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tv   BBC World News  BBC America  August 13, 2014 6:00am-7:01am EDT

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hello. i'm geeta guru-murthy with bbc world news. our top stories, the militant group calling itself the islamic state seizes more ground reportedly capturing a key town near the syrian city of aleppo. the neighboring iraq, thousands of stranded by the advance of the islamists. the u.n. says urgent measures are needed to prevent potential genocide. canada promises to donate doses of a vaccine as ebola continues to kill. >> you know how to whistle, don't you? you just put your lips together
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and blow. one of hollywood's leading ladies, lauren bacall, has died in new york at the age of 89. hello. reports from syria say that islamic state militants have captured a key town near the syrian city of aleppo. clashes around the town reportedly began overnight. it could mean supply lines to syrian rebel groups who control much of aleppo could be blocked. that, of course, is happening at the same time as is is launching a wave of attacks across neighboring iraq. they are said to control a large portion of the region seen here in yellow from aleppo and syria all the way to the region near
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erbil in iraqi kurdistan in the north. we learn more about the control that is has over the area at the moment. >> reporter: the town in the northern aleppo province is -- has reportedly been captured. it is almost certain it has been captured by i.s. fighters from the syrian opposition. what this highlights, what it reminds us of is that the -- the extension of i.s. control across the region in both syria and iraq is really challenging. the regional order in ways it has really not been challenged in recent times. we can see i.s. fighters are engaged in one sort of battle or another with the syrian army, the syrian opposition, the iraqi army, and the american air force.
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this illustrates the americans and all the regional players in the region are not trying could to contain the expansion. >> the humanitarian situation in kurdistan is getting worse. nick charles has the latest. >> reporter: with every image and every passing day, the potential scale of a humanitarian disaster unfolding in northern iraq is becoming more apparent. at this camp in the kurdish area of neighboring syria, they do what they can to help. >> we expect refugees in the coming days. we're talking about 1200 to 15,000 people might be coming. so we try to mobilize the
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sources we can to the needs of those families and children. >> reporter: the u.s. aid effort continues to grow as well as the sixth wave of air drops to those still in despair on mount sinjar. the americans dispatched 130 more u.s. personnel to the city of erbil to assess in depth what more needs to be done. but they insist again these are not combat boots on the ground. >> this is not any extension of any role other for the united states other than to find ways to assist and help advise the iraqi security forces which we have been doing. as the president has made very clear, we're not going back into iraq. >> reporter: and a third wave of british air drops of vital supplies, clean water and crucially shelter kits for those exposed to searing heat on the mountain side.
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the jets have arrived in cyprus. their task, reconnaissance. but pressure is growing for the government to consider a military interscension. chinook helicopters were being sent too for possible relief operations or to transport equipment to those fighting the militants. in the iraqi capital baghdad a bomb attack near the home of iraq's new prime minister designate. in the political upheaval, the hopes of the outgoing prime minister of clinging on to power, but will the new leadership will be able to unify the country to take on the militants. nick charles, bbc news. the incumbent iraqi prime minister nuri al maliki says he has no intention of leaving his job unless the supreme court rules he has to go. he used his weekly tv address to say he was still the head of the government and to attack the decision to appoint haider al abadi his successor.
