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tv   BBC World News  BBC America  September 3, 2014 6:00am-7:00am EDT

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hello. this is "bbc world news." our top story. ukraine's president announces a deal is reached with russia over a permanent cease-fire. russia's president vladimir putin says there was never any agreement. president obama is in estonia, reassured russia's neighbors they'll have the full support of nato if the ukraine crisis spreads to baltic states. >> as we stood together, russia is paying a heavy price for its actions and nato is poised to do more to help ukraine strengthen its forces and defend their country. the united states says a video showing the beheading of
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journalist steven sotloff by islamic state militants is authentic. protests calling for pakistan's prime minister to resign continue, parliament holds an emergency session to try to rally support behind him. hello and with welcome to the program. well, there has been a fair amount of confusion in the last hour about whether or not a deal has been reached to end the fighting in ukraine. the ukrainian president petro poroshenko said he reached a deal with vladimir putin on a permanent cease-fire in east ukraine. a spokesman said the russian president did not agree to a cease-fire in ukraine because russia is not a party to the conflict. he insisted that the two men discussed only how to settle the
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conflict. well, let's get some clarity on this. steve rosenberg joins us from moscow. steve, so who said what? where are we with this? >> i'm afraid i can't provide too much clarity. it remains a very confused situation. the first indications that the positions of moscow have moved closer came early this morning when the kremlin announced there would be a television conversation between president putin and president poroshenko. and the kremlin said that the viewpoints of the two presidents had coincided greatly on how to solve this difficult crisis. after that, we heard a very short statement from president poroshenko who claimed that there had been an agreement on a permanent cease-fire in the donbass in eastern ukraine. he talked about mutual understanding had been reached on the steps needed to achieve peace. well, after that, we heard again from the kremlin. the kremlin denied there had been an agreement on a cease-fire, because as the
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kremlin pointed out, russia is not a party to this conflict. despite the growing evidence in recent days that russia is a party to the conflict, and that there has been increased russian military activity across the border in eastern ukraine. nevertheless, moscow maintains it is not involved in the military conflict in eastern ukraine and therefore could not agree to a cease-fire. and i noticed a few minutes ago looking at the website of president poroshenko there has been one small change in his brief statement, the word permanent seems to have disappeared and now that statement says an agreement was reached on a cease-fire. so really, we're none the wiser. we're not sure whether the statements coming out of moscow and kiev actually will make a difference on the ground in eastern ukraine. >> indeed. it seems very confusing. in the meantime, president obama was saying moscow has got to stop arming, supporting and the guise of the home grown troops
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in eastern ukraine, but stop supporting the rebels. >> president obama has been saying that for weeks, for months now, so have other western leaders. none of these words have made president putin change course. i doubt whether president obama's tallinn speech today will change moscow's view on what is happening across the border in ukraine. and while president obama was making his speech today, and while nato prepares for its summit in wales, russia is preparing to react -- talking about updating, rewriting the national military doctrine perhaps to make it clearer in this doctrine that the united states and nato once again russia's principal enemy and there is talk about a new round of military exercises involving russia's strategic nuclear forces. so very little sign that russia
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is trying to end this confrontation that has blown up with the west. >> so a bit of saber rattling there for the time being. steven rosenberg in moscow, thank you very much. let's discuss this. we're joined by the bbc ukraine analyst alexi. a confused situation on this cease-fire, whether it is -- has been agreed, hasn't been agreed. if there is a cease-fire or isn't, where are we with the situation? >> i think the good thing is that the russian president and ukrainian president are talking and agreeing it appears on some of the details of some of the steps that need to be taken in order to achieve some kind of settlement. i think judging by some of the rhetoric coming from others, from diplomats, pundits on both sides, this is progress. what is not clear is that how those agreements will be communicated to the rebel leaders in donetsk and luhansk and the self-proclaimed people's republic because there are lots of confusing messages coming
