Skip to main content

tv   BBC World News  BBC America  October 8, 2014 6:00am-7:01am EDT

6:00 am
hello. i'm raj with wbs world news. our top stories this hour. more fighting in kobane has islamic state fighters push into the town. the u.n. syria says the world must act to prevent a massacre can. in turkey, a protest as kurds help to defend kobani. another person is treated in spain for ebola bringing the total to to five. more medical staff could become infected.
6:01 am
>> we minimize many risk but unfortunately this can happen. kenya's president appears in the international court, first serving head of state to do so. he denies crimes in post election violence in 2007. sky watch as in the americas and asia are beginning to witness this, a total lunar eclipse. eventually we'll see the blood red moon. hello there. thanks for joining us. at least 12 have been killed in turkey following demonstrations by kurdish protestors demanding government intervention to defend the syrian town of kobani.
6:02 am
riot police used tear gas and water canyons in a number of cities. let me show you the map of what we're talking about. kobane is on the border with turkey and has been on the siege for weeks. militants have been advancing on the town from three sides. the turkish army lie and wait on the other side of that town. that's the border between turkey and syria. they appear reluctant to intervene. let's get the latest. >> anger and frustration on the streets of turkey. thousands of kurds marched across the country including insti istanbul. some launched at police including tear gas. islamic state advances on the
6:03 am
syrian town of kobane. they say turkey's failure to help kurdish fighters there will lead to the fall. several were killed in the clashes. earlier, hundreds jump the fence on the border saying they want to fight along side syrian cousins. the president admitted kobane is in peril but only a ground operation will save the city. he's not prepared to go alone. >> the terror will not be over unless we cooperate on a ground operation. >> here, coalition warplanes launched another round of air strikes again and again hitting jihadi targets. it didn't stop the fighting, but strikes seemed to halt the advance of fighters at least for now. >> what needs to be done is whatever it takes in order to
6:04 am
save the say of kobane. there's been three weeks the people have been trying to fight isis. now if we are serious, and the resolution which came at u.n. security council was clear about fighting and doing whatever it takes to stop isis, well this is a test. >> can ada is the latest to joi the air strikes. >> air strikes are not enough not just in iraq but also syria and kobane to be a tipping point. they can put pressure and disrupt capabilities around kobane. it's going to take more than air strikes to preserve it or any territory isil wants to possess. >> anxious kurds look on. they doubt air strikes can really save kobane.
6:05 am
bbc news. >> in the siege of kobane 200,000 from the town fleeing. now a statement from kurdish fighters inside kobane. they say on twitter that they're dismissing reports the town has become a military zone to use their words. statements said despite all bar baric attacks by isis mercenaries, there's thousands of civilians staying in kobane. they'll defend at any cost. let's speak to bbc persian service in a small town on the turkey syria border, not far from kobane. she joining us on the phone. great to talk to you. bring us up to date with what we know about the activity, apparent air strikes taking
6:06 am
place wednesday there in kobane. >> a new air blockade against targets. the target here overlooking the city. the flag is there days showing they are there. that's important. if you get that you can have more control for attacks in the city. right now it's harder and harder to target kurds and is fighting inside city. fighting is going on.
6:07 am
however i just talked to official inside kobane and he said for the first time air strikes yesterday and today have occurred to make more progress and also stop progress inside the city. still clashes are going down. we could hear clashes and sea smoke. >> your line is difficult to understand. we're going to have to leave it there. important lines coming out saying kurds in kobane saying u.s. air strikes have helped repel i.s. attacks and there's street fighting going on now in the town of kobane. thank you very much indeed. now let's bring you breaking news. this is taking our attention to the ongoing conflict in ukraine. east of ukraine. the u.n. is saying that at least
6:08 am
3660 people have been killed in fighting in eastern ukraine since april. they've been doing that. they also say that includes at least 330 people since the september 5th ceasefire which seems to call into question whether the ceasefire is holding at all. they're saying at least 330 people killed in eastern ukraine since the ceasefire started bringing to a total of more than 3660 dead in fighting in eastern ukraine since april. what's that, six, seven months since they started that tally. more on that a story as and when we get it. now let's bring you more on another of our major stories at moment, the ebola outbreak. a fifth person has been admitted to the hospital in spain suspected of having ebola. the woman is a friend and
6:09 am
colleague of the spanish nurse who tested positive for ebola monday. she was the first person known to have contracted the virus without having been to west africa. the spanish prime minister has been facing questions in parliame parliament. he said there's no reason for panic. >> translator: let's allow health professionals to do their job, trust them. pain's health system is one of the best in the world. they're telling us at the moment the disease is not highly contagious. it's only transmitted by direct contact with the patient in advanced stages. we have to remain calm. >> that's the spanish prime minister speaking about the prime minister as ebola appears in spain. the major sense of the outbreak is in west africa. thousands have died in the current outbreak.
