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tv   BBC World News  BBC America  December 1, 2014 9:00am-10:01am EST

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this is bbc america, and now live from london, "bbc world news." >> hello, i'm geeta guru-murthy with "bbc world news." our top stories. the u.n. warns ebola could still spread around the world, but it refuses to say if targets for tackling the disease have been met. violence erupts in hong kong overnight as protesters try to surround government buildings. a video goes viral of two sisters fighting back after they were sexually harassed on a bus in india. and tying the knot along thousands of other couples, the mass wedding in brazil for those who can't afford a big bash.
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hello. today, december 1st marks the u.n.'s self-imposed deadline for tackling ebola in west africa. but the head of the mission has suggested it has missed its target for controlling the virus. there's still a huge danger the disease could spread around the world. the aim was to isolate 70% of those who have been infected with the disease, then to safely bury 70% of the victims in the three worst hit countries. liberia and sierra leone are falling well short of the targets in some areas. the number of deaths from ebola has now reached nearly 7,000. more than 16,000 people have been diagnosed since the
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outbreak began in march. freetown is one of the worst affected areas in sierra leone to be struck by the disease. our correspondent andrew harding is in the capital and has been speaking to men digging graves to help get their country out of the crisis. >> reporter: the burial team is hard at work here at the municipal graveyard in the center of freetown. they've just brought in eight more bodies. that's just over 20 today. yesterday it was 50. and you get a sense looking around here of the almost industrial scale of this ebola crisis. we've been talking to some of the grave diggers, volunteers. many of whom say they've lost their job, perhaps in the fishing industry at the port because of ebola. they've now come here partly they say to help their country and partly to earn a little bit of cash. this is a dangerous job you're doing. why have you chosen to do it? >> well, it's because i don't have a solution now.
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i'm a seaman. i've been to sea. because of ebola, no job. that's why i prefer to do this job. my family has abandoned me. my children have abandoned me. that's why we have come here. >> we are doing this job because we love our country, sierra leone. we want this kind of disease to go out of this country. our resources, our business, our things are going behind. >> reporter: in the background there, you can probably see the bulldozers. they've been hard at work, too. this cemetery has already run out of space, so they're clearing through a rubbish dump to try and get extra ground because everyone knows this crisis is still out of control here, so there are going to be many more burials to come. >> andrew harding there. the man leading the fight against ebola is also in freetown. our international development correspondent mark doyle met up with tony banbury to ask him about the targets. >> we've exceeded those targets
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in many cases. probably even most places we've exceeded those targets. but there are some areas, including here in sierra leone, in freetown, in port loco, where we are falling short. and those are the areas where we need to really focus our assets, our capabilities, those are the priority areas. we have to work hard to bring assistance to those areas where we're not quite meeting them. >> but can i put to you that you told the u.n. security council -- there was no nuance. you said, within 60 days of october 1st, 70% of all those infected must be under treatment and 70% of the victims must be safely buried. if the outbreak is to be successfully arrested. have you reached those 70/7 0 numbers? >> in many places, those numbers are exceeded. so it's 95%. in some cases 100% we're at. in some districts, we're doing great.
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in other districts, the situation is very bd and that's where we need to focus our efforts. >> tony banbury there. earlier, i asked mark doyle while they're so reluctant to give a clear answer on the target question. >> i think the honest answer is that they don't really know. the statistics come and go. they're going up and down all the time. you have to remember this ebola outbreak, the most serious outbreak of this deadly disease that the world has ever seen is taking place in three very poor countries, with very, very broken infrastructure. all three countries were recovering from conflicts before this ebola nightmare arrived. i think the u.n. is doing its best to get a handle on the statistics, but frankly, people are making this up as they go along. >> where are the main short falls now? is there a reason for the fact that the progress is partly to do with how remote the areas are? or is it to do with the staffing on the ground? what is it? >> it's to do with everything, i'm afraid.