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from there. even after the meeting on monday in minsk where the two sides, the ukrainian government and th sat down for the first time and exchanged their proposals. even after that there was confusion and contradictory statements about some people in the east saying they will never negotiate with kiev until kiev withdraws troops. so the fact that they're talking, this is good. the fact that they're fighting is very bad because not only the military casualties are huge problem, but also the mounting number of civilian casualties. some in cross fire, some out of indiscriminate shooting. we're talking about official figures of more than 2,600 civilians dead since april, unofficially the figure is probably much higher. we're talking about almost a million people displaced. some to russia, many inside ukraine. so while the fighting continues,
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those things are really very, very big burden, certainly for ukraine. one more thing i think that is really dangerous. no matter how this conflict will be resolved and whether it will be resolved very soon, the split that is rising in this area is quite dangerous thing that will have to be tackled by very, very sensitive politics and negotiation, mediation for many decades to come. the nationalism that is being played out now at which president obama referred to is a very dangerous phenomenon in european history. a lot of the language, a lot of the rhetoric, a lot of the nonacceptance of the other side in ukraine and in russia is growing very, very strongly as a result of this conflict. >> of course, it has to be remembered there are a large amount of people in ukraine that don't want to be part of the west. they want to join russia. >> well, we don't know how many because they think the whole thing needs to be decided through a democratic, you know,
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expression of their will. of course elections is one way, but what is happening in eastern ukraine with the self-proclaimed referenda which was not recognized, even russia didn't accept them, even though they said the russian foreign minister said they respect the will of the people, but didn't recognize the refer enda is not the way to do it. armed conflict is not the way to resolve those issues. i think if this could be moved from this area of direct military confrontation into area of political dialogue, then the situation will come down fairly quickly. >> thank you. just to make matters worse, we're getting reports that prime minister said that ukraine plans a war project involving the construction of real state border between ukraine and russia. so certainly that relationship not developing in the right way, if that is true. that's something that we're going to look into and try to ascertain.
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but we can go back to the events in estonia, in tallinn, speaking within the last hour there, president barack obama said it was important to ensure that each nato member takes on their full share of the responsibility. >> i think for a certain period of time there was a complacent here in europe about the demands to make sure nato was able to function effectively. my former secretary of defense came here and gave some fairly sharp speeches repeatedly about the need for making certain that every nato member was doing its fair share. i think secretary-general rasmussen during the course of his ten year continually emphasized the need for us to upgrade our joint capabilities. and obviously wt is happening in ukraine is tragic, but i do think it gives us an opportunity
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to look with fresh eyes and understand what it is that is necessary to make sure that our nato commitments are met. >> so the president there speaking in tallinn. our correspondent chris morris is also there following this. chris, the president was basically saying that there had been complacency about nato's capability. >> yeah, that's been a long-standing american complaint, that there are many countries in europe who aren't spending enough on defense, who aren't taking nato commitment seriously enough. and i think that's something to which he said he found a welcoming audience here in eastern europe. i think the overall picture in countries like this, in estonia, the baltic states, in poland, is that west european countries don't get what is happening in eastern europe, the nature of the threat they face from russia. yes, they can talk about it, but they don't feel there is enough understanding of how much
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pressure they feel under. that's one of the reasons barack obama has come here. don't forget this used to be part of the soviet union. a city run from moscow. and the president said his primary purpose of coming here was to remind everyone that nato is an alliance based on mutual defense and attack on one country, one member state is regarded as an attack on all. to try and back that up, nato is going to bolster its rapid reaction force. one of the things that the president announced here in tallinn was that the united states would be sending additional air force units to the baltics. said he hoped they could be based at an air base here in estonia. and that he would work with congress to achieve that. >> indeed, and also on the agenda was, of course, the growing concerns about islamic state. president obama took the opportunity during that media conference to express his condolences to the family of steven sotloff, the u.s. earlier
