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tv   BBC World News  BBC America  October 10, 2014 6:00am-7:01am EDT

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this is bbc america, and now live from london, "bbc world news." >> hello, i'm geeta guru-murthy with "bbc world news." our top stories. two winners of this year's nobel peace prize, it goes to pakistani education activist malala yousafzai, and to india's kailash satyarthi for his work in ending child exploitation. doctors in madrid say a nurse infected with ebola is at serious risk of dying. as seven more people in spain are monitored for signs of the virus. plus, the battle for the syrian border town of kobane continues.
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turkey and france discuss establishing a buffer zone against the advance of i.s. militants. hello. within the last hour, the pakistani education campaign malala yousafzai and the indian rights activist satyarthi have jointly won the nobel peace prize. malala is the youngest ever winner of a nobel prize at 17, and kailash satyarthi has forged to eradicate child slavery and labor for many years. the norwegian nobel committee awarded the prize saying peaceful global development can only come about if children and the young are respected. >> in the current global situation, i think it's important to highlight those persons that give young people a
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hope. let them go to school, rather than to be employed in negative activities around the world. so we have given also the prize to kailash satyarthi, that has worked against the suppression of young people and for education, against exploitation, extreme exploitation of young people, through many, many years. so this combination is a good one as we see. a strong signal to the world community. >> that announcement coming just an hour ago. our correspondent is in islamabad. what is the reaction there? >> well, a lot of excitement here in islamabad where i am. i mean, two years ago, malala was shot by the taliban for wanting to go to school and for standing up for girls'
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education. today she's a nobel laureate. a big achievement here. so i went down to an islamabad school for girls to get their reaction. let's see what they had to say. we've just heard the news of malala yousafzai's winning of the nobel peace prize, a huge achievement for the young education activist. only two years ago, was shot dead by the taliban for being outspoken about the rights of girls to education, and i'm here in an islamabad girls school. they just heard the news. what do you think, girls? >> whoo! >> this is an excited crowd here. let's get the reaction from the students. so tell us your name. >> i am very proud of malala. i love her sacrifice. she's a very great person. it is very difficult for a woman. and she's done great for us. i'm very proud of her and i love her. i want to be like her. >> you want to be like malala. what about yourself? >> when i watch malala on
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television, i am so proud of her, and i always want to be like her. she was shot by the taliban, but she stood up for herself. she has won the peace prize and that is huge. we are so proud of her. >> many girls here are proud of her. they want to be like her. they think she's an inspiration. but i must say malala is a divisive figure here in pakistan, with many people criticizing what she stands for. also her mission, her message, girls education is still very much a struggle in pakistan, where girls are still struggling to go to schools in the rural areas and also in the more remote part of pakistan. so a nobel peace prize winner, but still a lot of work to do. well, a mission still very, very much poignant here. a mission still very much needed in her home country of pakistan. of course, now malala has taken her message across the world,
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and with this latest nobel peace prize, this message is going to be all too powerful. but, you know, the education budget here is only 2%, or over 2%, and there are many calls for more focus on education, especially for girls who are still struggling in many parts of this country to make it to school, let alone get a good education. so malala's mission is still very much needed for girls in her country. >> i'm sure many people delighted there. thanks very much indeed. live in islamabad. let's cross now to delhi and the bbc's india service is there. celebrations there too in india. >> yes, geeta. quite exciting times for india as well. as india has won its first peace nobel. kailash satyarthi is known as a child activist in india and has been working against the suppression of children and young people and also for the right of all children's education. he has been active in the indian
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movement since 1990s. his organization has so far freed over 80,000 children from various forms of servitude. in his first reaction, he has said that getting a nobel is a great honor for the indians, and for all those children who have been still living in slavery despite their advancement of technology, he has dedicated this award to those children in the world. he has also campaigned on social issues involving children. some of his major projects include global march against child labor. not just in india, he has also been active in bangladesh, nepal, and pakistan. >> how well-known is he in india itself? obviously malala known globally. this will bring the work of his more to a global attention, won't it now? >> well, kailash is also
