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this is bbc america, and now live from london, "bbc world news." these are our top stories. hong kong's chief executive says china won't back down in the face of thousands of pro-democracy protesters who have brought parts of the city to a standstill. >> translator: i now appeal to the leaders to carry out the promise they made to the whole society. that is call off the protests immediately. afghanistan's new government is due to sign a new security deal with nato, allowing thousands of foreign troops to stay in the country beyond this year. and wildlife numbers across
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the globe have plunged by more than half in just 40 years. the stark new figures from the world wildlife fund. hello, and welcome. the chief executive of hong kong says china will not back down in the face of pro-democracy demonstrations in the city. in the last few hours, he called for an end to the protests. these are pictures of the huge numbers bringing the territory to a halt. they see him as very much the mouthpiece of china. they're demanding the chinese government gives hong kong a free vote for its next leader, something beijing has, of course, rejected. let's hear just what the chief
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executive had to say. >> translator: the leaders of the occupy central movement have repeatedly stated that if the protests go extensively out of control, they will call off the protests. i now appeal to the leaders to carry out the promise they made to the whole society. that is, call off the protests immediately. the decision made by the central committee of the chinese national parliament means that they won't be intimidated by anyone when they implement the law. any more illegal act would not force the committee to change its position made on the 31st of august, which is based on the basic law. >> that's the chief executive speaking there in the last couple of hours or so. a demonstrator who has been out on the streets today is on the phone for us. jeffrey, just tell us, why are you out? why do you feel so strongly
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about this? >> it's more like fighting for our own good in terms of fighting for real democracy. we demand universal suffrage for the chief executive in hong kong. >> what's the mood been like there today? is it a little quieter than we saw yesterday and over the weekend? >> it's pretty much the same. i'll say the numbers have dropped out this morning but then it surged again in the afternoon. people are trying to get off work right now, so it's definitely going to be more and more people coming. >> and what about the next couple of days? are you expecting more people to come? obviously you were expecting a public holiday. do you feel that people are prepared to go on with this for many days? >> definitely. because until now, the chief executive c.y. leung has only spoken in just like a landfall of times and he won't resign,
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and if he resigns there is no way for a universal suffrage in hong kong. but i guess demonstrators are mainly wanting d -- they're demanding him to speak up, at least to -- at least, like, to get what demonstrators thinks before making such bold statements. >> would you accept it if there were two or three candidates that had been agreed between some of the protesters? so if the candidates were perhaps not just totally controlled by beijing, or do you really want a full democratic system? >> i have to make my stance clear now. i would love to have full democracy. which every single legal resident of hong kong has the right to run for chief executive, and yeah, this is what some legislators, such as
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raymond wong and certain political parties want. this is my wishful thinking about the whole thing. >> just finally, are you worried about the fact that the police might get frustrated? are you worried about any sort of tougher measures? we did see tear gas being used at the weekend. >> tougher measures, i don't think so. but then, everyone, including demonstrators on the street, protesters on the street should be well-prepared for anything worse to happen. i don't think that they will use that much tear gas. if shooting is going to occur, this is going to have a huge impact on hong kong's national image in terms of investor confidence. yeah. stuff like that. it's going to hurt hong kong in the long-term and i don't think the chinese government is going to risk this. >> okay, jeffrey hui, many thanks indeed for your time.