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confirmed a video released by islamic state showing the beheading of the u.s. journalist is genuine. he said the prayers of the american people are with his family. >> like jim foley before him, steve's life stood in sharp contrast to those who murdered him so brutally. they make the absurd claim they kill in the name of religion, but it was steven, his friends say, who deeply loved the islamic world. his killers tried to claim they defend the oppressed, but it was steven who traveled across the middle east risking his life to tell the story of muslim men and women demanding justice and dignity. whatever these murderers think they'll achieve by killing innocent americans like steven, they have already failed. they failed because, like people around the world, americans are repulsed by their barbarism. we will not be intimidated. their horrific acts only unite
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us as a country and stiffen our resolve to take the fight against these terrorists. those who make the mistake of harming americans will learn that we will not forget and that our reach is long and that justice will be served. >> of course, very difficult topic for the americans and indeed everybody watching developments in iraq and syria. president obama did state, though, the u.s. air strikes are having a positive impact. >> the threat from isis is something else which will be discussed at the nato summit. the threat to the whole region and potentially wider. at one point he said our aim clear, it is to degrade and destroy islamic state. and he was asked if that's what he really meant. he seemed to back away from that slightly saying we are confident that over the long-term we can reduce their sphere of influence in all sorts of way and make it
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a manageable threat. it is something we need, all of us, to focus on very clearly. >> okay, chris. for the time being, as always, thank you very much. chris morris there, just going over what president obama has said in tallinn, a very busy time for the president and indeed the nato summit that will be taking place in wales on thursday. we will, of course, bring you up to date with all the developments, the situation in ukraine and the air strikes indeed too. stay with us here on "bbc world news." now, still lots more to come here on "bbc world news," including the battle against ebola. experts deliver a stark warning and call for a global response. w set of wheels, then... wham! a minivan t-bones you. guess what: your insurance company will only give you 37-thousand to replace it. "depreciation" they claim.
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hello. you're watching "bbc world
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news." our main headlands this hour, ukraine's president announces a cease-fire deal is reached with russia, russia's vladimir putin says there was never any agreement. president obama is in estonia, he's reassured russia's neighbors they'll have the full support of nato if the ukraine crisis spreads to the baltic states. pakistan's parliament has been holding an emergency session to discuss the country's political crisis. the meeting of both houses is an attempt to rally support behind prime minister sharif. supporters of khan said they will continue their protests aimed at forcing mr. sharif to resign. clashes earlier this week left at least three people dead. andrew north has the latest from islamabad. >> reporter: pakistanis demanding their prime minister step down. they're supporting imran khan and occupied the heart of the pakistani capital.
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wearing a bulletproof vest under his clothes, he repeats his accusations that the government is only in power to max ballot rigging. it sparked the most severe crisis. protesters tried to storm government buildings. doing the bidding of pakistan's ever powerful army, say critics, and it was the generals who helped restore order. but imran khan tells me he's fighting for democracy. >> if we do not challenge this election, that means we will become like hosni mubarak dictatorship, where he had elections, he had a constitution, he had a parliament, no democracy. we are heading exactly the same way. >> reporter: these protests against election rigging and corruption have brought the government to a stand still. some say what is happening here amounts to another coup and many say the ultimate victors will
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only be be pakistan's army. even with the deejay playing, the crowd s have thinned a bit. but supporters insist they'll stay put until the prime minister goes. >> we're going to stay here. >> reporter: the prime minister made it clear he's not going it resign. >> well, of course he's not going to say that, but he will eventually. all the public pressure he's got, i'm sure he will. >> reporter: many expect there will eventually be a deal to end the protests. but for pakistanis, it has been an uncomfortable reminder of how fragile democracy remains here. andrew north, bbc news, islamabad. it is estimated that a staggering $1 trillion a year is lost to developing countries because of global corruption. that is according to a new report from the campaigning organization one called trillion dollar scandal.
