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tv   BBC World News  BBC America  October 31, 2014 7:00am-8:01am EDT

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hello, i'm david eades with "bbc world news." our top stories. a breakthrough deal. gas will flow along pipelines from russia to ukraine this winter, after the eu brokers an agreement. >> there is now no reason for people in europe to stay cold this winter. thousands of protesters are back on the streets of burkina faso's capital after the president defies their calls to step down. >> i remain available to open a dialogue with you over a transitional period, after which i will hand over power to a
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democratically elected president. israeli reopens a site in jerusalem holy to both muslims and jews after closing it for the first time in 14 years. and it's one of the wonders of nature, vast clouds of birds sweeping through the sky. why do they do it? hello. thanks for joining us. there is no reason for people in yu europe to stay cold this winter. the warming words of jose manuel barroso after russia agreed to resume gas supplies to ukraine over the course of the months ahead. the deal was brokered by the eu, which gets about 23% of its gas from russia and about half of it pumped through ukraine. ukraine normally gets 50% of its gas supply from russia, but
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supplies were cut off back in june over late payments. some of russia's immediate neighbors like lithuania, latvia, and estonia are almost completely reliant on it for their supplies. 83% of slovakia's gas originates in russia and 59% of polish gas used actually comes from russia. if we move a bit further afield, 37% of germany's gas, 29% of italy's gas, and 16% of the gas in france comes from russian energy companies. as for norway, spain, and the uk, they don't get any russian gas, but they could be affected the global prices should drop on news of this deal. laura westbrook has the details. >> reporter: this was the moment the european union had spent months bargaining for. ukraine and russia signing a gas deal just in time for winter. >> this is an important step for
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our shared energy security in the european continent. there is now no reason for people in europe to stay cold this winter. >> reporter: gas had stopped flowing into ukraine this summer after kiev refused to pay an increased price imposed by moscow. talks had stalled because moscow wanted assurances from the eu that it would pick up any unpaid ukrainian bills. a new compromised gas price has now been agreed until march next year. in return, ukraine will pay back billions of dollars it owes to russia. the eu and imf are helping to provide the funding. still, russia had been accused of using gas as a political tool, as western sanctions begin to bite. this week, nato said it had intercepted these russian bombers in european air space, a sharp increase in military activity by moscow. a third of europe's gas supplies come from russia, and for those
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here in donetsk, the fear of winner is very real. this derelict hospital is now home to many, either too poor or too old to flee the fighting. they live in the basement, lit only by candles. this man says we can cook food only using a fire. fire is a problem, but there are many broken windows knocked out by explosions. we gather them and make fire. there is no heating here. a cease-fire may be in place, but that hasn't stopped the fighting that continues to rage on. ukraine says several soldiers have been killed this week alone. there may be optimism in brussels, but for those here, there is no sign of a deal to end this crisis. laura westbrook, bbc news. >> well, let's get the view from kiev. david stern is there for us. david, i'm sure much relief from
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many people that they are going to get the gas supplies. but ukraine, kiev still has to find quite a chunk of money here, doesn't it? >> well, exactly. there's a great deal of relief. in fact, i was just at a briefing with ukraine's foreign minister, he paut veut a very pe spin, as you can imagine. he said this gives them flexibility and also said it's temporary, only to the end of march. so he said they are not committing huge amounts, and there's not a take or pay deal, as they had before, where ukraine was required to pay for the gas, even if they used it. they are going to be paying monthly in advance. but as you said, this is a large amount of money that they are going to be paying. but the ukrainians are also very positive because they say they are getting assurances now from the european union and they see this as very key, so that if there's a jump in the price or a jump perhaps in the amount of gas that they do need, a
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protracted quote snap, perhaps, they say that the europeans are ready to help them out. so in general, obviously it remains to be seen how well this works out, but at the moment, the ukrainians are seeing this as a very positive thing. >> right. the energy commissioner, david, also had to say that perhaps we get the first glimmer out of this of a relaxation in between moscow effectively. what did the foreign minister have to say about that sort of thought? >> yes, exactly, david. he said it was a glimmer -- the european union said it was a glimmer of an improvement. but i think the operative word here is glimmer. as we heard from laura's record, the fighting goes on. the increased tensions over europe, in fact. we also have the rebels holding elections this weekend. so any positive steps are being taken very much with a pinch of
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salt. >> david, thanks very much indeed. david stern bringing us the latest from kiev. let's catch up on the business news. aaron is with us. big stimulus package in japan? >> yeah. an increase. and a big surprise to the marks off the back of what we've just seen over the last couple days, where the fed wound down. but the bank of. pan certainly took the financial markets by surprise today, saying it will expand its massive stimulus spending. the central bank has decided to take action because, well, because economic growth and inflation in japan just haven't picked up as expected after that sales tax hike that we saw in april. the bank's governor said that this was a critical moment for japan and a preemptive strike against damaging deflation. so we're going to keep across that one for you. also this. all hallow's eve, or halloween as most of us know it, originates from a northern european festival, which basically ushers in the cold and dark winter season. this year, it is a happy halloween for retailers.
