is only about 50 %. if they come late, the mortality rate is 95%. >> what are the concerns,
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raising education on how it's spread? >> there's so many aspects. we don't have enough people on the ground to be able to stretch. there's communication, response, training staff and teams. there's so much that needs to be done. >> what are your thoughts on this experimental drug we're hearing about now called zmap, untested drug used on american aid workers? >> if there's a possibility of treatment, people could benefit. there needs to be a proper frame work so it's tested and results are made known and it's clear and transparent. >> okay. thank you. we wish you and your organization the best of luck in tackling this awful outbreak. many thanks. >> thank you. the australian couple accused of abandoning their baby
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with his thai surrogate mother because he was born with down syndrome have given the first television interview. david and wendy deny allegations saying they felt they had little choice but to leave thailand with the healthy twin sister. this is drawing attention to lack of information to sur ga say. >> the surrogate mother blames the couple of turning their backs on the child born with down syndrome and returning to perth where his healthy sister pipah. not so say the couple who in an exclusive interview alleged the thai surrogate refused to let them take gammy home. >> we wanted to bring him. things were happening that we couldn't. we couldn't bring him. >> we asked her can you please
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give our boy? we want our boy. she get very, very angry. >> they said they left thailand in a panic fearing they might not be able to leave with his twin sister. >> the surrogate mother wanted to take our girl. we were scared we were going to lose her, so we had to try to get out as fast as we could. >> his story of claim and counter claim has another twist. the woman that give birth to twins in december is admitting she didn't let the australians take gammy because she feared they wouldn't look after hip. >> i never said i wanted to keep both babies. i did not allow gammy to go. that's the truth they would put
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him in an institution. i just hope my daughter is safe, and they will keep their word. >> authorities in western australia are investigating the safety and well being of baby pipah because of david farnell's convictions of abusing young girls. he was jailed for a string of offenses in the 1990s. the 56-year-old father was rigorously challenged during the tv interview about his criminal past. he insisted he was no longer a danger to children. the case which is prompted review of sur ga say laws in thailand remains smothered in confusion. bbc news sydney. now to a roller coaster ride that didn't pan out to be exactly the adventure thrill seekers expected. passengers that went on the ride in the u.s. ended up stranded
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out the top after it broke down. they were eventually rescued four hours later. >> this jumbled web is the joker's jinx, ironic name if you're one of these people two dozen riders at the amusement park trapped for several hours. emergency officials say the roller coaster malfunctioned leaving the car stuck near the highest point of the ride on sunday afternoon. this wasn't enough, the sun scorching heat meant rescue workers had to give umbrellas as protection. six flags america said in a statement it's not clear what caused the ride to stop but it has a computer xized safety system that performed as it's designed to do. it comes a month after passengers were freed from a derailed roller coaster at
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another six flags park in california. in this latest incident, the ups and downs of the joker's jinx have grounded it indefinitely. six flags will complete a thorough investigation. >> terrifying. >> stargazers in the northern hemisphere have been taking images of one of this year's most dramatic events. the moon appears 14% bigger and 30% brighter than normal as it reaches the point in orbit closest to the earth. the scientific name for it -- here it is if you missed it early in september. before we go, a quick update. talks in cairo to end the conflict in gaza appears to have started. egypt is hosting talks in cairo.
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you are watching bbc world news. more on that and all the stories that we're covering on the bbc website. for me and the rest of the team, that's all for this hour. do stay with us. that new guy is like a donut, tasty. yeah but you'll regret it. what about him? healthy like this super smoothie. yeeeeuk! the perfect man and the perfect snack,
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hello. you're watching "gmt" on bbc world news. i'm lucy hockings. our top stories. a political crisis deepens. mr. malaki takes the president to court as he struggles to cling to power. in northern iraq, america continues to drop urgent humanitarian aid. we're getting reports that washington is now directly supplying weapons to kurdish fighters. a three day ceasefire is holding in gaza as officials survey the extensive damage of the israeli operation. we're going to be speaking to palestinian economy

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