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the organization says that if action was taken to stop corruption, up to 3.6 million lives could be saved over the next decade in the world's poorest countries. it says the main issues are money laundering, shady deals for natural resources and illegal tax evasion. well, the report also is urging each of the g-20 countries to work together to prevent the theft of billions of dollars from developing countries' budgets by making more corporate information publicly available and by tracking down on tax evasion. our world affairs correspondent mike woolridge joins us from the newsroom. you've been going through this report. talk us through it. >> the scale of global corruption has been very hard to calculate by its very nature, of course, because so much of it is carried out in secret. what this group of one campaign have come up with is they feel a very credible estimate that at least a trillion dollars is taken each year out of developing countries. now, there have been other
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estimates roughly in line with this. what they have tried to focus on is lost revenues rather than lost capital. they argue that enables them to make the point more clearly that had those revenues been available, could that money have been recovered by developing countries that could have been spent more effectively in the way you described on health and education. now, nigeria is one of the countries they cite in this report for its damaging impact of corruption when policy is so rife. and they cite the nigerian government minister who estimated the country lost more th seeds. they also make the point that this is an issue equal, if not bigger, in many countries across the world and it is not only an issue to do with developing countries, but developed countries too because of the diverting of money through banks sometimes and shell companies in
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places like london and delaware and united states and hong kong. that's specifically where they're looking to the g-20 summit in brisbane, in australia, in november to take much tougher action going further, for example, than the g-8 did last year. australia said today that it very much intends to take the lead on this. >> staggering figures indeed, michael. thank you very much. the parents of 5-year-old arbor king are on their way to the hospital in southern spain where the boy is being treated for a brain tumor. they have been released perfect prison after being arrested for taking their 5-year-old son out of hospital against medical advice. well, the couple spoke exclusively to our correspondent john kay. >> i'm angry. i'm missing my son so much and my heart is aching for my son. anger can't come in at the moment because i just got these feelings, i got to see my son's face. >> i can't drink through his
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mouth. i want to brush his teeth, i want to turn him because he can't move. i just want to do all those things i was doing for him in south hampton, i want to do that for him here. >> as a mother, you spent so much time in hospital with him in south hampton, to be separated from him by hundreds of miles and put behind bars, can you explain what that's been like? >> well, all of us just all the time just crying and crying and praying that we could be reunited with him again. and i just really -- what could i do? i couldn't do much really. all i can do is just cry and pray. >> parents of 5-year-old ashya king speaking to our correspondent john kay. the head of the international medical charity has told the united nations that the battle against the ebola outbreak in west africa is being lost. world leaders are failing to address what she calls the worst ebola epidemic in history.
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>> reporter: the arrival of ebola in guinea six months ago has caused devastation and despair. so far the disease has killed more than 1,500 people, and spread to at least four other african countries. criticism of the way the outbreak is being handled is growing. now medicine issued its most damming statement yesterday, saying international response has been inadequate. >> ebola treatment center is reduced to places where people go to die alone. it is impossible to keep up with the sheer number of infected people pouring in our facilities. in sierra leone, people are in the streets. only by battling the epidemic at its root can we withstand it. >> reporter: they say this is
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the worst ebola epidemic in history and called for a global military intervention to curb its spread. the world health organization say they received reports that more than 3,500 people are now infected in guinea, sierra leone and liberia, but has warned the outbreak will get worse before it gets better with more than 20,000 people at risk of being infected by the disease. this is just one example of the impact the disease is having. this patient has escaped from a hospital in liberia, causing pan panic. he's eventually wrestled to the ground and taken back to hospital. at this church service in liberia, these people are praying for those who are fighting the disease. but there are strict rules here. no hugs, no handshakes, and no physical closeness of any kind. but the fear is that without an
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urgent global response, the battle against ebola is being lost. >> thanks for watching. bye-bye. (vo) if you have type 2 diabetes,
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our top story, after ukraine's president announces a deal is reached with russia over a permanent cease-fire, russia's president vladimir putin says there never was any agreement. president obama is in estonia, reassuring russia's neighbors they'll have the full support of nato if the crisis in ukraine spreads to baltic states. >> because we stood together, russia is paying a heavy price for its actions. and nato is poised to do more to help ukraine strengthen its forces and defend their country. the united states says a video showing the beheading of journalist steven sotloff by islamic state militants is