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it's been celebrated increasingly around the world from europe and north america to the philippines. and crucially this year, it falls on friday, and that is likely to boost demand for pumpkins, costumes and all those lollies and sweets. in the united states, spending on halloween is likely to reach $7.2 billion on halloween. and i will tell you the americans also spend $315 million on costumes, halloween costumes, for their pets. there you go. follow me on twitter. tweet me. i'll tweet you back. a lot more business news coming up in just over an hour's time on "gmt." i want to bring you some breaking news, as three bombs have exploded at a bus station in the northeast of nigeria. eyewitnesss said that three men were seen leaving, bags packed with explosives to the gombe bus station during rush hour. what is not known is whether anyone was hurt in the blasts. they've been blamed, though, on
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boko haram militants. it's the sort of action they have carried out in the past. so as i say, three explosives around gombe state station. israel has reopened access to an important holy site in jerusalem after closing it due to unrest in the city. the al-aqsa mosque compound, or temple mount, was shut on thursday. this followed a jewish activist being shot. israeli police then shot dead a palestinian man they suspected of carrying out the attack. a spokesman for the palestinian leader mahmoud abbas said that the president had described the closure as a declaration of war. or at least tantamount to that. i asked our correspondent in jerusalem where the situation at the site had calmed down now. >> it's business as usual, but there's a great deal of tension in the city. perhaps that is business as usual in jerusalem these days. worshippers are able to access
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the compound, but only men over the age of 50 or women. those restrictions are not in common. they've been in place in the past. but plenty of extra police and security officials all across jerusalem because there is that expectation. there could be more trouble. it is raining today, so that usually discourages lots of people coming out on to the streets. but there's still that expectation. it's worth pointing out, that's the second time in just over a week that hundreds of extra security forces have had to be deployed in this city because of the ongoing tensions here. not just to the al-aqsa compound, but a number of other issues. jewish settlers moving into palestinian neighborhoods and from the israeli jewish perspective, a number of what they felt as terror attacks against israeli jews in east jerusalem. >> just from what you're saying there, it sounds as if this is a brief respite almost in terms of the way in which both sides have
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been quite ready to ratchet up that sense of tension. >> well, the day isn't over yet. let's see if that respite lasts longer than the rain. but you're absolutely right. one of the things that perhaps our audiences aren't aware of is because of the war in gaza, the tension shifted away from jerusalem. but things have been pretty bad all through the summer here and have become increasingly bad since the end of the war in gaza and there's a great deal of frustration on both sides from israeli jews and from palestinians. this city, where a very dangerous status quo has been maintained, that that might be shifting and that's why we're seeing so much violence. the thing that's really lacking is the failure of that american-led peace initiative earlier in the year, it's been very little leadership demonstrated either by israelis or by palestinians to compromise and move things forward and to
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try and head off the balance. in sri lanka, heavy rains have disrupted the search for scores of people buried in a landslide. it's thought around 100 people are still missing. hopes of finding them alive are fading. some survivors are living in refugee camps now. >> reporter: this is a classroom in one of the schools that's been converted into a temporary shelter for the people affected by the landslide. there are people here who have lost their loved ones, people here who have lost their homes. all around me, you can see stacks of clothes, pillows, mattresses, bags. anything that people could pull out of their homes before they were buried under the mud. now, i've met a little boy and girl who have lost both their parents in this disaster. in fact, the by told me that his mother actually did spot a crack in the hillside and she sent her children away to safety and said