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thank you. we will be getting more views from hong kong later in this bulletin. you can keep up to date with everything in hong kong and beijing at the website. you can get the latest news from our correspondents on the ground and analysis from carrie gracie at our china editor, bbc.com/news. now, the new president of afghanistan ashraf ghani is due to sign a long delayed security deal which will allow some u.s. troops to stay in the country beyond the end of the year. mr. ghani's predecessor hamid karzai refused to agree to the deal, saying there was still much anger over civilian deaths. a little earlier, i spoke to a correspondent in kabul david loyn and i asked him how keen the u.s. is now to sign this deal. >> reporter: the u.s. certainly wants to keep troops here after the end of this year and there could be no more symbolic way of resetting relations with the international community and restoring a broken friendship with the united states, than to sign these two security deals. what happens today in the
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presidential palace is that the new national security adviser, he headed ashraf ghani's negotiating team in forming the new government, a former government minister educated in the united kingdom, very much a friend of the west, he will sign the deals on behalf of afghanistan and jim cunningham, first the american security deal will be signed. the bilateral security arrangement that allows u.s. troops to remain here after the end of this year, and then in a separate signing, about an hour later, the head of the nato diplomatic mission here will sign on behalf of nato for a smaller part of the force, which will provide the headquarters, turkish, italian, and german troops in the lead on that, and so 12,000 or so troops then will remain after the end of 2014. >> and why is there still that ongoing need after all this
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time? >> well, afghanistan is not a secure country. it's as simple as that. and the taliban have intensified their attacks during this year. i think the fed will say the toughest battles going on since 2001 have been happening during the last 21 months, south and east of the country. and america has said that they will end combat operations at the end of this year, and president obama has been unwilling to keep very many troops here for very much longer, although some in the u.s. military would have liked this training mission, which will continue after the end of this year, to go on for longer. but he did agree earlier this year that he would want some u.s. troops, but then it stalled because president karzai said he didn't want the troops to remain, even after the afghan forces very much did want them to remain. so there's been a breakdown inside afghanistan itself. hamid karzai breaking relations really with many people in this
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country by refusing to allow foreign troops to remain at the end of 2014. but now they will remain in this training mission and also crucially in a counterterrorism mission, fighting against the remnants of al qaeda and looking against the border into pakistan, where, of course, there are many more attacks being planned on the outside world than there are here in afghanistan. >> david loyn for us there in kabul. right here is aaron talking apple. >> talking apple, ireland, and tax. very little tax, in fact. that's the story. thanks very much, geeta. hello there. ireland could get raked over the coals in europe for the tax deals it's been offering to attract international companies like apple. the deal says the european commission amount to offer apple unfair state aid. it's part of a broader investigation into tax policies to the likes of ireland, the
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netherlands and luxembourg. the commission has been examining whether these companies have unfairly offered international companies including apple, amazon, and starbucks. it has found that the country's benign tax regime means multi-nationals are, in fact, receiving a form of unfair state aid. apple could end up having to pay billions of dollars in back taxes. apple says it's received no selective treatment from irish officials over the years, and apple says it's subject to the same tax laws as the countless other companies who do business in ireland. we're going to have more on "gmt" coming up in over an hour's time. and breaking the rules again. a u.s. judge has ruled that argentina is in contempt of court for refusing to rebay an order to repay the debt it owes to two u.s. hedge funds. this adds another twist to argentina and the fund that
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bought it at a discounted rate. the creditors, well, they continue to argue that the country must repay its outstanding debt in full. so that continues. here's a fascinating one. forget indoor swimming pools. forget your cinema room or basement cocktail rooms. who has a basement cocktail room? nowadays, there's a new must-have feature for the london mansions of the international super rich. look at that. yep, it's a panic room. these are armor-plated rooms you can retreat to if you have dangerous intruders or somebody you don't like in the house. they can cost anywhere between $7,000 and $7 million to install. some security firms say demand for these things has tripled over the past three years. we'll take a further look at this coming up on "gmt" in just over an hour's time. fascinating stuff. you can follow me on twitter. tweet me @bbcaaron. that's it with the business. what would you use one for? >> hiding from my husband and the children?
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>> nice mother. nice mother, you are. >> thanks, aaron. stay with us here on "bbc world news." still to come, turning art, history into a science. how a new scanner has revealed the secrets behind one of leonar leonardo da vinci's most famous paintings. regular. (english accent) the passport is clearly a forgery. but don't do it in a lady's voice. how do you know i'm not auditioning to play a woman? you're absolutely right. ok. you make your own choices. with the best screen of any tablet, the new samsung galaxy tab s is the world's most entertaining device. get it now at these retailers. the last four hours have seen... one child fail to get to the air sickness bag in time. another left his shoes on the plane... his shoes! and a third simply doesn't want to be here. ♪ until now... until right booking now.