6:10 am
most deaths have been in guinea, sierra leone and liberia. the charity working in sierra leone said there are currently 80 cases confirmed each day. diagnostic labs are in short supply. many more are going undiagnosed. >> reporter: i'm here at the sierra leone headquarters of the charity. they have been leading the fight against ebola since it first started six months ago. joining me now, christina who heads the mission here. explain how bad things are at the moment and how bad they could now get. >> ebola outbreak is not under control. we are far behind the control of the spreading of the virus. we are extremely concerned of
6:11 am
consequence and amounts because everything is very slow. it's not enough in terms of response to provide and stop this outbreak. >> we've heard this week that you've had one of your international staff become infected with ebola. i've seen first hand the precautions you take. we have this nurse being treated in spain. how does that happen? >> unfortunately in ebola, there's no zero risk. we minimize as much as possible. our protocol inside treatment senter and outside in mission life. it's very strict. there's no touch policy. we're always washing hands. inside treatment center, medical staff wear front line, really, really careful on what they are doing. we have full protection with the -- again, the risk is still there. we minimize as much as possible
6:12 am
this risk. unfortunately this can happen. >> reporter: the british prime minister david cameron is hosting an emergency meeting on ebola today. what is your message to him? what needs to happen now to bring this under control? we need options. we need resource. we need experience resource, medical staff. not only facility, not only building treatment center. we need more people on the ground. more means of transport. more facility, more beds, good management of this facility. there's not enough. not enough what we've been promised. we need action now. we cannot delay and cannot deliver responsibility. they have to act and provide everything needed for respond to this outbreak. >> thank you very much. as a you can see there, a very
6:13 am
difficult, a very dire picture painted here and across west africa. as this thing rages on here with the international help not coming fast enough, the whole world remains at risk. >> there reporting from free town in sierra leone on the latest outbreak. everybody has questions about this obviously. there's a live question and answer session taking place on twitter right now. the bbc is taking part in that. you can tweet him using the hashtag. there it is on your scre screen @umarufofana. the e-mail is have your s say @bbc. a live picture from the observatory. hah is the moon looking amazing there in los angeles. the moon is about to go into a
6:14 am
total lunar eclipse. when it does so, what we should see is a spectacle of a blood red moon. it should appear bright red. it's covered by the earth's shadow. that red color is the result of sunlight scattering off the earth's atmosphere. we've been tracking this the last hour or so. we're expecting that to appear shortly, the blood red color. you can see the moon starting to disappear in total eclipse there. nothing can eclipse an eclipse except the man himself. aaron is here with the latest. >> the moon is going to look like my eyes after -- >> after what? >> a night out. >> you don't have a night out. >> we're going to get in trouble. i've got to get in. european union terror counter ministers are meeting today with big names in
6:15 am
technology and social media, they're going to discuss ways to minimize exploitation of terrorists groups. governments are concerned about how social media is used as a recruitment tool by organizations such as i.s. that action needs to be taken now. we'll keep more on this from "gmt." also this london film festival from sky wars, james bo bond, a whole bunch of them. some of the most profitable ever. spending on film production in the uk has soared by an impressive 14% to $1.6 billion. that's the last year alone. why is uk such an attractive place to make a film. talent is part of it. you've been seeing it here. so our tax breaks, big time. later in the business we're going to take a look at more of
6:16 am
this coming up on "gmt." also, are people still going to cinemas are are you watching digital downloads from home? follow me on twitter. tweet me @bbc aaron. i'll see you on "gmt" in an hour's time. >> see you later. stay with us here on bbc for plenty more to come including this. we'll meet the cyclists rie s backwards across three continents to spread peace. e. ♪ could it be i'm falling in love... ♪ (in an english accent) with your pea coat and your stomping around with your bobbies. is the audition to play a portuguese guy? no, british. you are really going for it. eyes are muscles too. with the best screen of any tablet, the new samsung galaxy tab s is the world's most entertaining device. get it now at samsung.com. for bfor a love this strong is a labor of love. there's new iams naturals,
6:17 am
with no corn or chicken by-product meal, grain-free, and costs up to 25% less. iams naturals. just one of many iams formulas to keep love strong. there it is... this is where i met your grandpa. right under this tree. ♪ (man) some things are worth holding onto. they're hugging the tree. (man) that's why we got a subaru. or was it that tree? (man) introducing the all-new subaru outback. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru.