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that she and her husband would collect all their belongings, but even before they could do that, the mud was too quick. a woman also told me how she grabbed her children and ran to safety when she heard people screaming outside. rescue operations have been very slow. that's because it's been raining incessantly in this area over the past two days. the army said that the conditions are too dangerous to continue operations sometimes. yesterday, no survivors or no dead bodies were found. in fact, authorities have already said that at this point, the chances of finding any survivors are slim. but there are conflicting reports coming from everywhere. it's very hard to put a number on how many people are actually missing at this point. but in this school, it's not just people directly affected. other people who are fearing more landslides, who are gathered here trying to protect themselves.
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so for all of these people here, perhaps it's going to be a long wait to find any news on those who are missing, and also, to return back to their homes and start building back their lives. do stay with us here on "bbc world news." still to come on the program, it's enough to drive you to drink or perhaps away from it. calls for the calorie content of alcohol to be printed on labels in the fight against obesity. we'll have more. ♪ there it is... this is where i met your grandpa. right under this tree.
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ouagadougou have been getting back out on to the streets as they say that the president should resign immediately. that's president blaise compaore. on thursday, there were thousands of people sweeping through the capital. they burned down a number of public buildings, set fire to part of parliament as well. their call being one for change. but the president who's been leading the country for 27 years now says he's going to carry on governing for a one-year transition period. in the course of the last hour or so, he's been speaking about the protests that have hit the capital. >> translator: at this decisive juncture in our country's march, i call on all sides to put the supreme interests of the nation above everything else. i call on the security forces and all the protesters to respect the safety of our citizens and protect public and private interests.
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i remain convinced that only through a dialogue that we will be able to restore peace and look forward to the future with assurance. as for me, i remain available to open a dialogue with you over a transitional period, after which i will hand over power to a democratically elected president. >> the words of president president blaise compaore. laeila is on the line from the capital ouagadougou. are we seeing vast numbers pouring out on the streets again? >> reporter: crowds are certainly gathered in one of the main squares of the city. things have gotten almost back to normal in the city, meaning that traffic is back to normal. no looting was reported. the shops have reopened. in yesterday's statements with
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president blaise compaore, announced that the martial law was lifted, so there's a sense of reassurement amongst the population. but yes, opposition leaders have asked the people to maintain the pressure on blaise compaore, for him to step down immediately and not after a transition period. so large crowds have gathered on one of the main squares of the city center, which is nation square. >> laeila, sorry to interrupt. is it at all clear who actually is in control now? is it the head of the army? is it the president? do we know? >> reporter: well, it is unclear for now. we heard the army make an announcement, as you know. yesterday they were on television making a statement about the disillusion of the government. about curfew being installed from 7:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m. they also said -- they are the ones who announced the period of
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transition, but then the president -- so after the army's statements, sorry, some people thought that there were talkings amongst the opposition to see who would be the leader of that transition period, and then there was the statement of president blaise compaore during the evening saying that he will remain president for that transition period. there's a lot of confusion, and people here are asking the question, who is in charge? is it the army? is it blaise compaore. are they agreeing on things? is there a conflict between the two? what's sure for now is that the opposition and some of the youth and the civil society movements the not agree with blaise compaore's decision to stay in office. >> right. it's a messy picture. laeila adjovi, thanks very much indeed. would you think twice about