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well-known domestically. at the age of 26, he gave up a promising career as an electrical engineer and dedicated his life to helping the millions of children in india who are forced into slavery. he has been involved with various global movements involving health services to the children. he has also campaigned against child labor. and he has been recognized through various awards, and some of the likes. >> just very briefly, india and pakistan jointly awarded there. long-standing rivals. there's been some tension linked with kashmir in the last few days. is it being seen in that very overt political sense? what would you say is the general mood of reaction nationally? >> well, they're very happy. the firings have apparently stopped at the borders and this particular news has come as a dessert. india an pakistan are both
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celebrating on this great honor. malala, her name was quite sure to get the prize, but kailash satyarthi also getting this nobel is good news for india as well. >> many thanks. well, of course, malala yousafzai now lives with her family here in britain in birmingham, which is in the midlands. let's go now to speak to our correspondent phil mackie who is in birmingham for us. do we know whether she's going to be speaking? i think we're hoping for some sort of reaction, aren't we later? >> yeah, we are, geeta. we've been told that there will be something happening this afternoon. what, we're not quite sure yet. i gather that she's at school this morning and was taken out of class to be told that she's become the youngest ever we think winner of any nobel prize at 17. that there is some kind of special assembly happening at her school at the moment. the reason i'm standing here is that after she was released from hospital where she was treated for her injuries, she came and opened this building, the
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birmingham central library. she made a powerful speech about the subjects upon which she has campaigned about education for girls, women's rights, and she talked about how she was also proud to be a brummy. if you come from birmingham, you're known as a brummy. so she has clearly adopted this as her home city. since she came here under those awful circumstances in 2012. after she was saved by doctors in pakistan, they put her back together here at the queen elizabeth's hospital in birmingham, where most british troops who are wounded in action in countries like afghanistan are also brought to be treated and that's why she came here, because they were able to have the expertise and world renowned experts at the kind of injury she suffered. when she left hospital a couple months later, i remember a picture of her smiling and waving. she had very few visible signs of the injuries. it's remarkable that within a few months she was back on the
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campaign trail launching the malala fund, which campaigns across the world. >> given all that and her extraordinary work and her extraordinary ability to capture people's imagination in the last couple years, does she have a relatively normal day-to-day life? >> reporter: i don't think it's completely normal. i mean obviously, she still remains a potential target from organizations like al qaeda and the taliban. so there is a lot of security that surrounds her whenever she comes and appears in public. so wherever this news conference, if it takes place in birmingham happens later on today, there will be security surrounding that. she's a public figure. she's probably one of the best known teenagers in the world. and for that reason, she can't really do much that any hollywood star could do, like walk out and go to the shops as normal 17-year-olds might do in this city. but she's got her family with her. she's got a huge support network. and she's got a very good school. one of the best schools not just in this city and region, but in
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this country, where she's studying for her gce examinations, and will probably go on, one suspects, after she garage waits and goes to university to become a politician. >> well, it's great news. we hope to hear from her soon. for now, phil, thanks a lot. with me is the bbc world affairs correspondent mike waldrich. i know i'm not supposed to be biased, but personally i'm delighted that both these people won today. malala, everyone knows who she is. many people expected her to win last year, didn't they? >> they did indeed, and were disappointed that she didn't. she herself suggested that she might have to wait longer before she obviously hoped one day she might win the peace prize. but it has come this year. not only are you delighted, but also interesting, gordon brown, who is today the former prime minister, but today the u.n. special envoy on education around the world. and he has said this in a statement. malala yousafzai and kailash