6:18 am
this is bbc world news. these are the latest headlines. there's new air strikes against islamic state militants trying to take the down of kobane on the turkish border. there's another ebola
6:19 am
patient bringing the total to five in spain. kenatta is facing crimes against humanity cwhich he denies. he says the charges are politically motivated and insists the case should be thrown out. we can go live to the icc in hagan. i think it's fair to say anna that these scene as have never been witnessed. what's going on by the arrival of the serving head of state for the first time in front of the court. >> it actually felt more like when he arrived a few hours ago. his supporters were there displaying kenyan colors and waving flags. it was more somber when the hearing got underway. these are the most serious charges.
6:20 am
he's accused of being partly responsible for those killings that happened after the 2007 elections. he's accused of funding and instigating the violence, paying members of the street gang to carry out killings. he denies those charges. we've been told they expect to conclude this in the next half hour. we may have an outcome by then. >> earlier we understand by the prosecutors that back in september they threw their hands up. they haven't been able to get the evidence they need in the case. they've been saying the same today that they wanted a suspension. is that right? bring us up to date. >> throwing their hands up is a very good way to explain the prosecution. they face so many challenges with this case. the premise is that most powerful leaders cannot be above the law. prosecuting this president is
6:21 am
proving to be difficult. they've lost witnesses. prosecution says they've been bribed or blackmailed or disappeared. prosecution admitted they don't have enough evidence to take this to trial. they say it's the kenyan government fault for failing to hand over documents. firm records, bank statements and tax returns. the government argues the prosecution doesn't have the evidence, why are we here? he shouldn't stand trial, and charges should be dismissed. that's in the power of the judges. they could decide to dismiss this all together. the prosecution has asked for indefinite adjournment to give them time to gather vital missing evidence. >> we'll see what happens. anna is live in the hague. thanks very much. now at least three more civilians are killed overnight as forces continue to exchange
6:22 am
fire in the region taking the death toll to 12. 18 others are injured. latest casualties came after nine died monday. the highest single civilian toll in a day in more than a decade. thousands have fled to escape the shelling. a british tourist given a four month jail sentence has arrived in the uk. ray cole, 69 years old was in prison with his moroccan partner after police saw incriminating images on his mobile phone. he arrived back after spending 20 days in prison. he was released by the moroccan authorities. >> i'm overwhelmed. didn't expect this at all. i thought i was going to be transferred to a different prison. they said they were sending me home. they offered me the choice of staying the extra night. you could probably guess what i chose. >> what was it like in prison? >> you would not believe. it's horrendous.