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having a nice glass of wine with dinner if you knew how many calories were in it? health experts say alcohol should have a calorie count label to help reduce obesity. dominic hughes has this. >> reporter: a well-informed drinker might know about wine, but how many would know how many calories they contain? we asked them to list these in caloric order from highest to lowest. >> i reckon that one first. >> red wine. >> doughnut. >> the lagger. >> and the red wine at the bottom? >> in fact, the red wine has the most calories. the lagger, the least. now, a uk-wide survey has revealed widespread confusion about calories in booze. almost 90% didn't know or incorrectly guessed the calories in a pint of lager. for a large glass of wine, the
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figure was 80%. more than 2/3 of people supporting the idea of labeling calories in alcoholic drinks. >> in real life, most of us are used to seeing calories on things now because we have caloric labeling on our food. so we think it needs to have -- it has to have calories on there because people take notice of them. they understand them. and it will affect their behavior. >> reporter: the eu is considering bringing in europe-wide laws on calorie labeling, some uk supermarkets already do it for their own brand wine. but legislation to force a change looks like it's some way off. booze can be a significant source of excess calories. now, health experts believe that listing calories alongside units of alcohol may help make all of us a little bit more aware how drinking can distribute to us putting on weight. dominic hughes, bbc news. the hungarian prime minister says he's going to scrap plans to tax internet use. it sparked some of the biggest anti-government demonstrations seen for years, in fact.
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he said the tax couldn't be introduced in its current form because people considered it unreasonable. the protesters rejecting to the financial burden, but also feared that the move would restrict free expression and access to information. two people are missing after a major fire at a fireworks warehouse in staffordshire here in england. a 53-year-old man has been arrested in connection with that blaze. it produced some extraordinary pictures. fireworks going off left, right, and center. in total, four people were hurt. at its peak, the blaze was tackled by about 50 firefighters. you may not know what this is actually called, but you must have seen one of those vast clouds of birds sweeping through the sky from time to time. well, the word you're looking for would be murmuration. hundreds of thousands of starlings swing into action across the skies here in the uk. why do they do it? our environment correspondent
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explains. >> reporter: autumn is murmuration season. it's one of the wonders of nature. amazingly, we just don't know much about why it happens. is it to avoid predators? is it a massive sign post to show other birds where to roost? the university of gloucestershire wants to change all that. what really makes a murmuration? >> it's when they actually perform sometimes a ballet in the sky or they wheel around. they form patterns. they often split up. come back together again. and it is about that forming of patterns that's important. >> reporter: and that's where we come in. the university of gloucestershire has set up a simple online survey and they want as many people as possible to log as many as they see. the more data we send them, the more they can find out, learning not just where and when, but also for the first time why. >> we can best do that by studying lots of different
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murmurations, getting the british public to help us with that, and start to look at what happens from the data. >> starlings occur by 79% since 1970, so understanding more may help reverse or perhaps slow that decline. and for those that live underneath one, we might discover a way to politely move them on. david gregory kumar, bbc news. >> not quite got the answers to why, but lovely to look at. dogs are known, of course, as man's best friend. well, not in every case. bo the pooch, here he is, seems to have rather sold out his owner. police in alabama were trying to serve a search warrant on edward henderson, owner of bo, and suspected drug dealer. he fled, so police pointed in the direction he went and asked bo to go get him. the dog then stopped and wagged his tail in some tall grass. police found and arrested the suspect. mr. henderson is charged with
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failure to obey police, manufacturing a controlled substance, and possession of drug paraphernalia. oh, dear. thanks for watching "bbc world news." much more news, of course, throughout the day here. stay with us. means keeping seven billion ctransactions flowing.g, and when weather hits, it's data mayhem.
