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tv   BBC World News  BBC America  April 10, 2015 9:00am-10:01am EDT

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hello. i'm david eades with bbc world news. our top stories. will history be made in panama? president obama and cuba's leader, raul castro are due to meet formally for the first time during the summit of the americas. a plane shatterchartered by the red cross brings much-needed aid to sanaa. a big day for samsung, it unveiled its new flagship devices. and it's good-bye to the voice of cricket. tributes pour in for the
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australian commentator and former cricket captain, richie benaud. hello, thanks for joining us. the summit of the americas gets underway in the coming hours, at a time of great transformation huge challenges and also many opportunities for the region that really are worthy of history. let's just take the headline act. president obama expected to meet the cuban leader raul castro. when john kerry held his talks with his cuban counterpart, bruno rodriguez, in the course of thursday night, that was already the highest level meeting in more than half a century. have a look at these two. this is the last comparable meeting. fidel castro meeting the then vice president richard nixon, in 1959. just a year after that that
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diplomatic relations were broken off, as cuba nationalized all american businesses. fast forward to 1982 and the u.s. then added cuba to its list of state sponsors of terrorism. that was for offering sanctuary to separatist and colombian rebels. now the state department has recommended removing cuba from that list and that would have a huge impact, leading to the opening up of diplomatic and trade relations. a cuban historian and regional expert from the university of michigan. she outlines what each side has to gain. >> the united states will be rid of what has been a thorn at its side for half a century, an item that is only 90 miles away and that lends itself to awe kinds of things you know such as nuclear missiles way back in 1962. and at the same time you know, cuba will also gain a great deal
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from it with respect to opening its society to trade and commerce with the united states and some influences that are positive coming from this country also. >> sylvia pedraza. well well, our north american editor john sobel, has been speaking to a possible presidential nominee and asked if president obama's move was a brave one in trying to normalize relations between the u.s. and cuba. >> i believe so i believe it was a brave decision yes. >> do you worry that if relations are normalized and there's open trade between cuba and the united states yes, you might sell a lot more cigars but you're going to have all the american brands coming into cuba and cuba will stop feeling like cuba? >> i certainly hope that that's something that won't happen in cuba. i believe and i hope and i
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expect the cuban people or the cuban government to be ready to face that kind of situation and i hope and believe and trust that the cuban people will be capable of building a system that will know how to work with that but without letting happen in cuba what is happening now in many other countries. well the summit of the americas is itself is a major gathering of 35 national leaders, and we're taking the opportunity to highlight some of the key issues facing the region. there are certainly plenty of them. one other anticipated encounter at the summit of the americas itself is between barack obama and the eventvenezuelan president, nicolas maduro. maduro will attend the summit with a petition containing
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thousands of signatures condemning the obama administration for sanctions against venezuela. there are queues as a familiar sight now around the city as a result of sanctions. >> reporter: if you want to know what the economic crisis in venezuela looks like this is pretty much it. hundreds of people have been gathering here over the last two hours in the pretty searing sun, and what they're queueing up for is one of the products that you can't find or are very difficult to find now on the shelves of government supermarkets even private supermarkets. so people come here they present their i.d. cards, and if it ends in one of two digits they're given access to this. just one second if i can borrow that. it's powdered milk. should be something that's easy to find on the store shelves. was up until fairly recently but the collapse in can oil prices, economic mismanagement, and according to some people here the action of america and
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others means you can't find it on the shelves. the people that are organizing it are also organizing something else that's politically resident. here on the table, they're collecting signatures from ordinary people to be presented to president obama. and the idea is that this is calling for the order, freezing the assets of seven venezuelan government officials and declaring venezuela as a national security threat to be repealed. and president pa dur roe of venezuela, when he meets president obama, is hoping that he'll present this petition to him and call for a repeal of this specific order. this is also politics and the relationship between america and venezuela. and you can see the damaging effect it's having on the local population and the economy. well breaking news for you from islamabad, as authorities in pakistan have released the
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alleged mastermind of the 2008 mumbai attacks. he was released on bail. he's been accused over that siege which left 166 people dead. as i say, just to repeat the pakistani authorities are freeing on bail the mastermind, allegedly, of those attacks. it's a prospect which had already been condemned by narendra modi the indian prime minister, last month at the prospect and i suppose, inevitably, it's going to have an impact on the relations between india and pakistan. that is the latest news coming to you here on bbc world news. now, dozens of people are reported to have been killed in a crash in southern morocco. the first report suggests the accident involved a coach carrying young athletes as they returned from a sports event and a lorry. the crash is reported to have happened near the southwestern
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city of tan tan. the united nations has called on all sides for the conflict in yemen to abide by national law. it was simply unacceptable that civilians and aid workers have been coming under attack. earlier, iran's supreme leader ayatollah khamenei accused saudi arabia of committing genocide. the saudis have long accused iran of arming and supporting those houthis. well for the first time since the outbreak of the heavy fighting there, a plane cart chartered by the red cross has now been able to bring aid supplies into the capital. a spokeswoman is at the airport and says air strikes around the city have grounded her and her crew, but she gave us this update. >> we are still at airport. we just finished off-loading 16.4 tons of medical supplies.