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lack of staff, lack of trained medical staff, lack of foreign aid, behavior by west africans themselves who are continuing to practice burial rituals, such as touching bodies and so on in some instances which is spreading the disease. the worst hot spots of the moment are where i am here in freetown and up the road, a town called port loco. there's been a big surge in the number of cases and deaths in these two places, and that's one of the areas where the united nations says it has to concentrate the limited resources that it has. >> mark doyle. hong kong's high court has just granted a provisional injunction against the main occupy central protest site. it follows after a night of clashes with police who used pepper spray, batons and for the first time water cannons around the camp. 11 police officers were injured and 40 people arrested as protesters stepped up their campaign. pro democracy activists tried to surround government offices nearby. the protests have now entered
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their third month. one of the camps in the mong kok commercial district was cleared last week. >> reporter: these clashes took place overnight and into this morning in an area very close to that main protest site where you've been showing pictures of there. for the past two months, these protests have passed the two-month point, of course. these have been largely peaceful, civil disobedience protests that have had a principle of nonviolence at their heart. but we've seen these periodic moments of violence. mostly when police have gone to clear barricades or move some of the blockaded roads. this time, this violence was a result of the protesters themselves. these student movements upping the ante. they held a meeting on sunday. they called for people to rally, to attempt to surround the government buildings. and i think we're seeing two
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things. one, mounting frustration from the protesters that they've reached this long sort of impasse now. over two months of these sit-ins or blockades with nothing in terms of political achievement to show for it. and also perhaps the strengthening of the resolve of the police to take very firm action when these protesters try ooze they did last night to seize new ground. >> john sudworth there. in other news today, all 81 members of taiwan's cabinet have resigned following a poor performance by the governing nationalist party at local elections. it lost five of the island's six large municipalities in a vote seen as a referendum. at least nine people have been killed in a suicide bomb attack at a funeral in the north of afghanistan. two of the victims are said to have been police officers. the blast follows a series of attacks in the capital kabul in recent weeks. pope francis has urged muslim leaders around the world
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to condemn terrorism carried out in the name of islam. the pope said he understood the harm caused by the stereotype that linked islam with terrorism. aaron is here. they kept saying camera one. i didn't know where camera one was. hello, aaron. lovely in pink. >> yes, exactly. we called each other this morning, by the way. mama mia. how do you see mamma mia in italian? mamma mia. it might be fair to say that italy has certainly seen better days. we are talking about europe's third largest economy and it continues to be in trouble because we saw its latest economic numbers. gdp, gross domestic product figures out this morning confirming that italy's economy went backwards once again. it shrank 0.1% in that three-month period. the third quarter raising questions over whether the prime minister can meet his promise to
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cut spending while also boosting growth and halting the rise in unemployment. gdp for the full year, it's expected -- basically the italian economy expected to shrink nearly half of one percent. and this compounds the fact that the italian economy has been stagnant, no growth since 2008 basically, enduring three recessions since then. it continues to be in recession now and it's coming up to about 3 1/2 years of recession. we'll have more on "gmt." staying in europe, french business groups have begun a week of protests to press hollande to step up the pace of those reforms. they say that businesses still suffer from a crippling burden of taxes and tape, but the new socialist economy minister insists that reforms to help restore competitiveness are already under way. european politicians are due to meet tomorrow. in fact, tuesday in luxembourg
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to approve a new generation of low-cost rockets. space, of course, is seen as the next big frontier for business. but launching satellites remains a complicated and expensive process. so can europe keep up? we're going to be talking more and speaking to a space expert on "gmt" in just over an hour's time. we're talking about the plunging price of oil. the european markets are down, but oil price at the moment is below $65 a barrel. you can see brent crude at the bottom of the screen there. $69.43 a barrel. of course, the losers are the oil companies. some of the winners, the big airlines around the world. so there you go. that's it with the business, geeta. >> you can't stand up, can you? for reasons we will explain later. we go to india now, because a video of two sisters confronting a group of men who were allegedly sexually
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harassing them on a bus has gone viral on social media. it happened on friday, and it was recorded by another passenger with a mobile phone, as you can see. it's not quite clear how the incident began. police say they've arrested three men who have been charged with assault. now to our correspondent, just tell us about what we know happened here. >> the incident, as you said, occurred friday afternoon. these two state of the uniudent 22, one of the women has said -- they were sisters. one of the women has said that a man on the bus touched her sister inappropriately and was also verbally harassing her. the sister started shouting at them and they were hoping that some of the other passengers on the bus would help them, but when they didn't see that happen, they started hitting them. you can see that the sisters removed their belts and were trying to lash out at the men.