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satyarthi are the world's greatest children's champions. deserve the nobel peace prize for their courage, determination, for their vision that no child should ever be left behind and every child should have the best of chances. but i think that, you know, after the celebrations are over and particularly all the great attention that will be around this with the actual awarding of the prizes, presumably in oslo in december, it will be about what actually happens on the ground. does this prize, the most prestigious in the world, many people would say, actually make a big difference in the things that they fought for. >> yes, they will obviously both want that. they win a million dollars or so, which they will presumably split. and in india, of course, the campaign to end child labor and child slavery, it has some publicity here where we're razzed about where we get our clothes from. kailash satyarthi has said when you buy an indian rug, where is that made? it's often made by children. think again. >> that's right. he has operated on a global
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stage in that so sort of campaigning, even if he's not as well-known around the world as malala yousafzai, because of what happened to her. i think another very interesting aspect in this, the committee made the point in announcing the awards was that in his case, kailash satyarthi, they said how he operated very much in the gandhian tradition. gandhi himself never won a nobel peace prize, which amazes many people, and some on the committee itself in more recent times who felt that that should have happened all those years ago. so here they've honored that tradition in which he and so many others campaigned around india on a daily basis on these sorts of issues. >> we've just celebrated gandhi's birthday just a few days ago. great news for india an pakistan. thanks very much indeed, mike. let's catch up with some of our other top stories now. and too little, too late, too slow. words some might use to describe the international community's response to the ebola crisis? west africa. that certainly seems to be the
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view of joanne, who heads the group of msf. msf workers have been playing a key role in efforts on the ground. the bbc was told the world had to act now to contain ebola and prevent catastrophe. >> i still think that we're not winning the bottomle. i think we're still running behind and in order to get ahead of the game, we're going to need to deploy much more than what we have done so far. i am convinced that the world can change the course of this epidemic. that's what i'm convinced of. and it's a question of mobilizing and bringing the assets in the field. and now we need to do it in action. and promises have been done. and it will need to be somehow happening over the next few days, because every three weeks, we double the number of people who are infected. if we keep the same i would say response in west africa. so it's a question of now of action, rather than words.
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>> dr. joanne lui there. ebola is now entrenched in the capital cities of guinea, liberia, and sierra leone. meanwhile, the condition of the spanish nurse who contracted ebola whilst caring for a patient with the disease appears to have deteriorated. teresa romero was hospitalized in madrid five days ago with flu-like symptoms. there's much more on the website on what not to do if you're worried about catching ebola. it's really worth catching that if you are at all concerned. alice is here. the markets have been a bit concerned this week. >> absolutely right, geeta. we're talking roller coaster type activity. it's been quite tumultuous. wall street, it's been a hugely turbulent week. even by these standards, thursday there was nothing short of truly tempestuous.
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remember, this comes after the biggest rally in a year on wednesday, which itself followed a major selloff on tuesday. there are growing fears about the health of some european and asian economies. germany had its biggest dump-in exports in five years, and a warning that's heading to recession. this at a time when the federal reserve is winding up its stimulus measures. the end of all that cheap money that's been flooding the world over the past few years, this is all putting markets on something of a knife edge. we will speak to a market expert and find out what investors can expect next. let's have a quick look to see where european markets are right now. the slide continues after that worst one-day suffering in a year on wall street. and that german trade day fueling worry that europe is sliding into recession. the dax currently down over
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2.2%. all of these worries are top of the agenda in washington, where world leaders are gathering for the annual meetings of the imf and the world bank, which officially start today. we've already had warnings from them this week about the global economic slowdown, but over the past few days, another concern has begun to dominate many conversations in washington. the outbreak of the ebola virus. now, think of football crazy nations. and india is not the first country to spring to mind ordinarily, but a group of high-profile investors from the world of business, cricket, and bollywood are hoping to change that with the launch of a new indian football super league. so, will indian sports fans play billion? we'll see whether this move is going to be a success or an old go for investors. that's all for this hour. >> thanks very much, see you soon. stay with us here on "bbc world news." much more to come.