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with me is the editor of bbc arabic. on the political situation in baghdad there, can maliki hold on to power effectively or has he no choice now, the change has already happened? >> in this political crisis, maliki has very few choices. the americans have supported the new prime minister haider al abadi. the u.n., saudi arabia, iran, which used to be a strong ally of maliki. so now his only tactic now is to go to the courts and say this is unconstitutional. >> and are the courts free, biased, political? >> in iraq, because the thing is that maliki belongs to the shia section of the society. and what is apparent now is that there is a majority of the shia
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who wants maliki to move out and sees him as an obstacle to resolving this political crisis. >> it looks like he will have to go, even though it may be messy in the process? >> he can hinder it a little bit, but he doesn't have much choices. >> okay. looking at the spread of isis, or i.s. now, the news from earlier today is that they have taken another town near aleppo. and that wave of power is absolutely incredible in a relatively short space of time. is enough being done not only to help the yazidis but also to fight against them? >> when the international community is looking at how to deal with it, the united states and the european powers, they are dealing with very difficult situation to manage. and partly because of the political crisis in iraq. when isis or i.s. made their spectacular gains in june and captured majority of the
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provinces, america made it very, very clear they don't want to be dragged into a sectarian war and be seen as fighting on the side of the shias against the sunnis. and part of this was to, if maliki wins, this would resolve this. and we have seen lots of reports recently in the u.s. media, in the wall street journal and new york times indicating that the americans are considering widening their campaign against isis if haider al abadi forms a -- >> what would that widened campaign mean? boots on the ground or not? >> not necessarily. we have seen the 130 special forces who have been deployed in iraq recently. and they are going -- probably to look into how to contain i.s. and prevent them initially from saving the yazidis.
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but then know how to contain them and push them back. >> many thanks. we move on to another troubled part of the world now and ukraine because the interior minister there is insisting that a russian aid convoy will not be allowed to enter ukraine. they call humanitarian assistance provocation by the aggressor. trucks carrying food set off yesterday. the west is worried that russia is using humanitarian assistance as a pretext to put troops into eastern ukraine. dan sanford says the trucks are expected to pass through the border post. >> this convoy of military trucks that have been painted white and appear to be carrying baby food, sleeping bags and generators spent the night in voronezh south of moscow and about 300 kilometers east of the border crossing. we think they're going to use over into ukraine. if you imagine the border between ukraine and russia has a
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northern part which goes across into the kharkiv region of ukraine, controlled by the ukrainian government and the southern part which goes across into the donetsk region of ukraine where, of course, all the conflict has been. and the idea is, the ukrainian government's idea is that any aid should come across into the area controlled by them, in other words, the kharkiv region. the debate now is whether the trucks themselves will be allowed to cross the border and continue on down towards luhansk with ukrainian number plates on them are or if the aid will be moved out of those trucks and into ukrainian trucks. and the russians insist that it should be these same trucks that carry on, that's the simpler opening. the ukrainians seem wary about that. i should say the whole thing has a slightly theatrical air about it. it is not really quite clear why you need to send aid for moscow as opposed to buying it in ukraine itself. and it can be that the whole thing is being used to apply
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pressure on the ukrainian government to make them have to answer questions about why they're not supplying the aid themselves to the people in luhansk. >> do we know exactly how much in need people are in that area? >> well, i think in luhansk in particular, the situation is really quite serious. the city has been under siege for a few weeks now. it was in quite a bad situation when i was last there four or five weeks ago and things are much, much worse now. they haven't really got a reliable water supply. they haven't really got reliable electricity. there is quite a lot of shell fire around the edges of luhansk and it is difficult for food to get in and out. i think as this happened in other cities when they have been under siege in eastern ukraine, one of the issues is that people are having to shelter and they can't get out for food. the situation is bad. the question is whether the aid needs to be driven all the way from moscow in order to relieve it. >> daniel sanford in moscow.
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now, we move to events in africa and the third death from ebola has been confirmed in nigeria. the victim was an official from the west african regional bloc in contact with the liberian american patrick sawyer, the man who is thought to bring ebola to nigeria last month. canada will donate a thousand doses of a vaccine to help fight the outbreak. v-map is the only experimental drug which has so far been used and it has three antibodies to ebowl a but there are just 12 doses and there will be no more until the end of this year. that's why experts are warning it could take up to six months to make a large enough quantity to have any real impact. more than a thousand people are now believed to have died from
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ebola. 1800 others have also been infected. a short while ago, i spoke to our correspondent about the latest ebola late est death in nigeria. >> he was one of the people that received this man that came into the country a few weeks ago in july and we know he was also one of the ten people, ten confirmed cases of ebola in the country and in isolation before he died. so far all the people who have been confirmed as having the virus including all the people who died are believed to have come into direct contact with this liberian man. >> and in terms of the delay and the vaccine, do we know why it is going to take six months potentially to get a meaningful supply? has the government been given any understand on that? >> it is not particularly clear. we had nigeria appeal to the u.s. for whatever experimental
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drugs it could get and, of course, that request was declined. and so far there isn't any clear plan as we know as to how this will be administered. the government here, we have seen not just in nigeria, but the other three west african countries affected by the virus, these health care systems have been struggling so far. they have been strained. we're seeing them appealing to the international community for whatever help can be given. the who confirming that, you know, or proving that these experimental drugs can be used and within these countries now, just saying whatever support can be brought in should be given to be able to stop the spread of the virus. the former egyptian president hosni mubarak arrived in court in cairo are for his retrial on charges over the killing of around 850 protesters in 2011.