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they said nobody came to their aid. in fact, what happened afterwards, according to one of the women, is they said the men actually -- there were three men in all. they pushed them off the but and it's only when they threatened -- only when the women threatened those men with bricks that they were let go. the police have said that they were able to arrest all of those three men by sunday evening. >> it's really extraordinary to see that footage, isn't it? and it's long been known that traveling on a bus, even before the recent terrible events, was not necessarily a safe thing to do. what is the public reaction to this? and why did more people not get up and help? >> well, there's certainly outrage about it, you know, to people we talked to on social media. but also a lot of people not really surprised about the fact that nobody came to their aid. the police are saying they're considering taking action against the driver and the bus
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conductor as well because they think that the driver under these circumstances should have actually driven the bus to a police station and said that there were men on there assaulting these women. it's an issue that has been in the spotlight, but it's something across cities in india that women are aware of, that you need to be careful, that you do get harassed verbally, sometimes physically when you're using public transport. so people are angry, but they're also not surprised about the fact that not more people intervened to try and help these women out. >> worse in some parts. a difficult place for this sort of thing. we'll have to leave it there. thanks a lot. stay with us here on "bbc world news." much more to come. the former french leader nicolas sarkozy takes the first steps in what's being seen as a new bid to win back the presidency. you n wagon. no big deal... until your insurance company jacks up your rates. you freak out. what good is having insurance
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this is "bbc world news."
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i'm geeta guru-murthy with the latest top stories for you. the united nations says there's still a huge risk ebola could spread around the word. it comes as officials refuse to say if they've met their own deadlines for tackling the disease. police in hong kong clash with protesters overnight as they try to surround government buildings. the former french president nicolas sarkozy has called for party unity after winning the leadership of the conservative ump group. in an interview on french television, he said the country's economy was in a desperate situation. he urged all those who were unhappy with it to join his party. >> translator: our duty, whatever our ambitions, our sensibilities, our friendships, or our lack of sympathy, is to be united, to create the conditions that will allow a modern alternative with new ideas. together we will create the necessary conditions for a group. no one shall be subjected to it, but the general interest, the collective interest, the ability to accept alternatives in the
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country that is ours, in a situation which i find the country in, it is our duty. >> let's go live to paris and our correspondent lucy williamson. is this the return of sarkozy going for the presidential bid, lucy? and how popular is he, even if the current president is pretty unpopular? >> reporter: well, he certainly seems to be fairly keen on going for the presidency. that call to unity that you heard him make there is very much in his interest because he did win the party's support for the leadership of the party. but he didn't win it by a landslide. that was about 60% from a decade ago. he needs to unite the party behind him if he wants to win its nomination for the presidential race in three years time. at the moment, the party is very divided and there are some strong challenges for that. >> who else is in there fighting him at the moment? >> well, he has strong
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challenges from alain juppe, who is seen as far more popular with the voters. he is somewhat older and that's seen to be a stroke against him. he is expecting a challenge, and the party itself is already divided amongst several different groups. it's rumored mr. sarkozy is trying to form a committee and he's finding it difficult. >> and what are the particular criticisms of sarkozy. do they rest on current challenges about his political past or are they very much about his time in office or about what he's offering potentially in future? >> it seems that it's difficult for mr. sarkozy to come back, having had time in power. he is seen by many voters as a little glitzy. his personal lifestyle when he
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was president before made him quite unpopular. he's seen as a bit unpredictable. perhaps a bit autocratic, not really a team player. many people thought when he came back for the second run that he would have changed. there are many reports saying that perhaps he hasn't changed and i think that perception is going to be one of the hardest things he's beginning to have to fight if he does win that party nomination for the presidency. >> lucy, thanks very much there, in paris. australian police have urged the mother of a dead baby found buried on the beach in sydney to come forward. the body was buried under 30 centimeters of sand. the bbc's jon donnison has the latest from sydney. >> reporter: over the weekend, a grim discovery on a sydney beach. police say the baby's body was found by two young boys, digging in the sand on sunday morning. it was buried around 30 centimeters deep. >> two young children reported it to their father who was nearby.