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welcome to "bbc world news." our top stories. thousands of protesters are back on the streets of burkina faso's capital after the president defies their calls to step down. >>. >> translator: i remain available to open a dialogue with you over a transitional period, after which i will hand over power to a democratically elected president. gas will flow along pipelines from russia to ukraine this winter in a deal brokered by the european union. >> there is now no reason for people in europe to stay cold this winter. tension on the streets of
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jerusalem as israel allows only restricted access to a site holy to both muslims and jews. also, the harrowing stories of gay refugees from syria persecuted by assad forces and islamic state militants. hello. thanks for joining us. protesters in the west african state of burkina faso are taking to the streets again to demand the immediate resignation of their president blaise compaore. on thursday, thousands of them swept through the capital. they burned down several public buildings, set fire to parliament as well in their call for change. mr. blaise compaore says he will
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continue to govern for a one-year transition period. he's been speaking about the protests that have hit the capital. >> translator: at this decisive juncture, i call on all sides to put the supreme interest of the nation above everything else. i call on the security forces and all the protesters to respect the safety of our citizens and protect public and private interests. i remain convinced that only through a dialogue that we will be able to restore peace and look forward to the future with assurance. as for me, i remain available to open a dialogue with you over a transitional period after which i will hand over power to a democratically elected president. >> this unrest began as the president tried to extend his
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tenure by another five years. that seems to have been thwarted certainly. laeila adjovi has the latest for us from the capital ouagadougou. >> reporter: well, crowds have certainly gathered in one of the main squares of the city. things have gotten almost back to normal in the city, meaning that traffic is back to normal. no looting was reported. the shops have reopened in yesterday's statements with president blaise compaore announced that the martial law was lifted, so there's a sense of reassurement amongst the population. but yes, opposition leaders have asked the people to maintain the pressure on blaise compaore, for him to step down immediately and not after a transition period. so large crowds have gathered on one of the main squares of the city center, which is nation square. >> is it at all clear who
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actually is in control now? is it the head of the army? is it the president? do we know? >> reporter: well, it is unclear for now. we heard the army make an announcement, as you know. yesterday they were on television making a statement about the disillusion of the government, about a curfew being installed from 7:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m. they also said they are the ones who announced the period of transition, but then president compaore -- so after the army statement, sorry, some people thought there were talkings amongst the opposition to see who would be the leader of that transition period. and then there was the statement of president blaise compaore during the evening saying that he will remain president for that transition period. so there's a lot of confusion and people even here are asking the question who is in charge
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now. is it the army, is it blaise compaore? are they agreeing on things, or is there maybe a conflict between the two? this remains to be seen. what's sure for now is that the opposition and some of the youth and the civil society movements do not agree with blaise compaore's decision to stay in office. there is no reason for people in europe to stay cold this winter. the warming words of european commission president jose manuel barroso after russia agreed it would resume gas supplies to ukraine over the coming months. now, the deal was brokered by the eu. it gets about 23% of its gas from russia. and about half of that is pumped directly through ukraine. ukraine itself normally gets half of its gas supply from russia, although supplies were cut off back in june. that was over late payments. let's just run through the list for some other countries. russia's immediate neighbors like lithuania, latvia, estonia
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are almost completely reliant upon it for their supplies. 83% of slovakia's gas originates in russia. 59% of polish gas also comes from russia. if we go a bit further afield, we'll see also 37% of germany's gas, 29% for italy, 16% for france. all of that coming from russian energy companies. norway, spain, and the uk are three of the countries that don't receive any russian gas. but they could be affected, if global prices drop on news of this deal. laura westbrook has this report. >> reporter: this was the moment the european union had spent months bargaining for. ukraine and russia signing a gas deal just in time for winter. >> this is an important step for our shared energy security in european continent. there is now no reason for people in europe to stay cold
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this winter. >> reporter: gas had stopped flowing into ukraine this summer after kiev refused to pay an increased price imposed by moscow. talks had stalled because moscow wanted assurances from the eu that it would pick up any unpaid ukrainian bills. a new compromised gas price has now been agreed until march next year. in return, ukraine will pay back billions of dollars it owes to russia. the eu and imf are helping to provide the funding. still, russia had been accused of using gas as a political tool as western sanctions begin to bite. this week, nato said it had intercepted these russian boer s -- bombers in european air space, a sharp increase in european activity by moscow. a third of europe's gas supplies come from russia, and for those here in donetsk, the fear of winter is very real. this derelict hospital is now home to many, either too poor or