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authentic. protests calling for pakistan's prime minister to resign continue, parliament holds an emergency session to try to rally support behind him. hello. and welcome. there has been a fair amount of confusion in the last hour about whether or not a deal has been reached to end the fighting in ukraine. the ukrainian president petro poroshenko said he's reached a deal with his russian counterpart vladimir putin on a permanent cease-fire in east ukraine. but a spokesman for mr. putin said that the russian president did not agree to a cease-fire in ukraine because russia is not a party to the conflict. he insisted that the two men discussed only how to settle the conflict. well, earlier i asked our
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correspondent in moscow steve rosenberg to help us get some clarity. >> i'm afraid i can't provide too much clarity. it remains a very confused situation. the first indications that the positions of moscow and kiev perhaps have moved closer came earlier this morning when the kremlin announced that there had been a telephone conversation between president putin and president poroshenko. after that, we heard a statement from president poroshenko would said there was an agreement on a permanent cease-fire in the donbass in eastern ukraine. he talked about mutual understanding had been reached on the steps needed to achieve peace. well, after that, we heard again from the kremlin. the kremlin denied there had been an agreement on a cease-fire, because as the kremlin pointed out, russia is not a party to this conflict. despite the growing evidence in recent days that russia is a
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party to the conflict, and that there has been increased russian military activity across the border in eastern ukraine. nevertheless, moscow maintains it is not involved in the military conflict in eastern ukraine and therefore could not agree to a cease-fire. and i noticed a few minutes ago looking at the website of president poroshenko there has been one small change in his brief statement, the word permanent seems to have disappeared and now that statement says an agreement was reached on a cease-fire. so really, we're none the wiser. we're not sure whether the statements coming out of moscow and kiev actually will make a difference on the ground in eastern ukraine. >> indeed. it seems very confusing. in the meantime, president obama was saying moscow has got to stop arming, supporting and the guise of the home grown troops in eastern ukraine, but stop supporting the rebels. >> president obama has been saying that for weeks, for months now, so have other
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western leaders. none of these words have made president putin change course. i doubt whether president obama's tallinn speech today will change moscow's view on what is happening across the border in ukraine. and while president obama was making his speech today, and while nato prepares for its summit in wales, russia is preparing to react -- talking about updating, rewriting the national military doctrine perhaps to make it clearer in this doctrine that the united states and nato once again russia's principal enemy and there is talk about a new round of military exercises involving russia's strategic nuclear forces. so very little sign that russia is trying to end this confrontation that has blown up with the west.
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>> that was steve rosenberg from moscow. let's get the latest from our correspondent in kiev, david stand. what more can you tell us? >> well, unfortunately i can't give a whole lot more clarity either, just as steve couldn't. we have an updated message or statement on the presidential website saying they have agreed over a cease-fire regime, which is being interpreted as a mechanism, ie, the steps that can be taken towards a cease-fire. but obviously it has been walked back. so in addition to the other disagreements between kiev and moscow, we also have now this disagreement about who exactly said what. but on the other hand, there is a positive element to this. on both sides have described this in fairly positive terms and they apparently are talking about the cease-fire, even if russia says that they actually
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can't do anything since they're not a party to the conflict, still the statement on the russian website was one that said they reached agreement about a number of things, positive note, and, of course, the statements on the presidential website, positive, perhaps not as positive as we had originally thought. still there does seem to be some movement. this is all happening as the fighting goes on, but also as the european union says it is preparing for a new round of sanctions, which they could announce on friday. >> and in the meantime, president obama, in his speech, in estonia, continued to provide his commitment and nato commitment to ukraine saying that they will support ukraine, but ultimately the chances of ukraine joining nato are very far at the moment given the country is so divided. >> well, yes. so divided and also, yes, fighting a war. nato usually does not accept
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countries that have disputed borders or have ongoing disputes. nobody really expected that ukraine would be joining nato tomorrow. it was always a prospect in the future, but the talk about this, of course, is growing stronger. the ukrainians have reiterated their commitment to nato. perhaps as a political stamp to show the anxiety here in kiev, what they say is an invasion of their country. but it also mirrors the anxiety in the nato countries. the actual members. estonia calling for a permanent base. the other nato countries also very worried from what they see and as david said of the growing evidence that russia is very much involved in the conflict in ukraine. >> okay. david, for the time being, from kiev, thank you very much. our correspondent from kiev, david stern giving the reaction to all of this. let's cross over now to speak to the romanian foreign minister.