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this is "bbc world news." i'm geeta guru-murthy with the top stories. this year's nobel peace prize has been won jointly by the pakistani activist malala yousafzai and india's kailash satyarthi for their work promoting children's rights. and doctors treating the spanish nurse infected with ebola say her condition has deteriorated. meanwhile, seven more people are now being monitored in hospital in spain for signs of the virus. reports from south korea say that north and south korea have traded fire after the north shot at a south korean propaganda balloon. the incident happened near the
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south korean border town. let's find out more and speak to our correspondent steve levins. what do we know about what's happened here, steve? >> reporter: according to the south korean military, what happened about five hours ago is that activists and defectors from the north in the south send up propaganda balloons, very big balloons which are filled at the bottom with food and propaganda messages, anti-north korean messages. the north korean authorities have frequently said that they find such behavior very, very provocative and have threatened in the past to fire on the balloons. this they did. with machine gunfire. some of the rounds landed in south korean territory, and the south korean military responded. now, initial reports from the site say obviously high tension
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and people have been evacuated from the area. but that there have been no casualties. so, a very serious incident clearly. reminiscent, though not as serious as the exchange of shells on an island four years ago. certainly the most serious incident since that one, since that shelling four years ago. >> and it comes as there's been some speculation about the leadership in north korea. >> that's right. on this day, this day is celebrated in the north of the country as being the anniversary of the founding of the political party there. and speculation and questioning and puzzlement about whether the country's leader would appear for these celebrations. he's not appeared since september 3rd. and a lot of people were saying what's happened to him if he doesn't appear today, well then something serious is clearly going on. is he ill?
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has there been a coup against him? whatever. in the event he didn't appear, but clearly there was a heightened state of emotion because of the anniversary. a heightened state of emotion used by the defectors in the south. and a heightened state in the north, which then retaliated. >> steve evans in seoul. thanks very much indeed. heavy fighting has continued overnight in the syrian border town of kobane, where islamic state militants are fighting kurdish fighters. as you can see, there are plumes of black smoke rising above the town. on thursday, the u.s.-led coalition carried out at least five air strikes on islamic state positions in eastern and southern parts of the town itself. kobane is right on the border with turkey, and turkey has so far refused to intervene in the conflict. instead, it is calling for a buffer zone to be created inside the syrian border, which has --
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that suggestion is now being talked about in paris. the french foreign minister is meeting with his turkish counterpart. our correspondent gave me more. >> the big question is what form would that buffer zone take and who would be in control of it? so would it be a passage to allow civilians to access and humanitarian aide to answer, or would it be to protect europe from the advance of isis from its borders? turkey has made it very clear it doesn't want to conduct any kind of ground operation by itself. and it very much wants the u.s.-led coalition to impose a no-fly zone against assad's forces. that's what they'll be discussing. they could be looking at some kind of compromise here because turkey is nato's second-largest military force and we've already seen turkish tanks lined up on
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the border. so in theory, they could get involved but there is a huge reluctant. the uk independence party has just won its first ever elected member of parliament. its candidate won the election in southeast england. he was originally the conservative mp for the town, but he defected to ukip last august. so who exactly are ukip? they're well-known for being anti-eu, and they've called for britain to leave the european union. they're also anti-immigration. they've called for a five-year freeze on immigration for permanent settlement. ukip have now gained their first elected mp today after the carswell victory. the mp himself spoke to the bbc about his defection from the conservative party. >> i'm going to work with people from all parties, including my friends in the conservative party to try to ensure we get change. and i think, you know, it's not really a question of whether
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conservative mps come with me. the real issue is how many former conservative and labour voters are prepared to come with us. i think you'll find if we get this right, if we make sure we learn to count, we get the messaging right, and we have the right values, i think we can achieve great things. >> douglas carswell. i'm back in five minutes. stay with us. (receptionist) gunderman group. gunderman group is growing. getting in a groove. growth is gratifying. goal is to grow. gotta get greater growth. i just talked to ups. they got expert advise, special discounts, new technologies.