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play the 5 gum truth or dare challenge and you could win a sensory adventure. this is "bbc world news." i'm geeta guru-murthy with the latest headlines. the chief executive of hong kong appeals for an immediate end to pro-democracy street protests that have brought parts of the city to a standstill. afghanistan's new government prepares to sign a new deal with nato. more on hong kong and what it takes to keep protests like these going. it's not just about the politics, it's about making sure those taking part are fed and looked after. ali moore reports from the heart of the protests in central district. >> reporter: these protests are
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exceptionally well-organized. all the way along this main thorough fair that's usually full of buses and trucks and cars, there are supply stands, just dotted around, so people can access them. there's everything here that the protesters might need. there's towels, and indeed there's paper towel that's been soaked in water, and this is in case the tear gas and the pepper spray is used again. this is in preparation to help to relieve the impact of those gases and sprays. if you move along here, plenty of water, which is absolutely vital because it's so hot here in hong kong, and we've got masks and lots of food. all of this donated by local people who want to support the protesters. >> translator: i feel responsible to the people. >> reporter: when you've got thousands of protesters in one
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place, you need a first aid station and there are a number of them dotted around the protest site, including this one. staffed mainly by volunteers. tell me, what sort of illnesses and ailments are you treating here? >> translator: we are preparing a first aid service here. >> and you have a lot of medical supplies. where do they come from? >> they come from the hong kong cities. they ask us to tell what we need and they come back just hour later and take stuff for us. >> reporter: no protest would be complete without tailor-made banners. they reflect what the protesters want. and in the case of this man, hong kong's chief executive, c.y. leung, what they definitely don't want. now the world's wildlife numbers have plunged by more than half. in just 40 years, those are the
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startling new findings. it says populations of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish have declined by an average of 52%. colin botfield said he was confident about the disturbing findings. >> nobody's looked at every species, but we've looked at over 10,000 different populations of over 3,000 species across the world and it gives a clear picture of a long-term decline. >> so where is it worst? >> the two big things that stand out are tropical areas, particularly across southeast asia, central africa are being particularly badly impacted. one of the big things here that's causing that is tropical deforestation. take forest elephants, their range has declined to about 6% of what it formerly was, plus they're getting hunted for their ivory. species that have a double
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whammy are particularly badly affected. >> so that's in africa. >> yeah. >> the problem is that the habitat is being mown down, plus they're being hunted. >> yeah, and that's a particularly bad example when things like that happen. another big trend is fresh water damage to rivers in particular. any pollution from the land gets washed into rivers, but also if we're taking out too much water upstream, the people and the wildlife are being affected. >> so the fish populations. >> fish and the bird populations that rely on the river. the impact we're seeing on wildlife are starting to impact people. >> bird populations, too, of course. >> exactly. >> what about -- there are some groups like tigers and polar bears, which i know my children are avid fans of your charity. and they all know about those populations. is that as we thought? >> tigers are a really interesting one. although the population has been in huge decline, it's gone down
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from about 100,000 tigers to only 3,200 at all in the world now. actually, there's relatively large amounts of habitats, so those numbers could well increase. we have a big program around the world to try and double tiger numbers by 2022. >> these in captivity. looks like london zoo there. >> helped us a lot on the report here. so things like that. really good optimistic reasons. >> people say, what about my own area. how do they find out what the situation is there and whether they can do anything? >> so the big thing that all of us can do, almost no matter where we are in the world, is stopping impacts from things like illegal logging around the world. >> in other news today, rescue teams in japan have called off their latest attempt to find the boe bodies of hikers who died when a volcano erupted on saturday.