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the 86-year-old was found guilty of conspiracy to kill demonstrators in june 2012, but the conviction was overturned last year. the former leader is due to speak today. >> yes, mubarak arrived a couple of minutes ago and we're expecting his speech very, very soon. this is the first time to give a speech since his first -- in 2011. lots of speculation around this speech. will he give an emotional argument asking to sympathize with him or will he repeat what others have said in a couple of hearings that are were held days ago. other defendants in the case said that this was by the muslim brotherhood in preparation with hamas. there were a lot of controversy about giving mubarak this chance
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at all. some have been saying that if this ex-president has the chance to defend himself, the other ex-president, mohamed morsi, should have the chance as well to give a defense statement to support his case. anyhow, we have to wait and see if the man is going to uncover any hidden past in today's proceeding, his ouster. >> sally nabil in cairo. stay with us on bbc news. much more to come. a natural wonder under threat. could climb change put the future of the great barrier reef in doubt? prem ium every month on the dot. you're like the poster child for paying on time. and then one day you tap the bumper of a station wagon. no big deal... until your insurance company jacks up your rates. you freak out. what good is having insurance if you get punished for using it? hey insurance companies, news flash. nobody's perfect. for drivers with accident forgiveness,
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♪ unless your passion for innovatioh no.nonstop. who are you? daddy, this is blair, he booked this room with priceline express deals and saved a ton. i got everything i wanted. i always do. he seemed nice. this is "bbc world news." i'm geeta guru-murthy. militants from the group calling itself the islamic state are reported to have taken over from the town of akhtarin in northern syria. in neighboring iraq, the
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united nations is warning that a humanitarian crisis of huge proportions is unfolding. david cameron just returned from his holiday to chair an emergency meeting on the crisis in iraq. but perhaps that is a segue from iraq -- >> how did you do that? >> aaron, it is close to my heart. >> going on holiday. guard dogs, we'll take care of it. cracking down on car rentals, the european commission said that drivers are being charged different prices online for the same car rental based on where they live in europe. now, the eu commission says this price discrimination is against the eu's single market rules. hertz, avis and euro cars have to review their pricing structures by the end of the month. but they said we're not doing
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anything wrong, we're compliant with eu regulations. we'll keep on that throughout the rest of the day. japan's economy, big backward step, biggest contraction since 2011 when it was devastated by that earthquake and tsunami. the shock of a new sales tax that took effect on the first of april meant the japanese economy this rank in the last three months by 1.7% when compared to the previous quarter. the congress thinks the impact of the sales tax will fade, but i have to say this, the sales tax in japan is going up again to 10% in 2015. twitter, yes, the little bluebirdy has announced it is set offing a new video advertising feature. twitter is trying to show it reached even as the growth in its user figures slows down, but it is not the only website trying to tap into the lucrative video advertising. worldwide was worth an estimated $17 billion last year. this year, it is expected to reach $32 billion.