6:23 am
it's not a prison. it's a concentration camp. people are in there from age of 10 to 80s and 90s. >> ray cole there arriving back in the uk. to new york. an appeals court will consider whether chimpanzees will have the same legal rights as a person. an american animal rights group has asked the judge to declare the chimp like this one has been unlawful areally kept in prison. a landmark case there. how far would you go in the name of world peace. over the last decade, he has ridden a bike backwards over three countries to spread the message. he travels with two companions. we caught up with him on the british leg of his journey. >> translator: we embarked on
6:24 am
our cycling tour to promote around the world and encourage people to turn away from violence. we hope people understand our message when they see us riding by. i first started cycling backwards in the year 2000. at the time nepal was in middle of mass conflict. 13,000 people were killed. >> translator: we carry that pain with us. we've slept in a lot of unusual places of our journey. we have stayed in mosques, churches, temples and mond monasteries. in some places ladies asked us to spend the night with them. some even asked us to help them conceive a baby. one said she would like to have a child as courageous as me. >> translator: sometimes we have
6:25 am
difference of opinions of which roads to take. we work out our differences for the sake of world peace. in some countries like singapore, we haven't been allowed to cycle backwards. as soon as the police were out of site, i would do it. once in saudi arabia three police vans surrounded us. people don't ride bikes or motor bikes there. the embassy helped us and we continued our journey. >> translator: while cycling backwa backward, i have developed problems in my i neck. it also affected nerves in my eye. we want to have our names registered in the geniuss book of world records for cyclists
6:26 am
backwards. we are here and we are happy. >> cycling in the name of world peace. let's take you back to live pictures from los angeles thousand. that my friends is a blood red moon. the moon is in total eclipse. it appears red because of sunlight scattering off the earth's atmosphere. it's covered by the shadow of the lovely pictures there. and raise hopes. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. (pro) nice drive. (vo) well played, business pro. well played. go national. go like a pro. you pay your auto insurance premium every month on the dot. you're like the poster child for paying on time. and then one day you tap the bumper of a station wagon. no big deal...
6:27 am
until your insurance company jacks up your rates. you freak out. what good is having insurance if you get punished for using it? hey insurance companies, news flash. nobody's perfect. for drivers with accident forgiveness, liberty mutual won't raise your rates due to your first accident. see car insurance in a whole new light. liberty mutual insurance.
6:28 am
revolutionary by every standard. and that became our passion. to always build something better, airplanes that fly cleaner and farther on less fuel. that redefine comfort and connect the world like never before. after all, you can't turn dreams into airplanes unless your passion for innovation is nonstop.
6:29 am
♪ unless your passion for innovatioh no.nonstop. who are you? daddy, this is blair, he booked this room with priceline express deals and saved a ton. i got everything i wanted. i always do. he seemed nice.
6:30 am
more fighting as islamic state fighters push to the town. the world must act to prevent a massacre. in turkey, 12 people are killed in protests as kurds urge the government to help defend the town of kobane. also today another person is treated in spain for suspected ebola. experts warn more medical staff could become infected. >> dealing with patients with ebola illness who are sick is
6:31 am
very risky business. the slightest mistake can be fatal. kenya's president appears at the international criminal court, the first serving head of state to do so. he denies crimes against humanity against post election violence in 2007. coming up, how radio broadcasts are helping to improve the health of the natio nation. hello there. thanks for joining us. at least 12 people have been killed in turkey following demonstrations by kurdish protestors demanding intervention to defend the town of kobane. riot police used tear gas and water canyons in a number of
6:32 am
towns and cities as disturbances spread across the country. let me show you the map to give you an idea of what we're talking about. kobani is on the border with tu. it's been under siege for weeks. militants have been advancing from three sides. the turkish army lies in wait across the red line. it appears reluctant to intervene. these are latest pictures from co bane. reports say the u.s. led coalition has carried out fresh air strikes on islamic targets near the town this morning. you can see the plume of smoke. there are reports of renewed fighting of kurdish fighters inside kobane and militant who is launched another assault on wednesday. let's get the details from laura west brook. >> anger and frustration on the streets of turkey. thousands of kurds marched across the country including the
6:33 am
capital and istanbul. some protestors launched fireworks at police. the response rubber bullets and tear gas. they are furious that turkey seems to be standing by as islamic state advances on the syrian town of kobane. they say turkey's failure to help kurdish fighters there will lead to its fall. several were killed in the clashes. earlier, hundreds of kurds cut and jumped the fence along the border saying they want to fight along side their syrian cousins. turkey's president has admitted kobane is in peril but says only a coordinated ground operation can save the city. he's not prepared to act alone. >> i'm telling the world dropping bombs will not provide a solution. the terror will not be over unless we cooperate on a ground operation. >> here in kobane, coalition
6:34 am
warplanes launched another round of air strikes. again and again hitting jihadi targets. it didn't stop the fighting, but the strikes seemed to have halted the advance of is fighters at least for now. >> what needs to be done is whatever it takes in order to save the city of kobane. there have been three weeks the people of kobane have been trying to fight isis. if we are serious and the resolution there which came at u.n. security council was clear about fighting and doing whatever it takes to stop isis, well this is a test. >> reporter: canada is the latest country to join the coalition launching air strikes. the u.s. admitted more is needed. >> air strikes alone are not going to be enough anywhere, not just in iraq but also in syria and certainly around kobane to be a tipping point. they can put pressure, help disrupt and degrade capabilities
6:35 am
around kobane. ultimately it will take more than air strikes to preserve it or any territory that isil wants to possess. >> anxious kurds look on. they doubt air strikes can really save kobane. bbc news. >> this siege of kobane has been exodus of people living there from outside the town, 200,000 estimated. there's a statement on the twitter page dismissing the the reports the town has become a military zone. the statement said despite bar baric attacks by isis mercenaries, there's still thousands of civilians staying in kobani. they also said they'll defend them at all costs.