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there's been increased seismic activity. mount ontake has been shooting out toxic fumes too dangerous to go anywhere near. the indian prime minister narendra modi has had a private dinner at the white house with president obama. they're also going to be meeting to discuss regional security issues and economic growth today. washington is worried about india blocking a world trade organization deal to protect its domestic food supplies. all this month, the bbc pop-up team has been reporting from the u.s. state of colorado, bringing local stories to a global audience. the state is one of the key battlegrounds in the midterm elections, which take place five weeks from now. democrats could lose control of the senate. women and voters from ethnic minorities are proving crucial to the election. >> reporter: which way it goes is all in the hands of colorado's voters. strong wills to be won over. but the politicians are on uncertain ground. both parties struggling to get
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ahead. their fate hangs on the female vote. women's issues have dominated the campaign ads so far, but there's a difference between what these women want and what politicians think they want. >> as a woman who's about to graduate college, i would say, is first of all safety, regarding sexual assault. and second of all, not only fair wages, but fair opportunities to get a job. i feel like i am disadvantaged because of my gender. as i'm about to enter the working world. >> anything to do with the environment, fracking, energy issues, abortion. >> and are the politicians addressing those issues? >> i don't think so. >> there are still very few women in leadership positions, in congress, in the senate, in our elected offices, and that's not being addressed at all. >> so how is it we're still debating a woman's access to abortion or birth control? >> reporter: democrat mark udall is defending his senate seat.
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both sides are spending millions on campaign ads. >> what's the difference between me and mark udall on contraception? i believe the pill ought to be available over the counter. >> reporter: this is the challenger. polls put them neck and neck. a third of voters here in denver and across colorado aren't registered to be either democrat or republican, so there is a lot to be fought over. and if politicians want to win not just the midterms but the next presidential election, they absolutely need the support, not just of women, but also of young people and latino voters. >> hello, guys! excuse me, how old are you? >> reporter: this nonpartisan group is trying to persuade more latinos to vote. the economy matters most to this man and the way it impacts mexican-americans. >> latinos are just like everyone else. they care about the economy, they care about education. but specifically, immigration will be the number one issue.
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>> reporter: the republican party lost the latino vote last election by a huge margin. cory gardner needs the support of core voters and more liberal leaning voters. most people at this event were kind of old and white. what are you doing to get women, to get the latino vote, to get young people? >> well, we're everywhere. we'll be at an asian candidate forum. we'll be at a black candidate forum. we'll be all over the state in terms of the campuses, college campuses. we're reaching out into every community. we will be in every nook and cranny of this state. >> reporter: change is coming to colorado. every autumn that comes and goes, the population becomes a little more latino. it's a transformation that will change politics and politicians here and across america. now, a major new discovery about one of leonardo da vinci's most famous paintings that shed new light on his techniques using reflective light
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technology. this 500-year-old work has an intriguing history. >> reporter: this magnificent portrait shows leonardo's genius in all its glory. renowned for her beauty and charm, she was mistress to the duke of milan, leonardo's patron. his nickname was the white ermin. scientists have delved deeper onto the painting than ever before, peeling back the layers of leonardo's work. it's been analyzed by a multi-lensed camera under intense light, producing extraordinary revelations about this enigmatic painting. the new findings suggest that leonardo painted her in not one, but three stages. this reconstruction shows that his first version was a simple portrait. in the second attempt, leonardo added a small ermin. and finally it's transformed into a larger, muscular creature
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with paws like a lion. this is a scientist who's revealed the latest findings. >> this is very exciting. many in the world have studied this painting. wow. we make a lot of discoveries. >> reporter: so why did leonardo make such major changes? did he decide to add the ermin to symbolize her lover? or did she ask leonardo to paint the animal in? leaving people in no doubt about her love affair with the duke. leonardo experts say they are fascinated by this new research, which changes their understanding of the artist. >> it tells us a lot more about the way that leonardo's mind worked when he was doing a painting. we know that he fiddled around a good deal at the beginning, but we now know he kept fiddling around all the time and it helps
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explain why he had so much difficulty finishing paintings. >> reporter: with these discoveries raising new questions about the painting, the history of leonardo's masterpiece is now being rewritten. bbc news, paris. >> that's it for this half-hour, but we are back in about five minutes. do join us if you can. what am i thinking about? foreign markets. asian debt that recognizes the shift in the global economy. you know, the kind that capitalizes on diversity across the credit spectrum and gets exposure to frontier and emerging markets. if you convert 4-quarter p/e of the s&p 500, its yield is doing a lot better... if you've had to become your own investment expert, maybe it's time for bny mellon, a different kind of wealth manager ...and black swans are unpredictable. you pay your auto insurance premium every month on the dot. you're like the poster child for paying on time. and then one day you tap the bumper of a station wagon. no big deal... until your insurance company jacks up your rates.