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follow me on twit, tweet me @bbcaaron. all the news coming up on "gmt." and now i will move in while you're away. protect it. don't you worry. i will protect the house. party time at geeta's! >> we're scared now, aren't we. down to aaron's part of the world, the home of the great barrier reef, one of the natural wonders of the world, not talking about aaron, i'm talking about the home in australia of the coral. the stark warning from the australian government report says the outlook for the great barrier reef is poor. that's because of climate change and other dangers. the reef is the world's largest coral structure and home to thousands of species of fish. matt mcgrath says despite actions to protect the reef, the future is looking bleak. >> this report is the most starkest warning. planet changes hampering the growth of the reef, point out that human development in terms
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of development of ports on the coast of australia, for the export of coal and gas is causing trouble and nutrient runoff from farms is hampering the reef. steps have been taken, but the outlook as they say is poor. and they're worried that next year the united nations might declare it a world heritage site that is in danger. >> they do specifically criticize the government. >> yeah. it is a report that says not enough has been taken at the regional, local and international level. they talk about trying to save the reef in the future by having a global climate change packed in place that will help reduce the impact of climate change on the oceans around the reef. they also talk about farmers doing more, talk about the issue of development. australia is in a difficult position. it wants to protect the great barrier reef from climate changes but many environmentalists say it is exporting so much coal, gas, that it is contributing to the particular problem. the government wants both ways. to keep the development going. they want to protect the global icon as well. >> how much of this comes down
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to cost? >> there is a huge economic investment here. the reef is worth 6 billion australian dollars to australia every year. it is hugely important that way, just in pure dollars and cents terms but it has an intangible value to the planet. it has got financial value that the australian government is aware of and also this great cultural scientific value to the world as well with the australian government is determined to protect, so it says. >> matt mcgrath there. now, she was one of the last survivors of hollywood's studio age. lauren bacall died at the age of 89 in new york. she was known for her smoldering looks, husky voice and partnership on and off screen with humphrey bogart. she emerged as a star of the silver screen in the 1940s in the film "to have and to have not" when she played his leading lady. we look back at her extraordinary life and career.
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>> anybody got a match. >> reporter: rarely has an actress made such an impact with her first appearance. she was 19, unknown and playing opposite a screen legend, humphrey bogart. but this sultry blond became an instant star, tough, wise beyond her years but with an air of vulnerability, albeit masked by a voice that one critic said sounded as if it had been smoked in vodka. >> thanks. >> reporter: the couple fell in love off screen too. and bacall married bogart 25 years her senior in 1945. >> wait a minute, you better talk to my mother. >> reporter: to make three more films together, including this classic. >> hello. who is this? the police. this isn't a police station. well, if you know, why did you -- look, this is not a police station. what was that you said? my father should hear this. >> reporter: they had 11 happy years together, before bogart's death from cancer.
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and she felt in private she was very different from her screen image. >> i am looked upon as a woman who is this total control and command of every situation, i don't need anyone and i have all the answers. well, as we all know, no one is that sure of themselves, i don't think. if they are, i don't want to meet them. >> reporter: in the years after, she was briefly engaged to frank sinatra and married for eight years to jason robards. but she struggled to escape the shadow of bogey. that is until a stage musical applause revived her career and brought more films such as "murder on the orient express". >> what's the matter with him? >> reporter: and she won an oscar nomination for her role in "the mirror has two faces". >> if you don't behave yourself, i'll have your birth certificate blown up as a christmas card. >> i should have never encouraged you to speak. are. >> reporter: but she knew she
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would be best remembered for her first film in one of cinema's most famous lines. >> you know how to whistle don't you? you just put your lips together and blow. >> lauren bacall who has died at the ith of 89, this is bbc world news. [male vo] inside this bag is 150 years of swedish experience in perfecting the rich, never bitter taste of gevalia. we do it all for this very experience.