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i'm geeta guru-murthy with "bbc world news." our top stories, the nobel peace prize goes to two winners. pakistan's malala yousafzai and india's kailash satyarthi for their work promoting children's rights. doctors in madrid say a nurse infected with ebola is at serious risk of dying. as seven more people in spain are monitored for signs of the virus. the uk independence party, ukip, 21,113. >> ukip, the anti-european and
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anti-immigration party has won its first seat in the british parliament and it's come a close second in another after two bi-elections. and india's prime minister is on a mission to clean up the country. but has it caught the public imagination? hello, and welcome. the pakistani child education campaigner malala yousafzai and the indian child rights activist kailash satyarthi have jointly won the nobel peace prize today. age just 17, malala is the youngest ever winner of a nobel prize, and kailash satyarthi has fought to eradicate child slavery and bonded labor for many years. the norwegian nobel committee awarded the prize saying
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peaceful global development can only come about if children and the young are respected. our correspondent in malala's home country of pakistan spoke earlier to schoolgirls in the capital islamabad and got some reaction to the news. >> she's a very great person. it is very difficult for a woman. and she's done great for us. i'm very proud of her and i love her. i want to be like her. >> you want to be like malala. what about yourself? >> when i watch malala on television, i am so proud of her, and i always want to be like her. she was shot by the taliban, but she stood up for herself. she has won the peace prize and that is huge.
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we are so proud of her. >> many girls here are proud of her. they want to be like her. they think she's an inspiration. but i must say malala is a divisive figure here in pakistan, with many people criticizing what she stands for. also her mission, her message, girls education is still very much a struggle in pakistan, where girls are still struggling to go to schools in the rural areas and also in the more remote part of pakistan. so a nobel peace prize winner, but still a lot of work to do. well, a mission still very, very quite exciting times for india as well. as india has won its first peace nobel. kailash satyarthi is known as a child rights activist in india
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and has been working against the suppression of young people and the right of all children to education. he has been active in the indian movement against child labor since 1990s. his organization has so far freed over 80,000 children from various forms of servitude and helped them in reintegration, rehabation and education. in his first reaction, he has said that getting the nobel is great for the indians and also an honor for all those children still living in slavery despite the advancement of technology. he has dedicated this award to those children. he is also dedicated to issues involving children. some of his major issues include global march against child labor. not just in india, he has also been active in bangladesh, nepal, pakistan, and sri lanka. >> how well-known is he in india itself? malala known globally.
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this will bring the work of his more to a global attention, won't it now? >> well, kailash is also well-known domestically. at the age of 26, he gave up a promising career as an electrical engineer and dedicated his life to helping the millions of children in india who are forced into slavery. he has been involved with various global movements involving health services to the children. he has also campaigned against child labor. and he has been recognized through various awards, and some of the likes. >> just very briefly, india and pakistan jointly awarded there. long-standing rivals. there's been some tension linked with kashmir in the last few days. is it being seen in that very overt political sense? what would you say is the general mood of reaction nationally? >> well, they're very happy. the firings have apparently stopped at the borders and this particular news has come as a dessert.
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india an pakistan are both celebrating on this great honor. malala, her name was quite sure to get the prize, but kailash satyarthi also getting this nobel is good news for india as well. >> not surprisingly, the nobel peace prize is trending on twitter on pakistan and india. a lot of celebrations there. and kailash satyarthi himself has now been speaking about whether his win came as a surprise. >> i have been nominated by the people. against child labor globally, as well other people, including some indians. so it's a great honor for all the indians. it's an honor for all those children who have been still living in slavery. and i dedicate this award to all
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those children in the world. >> kailash satyarthi there. the indian winner, along with malala yousafzai, a joint ownership there of the nobel peace prize. it will be awarded formally in december. let's move on now to the other main news that we're bringing you today, news on ebola. and of course, the international reaction has been hugely criticized by many for being far too slow, far too late, as the crisis continues in west africa. certainly, the view of joanne lui, with msf workers playing a key role, setting up treatment centers and trying to raise awareness. dr. lui told the bbc the world must act now to contain ebola and prevent a catastrophe. >> i still think that we're not winning the battle. i think that we are still behind. and in order to get ahead of the game, we're going to need to deploy much more than what we have done so far.