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too old to flee the fighting. they live in the basement, lit only by candles. this man says, we can cook food only using a fire. fire which is a problem, but there are many broken windows knocked out by explosions. we gathered them and make fire. there is no heating here. a cease-fire may be in place, but that hasn't stopped the fighting that continues to rage on. ukraine says several soldiers have been killed this week alone. there may be optimism in brussels, but for those here, there is no sign of a deal to end this crisis. laura westbrook, bbc news. sarah rainsford is in our moscow studio. there's a lot of relief, it seems, from the eu side of the fence. i guess for economic reasons, there is from where you are, too. >> yes. the energy minister has said
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that russia is quite pleased with this deal. of course, making the point this has ononly ever been about money for russia. that's the line coming from russia and has been the line all along, that ukraine owed russia huge amounts of money for its gas, that it needed to pay that and it needed in the future to pay in advance for gas that it was going to receive from russia in order for those supplies to be switched back on. so what russia is now saying is that as soon as the first trench of that debt arrives in the accounts of gazprom, then the gas will start flowing again within a couple of days. they're saying 48 hours. so the immediate crisis averted, but russia showing the great power it has, the great control it has over gas supplies. not just ukraine, but many countries if europe as well. >> is the kremlin making any link between this deal and the potential for improving relations with ukraine? that is certainly the hope, isn't it, coming from the eu side of the fence?
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>> reporter: well, there were certainly some words talking about this deal being perhaps the first glimmer of hope for an improvement in relationships between moscow and kiev. russia's not making an explicit link between the two things. it's saying that this is always about money, about paying back the debts, and paying russia for gas. but of course, the whole crisis blew up in the summer, at the height of the physical crisis between ukraine and russia, the fighting on the ground in eastern ukraine in particular. so the link there is implicit at least. that situation remains extremely complicated. there is a cease-fire in place in theory, but there is still fighting on the ground, albeit less than there was before. but we have a difficult weekend coming up. on november 2nd this weekend, the rebels will be holding an election in those breakaway regions of eastern ukraine. those are not recognized by kiev and the eu has suggested at the very least that there's a possibility of further sanctions from the west on russia, if as it says it will do, it recogn e
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recognizes the result of those elections. >> okay, thanks, sarah. israel has allowed restricted access to an important holy site in jerusalem. only men over 50 are being allowed into the al-aqsa mosque compound at the moment, or temple mount, for friday prayers, meaning many have simply prayed in the street nearby. the compound was shut on thursday after a jewish activist had been shot earlier in the week. israeli police later shot a palestinian man they suspected of carrying out that attack. quentin sommerville gave me his assessment. >> it's business as usual. worshippers are able to access the al-aqsa mosque compound, but only men over the age of 50. those restrictions are not in common. they've been in place in the
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past. but plenty of extra police and security officials all across jerusalem because there is that expectation. there could be more trouble. it's raining today, so that usually discourages lots of people coming out on to the street. but there's still that expectation. it's worth pointing out, that's the second time in just over a week that hundreds of extra security forces have had to be deployed in this city because of the ongoing tensions here. not just over access to temple mount, also known as the al-aqsa compound, but because of a number of other issues. jewish settlers moving into palestinian neighborhoods, and from the israeli jewish perspective, a number of what they felt as terror attacks against israeli jews in east jerusalem. >> it sound as if this is a brief respite almost in terms of the way both sides have been quite ready it seems to ratchet up that sense of tension. >> reporter: well, the day isn't over yet. let's see if that respite lasts
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longer than the rain. but you're absolutely right. david, one of the things that perhaps our audiences aren't aware of is that because of the war in gaza, the tension shifted away from jerusalem. but things have been pretty bad all through the summer here and have become increasingly bad since the end of the war in gaza and there's a great deal of frustration on both sides. both from israeli jews and from palestinians. that this city, where a very delicate status quo has been maintained religiously and politically for many, many years, that that status quo might be shifting and that's why we're seeing so much violence. the thing that's really lacking is the failure of that american-led peace initiative earlier in the year, it's been very little leadership demonstrated either by israelis or by palestinians to compromise and move things forward and to try and head off the violence here. some breaking news to bring you from the north of nigeria,
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as at least eight people have reportedly been killed, another 30 or so injured when three bombs exploded at a bus station. eyewitnesss say that three men were seen leaving, bags packed with explosives at the gombe state bus station. the blasts have been blamd on boko haram militants. they've carried out a series of similar attacks in the past, but it's understood as many as eight people may have been killed in those attacks. do stay with us here on "bbc world news." still to come, concerns in west africa that areas at risk of ebola are still underprepared for an outbreak of the disease. you need a permit... to be this awesome. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price.