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our top stories, hong kong's chief executive says china won't back down in the face of thousands of pro-democracy protesters who brought part of the city to a standstill. >> translator: i now appeal to the leaders to carry out the promise they made to the whole society. that is, call off the protests immediately. afghanistan's new government is due to sign a new security deal with nato, allowing thousands of foreign troops to stay in the country beyond 2014.
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and wildlife numbers across the globe have plunged by more than half in just 40 years. the stark new figures from the world wildlife fund. hello, and welcome. the chief executive of hong kong says china will not back down in the face of pro-democracy demonstrations in the city. c.y. leung has called for an end to the protests. these are some of the live pictures coming in. sorry, we've just lost those live shots, but we have been looking at pictures the last few hours. many parts of hong kong still now blocked by protesters who want mr. leung, of course, to stand down, because they see him as something of a puppet of china. they're demanding the chinese government should give hong kong a free vote for its next leader, something that beijing has
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rejected. >> reporter: dawn, and another day of demonstrations. another night spent on the pavement. tens of thousands are still camped outside hong kong's government headquarters, demanding full universal suffrage. they also want hong kong's leader c.y. leung to go, and free elections for a new leader, accountable to hong kong, not beijing. but mr. leung says he will not step down. >> translator: the leaders of the occupy central movement have repeatedly stated that if the protests go extensively out of control, then they will call off the protests. i now appeal to the leaders to carry out the promise they made to the whole society. that is, call off the protests immediately. the decision made by the central committee of the chinese national parliament means that
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they won't be intimidated by anyone when they implement the law. any more illegal act would not force the committee to change its position made on the 31st of august, which is based on the basic law. >> reporter: overnight, the crowd swelled once again, sending a message to beijing that they were here to stay. after monday night's tear gas, the protesters were prepared for the worst. but in a shift of tactics, police did little else but look on. last month, beijing granted voters the right to elect their future leader in 2017. but, said the candidates, must be selected by a nominating family. when hong kong was handed back to china by britain in 1997, an agreement called one country, two systems was wiped out. it gave hong kong greater civil freedoms than the mainland. it promised the city a higher degree of autonomy for 50 years. and ultimately, universal
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suffrage, the right to vote. and that is why protesters like these are here. they say beijing's plan is not full universal suffrage. >> it's a simple matter. we just want democracy and a fair choosing our chief executive of hong kong. just simple. nothing more. >> reporter: but for beijing, there is nothing simple about scenes like this. on the mainland, there is strict censorship of these protests, and social media sites like instagram are now blocked. the government says these protesters are here illegally, but with a public holiday on wednesday, even larger crowds are expected to join them. laura westbrook, bbc news. >> well, we are hoping to hear more views from hong kong in this bulletin. and this is the live picture now from hong kong, as you can see.
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it's evening, it's dark, but still many people gtherred. in fact, yesterday, i think it gathered speed more in the evening as people head home from work and college, lots of students involved. but also many people who are employed as lawyers. the professional middle class is still getting involved in this. there is a two-day holiday coming up, which could see those numbers swell. there is much more detail on our website, bbc.com/news. including a really good blog from our china editor carrie gracie. do have a look. well, we can now speak, i'm told, to one of the main organizers of the protest group, professor chan kin man. thanks for joining us. do you have any idea of the numbers of protesters out there at the moment? >> i don't think i can have a very accurate estimation now, because people are coming, particularly in the evening.
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we've got more and more people. but it must be hundreds of thousands of people joining us. >> what do you make of that statement by the chief executive? he is saying there is no point protesting, please stop, because china will not back down. >> well, we believe in a responsible government. when there are so many people that took to the streets, they were not afraid of tear gas, the fight for democracy. they have to respond to it. and we now asked our chief executive to step down. we will have new government. we start the whole constitutional reform process. we're here to send a message.