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i am convinced that the world can change the course of this epidemic. that's what i'm convinced of. and it's a question of mobilizing and bringing the assets in the field. now we need to do it in action, and promises have been done. and we need to be somehow happening over the next few days, because every three weeks, we double the number of people who are infected, if we keep the same i would say response in west africa. so it's a question now of action, rather than words. >> dr. liu there, president of msf. a w.h.o. spokesman said there were only about a quarter of the beds needed for patients in the worst affected countries, guinea, sierra leone and liberia. we've seen people being turned away. >> exactly, because there's nothing else they can do. the facilities there are operating beyond their capacity.
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w.h.o. has asked for at least a billion dollars, only about a quarter of that has been raised. there have been pledges. some of that has not trickled down to the ground. it's a really worrying situation. ebola is having a huge impact on the ground. a country like sierra leone was supposed to grow at an average of 5% this year. with no end in sight, i'm afraid it could go farther down. >> in reality, are people daring to go to work, go to school, go shopping? i mean, what happens today dail life? >> it has affected daily life. we have seen pictures of people going to the market, but it has curtailed how much people can get in contact with one another in the villages, for instance. many of the areas are farming communities. most of the people who go to the farms are women. but we also know that women are
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the ones who are really bearing the brunt, because in liberia, for instance, up to 75% of those who have died have been women. because they are the primary care givers as well. so it is having an impact in a very huge way in these three countries. and the world bank estimates that the foregone output in terms of the way the economy is is estimated at up to $350 million dollars in this country alone. >> i saw the nigerian finance minister say this is such a problem because if investment stops in this country, goodness knows what's going to happen. you're looking at potential collapse of these countries, which means picking up the health system and all that worse. this has global consequences, we must not forget. >> exactly. countries far away from these three countries that have been affected by ebola in africa, already feeling the impact. tourist arrivals are falling even in southern africa, far
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away from the epicenter of this outbreak. and the west african block alone is estimated to the cost on the economy is estimated to be about $25 billion in 2015. if nothing is done right now to check the spread of ebola. >> anne soy, thanks very much. there is much more on the ebola outbreak at the website. there is full background, details on how to avoid catching the virus, and that is really worth having a look. very specific, clear information on what to do, what not to do if you're traveling in the region. do check out the website page. now, heavy fighting has continued overnight in the syrian border town of kobane, where islamic state militants are fighting kurdish forces. these pictures were shot a little while ago from the turkish side of the border. you can see plumes of black smoke rising above the town, as we've seen all week, in fact. yesterday, the u.s.-led
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coalition carried out at least five air strikes on islamic state positions in eastern and southern parts of the town. but obviously still very difficult there. do stay with us here on "bbc world news." much more to come. yellow alert over beijing. how to cope with the city's choking smog. gon. no big deal... until your insurance company jacks up your rates. you freak out. what good is having insurance if you get punished for using it? hey insurance companies, news flash. nobody's perfect. for drivers with accident forgiveness, liberty mutual won't raise your rates due to your first accident. see car insurance in a whole new light. liberty mutual insurance. hey, razor. check this out. it's time to get a hotel. we can save big with priceline express deals. hey you know what man, these guys aint no dragons. they're cool. these deals are legit. yeah, we're cool. she's cool. we're cool.
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this is "bbc world news." i'm geeta guru-murthy with the latest headlines. the nobel peace prize has been jointly won by the pakistani activist malala yousafzai and india's kailash satyarthi for their work promoting children's rights. and doctors treating the spanish nurse infected with ebola say her condition has deteriorated. seven more people have now been taken into hospital for monitoring in spain with signs of the virus.
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here in britain, the uk independence party has just won its first ever elected member of parliament. its candidate comfortably won the bi-election in southeast england. mr. carswell was originally the conservative mp for the town, but he defected to ukip last summer. so, who exactly are ukip? well, they're well-known for being anti-eu, and make calls for britain to leave the union. they're also anti-immigration. ukip have now got their first elected mp, of course, which is something of a coup for them. what does it all mean? let's speak to jeff meade, an analyst covering the news in brussels for many years. seen in the european context, britain is one of the last countries in a way to have this sort of party formally in the house of commons. it is quite a moment, isn't it?