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he is speaking to us live from london. thank you very much, minister, for speaking to us here on "bbc world news." president obama was in estonia trying to calm fears that this crisis in ukraine will spread to other neighboring countries. as a neighbor of ukraine, are you worried? >> it is true that we also have a clear concern here, romania, and it is not only romania, about the fact that russia's aggressive attitudes against ukraine is related to much more complex project related to the region. to create a ring of conflict against also the republic of moldova, we know the situation, it is related also to georgia, it is something that is not a surprise for us. this is why from the beginning we stand for -- firm attitude at the level of our european family
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against russia's aggressive attitude. it is important to underline all the time, politically speaking, and also to do concrete things that fundamental principles of the international law, integrity, the ability of the border are to be respected and should be respected by all the actors including by russia. >> we're seeing they're not being respected. you mentioned -- you touched upon that area in moldova. we have seen what happened in crimea. do you think that nato, the rest of the western countries, are they doing enough? do you want them to do more? >> i think developments, dramatic developments and the fact that russia continues to give a clear, strong military support to the pro russian authorities, i think we are obliged to do supplementary steps forward. you do remember the last discussions during the european
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council in brussels and the fact that we are -- gave one week to russia to really take the measures to stop this aggressive attitude. unless we're in the position, it is the same position that must remain at level of the nato -- and this is why the next summit will be so important, also related to this delicate file. >> if you have russia refusing to admit they are supporting rebels in ukraine, how can you point the finger at them, how can you even begin getting into a discussion about asking them to stop if they're not even admitting they're involved. >> well, i think that despite different discussions at the level of international public opinion, the sanctions are already adopted, gave some result. what we need honestly is real sanctions and we had discussions
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during the past day among the foreign ministers, we will continue to discuss tomorrow and the day after tomorrow during the nato summit. really if russia will not adopt the correct attitude, we must discuss serious sanctions and attitudes on russia. >> serious sanctions you say, but we're so tied in terms of energy, so tied in terms of finances, the amount of russian millions in london, for example. it seems there is a reluctance to put any stronger -- any more stringent sanctions on moscow. >> yeah. it is not an easy subject. i do agree there are economic interests, there are issues related to the security of a number of european member states, but in the same time, i want to underline the fact that such fundamental things and i'm making the reference once again to the territoryian integrity
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and ability of the border are not subject of any notiegotiati. >> okay. thank you very much. romania's foreign minister speaking to us from central london. of course, we'll continue to monitor all of that. but now let's bring you up to date with the day's other news because the u.s. confirmed the video released by the islamic state showing the beheading of u.s. journalist steven sotloff is authentic. and the militant who appears in the footage appears to be the same man who carried out the killing of james foley two weeks ago. president obama paid tribute to steven sotloff and said his killers would not succeed. >> whatever these murderers think they'll achieve by killing innocent americans like steven,
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they have already failed. they failed because like people around the world, americans are repulsed by their barbarism, we will not be intimidated, their horrific acts only unite us as a country and stiffen our resolve to take the fight against these terrorists. and those who make the mistake of harming americans will learn that we will not forget, and that our reach is long and that justice will be served. >> well, president obama also said it will take time to degrade and to destroy the islamic state group. he said an international effort was needed to combat what he called its bar barribaric and e vision. >> reporter: steven sotloff once described himself as a person who liked adventure and risk. but was also cautious. the 31-year-old dedicated his life to reporting from some of the most dangerous places in the world. he was abducted in syria last year. and held hostage by islamic
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militants. the video released by his captors appears to show him being brutally murdered. the footage is too graphic and distressing to broadcast. in it, a fighter from the islamic state says he killed sotloff because of what he described as president obama's arrogant foreign policy. he warned that another british hostage he would not name at the request of the family could also be beheaded. >> steven is a loyal and generous son. >> reporter: last week, his mother made an emotional appeal for her son's return. the family says it now wants to grieve privately. >> we miss him very much. >> reporter: just last month, another american journalist james foley was murdered by is militants. in a video, they said steven sotloff would be next if president obama failed to stop air strikes in iraq. the u.s. military action against the jihadis continues.