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police turned up a short time later. >> reporter: the police don't know how long the body had been there, but initially, they said it was too badly decomposed to determine the age or sex. they've since concluded it was a baby girl. officers have appealed to the mother to come forward and have been contacting maternity wards in local hospitals to see if they can trace her. it comes just a week after an unrelated case where a newborn baby boy was found alive after being dumped in a storm drain in the west of the city. remarkably, police believe the baby had been there for five days. the child's mother has been charged with attempted murder. the circumstances of this latest case are not known, but police clearly think one possibility is another newborn baby may have been dumped by its parents. jon donnison, bbc news, sydney. in the last few minutes, russia's president vladimir putin has arrived in turkey.
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he's there to meet president erdogan for wide-ranging talks on economic ties and the conflict over the border in syria. russia and turkey have opposing positions on the issue, with russia standing by syrian president bashar al assad, turkey wanting him ousted. the bbc's mark lowen in istanbul told me the two men will hope to discuss an issue the two countries can agree on, that's trade. >> reporter: certainly, they will try to focus on the economic benefits of their relationship today, and keeping the tricky topics of disagreement at bay. as you say, they have a very strong trade relationship. turkey is russia's second-biggest trade partner after germany, worth $35 billion a year. they want to increase that to $100 billion a year by 2020. there is also a heavy dependence on russian gas here, which accounts for about 65% of turkey's energy needs. and four million russian tourists a year come here to turkey. so all of that will be on the
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agenda of talks in ankara. but the topics are tricky as well. turkey has been at the forefront of president assad while moscow defends him, and turkey also was against russia's annexation of crimea earlier this year. so they will i think try to focus on where there is agreement today, to talk about the economic benefits, but there will be some tricky elephants in the room as well. >> mark lowen there. the australian racing driver mark webber has been injured in a high speed crash. his porsche hit a ferrari and hit a barrier. he was taken to hospital, though his team say he wasn't seriously injured. now, what if you get married with thousands of other couples alongside you? rio has just witnessed the biggest mass wedding in the city's history. couples who have been living together for years can tie the knot for free, if they meet certain criteria.
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>> reporter: it's supposed to be the happiest day of their lives, but it costs a fortune to get married these days and these brides to be just couldn't afford to tie the knot. so they're taking part in what's known as the yes day ceremony. it happens once a year in brazil and it's the only day that a wedding won't cost a happy couple anything at all. that's because the government foots the bill for the mass ceremony. but only couples with a monthly income of less than a thousand dollars can take part. this year, 2,000 couples qualified, and the government even laid on special commuter trains free of charge for the couples and their guests. on sunday, they gathered at this sports arena in rio de janeiro to say their vows, exchange their rings and kiss their brides. having 12,000 complete strangers at their wedding might not be
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exactly what they had in mi. but at least they don't have to worry about next month's credit card bill. now, as a driver, it is always wise to be completely aware of your surroundings, but however alert you are, you would never expect to come across anything like this. yes, as the four-meter-wide sinkhole in the road. a driver in china had just enough time to jump out of his car before it was swallowed up whole. the sinkhole opened up at a busy junction. moments after the driver escaped from his car, traffic cameras show the car totally disappearing into that hole. that was an extraordinarily lucky escape. pretty unnerving to see those sinkholes opening there. we'll just leave you with our top story. the u.n. says there is still a huge risk that ebola could spread around the world. it comes as the head of the
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mission in west africa declined to say if the targets for tackling the disease had been met. i'm back with more on that story in five minutes. if you are free, do join me, and i'm on twitter. thanks for watching. this is "bbc world news." then all the parts. come together, and there it is ... our new car! so, that's how santa fits it in his sleigh. wow ... wow. the magic of the season is here, at the lexus december to remember sales event. this is the pursuit of perfection. yeah so with at&t next you get the new iphone for $0 down. zero down? zilch. nothing. nada. small potatoes. no potatoes. diddly squat. big ol' goose egg. the new iphone, zero down. zero. zilch.