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something that many people thought they'd never see. >> it certainly is. i think we can safely say today that david cameron's problems in brussels over europe have just got infinitely worse. here is a man, a prime minister desperately trying to encourage the nation away from ukip and encourage brussels, encourage other eu leaders to offer him some reform, some slackening off of the control of brussels over london. and in the midst of all this, we have this resounding success for ukip, and broadly speaking, ukip is more than a one-subject party. but broadly speaking, you can say it is just anti-eu. this is a clear warning sign that the anti-eu returns in the recent european elections, the parliament elections, returned a lot of anti-eu meps from all over europe, not just britain. i think until now, the dust has settled on that election, and until now everyone's thought that was just a flash in the pan, they don't really have much power. this is being seen from brussels as a big sign of possibly things
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to come across europe, because as we all know, euro skepticism has been around for the last 30 years. >> this is about two seats with a lot of aging white male voters, who feel very disenfranchised by the political elite as they see governing them, it's an anti-politics vote, a protest vote, not in a general election situation. so should we really think that ukip is a viable force going forward? >> well, i think you can't dismiss it. the scale of mr. carswell's victory and the underlying anti-eu movement across europe, there's not one movement, but it's distinct and it's getting more and more serious. and everyone in brussels knows that. that's why they do take this seriously. if this turns out to be a flash in the pan, again the dust will settle and we'll go back to normal. but if any of the new incoming eu team were inclined to ignore
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that result in may, this is a wake-up call that those anti-euro factions in britain, in the netherlands, in germany, france, and many other countries, they're not really dormant. they may seem to be quiet for now, but this is something that has got to be addressed, and david cameron comes here for an eu summit later this month, a couple of weeks ahead of another major election for him that he doesn't want to lose to ukip. that would be really bad news. and when he comes here for that summit, he's going to have to say to the new commission president, give me something i can take home, a reform package so that i can fend off ukip. >> very, very briefly, the anti-immigration theme has run through europe. the head of ukip, seen as very affable, but lots of his messages seen as pretty nasty. >> they are, but again, one has to admit that they reflect views held elsewhere, not least in the netherlands, but of those nasty party people, his group was the one that came through. the british anti-eu, anti-immigration party was the
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one which did so well in the euro elections, leaving others behind. everyone knows him in brussels. everybody expects his ability to attract votes and people. that's why they're not dismissing this as a flash in the pan. >> jeff, thanks very much indeed. parts of northern china have suffered the worst bout of smog since july, pushing pollution well past healthy levels and cutting visibility. they have issued an orange alert, the second highest. >> reporter: it's another gas mask day here in beijing. i'm just going to take off the mask so you can actually hear what i've got to say. but the city is enveloped in a thick smog. now, the authorities are bly ie- blaming the usual supports. but they also say that farmers are burning straw at the end of harvest. if you want to get some idea of how bad it is, you have to take a look at this.
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this is an application on a smart phone. when i look at it, it says severely polluted, hazardous to your health. now, at the moment, it's only actually the second highest pollution reading in beijing. why it isn't the highest, i don't know, because we've seen three days of severe pollution. but when that happens, cars need to be taken off the streets and schools are shut down. that hasn't happened and the authorities probably don't want to see that kind of disruption. but just to put it all in context, you might remember earlier in the year, paris had a health emergency when smog enveloped that city. well, the pollution readings at the moment here in beijing are double that. the people here just need to suck it up and get on with it. in other news today, thousands of pro-democracy protesters in hong kong are gathering for a rally today after the government cancelled talks. demonstrations have brought parts of the territory to a standstill for almost two weeks. protesters are opposed to the
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chinese government's plans to vet candidates for hong kong's next election in 2017. fierce fighting in libya has forced 100,000 people from their homes in the last three weeks, according to the united nations refugee agency. rival armed groups battling for the territory in the capital of tripoli and benghazi is fighting a huge flood of internal refugees. now, while america, britain, and other coalition partners are focused on defeating the group calling itself islamic state, syria suffering in the hands of the assad regime appeal to the international community not to forget them. one syrian fireman has traveled to new york to take his protests to the u.n. our reporter caught up with khalid hara as he made his journey from aleppo to the big apple. >> this is a sprint that khalid has to make too often. he's a member of a civil defense team in aleppo. the first responders when the
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assad regime dropped bombs on what's left of his city. in june, it was khalid who was sure he heard the cries of a baby from beneath the rubble of a bombed out house. even the colleagues thought he was mistaken, but he refused to give up, clawing at the rubble with his hands. a tiny baby boy, just 10 days old. what happened was a miracle, he says. the baby boy was under three meters of debris. after the rescue, we felt indescribable joy. this was khalid setting off on a different journey, leaving bomd out aleppo. this might be quite something. and traveling to new york where the skyline has now been repaired.