6:36 am
you've spoke ton people inside kobane. what have they said? >> the entire operation of the city, the government, have picked up to join the fight. it shows the situation is diempt i talked to a local leader. he said many families who's daughters and sons have been many fight with i.s. militants have refused this asking him to lift the town, have refused them of the town. thousands of people are inside the city under shelling. when talking about the civilia s s, most are people that refuse to leave and stay to help sons and daughters. in terms of food, electricity and water, it's dire. the city is under siege. the boarder shut down.
6:37 am
they are resisting. that was what she said. we came back to the city because we are with our small weapons. we could fight them in outskirt of the city. >> they are outgunned by isis? i.s. has tanks and artillery as well. therefore the u.s. led air strikes are going to be needed as well aren't they in. >> i think they said absolutely since yesterday air strikes have been essential and productive for them. they said they really hurt the i.s. militants. that was one of the reasons the kurds were able to push back last night. >> the town is still very much in danger. >> the town is in danger. obviously i.s. militantsing manied to reach some part of town in the outskirt of the city, particularly towers over the city from i.s. militants.
6:38 am
>> the issue of kobane has within turkey. we've seen protests and 12 killed overnight into wednesday. how much of an issue of a problem or key moment is kobane going to be for turkey's involvement in this battle against i.s. >> this is an icon for many around the world. in many cities in iran. they put in support of kobane. many intellectuals. >> turkey has a sizable population, somewhere around 20 million. there's 18 month peace process. mr. erdogan is hoping to do more power for himself as a president. this issue may derail efforts in the past 18 months.
6:39 am
look at the news in the past few days. major kurdish and turkish city with a population. there's been an uprising. riots, police cars burned, ruling party office burned. turkish locals report more than 12 people have been killed. many hundred people have been injured. many police have been injured. even some part of the major city far east of turkey. the heart land of the kurdish uprising. there's parts of the city even for a few hours. it was in control of the protestors. we see turkey is facing serious issues internally while what's happening in kobane kurdish town could affect the population. >> very interesting. thank you very much indeed. we'll watch closely what turkey decides. thanks very much. now let's bring you more on another of our main stories. that is the outbreak of ebola.
6:40 am
a fifth person is admitted to the hospital in spain suspected of having the virus. the woman is a friend and colleague of the spanish nurse. she tested positive for ebola on monday and is the first person known to have contracted the virus without having been to west africa. the prime minister has been facing questions in parliament there. he said there's no reason to panic. >> let's allow health professionals to do their job. let's trust them. spain's health system is one of the best in the world. what they're telling at moment is that the disease is not highly contagious. it is only transmitted by direct contact with the patient in the advanced stage of the illness. what we have to do at the moment is be vigilant but maintain calm. >> the professor on the team that discovered ebola in 1976 and advising the world health organization says there's little danger of epidemic in spain.
6:41 am
the professor expects more cases among medical staff treating patients even in developed countries. >> there's no risk i see for outbreaks, but there will be people most likely particularly in intensive care units who may become infected. that's just what happened. the -- particularly when you consider that dealing with patients with with ebola illness who are sick is very risky business. the slightest mistake can be fatal. >> the professor, world expert on ebola. the center of this outbreak has been west africa. experts are learning more about how to contain the virus that infected 7775000 there.