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i'm geeta guru-murthy with "bbc world news." our top stories. a new warning over ebola. the united nations says there's still a huge risk it could spread around the world, but is the u.n. meeting its own targets for tackling the disease? >> we've been very successful in many, many areas. of those 62 districts, the vast majority for sure were exceeding those targets. not in all the districts. also coming up, the fight against another deadly disease. hiv and aids. the u.n. hopes to eradicate it
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by 2030. a video goes viral of two sisters fighting back after they claimed they were sexually harassed on a bus in india. and the australian parliament pays tribute to phillip hughes, who died last week after being struck on the head by a ball. hello. december 1st today marks the u.n.'s self-imposed deadline for tackling ebola in west africa. but the head of the mission has suggested it has missed its target for controlling the virus. tony banbury also warned there's still a huge danger the disease could spread around the world. the aim was to isolate 70% of those who have been infected with the disease. then to safely bury 70% of the
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victims in the three worst hit countries. liberia and sierra leone are falling well short of the targets. the number of deaths from ebola has reached nearly 7,000. more than 16,000 people have been diagnosed since the outbreak began in march. the man who's been picked to lead the fight against ebola is tony banbury from the u.n. mission for ebola emergency response. let's find out what he had to say. >> we've succeeded, or we've exceeded those targets in many cases. probably even most places we've exceeded those targets. but there are some areas, including here in sierra leone, in freetown, in port loco, where we are falling short, and those are the areas where we need to really focus our assets, our capabilities, those are the priority areas. we have to work hard to bring assistance to those areas where we're not quite meeting them. >> so why is it proving so difficult to tackle the disease? the bbc's andrew harding has
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found some clues in a village outside the capital of sierra leone. >> reporter: we've come to a small village just outside freetown. in the space of a couple of hours walking around here, we've come across four very stark reasons why the fight against ebola is still proving so difficult here in sierra leone. first of all, we came across quite by chance a woman who was very sick indeed but says she's not called the ebola hotline, not reported her illness to anyone because she was afraid for what would happen to her three young children if she was taken away. then, second reason, the local chief said that although he sometimes called the hotline, it often took days for anybody to respond to other cases in the village. thirdly, we went to a house where a young girl had died a few days ago. the rest of her relatives were being kept in quarantine, but that quarantine just wasn't working. we saw the relatives wandering all over the village, and locals were criticizing them for that.
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and fourthly, we heard that just after that girl had died, her relatives washed her body, which is considered one of the most dangerous things, the easiest way to catch ebola. they did that, and then, and only then did they call the ebola hotline. >> andrew harding there. new treatment centers are being set up in west africa all the time. this is footage filmed by the british military of an ebola center under construction in sierra leone. you can find out much more about ebola on our website, including how the spread of the disease is being tracked. remarkably, both ebola and aids started in the drc, and today is world aids day. it is observed every year on the first of december. currently 35 million people have the virus. more than three million of them are children. each day, almost 600 children
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are infected with hiv in sub saharan africa and many of those get the virus from their mothers during pregnancy, childbirth, and breast-feeding. this is all entirely preventable, and the charity mothers to mothers are working to make sure that hiv-positive women in south africa know how to prevent transmitting hiv to their babies. thanks very much for coming in. you work with the charity. you are hiv positive yourself. >> yes. >> you have two children now, who are hiv negative. but you have very tragically lost two babies, i know, to hiv. tell us first of all what you do now to help other women in this position. >> firstly, i would like to say i'm working for mothers to mothers, which is the charity organization, which will empower women to eliminate pediatric aids in our country.