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we are looking forward it to. >> but c.y. leung, that statement is very defiant. politically, it's not in beijing's interests to give in to you at all, is it? >> well, i think c.y. leung has done something really beyond our imagination. when there are a large group of peaceful demonstrators asking for democracy, he responds with violence, tear gas, pepper spray. and i don't see a chief executive with ideas that continue to rule hong kong. china will have to do something. >> are you worried about destabilizing the economy of hong kong?
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>> the people now are very sympathetic to us. that's because the government used excessive force in responding to the community's demands for democracy. i hope that people can understand that. as well as we don't have a fair system. i don't see that we could maintain a fair economic system and harmonious society. >> just very finely, can i ask you very briefly, are you expecting a lot more people to turn up in the next couple of days because it is a holiday, and are you worried about whether things will stay peaceful? >> yes. because coming today, we have two holidays, and we expect more people to come. people would like to use this day to appeal to beijing that we
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are serious about democracy. and whether we can maintain the whole movement, we are confident. when they use tear gas, pepper spray to crack down on our demonstration, people didn't respond to violence. people didn't set fire, didn't vandalize any properties. it showed that people are very serious with the principle of nonviolence. >> sorry to end it there. professor chan kin-man, many thanks for your time. we move on to afghanistan, because a day after the new president ashraf ghani took office, the afghan government is now going to sign a new security deal with nato authorizing 12,000 foreign troops, mostly american, to stay in the country beyond the end of this year.
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mr. ghani's predecessor hamid karzai refused to agree to that deal. of course, many people thought, okay, foreign troops are coming out of afghanistan, certainly combat troops. is this a sign that actually in a way the international mission has failed, that we still need so many foreign troops in afghanistan going forward? >> well, the number of afghan security forces is around 350,000. they are equipped, they are trained, but according to western military experts, they are not ready yet. it still relies on u.s. and nato airplanes and they still need assistance in surveillance. they don't have heavy weapons. and they still need to help in logistics, so that's why they want to keep a few thousand
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foreign forces for training and for counterterrorism operations, because the u.s. forces will be based in a number of strategically important facilities and areas from where they can have their air attacks. they can assist on security forces if they are needed and they can also trend off on forces for the next few years. >> and looking into the border areas, especially with pakistan? >> well, there's the idea that they should be controlling the border because pakistan has been accused of allowing taliban militants on its side to have sanctuaries, of not taking proper direction against them. so the idea is that nato forces will be able -- will attack those across the border from pakistan. and another important point is it expires by the end of this year. so the foreign forces wouldn't
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be allowed. there's an agreement until now to stay until 2014. so this agreement will give this cover to foreign forces, to stay in afghanistan for another maybe ten years. but this can be cancelled with a one-year advance notice. and this is one of the most important decisions in recent history of afghanistan. with far-reaching implications for the security and politics of afghanistan. they will be based for another five to ten years, maybe longer. because the agreement says until 2014 and beyond. >> so presumably, obviously a vast range of reaction to that politically. but is it possible to sum it up? i mean, how will people feel? >> this agreement also means that afghanistan will be getting around $5 billion a year for its security forces. threatened that it wouldn't be giving you that money.
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but the taliban has also reacted a couple of hours ago, they sent a statement to media saying there is a sinister plot by the u.s. and they want to control afghanistan, and they said it's the continuation of what, because in the past days, by the end of 2014, the u.s. forces will leave and afghanistan will be able to control more territory. but it seems that maybe 10,000 to 12,000 will stay in a counterterrorism role and also train the afghan forces for the foreseeable future. >> okay, many thanks. a new study has warned that wildlife populations around the world have dropped by more than half in just 40 years, and that the global loss of species is much worse than previously thought. according to the new living planet index, populations of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish have decl e declined by an average of 52%.