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with "bbc world news," our top story, the militant group calling itself the islamic state seizes more ground, reportedly cap chuturing a key town near t city of aleppo. in neighboring iraq, thousands are stranded by the advance of the islamists. spanish immigration centers are overwhelmed as over 800 african migrants arrive in just 24 hours. and from equations to accolades, an iranian born professor becomes the first
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woman to win imagimathematic's prestigious award. hello. reports from syria say the islamic state militants have captured a key town near the syrian city of aleppo. clashes around the town of akhtarin reportedly began overnight, and it could mean supply lines to syrian rebel groups who control much of aleppo could now be blocked. well, that, of course, is happening at the same time that i.s. is launching a wave of attacks across neighboring iraq. islamic state militants are now said to control a large portion of the region seen here in yellow from aleppo in syria all the way to the region near erbil in iraqi kurdistan. our correspondent is in erbil
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for us. he told me more the control that i.s. has over the area. >> the town of akhtarin in the northern aleppo province is -- has reportedly been captured. it is almost certain it has been captured by i.s. fighters from the syrian opposition. what this highlights, what it reminds us of is that the -- the extension of i.s. control across the region in both syria and iraq is really challenging the regional order in ways that it has really not been challenged in recent times. we can see that i.s. fighters are now engaged in some -- in one sort of battle or another with the syrian army, the syrian opposition, the iraqi army, proiranian militia, and the american air force. so basically what this illustrates is that the americans as well as all of the regional players here in the region are not trying to contain
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the expansion of i.s. they have this common goal in between them across syria and iraq. >> as you have been hearing, the situation in kurdistan is getting worse. nick charles has more. >> reporter: with every image and every passing day, the potential scale of the humanitarian disaster unfolding in northern iraq is becoming more apparent. at this camp in the kurdish area of neighboring syria, they do what they can to help. >> we expect to have refugees in the coming days. we are talking about 1200 to 15,000 people might be coming. we try to mobilize the sources as quick as we can to respond to the need of those families and the children. >> reporter: the u.s. aid effort
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continues to grow as well as the sixth wave of air drops to those still in despair on mount sinjar. the americans have dispatched 130 more u.s. personnel to the city of erbil, to assess in depth what more needs to be done. but they insist again these are not combat boots on the ground. >> this is not any extension of any role other for the united states other than to find ways to assist and help advise the iraqi security forces which we have been doing. as the president has made very clear. we're not going back into iraq. >> reporter: and a third wave of british air drops of vital supplies, clean water and crucially shelter kits for those exposed to the searing heat on the mountain side. the tornado jets britain dispatched arrived in cyprus, their task reconnaissance. but pressure is growing for the government to consider a
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military intervention. chinook helicopters are being sent too for possible relief operations or to transport equipment to kurdish forces fighting the militants. in iraqi capital baghdad, a bomb attack near the home of iraq's new prime minister designate. in the political upheaval there, the hopes of the divisive outgoing prime minister nuri al maliki of clinging on to power seem to be ebbing. but will the new leadership be able to unify the country to take on the militants? nick charles, bbc news. the incumbent iraqi prime minister nuri al maliki says he has no intention of leaving his job unless the supreme court rules he has to go. he used his weekly tv address to say he was still the head of the government and to attack the decision to appoint haider al abadi as his successor. he called on people to reject those who he says have rebelled against the constitution. well, i asked mohamed yaya if he
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could keep his hold on power in the country? >> in this political crisis, maliki has very few choices. the americans have supported the new prime minister haider al abadi, the u.n., saudi arabia, iran, which used to be a strong ally of maliki, so now his only tactic now is to go to the courts. and say this is unconstitutional. >> and are the courts free, biased, political? >> in iraq, because the thing is that maliki belongs to the shia section of the society. and what is apparent now is that there is a majority of the shia who wants maliki to move out and see him as an obstacle to resolving this political crisis. >> one way or another, it looks like he will have to go, even if it is messy in the process? >> yes, he can hinder it a little bit, but he doesn't have much choices. >> okay. now, just looking at the spread
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of isis, or i.s. as it is called now, the news from earlier today is that they have taken another town near aleppo. and that wave of power is absolutely incredible in a relatively short space of time. is enough being done to help the yazidis and also to fight against them? >> when the international community is looking at how to deal with this, the united states and the european powers, they are dealing with very difficult situation to manage. partly because of the political crisis in iraq, when isis or i.s. made the spectacular gains in june and captured the majority of the province, the americans maid it very, very clear they don't want to be dragged into a sectarian war and be seen as fighting on the side of the shias against the sunnis. and part of this was to -- if maliki went, this would resolve
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this. and we have been seeing lots of reports recently in the u.s. media, in the wall street journal and new york times indicating that the americans are considering widening their campaign against isis if haider al abadi forms -- >> what would that mean very quickly in the line? what would that campaign mean? boots on the ground or not? >> not necessarily. you mean, we have seen the 130 special forces who have been deployed in iraq recently. and they are going -- probably to look into how to contain i.s. and prevent them initially from saving the yazidis. but then how to contain them and push them back. just in last few minutes, a spokesman for the french president said france will in the coming hours supply arms to the iraqi kurds in response to their request, of course.