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>> and how does a mother stop her child getting hiv if she's pregnant? >> by making sure that we educate those women. most of the time you know that mothers, when they go to the doctor, they don't have much time to know the importance of taking medication, and they will be given the treatment, but not knowing what it is. so my role as mentor is to make sure that we educate those women about the medication while they're still pregnant, and then even when they're breast-feeding period, so they will prevent hiv to the unborn baby. >> your children are quite grown up now, but if you don't mind, let me ask you about what
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happened with your two earlier children that you lost as babies. was that because you didn't know what to do or you weren't given the right treatment? what happened? >> for my first child, there was no program itself. yipt ha i didn't have any medication to prevent mother to child. and there was no support. i was on my own. knowing that hiv is a death sentence, i will be dying soon. and then on the second child, i was just given only a single dose of medication, which it was not enough to prevent my baby from getting hiv. >> this must be absolutely heartbreaking to live with and to go through. just tell me a lift bit how difficult it was for you. >> you know the stigma around hiv, and then you know, we didn't have that much support, as i explained to you. after knowing my hiv, i just know that i'll be dying.
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but what makes me happy now is that i'm a role model now, and every day, i'm so happy realizing that i'm going to save the life of our children, our future, our leader. you know when you save somebody's life, you become so -- you have the strength and you have that power, and since i'm doing something for my community, for my country as well, so that's what's making me happy. >> and how old are your children now, and why did you carry on wanting children even though you know you have hiv? many people would say you shouldn't have children at all. >> you know, you ask the right question. there's a difference between a mother who lost their children. if you lost the children or you lost the baby, you have something in your heart that is
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always -- to be a mother is something that is treasured by every woman around the world i think. and when i lost my first child, it wasn't easy. and then to get another child who died again by hiv, it wasn't easy. but for me, to have those children around me, i see myself as the richest woman around the world. because i'm a mother. >> you're fantastic for coming in and talking to us. thank you for your time and good luck today. i know you've got a lot more work to do, but thanks for joining us. >> thank you. let's take you to hong kong now, where in another sign of the authorities' determination to clear the pro democracy protest camps which sprang up earlier this year, the high court has granted a provisional injunction in the admiralty area. it comes after pro democracy activists forced the closure of government offices following a night of clashes in the area.
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11 police officers were injured and 40 people were arrested. the protesters want more say in the way that hong kong chooses its leaders and they claim the government in beijing has gone back on earlier promises to let them do so. well, let's take a snapshot of the protests. on sunday night, police used pepper spray, batons and for the first time water cannons around what's become known as the admiralty camp. the clashes started when pro-democracy activists tried to surround government offices nearby. the protests have now entered their third month. one of the protest camps in hong kong's mong kok commercial district was cleared by police and bailiffs just last week. in a moment, we'll bring you the thoughts of one of the protesters, but first, here's the territory's chief executive y.y. leung and what he had to say about the latest developments. >> translator: from this day on, the police will take resolute action when carrying out their du duties. i call on the students who are thinking about returning to the
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occupation area tonight not to do so. do not think that the police's tolerance in the past means they're incapable of handling the situation. don't mistake the police tolerance as weakness. the police and the government are responsible for maintaining social order as soon as possible. >> i feel many uncertain things. because in the morning you can see that the police comes and would like you to leave, and they have used lots of weapons that make us painful and fear, but actually we do fear, but democracy deserves it. yes, we think that. so we insist to stay here. >> the protester speaking there. earlier you heard from c.y. leung. there's more on the unrest in hong kong on "impact" from 1400 "gmt" today. to germany now, where there's been a series of
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demonstrations to support a young woman who suffered fatal injuries when she tried to defend two teenage girls from men who were harassing them. a 23-year-old student died on friday after her family gave doctors permission to switch off her life support. the news has provoked vigils in several german cities. jenny hill is in berlin. tell us more about this. >> reporter: well, on friday, she should have been celebrating her 23rd birthday. instead, her parents took that terrible decision to switch off her life support machine. it's just over two weeks since she went to the aid of two girls in the toilets of a fast-food restaurant in southern germany. witnesses say that they were being harassed by -- went to help them a little later outside the fast-food restaurant, one of those men returned and attacked her.