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you're watching "bbc world news" with me, david eades. the latest headlines. thousands of protesters are back on the streets of burkina faso's
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capital, demanding the president step down. europe will not feel the cold this winter, reassuring words coming from the head of the european commission, as deal is brokered for russia to resume its gas supplies to ukraine. the world bank has announced another $100 million to train health workers to help stop the spread of ebola in west africa. in geneva, the world health organization has been outlining its latest recommendations on use of protective clothing and equipment. it's emerged that not every area in the region is sufficiently prepared to deal with the infection. our africa health correspondent anne soy has sent us a report from ghana where staff in one hospital have had to use raincoats rather than proper protective gear. >> reporter: this megaphone has seen better days, but it's all the liberian refugees here have
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got. this man is just outside accra as an announcer. of late, his messages have centered on the disease that has hit his home country hard. at the gate, the guard keeps a watchful eye. but he's not able to tell who's arriving from the countries at the center of the ebola outbreak. the residents feel a trisk. >> i'm worried. because i don't know who is who. maybe somebody might be carrying the disease. like now, maybe i have the disease. you don't know. >> reporter: this hospital was set up as a refugee camp. health workers have been learning how to deal with ebola. they are relying on the community to inform them of new arrivals from infected countries. at the moment, the nurses are monitoring 11 of them. >> we are scared because most of the liberian citizens, those living here and those in liberia do treat people who are coming and going out to liberia. so we're a bit scared. >> reporter: they do not have personal protective equipment,
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but they have improvised. they've stocked up on gyno care gloves, wellington boots and raincoats. this is what proper protective gear for ebola looks like, but even in some cases, health care workers have become infected while treating patients. now, compare that with this. not fit, of course. the exposed areas. and just the fact that these are not manufactured to meet any high standards. even when airlines stopped flying and some countries closed their borders, there are those who still found a way. that is why the management feels the camp is vulnerable. >> once a man is identified having ebola, we direct the patient to that area. so yeah, seriously a problem.