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they're fighting against the islamic state militant group. so france saying they will now step up to the growing calls for support in the region against those i.s. militants. we'll update you just as soon as we can. we know david cameron just returned from his holiday too, to chair an emergency meeting on the situation in iraq and syria. let's move on to another huge trouble spot we have been covering for many months, ukraine. interior minister there says a convoy which russia says is carrying humanitarian aid for people in eastern ukraine will not be allowed to enter ukrainian territory. earlier, moscow said it expected the lorries to be able to pass through the border. ukrainian forces have been attacking areas held by pro-russian rebels. well, russia insists the aid is urgently needed to help people caught up in the fighting.
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hundreds of refugees are continuing to flee directly into russia. these people told russian journalists that power, water supplies have been cut off in parts of ukraine and that supplies of food were running short. let's go live to daniel sanford in moscow. this picture, daniel, seems to be changing all the time. what is the latest on the convoy? >> if russia achieved anything with its theatrical convoy of more than 200 shiny white vehicles charging towards the ukrainian border carrying humanitarian aid, it managed to sow confusion. the president of ukraine had signed up for that, but russia then jumped the gun, started sending this huge column of trucks to the border. it seemed as if that aid was going to be allowed across, even first thing this morning, even if it might have been transferred into other trucks. but now the interior minister, who i should say can be -- speak
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slightly off message -- ended up saying there was no way he was going to allow putin's convoy into ukraine and perhaps more importantly the prime minister said the level of russian cynicism is boundless, first they delivered tanks and rockets and terrorists who fire on ukraine and now they're delivering water and food. so clearly there are senior members who are quite against this convoy. whether that means that none of the aid in that convoy will ever cross the border i think isn't quite clear yet. but certainly the picture is becoming less clear rather than more clear as the days progress. >> daniel sanford in moscow, many thanks indeed. now, the former egyptian president hosni mubarak has arrived in court in cairo for his retrial on charges of the killing of around 850 protesters in 2011. the 86-year-old was found guilty of conspiracy to kill demonstrators in june 2012, but
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the conviction was overturned last year. now, immigration centers in southern spain are overflowing after 80 small boats and rafts carrying migrants made it to the spanish mainland. over the course two of days, more than a thousand people have arrived. they're mainly from sub-saharan africa. it is reported this could be the largest ever number of migrants to enter the country in such a short space of time. let's go live to correspondent in madrid tom barth. we have seen this before. but why such a sudden flow here? >> it is interesting. this court of thing, they have given me the latest figures. 1,229 people have been rescue d between morocco and the southern spanish coastline. that is an unprecedented number of people in such a short space of time.