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last night u.s. fighter jets near the mosul dam and troops are being sent to baghdad to protect the embassy. here in washington, politicians from both sides of the aisle are frustrated that the president failed to come up with a comprehensive regional strategy to deal with the threat posed by the islamic state. they say mr. obama is too cautious and demanding that his administration takes tougher action faster. bbc news, washington. do stay with us here on "bbc world news." a lot more still to come including our exclusive conversation with the parents of ashya king, freed from a jail after taking their son out of hospital against medical advice.
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who cares?letree by hil where the little things mean everything. hello. you're watching "bbc world
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news." i'm kasia madera. ukraine's president announced his cease-fire deal is reached with russia, russia's president vladimir putin says there never was any agreement. president obama is in estonia. he's reassured russia's neighbors they'll have the full support of nato if the ukraine crisis spreads to baltic states. pakistan's parliament has been holding an emergency session to discuss the country's political crisis. the meeting of both houses is an attempt to rally support behind prime minister sharif. supporters of imran khan said they will continue their protests aimed at forcing mr. sharif to resign. earlier, clashes earlier this week left at least three people dead. andrew north has the latest from islamabad. >> reporter: pakistani demanding their prime minister step down. their they're supporters of
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imran khan and have occupied the capital. wearing a bulletproof vest under his clothes, he repeat his accusations that the government is only in power through mass ballot rigging. it sparked the most severe crisis in years. protesters tried to storm government buildings. doing the bidding of pakistan's ever powerful army, say critics, and it was the generals who helped restore order. but imran khan tells me he's fighting for democracy. >> if we do not challenge this election, that means we will become like hosni mubarak dictatorship, where he had elections, he had a constitution, he had a parliament, no democracy. we are heading exactly the same way. >> reporter: these protests against election rigging and corruption have brought the government to a stand still. some say what is happening here amounts to another coup and many say the ultimate victors will
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only be be pakistan's army. even with the deejay playing, the crowds have thinned a bit. but supporters insist they'll stay put until the prime minister goes. >> we're going to stay here. >> reporter: the prime minister made it clear he's not going it resign. >> well, of course he's not going to say that, but he will eventually. all the public pressure he's got, i'm sure he will. >> reporter: many expect there will eventually be a deal to end the protests. but for pakistanis, it has been an uncomfortable reminder of how fragile democracy remains here. andrew north, bbc news, islamabad. >> a group of work involved in decommissioning the power station at fukushima are suing the plant's operator, tepco. four men are claiming $600,000
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in extra wages for danger money. they say compensation for removing contaminated debris and petroleum at the plants has been inadequate, given the risks involved. the parents of 5-year-old ashya king are on their way to hospital in southern spain where the boy is being treated for a brain tumor. they have been released from a madrid prison after being arrested for taking their 5-year-old son out of a hospital in south hampton against medical advice. the couple spoke to our correspondent john kay. he asked brett king if he was angry about what happened. >> i'm not angry. i'm just missing my son so much. and my heart is aching for my son. anger can't come in at the moment because i just got these feelings. i got to see my son's face. >> i just want to work his mouth because he can't drink through his mouth. i want to work his mouth, brush his teeth, i want to turn him side to side every 15, 20 minutes because he can't move. i just want to do all those things i was doing in south
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hampton, i was to do thnt to do him here. >> as a mother, to be separated from him by hundreds of miles and put behind bars, can you explain what that's been like? >> well, all of us just doing all the time, just crying and crying and praying that i can be reunited with him again. and i just really -- what could i do in prison cell? i couldn't do much really. all i could do was just cry and pray. >> ashya king's parents speaking to our correspondent john kay. it is estimated that a staggering $1 trillion a year is lost to developing countries because of a global corruption. that's according to a new report from the campaigning organization one called trillion dollar scandal. the organization says if action was taken to stop corruption, up to 3.6 million lives could be saved over the next decade in the world's poorest countries. earlier i spoke it our world affairs correspondent mike wooldridge who had been studying