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he saw this half-destroyed fire truck and said it could be made road worthy and used in syria. but this trip wasn't about sightseeing. the aim was to remind the international community that the assad regime is still killing syrians, not just islamic state. we hope that the american government and people will remember the syrian people who have suffered from the bombing and destruction, he says. and that they'll help us. khalid and his colleagues also wanted to make a protest at the united nations to complain about the onslaught of barrel bombs from the assad regime. but despite showing their syrian passports, they were quickly turned away. the victims of 9/11 will never be forgotten, but with america's focus now on a new terror threat islamic state, khalid fears that
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the suffering of his syrian compatriots could easily be neglected. >> extraordinary rescue of that baby. i wonder where it is now. let's hope safe and well. now, there was huge fanfare last week when indian prime minister narendra modi launched his version of the ice bucket challenge. rather than fundraising for charity, he wants indians to clean up their country. the video of him cleaning a delhi street went viral, but has the challenge really been embraced by the rest of india? >> reporter: indians, go clean up your country. a week ago, prime minister narendra modi attempted to start a viral craze. he swept up a delhi street and nominated nine famous indians to do the same. but a week on, are indians actually doing the challenge at all? there's no doubt that "my clean
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india" trended big. two million facebook likes, 121,000 tweets on day one. but it began to drop off rapidly the next day. a 94% drop by a week later. the pm nominated nine of india's great and good. so far, four have actually cleaned something, though the actors of this soap opera cleaned their own set, not a street. a cricket legend did a massive street cleanup, but like a prominent guru, he seemed to forget to nominate anyone else. one top bollywood actress hasn't done it yet, but has already nominated 49 others. the great indian public? so far, we've only counted around 50 videos posted on youtube, using the my clean india labels. >> in terms of the mechanics of the campaign, i have to struggle to find nine people among my
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facebook friends to say okay, who is the right candidates for this. people are likely to make something go if there's an exciting twist. nobody can help the fact that cleaning is really not much fun. >> reporter: there are waste crises in indian cities. over half are forced to defecate in the open. human scavengers often clean up by hand. so the prime minister's intervention is a big deal. but some are asking, does a social media photo opportunity make any real difference? >> suddenly people want to be involved, want change. but at the same time, how that change will happen. >> reporter: there is still time, though. prime minister modi has allowed five years for his campaign to really make a difference. >> that report from bbc trending there. before we go, a look at these pictures, because staff at a
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police headquarters here in the uk got a bit of a surprise when an unusual visitor stopped by the early hours of the morning. yes, it is a little horse. ignoring security guards, strolling into main reception at police headquarters. it was soon ushered back to its home in a nearby field. goodness knows how on earth that happened. less-expensive optionf than a traditional lawyer? at legalzoom you get personalized services for your family and your business that's 100% guaranteed. so go to legalzoom.com today for personalized, affordable legal protection.
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hello, and welcome to "gmt" on "bbc world news." our top stories, the pakistani teenager malala yousafzai who took on the taliban to fight for girls education becomes the youngest ever winner of the nobel peace prize. the nobel committee hails her struggle against the suppression of children. she shares the prize with indian campaigner kailash satyarthi. as the ebola crisis intensifies in west africa the boss of one of the world's

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