6:42 am
>> reporter: it's a very important and difficult task. it's the absolute number one priority before we come out here. there was a very intensive risk assessment we had to fill in. every eventuality. we have a bio hazard expert with us overseeing safety aspects of what we're doing. all of us are carrying disinfective sprays in our pockets at all times. when we go in difficult area or out of this hotel. we are spraying the soles of our shoes before we step back in the car. you may have seen i've been wearing full bio hazard kits when i've been in high risk areas like graveyards. these are stringent precautions that we are taking to make sure that we stay safe.
6:43 am
>> talking there about precautions she and her team are taking in west africa to bring us the story. let's take you live to los angeles. i want to show you the picture. that my friends is a blood red moon. it's actually a total lunar eclipse visible across the americas and also in asia. we see that phenomenon appearing to be colored red. it's in the earth's shadow. s the effect of sunlight scattering off the earth's atmosphere called a blood red moon. eclipse has been going on an hour or so. this is what we see as a result. looks quite stunning. i'm sure you'll a agree. pop back to that picture later on. wanted you to enjoy that right now. now other news. the kenyan president has become the first sitting head of state to appear before the international criminal court in the hague.
6:44 am
kenyatta is facing charges of crimes against humanity over his advanced role of violence in the 2007 elections in kenya. he says the charges are politically motivated and insists the case should be thrown out. earlier i spoke to bbc anna who sent this from the hague -- we'll speak to her later on. first of all, let's give you details about what the icc is all about.
6:45 am
>> supporters were there displaying kenyan colors and waving flags. it was more somber when the hearing got underway. these of course are the most serious charges. he's accused of partly responsible for killings that happened after the 2007 elections. he's accused of funding and instigating violence, basically paying members of the feared street gang to carry out killings. he of course denies those charges. >> earlier, i understand the
6:46 am
prosecutors -- we know back in september, prosecutors effectively threw their hands up. they haven't been able to get the evidence. they've been saying today they wanted suspension. is that right? bring us up to date. >> throwing hands up is a very good way to explain the prosecution. they face so maniy many challe with this case. in prosecuting this president, it's proving to be just so difficult, so many challenges. they've lost so many witnesses. prosecutors said they've been bribed or blackmailed or simply disappeared. >> anna reporting from the hague there international criminal court. stay with us here on bbc. plenty more to come. we showed you a blood red moon earlier. we show you the 13-year-old training to be become the first astronaut on mars. some brands use fish processed with gluten, but iams tasty fish recipes
6:47 am
are made with 100% real fish filets. love the iams difference or your money back. break the ice, with breath freshening cooling crystals. ice breakers.
6:48 am
6:49 am
you're watching bbc world news with me. these are the latest headlines. there's been new air strikes against islamic state militants trying to take the town of kobane on the syrian turkish border. another person is treated in spain for ebola bringing the number there to five. let's take you to australia now because the prime minister tony abbott says moves republican underway to ban preachers of extremists ideology of entering his country. a red card system will be to refuse, identify those. there have been anti-terror raids in recent weeks. >> there's been all sorts of people coming to this country to cause trouble, make a nuisance of themselves, stir up australian against australian.
6:50 am
as far as i'm concerned, this will stop. i say to people that want to come to this country from overseas, divide australian from australian, to give implicit support, don't bother applying. >> tony abbott in australia there. it's one of the poorest countries in the world. one child in ten does not make it to their fifth birthday. a new study suggests child mortality might be thanks in part to a health campaign. radio stations in some for thes of the country have been broadcasting simple advice from breastfeeding to malaria. >> six years ago the brother of these children fell sick. they called the pastor and prayed. they used traditional medicine.
6:51 am
the 6-year-old never woke up from his fever. no one, not even the nurses knew why he died. >> translator: i thought it was the maize sickness. when maize grows, children pick itse it from trees. they get the disease and need treatment. what's what i thought. >> it was nothing to do with their crops. it was malaria that killed him. one in ten children die before they reach the age of five. in rural areas, few have access to health care. the dry land brings in little money for hospital bills. >> translator: child mortality is one of the highest here in the world. first of all there is malaria, the leading cause of child death and hospitalization. that's followed by diarrhea and then respiratory disease.