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now, the reasons, i think, are several. firstly the weather conditions were very good. generally speaking in the summer there is an increase generally speaking in the number of boats trying to attempt the crossing, which is perilous for many, from northern africa to spain or other parts of southern europe. but the spanish media have been reporting that on monday and tuesday, on tuesday alone 922 people who tried to make the crossing. and spanish media reporting the moroccan authorities are to blame because they weren't on patrol in those particular two days. i've spoken to spain's interior ministry. they are not going along with that line. they say the weather was good. and they put the other main reason down to the fact that they have increased the border fences surrounding two spanish territories in north africa. what you have to realize in this story is that there are thousands of migrants originating from sub-saharan
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africa living in parts of morocco in the hills and country side and for months they have been trying in large groups to try and scale that border fences and spain says because the border fences are better, more people are resorting to trying to cross in small boats across the stretch of water to the main land. >> tom burridge there in madrid. thank you for explaining all that. stay with us on "bbc world news." much more are to come. we meet karachi's latest comic book crusader and the cartoonist who brought her to life. the perfect snack, don't exist. you sure? try dannon oikos greek nonfat yogurt. perfect cause it's healthy with 0% fat and 12 gr. of protein and so creamy. mmm... could be the perfect... oh! ladies. snack, john! the perfect snack! dannon oikos. ♪ dannon!
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this is "bbc world news." i'm geeta guru-murthy with the latest headlines. militants from the group calling itself the islamic state are reported to have taken over the town of akhtarin in northern syria. in neighboring iraq, the united nations is warning that a humanitarian crisis of huge
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proportions is unfolding. now to an issue that affects 17 million people worldwide. and that is the number of men, women and whirn forchildren for escape their home countries. well, it is estimated that about 7,000 of them each year are housed in the u.s. the bbc met one refugee family originally from the democratic rep republic of congo as they prepare to make the difficult journey to america. >> reporter: these rolling hills provide the backdrop for an incredible journey. from refugee camps like this one, close to the border of eastern congo, thousands of people are hoping to start a new life. fleeing their homes, many spent most of their lives here. for emanuel and his wife ester, providing for their three young boys means sacrifice.
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when food is in short supply, they often go without, so their children can eat. >> translator: life in the camp is not that easy. sometimes our food is finished before the end of the month. which means we only feed our children once a day. >> reporter: but they tell me everything is about to change for them. today is their last day before they leave. >> translator: this hasn't been much of a life, but i've given it my best. we hope to one day consider america to be our home. >> reporter: but not everyone wants to make that move. having spoken to many families in this camp, you have a sense there is a debate if it would be better for them to stay here and wait for it to get better or if they should take what might amount to a huge cultural leap to the united states. and making the jump is not easy. many here have little experience of city life and have to undergo cultural lessons about life in the west. >> they are coming from refugee camp setting to a totally
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different environment in the u.s. and many, especially the older people, will not speak any english. >> reporter: before they leave, there is a chance for one last sendoff. they haven't been told where their new home is in the u.s. and about what to expect there. >> translator: i'm very excited and i'm pleased we can have a farewell. i told my friends and my family to be patient. i hope one day we can meet them in america. >> reporter: with their bags packed, hundreds of well wishers arrive to say good-bye. a new life in the u.s. is a daunting prospect, but in last minutes before they leave, the fear of the unknown is outweighed by optimism for the future. bbc news, northern rwanda. now, many in the medical
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community suspected a link between genetics and eating disorders. now scientists in the uk are looking at the dna of people who had anorexia and hope that it will help them understand why some and not others struggle with the condition. >> it is a very large collection of dna samples. >> reporter: this 22-year-old was first diagnosed with anorexia when she was 13. >> it is something that still is seen as a bit of a taboo subject. >> reporter: today, she's fully recovered, happy and healthy. and offering a sample of her dna to scientists here at kings college london. >> it was an emotional thing, you know, in a good way, it see there is something being done to find a cure for anorexia. it is such a horrible illness to go through. >> reporter: they believe biology may help to unlock new information about the condition. >> can you mack a fist for me? >> reporter: the dna is frozen before researchers take a closer
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look. >> i think as a scientist to be able to understand the biology of mental illness is very rewarding. >> reporter: they'll be looking at the dna to see if there is by nations of genes that is common between people with anorexia to treat and predict who could be at risk. the numbers of samples we have in the study gives us a really powerful tool at looking at patterns at a molecular level that can either raise the risk or lower the risk. >> reporter: 25,000 samples globally from people who suffered from anorexia in the past. here in the uk, a project has been set up to try and contribute to at least 1,000 dan samples. charlotte was inspired by george's mom who passed away from breast cancer earlier this year, but not before helping georgi evercome her battle with anorexia. >> she believed it was a genetic thing rather than my conscious
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choice. a lot of people did kind of think that if you just eat, it will be fine. and i think that with the project she was excited and passionate that there can be a kind of modern attitude toward this rather than some complete misconception. >> reporter: it is hoped that the dna donations will provide medical professionals with more answers and a better understanding to try and save more lives. leah gidding, bbc news. now, to a woman with all the makings of a modern day superhero, a tragic back story, a fearless demeanor and a blatant disregard for any rules. she may only be a fictional creation, her adventures are heavily based on real life events in karachi, the home city of her creator. we asked the cartoonist to give us the insight on his unique heroine.