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the report. >> the scale of global corruption is hard to calculate by its very nature because so much is carried out in secret. what this group of one campaign have come up with is they feel a very credible estimate that at least a trillion dollars is taken each year out of developing countries. now, there have been other estimates roughly in line with this. what they have tried to focus on is lost revenues rather than lost capital. they argue that enables them to make the point more clearly that had those revenues been available, could that money have been recovered by developing countries that could have been spent more effectively in the way you described on health and education. now, nigeria is one of the countries they cite in this report for its damaging impact of corruption when policy is so rife. and they cite the nigerian government minister who estimated the country lost more than $400 billion to what he called oil seeds.
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they also make the point that this is an issue equal, if not bigger, in many countries across the world and it is not only an issue to do with developing countries, but developed countries too because of the diverting of money through banks sometimes and shell companies in places like london and delaware and united states and hong kong. that's specifically where they're looking to the g-20 summit in brisbane, in australia, in november to take much tougher action going further, for example, than the g-8 did last year. australia said today that it very much intends to take the lead on this. >> that was mike wooldridge looking into that report by the campaigning group, the one organization. we're going to take you to argentina for the next part of accessible world, which is our special series on people with disabilities. in this installment, we're going
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to focus on one business which is opening up work and training opportunities for disabled people. >> translator: i'm the president of the argentinean association which supports this restaurant. it is called -- sells hot dogs and pizza. most of us have disabilities. we work in leading by example to show that despite having disabilities, we can lead a normal life. we opened in 1998 and since then this has been a successful business. actually we have expanded. >> translator: my name is franco. i am 22 years old. i had a motorbike accident, my leg was amputated from the knee down. i started working here two months ago. i think people are very prejudiced and don't think that
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someone with a disability can work like everyone else. my accident happened four years ago and now i believe we can do what other people do. we disabled people have changed our mind set and we feel we can do whatever we want. and, yes, i would like to do more, but i am fine for the time being. let's wait and see what the future holds. >> translator: i lost my arm, but i developed an inner strength that allowed me to move on. i studied and gained new skills, so i'm perfectly capable of having a job. we have to lead by example. and this is proof. we as people with disabilities can do. >> that was the view from argentina in our accessible world series. for me and the team as always, thank you very much for watching
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and don't forget, get in touch with me on twitter. @kas @kas @kasiamadera. thank you for watching "bbc world news." you owned your car for four years. you named it brad. you loved brad. and then you totaled him. you two had been through everything together. two boyfriends. three jobs. you're like "nothing can replace brad!" then liberty mutual calls. and you break into your happy dance.
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avoid if you take clopidogrel. nexium 40 mg is only available by prescription. talk to your doctor. for free home delivery, enroll in nexium direct today. hello. you're watching "gmt" on "bbc world news." the ukrainian president says an agreement over a cease-fire has been reached with russia, but the kremlin says they agreed on nothing more than a process to peace. we'll ask where this leads the deteriorating situation in eastern ukraine. amid all that, president obama arrives right on russia's doorstep in estonia with reassurance that nato states have america's full support. >> because we stood together, russia is paying a heavy price for its

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