6:52 am
>> this is where the radio comes in. a new campaign broadcasting targeted health messages to deal with things like importance of breastfeeding or malaria treatment are starting to change people's behavior. it's thought this change could help reduce the infant mortality rate. the radio is one of seven community station as broadcasting dramas and live programming to deal with child health. regions that aren't covered be by the campaign are also monitored. results show families living in the broadcast zones are beginning to change how they look after their children. simple things like giving more fluids when they have diarrhea. >> this trial is an opportunity to prove to party leadsers that mass media is one of the
6:53 am
effective ways to prove. the goal is not to prove we have a great way but goal is reduce mortality. >> the radio has opened my eyes especially when they talk about malaria, hygiene and nutrition. we change the ways we do things. it's like school for me. radio is my teacher. >> three quarters of the population listens to the radio everyday. dmi claims media campaign changing people's behaviors could be a cheaper way to improve the health. we'll introduce you to a young girl with very big dreams. at the age of 13 she's determined to be the first person to land on mars. it's more than just wishful thinking. she's the first person to to have attended all of nasa's
6:54 am
space camps. our newest mobile bureau in the state of louisiana has this. let's go to meet her. >> i want to go to mars because it's a place no one has been. it's completely desserted right now. so i want to take that first st step. at the nasa visitors center, i get the chance to deploy a parachute and land curiosity on the proper landing site on mars. i think that i have a high chance of going to mars
6:55 am
basically because i've been training for nine years so far. as i get older and continue to do more things, the resume will get longer, help me stand out and help me look unique compared to other people. >> i absolutely think she will be on mars. there's not a doubt in my mind because how hard she works trying to get there. there's not a doubt in my mind that her dream and passion will drive her to that planet. >> nasa takes people like alyssa very seriously. she's of the perfect age to one day become an astronaut and eventually travel to mars. she's doing the right things, taking the right training, taking the right steps to actually become an astronaut. >> we have french, spanish, chinese, english, art, social
6:56 am
studies, math, science. i have a pretty balanced life. my saturdays are usually packed but not always by nasa stuff. sometimes it could be due to soccer games or a piano recital. these things help me just be a kid sometimes. >> we have the next 20 years planned out. we know what she's doing. she's looking at going on a mission to mars in 2033. in 20 years i may not ever see her again. there's options out there they go to mars and not come back. we have those discussions. if that's the only option she has, she still wants to go. >> i have thought about possibly being other things, but being an astronaut was always first on my list. failure is not an option. i don't want one obstacle in the way to stop me from going to
6:57 am
mars. >> i'm sure that's a name we'll be hearing a lot more in the future. i'm on twitter if you'd like to get in touch with me. i'd like to hear from you. on this screen we're going to leave you live pictures of the blood moon and total eclipse from los angeles. hey, razor. check this out. it's time to get a hotel. we can save big with priceline express deals. hey you know what man, these guys aint no dragons. they're cool. these deals are legit. yeah, we're cool. she's cool. we're cool.
6:58 am
(receptionist) gunderman group is growing. getting in a groove. growth is gratifying. goal is to grow. gotta get greater growth. i just talked to ups. they got expert advise, special discounts, new technologies. like smart pick ups. they'll only show up when you print a label and it's automatic. we save time and money. time? money? time and money. awesome. awesome! awesome! awesome! awesome! (all) awesome! i love logistics. revolutionary by every standard. and that became our passion. to always build something better, airplanes that fly cleaner and farther on less fuel.
6:59 am
that redefine comfort and connect the world like never before. after all, you can't turn dreams into airplanes unless your passion for innovation is nonstop. ♪
7:00 am
hello. welcome to bbc world news. i'm lucy hockings. the bodies of ebola victims are left in the streets in sierra leone as burial teams go on strike. it's a sign of desperation in west africa. we'll hear from our team on the ground in sierra leone and we'll talk to health experts later in the program. 14 are killed in pro kurdish protests in

33 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on