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in ghana alone, the lion population fell by 90% in 40 years, while populations of fresh water species have been falling by a staggering 76% in the last four decades. the index tracked more than 10,000 species from 1970 to 2010. the report blames human activity for the alarming drop in numbers, with habitats destroyed more quickly than they can be replaced. colin butfield said the figures are disturbing. >> nobody's looked at every species in the world, but we've looked at over 10,000 different populations of over 3,000 species across the world and it gives a really clear picture of a long-term decline. >> so tell me where is it worst? >> the two big things that stand out are tropical areas across southeast asia, central africa are being particularly badly impacted. one of the big things here that's causing that is tropical
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deforestation. if you take forest elephants, their range has declined to about 6% of what it formerly was. plus they're getting hunted for their ivory. species that have a double whammy like that are particularly badly affected. >> so that looks like that's taken in africa. >> yeah. but the problem is that the habitat is being mown down, plus they're being hunted. >> yeah, and that's particularly bad examples when things like that happen. another big trend is fresh water damage to rivers in particular, because any pollution from the land gets washed into rivers, but also if we're taking up too much water upstream, both the people and the wildlife that depend on it downstream are being affected. >> so the fish populations. >> fish and the bird populations that rely on that river and amphibians as well. but also the people. that's what's crucial about this. it's also beginning to impact people as well. >> bird populations, too. >> exactly. >> and what about the big -- there are some groups like tigers, for example, and polar
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bears, which i know my children are avid fans of your charity. they all know about those populations. is that as we thought? >> tigers are a really interesting one. although the population has been in huge decline, it's gone from 100,000 tigers to only about 3,200 in the wild now, there's relatively large amounts of habitats, so those numbers could increase. we have a big program to try and double tiger numbers by 2022. >> these in captivity. looks like london zoo there. >> probably is. you helped us a lot on the report here. so things like that, that's really good, optimistic reasons for reversing the decline if we can stop the underlying trend in poaching in that particular example. >> people say what about my own area. how do they find out whether they can do anything? >> the big thing that almost everyone can do is stopping things like tropical
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deforestation and illegal palming around the world. >> that afghan-u.s. deal that we were just talking about has now been signed in the last few moments. the new national afghan security adviser has signed the security deal. it allows u.s. forces to stay in afghanistan beyond the end of this year. they were due to draw to a close and leave. the u.s. ambassador to kabul has signed on behalf of the u.s. as we were hearing, that's quite a big move. stay with us here on "bbc world news." much to come. how special censors placed in a city's sewers could help track down would-be terrorists and their bomb-making labs. it's data mayhem. but airlines running hp end-to-end solutions are always calm during a storm. so if your business deals with the unexpected, hp big data and cloud solutions
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this is "bbc world news." i'm geeta guru-murthy with the top stories. the chief executive of hong kong appeals for an immediate end to
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pro-democracy street protests that are brought parts of the city to a standstill. and afghanistan's new national security adviser has just signed a security deal allowing u.s. troops to stay in the country beyond the end of this year. at least 36 people are now thought to have died since a volcano in japan erupted at the weekend without warning. recovery efforts on mount ontake have been suspended because of uncertainties over potential new erupti eruptions. >> reporter: mount ontake is still active and deadly. spewing out yet more toxic fumes. increasingly strong tremors are raising fears that pressure inside the volcano is building up again, and another eruption may be imminent. hundreds of rescuers were about to resume their search for the missing, but they have been grounded. it's just too dangerous. >> translator: unfortunately, we've had to suspend the recovery operations due to volcanic activities. it's very unfortunate and
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frustrating. we're well-prepared, but we're no match against the power of nature, and that's a reality i've had to face. >> reporter: this is the moment of saturday's eruption. some unsuspecting walkers watched in horror as tons of ash and stone shot into the sky. as it began to rain down on them, they fled. but they weren't fast enough. the poisonous cloud caught up with them. this group was very lucky to survive. others did not escape. they succumbed to the fumes or were hit by falling rocks. there are more walkers on the mountain whose fate is still not known. the uncertainty is agonizing. but there's nothing the rescue teams can do but watch the volcano and wait. emily buchanan, bbc news. now, london, madrid, boston, three major cities that have been a target of bombers in recent years, now scientists in