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>> translator: i see her as a strong woman because there is a dearth of such characters in pakistan. and then to show a woman rather than a big beefy superhero fighting against gangsters and corrupt people. it has created a visual impact. people criticize the way she looks. when you see a girl walking down the street in pakistan, she's very conscious of how she dresses. but my superhero is beyond social scrutiny. she doesn't care. she has to fight. my main focus was terrorism and
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gangster violence in karachi. karachi is not just a city. it is a character all on its own. and karachi burns, it heals itself and then springs back to life. the reason i look at it is that so many people died due it terrorism or targeted killings. but nobody asks about what happens to the families of the victims afterwards. she is from one of those families. and takes revenge. and she takes it cold. >> a look there at a new cartoon character coming out. now a professor born in iran has become the first woman to win the equivalent of the nobel prize for work in math. meriam receiving her award from the south korean president now lectures at stanford university
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in the united states. her work on understanding the symmetry of curved surfaces helped her to become the first female to take the field medal since it was set up in 1936. well, sarah hart is professor of mathematics here in the uk. i asked her why it took so long for a woman to win this prestigious prize. >> part of the reason i think is that the prize is awarded to someone who is are under the age of 40 and as we all know there are pressures on women in those crucial years in their 30s and 20s, they have a lot on their plate, having children, things like this, that may make it harder to reach that goal. >> do we know what exactly she has won her prize for? >> she's done some really astonishing research in the area of hyperbollic geometry, researching into kind of shortest paths on curved surfaces. this is really groundbreaking stuff and she's always been, since the beginning of her
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career has been a stellar person. and people who know about these things have seen that, you know, she's really -- she's won lots of awards already and just -- >> sarah hart there. she was great talking about the award. to another astonishing woman, the veteran american actress lauren bacall i'm afraid has died age 89. here is a quick taste of perhaps her most famous line. >> you know how to whistle, don't you? you just put your lips together and blow. >> well, she shot to fame in the 1940s with her first film "to have and to have not" alongside mum the man she went on to marry, humphrey bogart. flowers have been laid at her star on the hollywood walk of fame. the singer gloria gainer tweeted, just put your lips
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together and we'll say good-bye. before we go, we want to bring you breaking news, hosni mubarak just started speaking in the courtroom in cairo. there will be more coming up here on "bbc world news." stay with us for continuing coverage. he is appearing to try and put the record straight. wouldn't it be great if hiring plumbers, carpenters shopping online is as easy as it gets. and even piano tuners were just as simple? thanks to angie's list, now it is. we've made hiring anyone from a handyman to a dog walker as simple as a few clicks. buy their services directly at angieslist.com no more calling around. no more hassles. start shopping from a list of top-rated providers today. angie's list is revolutionizing local service again. visit angieslist.com today.
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hello. you're watching "gmt" on bbc world news. i'm lucy hockings. our top stories, the united nations warns of a potential genocide in northern iraq. time is running out for thousands of yazidis. as the humanitarian needs escalate, so too does the country's political crisis. the prime minister says he will not quit. another ebola death in nigeria. questions now being asked about why the man who brought it to country was allowed to leave

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