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>> reporter: ghana has had no case of the disease. even though it does not share a board we are the affected countries, the fact that this movement of people from the epicenter of the outbreak means it is at high risk, so any hint of being unprepared is worrying. anne soy, bbc news. for any syrian fleeing the war is a pretty traumatic experience, of course. but for gay refugees, it's especially harrowing. many have had to run away from groups like islamic state and the syrian regime. many are also on the run from their own families. without networks of family and friends, the refugees sometimes have to turn to prostitution to survive. and when they arrive in a new country, they often face discrimination there as well. james longman went to beirut the hear some of their stories. >> reporter: beirut. famed for both conflict and success. now a magnet for those made h
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homeless by war. the turmoil in syria has produced the biggest refugee crisis of the 21st century and more than one million refugees have swelled lebanon's small population. among the thousands who arrive here every month are gay refugees, hoping to start new lives in what they think will be a more liberal environment. now, we're in central beirut and we're on our way to meet a group of syrian refugees who fled the war next door. like many thousands, they've come to the relative safety of lebanon. but these men are gay men, and they've suffered extraordinary levels of persecution. they've arrived here in lebanon to find that life really isn't that much easier. in fact, they're so scared of what might happen to them, they won't even let us show exactly where they live. these five men, former doctors, teachers, and engineers, live together in this small two-bedroom flat. refugees from both their country and their families. one young man says he was kidnapped by isis when they took
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control of his city. rawad says he was tortured by them for 11 days. >> translator: they said to me you're here because you're gay, and i was in shock. they asked me about all my gay friends and anyone i knew. they hit me so much that day, i passed out four times. my whole body was bruised. every time i tyra banks water, i would vomit. they handcuffed my hands behind my back. and they hung me from the ceiling. unbearable pain. but i didn't want to give anyone up. >> reporter: he and his new friends have all had to escape not only from the syrian regime and isis, but also from their own families who they say in some cases have even tried to kill them. but they say they have each other now. a vital support network in an otherwise lonely city. others have still not found such support. even before the war in syria began, life was difficult. given up by his father, he spent
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five years in a syrian jail for being gay. when he was released, he found his country in the midst of war. but his suffering had only just begun. >> translator: i was taken by an armed group and four men raped me. they said they wanted to kill me and had guns to my head. they could tell i was gay. life in lebanon now is nothing for me. i hate it. i feel suffocated. i just need to get out. i've been forced to sell my body. $10 or $20 just so i can eat. i don't have anything but my body to sell. >> reporter: homosexuality is illegal in lebanon. the massive influx of syrians has strained an already fragile state. this means gay syrian men face a double discrimination. in this tense climate, the morality police have been accused of targeting gay men and performing illegal anal testing,
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an allegation they deny. >> translator: we have a focus on syrians now, not because they're syrian, but because of the security situation. we've arrested lebanese and syrian and other nationalities. we do not undertake anal tests. a decree was underpassed recently banning these procedures. >> reporter: despite the ordeals he's been through, both in syria and lebanon, life took an unexpected twist. his relationship with said grew and they fell in love. so what does it mean to you now to have each other? >> i cannot live without him. many things come, but i cannot live without him. and you? >> me, too. we're going to turn our attention to the u.s. now, as the polls open in the midterm elections next tuesday. this year's campaign is going to be the most expensive in history, racking up a reported
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$3.7 billion bill. that's twice the amount spent during the 2004 presidential election race. let's have a breakdown of the spending and where all that money comes from.
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>> one thing at a time. midterms starting on tuesday. now, anyone who's ever tried to give medicine to someone who really didn't want it are going to identify very much with this. what you see here are some pictures which have gone viral, actually. but a breeder in china given the task of giving these two baby pandas their medicine. not sure if they're having fun or just don't want the medicine
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to start with. but it becomes clearer and clearer as this goes on, they are pretty adamant, they're not going to take the medicine. they prefer another bamboo chute. what's more, they had it their way in the end. thanks for watching "bbc world news." give you 37-thousand to replace it. "depreciation" they claim. "how can my car depreciate before it's first oil change?" you ask. maybe the better question is, why do you have that insurance company? with liberty mutual new car replacement, we'll replace the full value of your car. see car insurance in a whole new light. liberty mutual insurance. (receptionist) gunderman group is growing. getting in a groove. growth is gratifying. goal is to grow. gotta get greater growth. i just talked to ups. they got expert advise, special discounts, new technologies. like smart pick ups.
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[ thunder ] [ lightning crashes ] how are we looking? oh, about ready, i think. [ music plays ] any thoughts on the interference? a stray fm broadcast, possibly. but i've fitted some ferrite suppressors and some rf chokes, just in case. [ thunder rumbles ] are you sure you want to go through with this? i mean, the last time, it was very -- but she's so lonely. excellent,

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