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europe are trying to come up with new ways to track down would-be terrorists. our science correspondent rebecca morell reports from stockholm. >> reporter: beneath the streets of stockholm lies a part of the city that most never see. down here in these pipes and tunnels, the waste from 700,000 inhabitants flows. but sewer systems have been earmarked for a new use. this might seem like an unlikely place, but the fight against terrorism is moving here underground. some sewers could be kited out with networks of high censors, they could trace out minute traces of explosives. helping police find them before they explode. >> they are attached to the surface. >> reporter: the censors can sniff out chemicals used to make homemade explosives and send an alert to the police. >> if you make homemade
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explosives for bombs, you need a place to be and you will need to use some equipment and the chemicals for this, and in the process, there could be equipment or pouring something down the drain, and this is something we want to take advantage of. >> reporter: they've built a replica of a bomb lab where they're making explosives to put the technology to the test. and they're not just interested in what ends up down the drain. fumes from the manufacturing process also leak out into the air. with a network of censors fitted to rooftops and even cars, working alongside those in the sewers, they can pinpoint where the illegal activity is taking place. >> the london bombings in 2005, the police also had some intelligence that something was going on in leads, and if this sort of censor was deployed in leads, we would have had a fair
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chance of detecting the bombs. >> reporter: the censors are currently prototypes, but they've attracted the interest of authorities from around the world, including the uk's ministry of defense and the department of homeland security in the u.s. and while focusing on the sewers will certainly be dirty work, the intelligence it provides could save lives. rebecca morell, bbc news, stockholm. as brazil heads for presidential elections, one issue being discussed is the right to abortion. it's legal only in exceptional circumstances, but it's thought that around a million brazilian women have had a legal abortion every year. >> reporter: a brutal death and a much-delayed burial. this woman disappeared over a month ago after going for an abortion at a clandestine clinic in rio. her body was found burned, unidentifiable. dna exams finally confirmed it was her.
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she was 27 years old, a mother of two. her death has shocked brazil and brought attention to the huge risks women take to try to get an abortion. considered a crime in brazil, though up to a million abortions are held here every year. most brazilians don't want the law to change and her family is part of the growing evangelical population that doesn't think women should have a choice. her sister says they want justice and that includes a crackdown on illegal abortion clinics. she's already paid for what she's done. many people have been criticizing her, and said she deserved to die. i'm against abortion, too, but she's paid the price. now those who did this to her have to pay, too. >> reporter: brazil is a traditionally catholic country. three million people turn eed o to see the pope last year. a recent poll suggests most brazilians are against legalizing abortion, but one in
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five women has had an abortion by the age of 40. abortion is legal only in case of rape, risk to the mother's life, or when the fetus can't develop its brain. groups of women's rights activists have held small protests in rio and sao paolo to defend the right to choose. this banner in rio says we are all janjidas. it only makes women more vulnerable, forcing them to resort to dodgy operations. >> we are trying to find a way out and they are getting in the hands of criminals. so this is very serious. >> reporter: the professor and her colleagues are dismayed by the lack of debate in the current election. political campaigning is at full speed. the three main presidential candidates say they are against changing the law. the topic is seen as taboo, one that would jeopardize too many votes, so despite recent deaths,
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it has stayed largely off the radar. janjida's family mourns their lost daughter, sister, and friend. a victim for making a choice still seen as a crime. yet made by thousands of others every year. i'm back later this week. bbc continues. action. (british accent) the passport is clearly a forgery. is the audition to play a portuguese guy? no, british. oh. (british accent) the passport is clearly a forgery. (american accent) the passport is clearly a forgery. that was just... regular. (english accent) the passport is clearly a forgery.
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hello. you're watching "gmt" on "bbc world news." i'm lucy hockings. our top stories. standoff in hong kong. the territory's chief executive tells protesters they will not change china's mind on electoral reform. the demonstrators say they're not backing down. >> translator: i now appeal to the leaders to carry out the promise they made to the whole society. that is, call off the protests immediately. >> i am live in hong kong, where for a fifth night, yet again, thousands have turned out to demonstrate in the heart of

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