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there is some cctv footage which is circulating this morning in germany which shows the moment that attack happened. it's a pretty shocking watch. you can see her clearly crumpling to the ground where she lies motionless. this is a case which has shocked germany. there's been a number of candlelight vigils over the weekend. there's many calling her to be given the award for bravery, they want her to be awarded that bravery award. germany's president has described her as a role model for the whole country. the police in the meantime have one man in custody, an 18-year-old. they are still appealing for witnesses, but in the meantime, the tributes continue to pour in on social media sites. tributes to a girl who in the words of germany's president showed exemplary courage when
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other people looked in the other direction. >> jenny hill, thanks very much. sadly, the problem of male harassment is far from confined to one country. in india, a video of two sisters con fronting a group of men who were allegedly sexually harassing them on a bus has gone environment on social media. it was recorded by another passenger with a mobile phone. it's not clear how the incident began. police have said they arrested three men who have been charged with assault. violence against indian women has been in the spotlight since the gang rape and murder o'. a student on a bus in delhi in 2012. our correspondent as been following developments in this case. >> the incident occurred on friday afternoon. two students, age 19 and 22, they had boarded a bus. one of the women has actually said that -- they were sisters. one of the women has said that a
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man on the bus touched her sister inappropriately and was also verbally harassing her. the sister started shouting at them, and they were hoping that some of the other passengers on the bus would help them, but when they didn't see that happen, they started hitting them. you can see that the sisters removed their belts and were trying to lash out at the men. they said nobody came to their aid. in fact, what happened afterwards, according to one of the women, is they said the men actually -- there were three men in all. they pushed them off the bus, and it's only when they threatened -- it's only when the women threatened those men with bricks that they were actually let go. now, the police have said that they received a call from the women on friday afternoon and that they were able to arrest all of those three men by sunday evening. >> it's really extraordinary to see that footage, isn't it? and it's long been known that traveling on a bus even before the recent terrible events was not, you know, necessarily a safe thing to do. what is the public reaction to this?
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and why did more people not get up and help? >> well, there's certainly outrage about it. you know, to people we talk to on social media. but also a lot of people not really surprised about the fact that nobody came to their aid. the police have, in fact, said that they're considering taking action against the driver and the bus conductor as well because they think that the driver under these circumstances should have actually driven the bus to a police station and said that there were men on there assaulting these women. it's an issue that has been in the spotlight, but it's something across cities in india that women are aware of, that you need to be careful, that you do get harassed verbally, sometimes physically when you're using public transport, and so people are angry, but they're also not surprised about the fact that not more people intervened to try and help these women out. in the last few minutes, russia's president vladimir putin has arrived in turkey. he's there to meet the president
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for wide-ranging talks on economic ties, and of course the conflict over the border in syria. russia and turkey have opposing positions on the issue with russia standing by syrian president bashar al assad. turkey has been consistently opposed to any deal which would allow president assad to remain in office, but they have a very big economic and trade relationship. stay with us here on "bbc world news." much more to come. getting ready to mark the 200th anniversary of the battle of waterloo, there's a row brewing over who will play napoleon. given new hope. during the subaru "share the love" event, subaru owners feel it, too. because when you take home a new subaru, we donate 250 dollars to helping those in need. we'll have given 50 million dollars over seven years. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru.
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this is "bbc world news." i'm geeta guru-murthy with the latest top stories for you. the u.n. warns ebola could still spread around the world, but it refuses to say if targets for tackling ebola have been met yet. and police clash with
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protesters in hong kong in some of the worst violence since pro-democracy demonstrations began. the australian parliament has paid tribute to the cricketer phil hughes who died last week after being struck on the head by the ball whilst batting. a moment's silence was held to honor the 25-year-old at the assembly in canberra. a funeral for phillip hughes will be held on wednesday in his hometown of maxville. australia's prime minister tony abbott paid tribute to a man he described as a great cricketer. >> he was 63, not out, on his way to a century and return to the test team. madam speaker, people are not supposed to die playing our national game. police in ohio say a university level footballer who had been missing for nearly a week has been found dead. he had apparently shot himself.
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hundreds of people joined the search for kosta karageorge. although he was only 22, his family said he'd sustained several head injuries and had a few spells of being extremely confused. his death comes amid growing concern about the dangers of head injuries in many sports. this week on "bbc world news," we're going to take a look at the risks, beginning today with american football. bbc sports alex south has travelled to the u.s. to talk to some of those directly involved. >> reporter: hit after hit after hit. it's part of the allure of american football, a sport that comes with a serious health warning attached. the national football league has estimated that it will have to pay out around a billion dollars to thousands of former players who have claimed compensation for concussion injuries. it's now expected 28% of retired players will suffer from alzheimer's, making former nfl
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players nearly twice as likely as the general public to experience some form of dementia. despite spending hundreds of millions of dollars in compensation to former players, the nfl's concussion problem shows no science of going away. it's estimated that more than 150 players will suffer a concussion of some sort by the end of this season. you'd think that would concern the current generation of stars, but you'd be wrong. >> it's football. you're going to get hit no matter what. the other side is going to hit you. i think they've overswung the boundary, you know? football's been around for a long time. everybody's fine, so we'll keep going from there. >> yeah, football's football. we sign up for this stuff. we know what we're getting into. we all wear the quim for a reason. >> reporter: the culture of every contact sport is to play through injury. the nfl is trying to protect their talent after head injuries, but admit changing perceptions isn't easy. >> the players want to play. i think that's true whether you're talking about nfl
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football players or kids playing in pop warner or girls playing soccer. whether it's us talking to our players about it or putting large posters in the locker room to work with the players to make sure that they appreciate and recognize the signs and symptoms of the injury, those things are important and that culture change takes a little bit of time. >> reporter: in this sport, there will always be collisions, which means there will always be concussions. the question is, what is america's appetite like for a game that can leave many in their 50s broken? >> it's just part of the game. you take that out, the game's over, honestly. >> these guys, they're making big bucks right now, but all the money they have now isn't going to help them with their brain later on. >> tackle football is a man's game. let the man play. >> reporter: so it doesn't seem life will change for the nfl. america continues to watch in record numbers. next year marks the 200th
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anniversary of one of the major events to have changed the face of europe. the battle of waterloo, the british duke finally defeated napole napoleon. there are big plans to mark that anniversary, but it's not without controversy. who, for example, will play the part of napoleon? here is our report from belgium. >> reporter: shooting a 3-d movie in the belgian mud. not far from the actual site of the battle of waterloo. the film will become the centerpiece of a new museum. opening next year in time for the 200th anniversary of a battle that changed the course of european history. the highlight of the commemorations will be a reenactment of the battle itself, and everyone wants to be involved. >> it's 169 guys in uniform, ready to fight. and to enjoy the moment, of
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course. >> reporter: and do you always play a frenchman? >> yes. >> reporter: you lose every time. >> yes, and more specifically in waterloo, yes. >> reporter: battle reenactment is big business. and it doesn't get much bigger than waterloo. people come from all over the world to take part. these are pictures of last year's event. hundreds of horses and cannons and 5,000 participants all individually screened. attention to detail is everything, and 2015 will see the biggest reenactment of waterloo ever staged. it's good for the local tourist industry, of course, but one big question, who will play the starring role? napoleon might have lost to wellington and his allies, but he remains waterloo's iconic
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figure. this french reenactor is playing a role in the film which will be screened at the new museum, but competition is fierce. for next year's big event, there could be a pretender to the imperial throne. >> translator: no, you're wrong. i am the real napoleon. i am not an actor. and i am happy to be here among my troops to lead the bottomle. >> but i hear there is an american napoleon, too. >> translator: the emperor napoleon is french, sir. >> reporter: a decision on who gets the imperial job will be made soon. but france is currently riven with debate about national decline. an american playing napoleon on the 200th anniversary, that could be the final straw. chris morris, bbc news, waterloo. >> let me know whether you think
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an american is suitable. i'm on twitter and i'm also back tomorrow here on "bbc world news." do join us if you can. we are back with "bbc world news" throughout the day, too. bye-bye. you drop 40 grand on a new set of wheels, then... wham! a minivan t-bones you. guess what: your insurance company will only give you 37-thousand to replace it. "depreciation" they claim. "how can my car depreciate before it's first oil change?" you ask. maybe the better question is, why do you have that insurance company? with liberty mutual new car replacement, we'll replace the full value of your car. see car insurance in a whole new light. liberty mutual insurance.
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