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this the first plane due to arrive a few days ago, and a arrived today, which is good news. we are expecting another plane hopefully we'll know tomorrow with 32 tons of medical supplies, but also water systems on the hospital. but also has been affected do not have water. we are at this hour still at airport. we are going to leave in a while. but the plane came it off-loaded, and so far, everything is good. >> right, that sounds very encouraging, especially as you talk about possibly more cob signments to come. do you feel now you've established some sort of access? >> it's still a very complect complicated -- i mean, this first plane that came it took us over ten days to have it come. we have faith over the complicated procedures. we always thought we had all the
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documents that we needed the procedures were always a bit more complicated. we have to remember, it's also very complicated to fly in anything, any plane to a war zone. for tomorrow we still have hope. it is definitely a positive sign, but what we need is it to have more encouraging signs and we count on everyone who is involved in this entire procedure to help us facilitate our job. the former australian cricket captain and commentator richie benaud died at the age of 64. he'd been suffering skin cancer. he became one of the most recognized cricket commentators. he also worked for the bbc for decades and was recognized pretty much around the world. on twitter, tony abbott said we
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have lost a cricketing champion and australian icon. he has also offered a state funeral for the man known as the voice of cricketing. a look back at the man. >> welcome to highlighting of the first day's play england and india. a marvelous day, weather wise. >> reporter: for many he was the voice of cricket, as a presenter, but above all as a commentator, richie benaud had wit, wisdom, and a quite inimitable way with words. >> chasing, goes straight into a confectionary store. >> what a beauty. an absolute dazzler. >> reporter: but the commentator himself was once himself a hugely successful cricketer. >> if england regains though they must get benaud once and
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for all. >> reporter: benaud made his debut for australia in 1952 and as he toured the world he blossomed into one of its final talents. he took 428 test wick ets, scored more than 2,000 runs and became a charismatic captain, guiding australia to three triumphs. although he insisted leadership wasn't all about expertise. >> i think there are two aspects of it. it needs to be 90% luck and 10% skill. i give you a very strict warning, don't try it without the skill. >> reporter: after retiring as a player, benaud transferred his skills to the media with the same cool composure. >> hello, welcome to highlights and welcome to viewers in england, india, and this match is the second semi-final. >> reporter: his mellow understated style turned into one of sports' most famous voices capturing cricket's
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drama. >> he's done it! >> reporter: but also its humor. >> a streaker on the field. that's the first catch rodney mass has made today. >> reporter: richie benaud continued congressmen at a timing into his 80s. his popularity has enduring as his talent a man who excelled with bat, ball and microphone cricket's ultimate all-rounder. >> true enough. andy swiss reporting. jamie's with us now. samsung on the front today? >> it's all about phones yes. and apple as well. we'll start with samsung. it has been the world's top mobile phone maker for about four years, since 2011 now it is struggling to stay at the top of a very competitive market. big day for the electronic giant from south korea. and it is all about these things, which are about to appear on the screen behind me flp they are. the samsung s6. the s6 edge as well. the new flagship devices which will go on sale today in 20 countries around the world. that includes the u.s. here in
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the uk as well. they've received pretty good reviews from the critics, especially the s6 edge. it's got a different screen it curves down ton sides. some say it's the best phone the company has ever made. will they actually be a hit? they could be the best-selling galaxy phones ever. sales of some $50 million. they'll have to be if they want to catch up with apple because apple sold 74 million iphones in the last three months and that was driven by demand for the iphone 6s with the bigger screens. apple may have even overtaken samsung as the top smartphone maker during that quarter alone. and then china, there's more competition, because samsung has fallen behind both apple and rival xiaomi. that pressure has taken a toll on samsung. profits of its mobile division plunged about 40% last year. so a lot riding on these new models.
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and keep you on with phones the apple watch goes on display. the apple stores in the u.s. and eight other locations today, paris, london and tokyo are going to be displaying them. they'll be available for online orders. they won't actually ship until april the 24th. you can check e-mail listen to music, and make calls when paired with the iphone. that's business. back to you, david. do stay with us here on bbc world news. coming up in a moment the same day, on the same course for the first time ever. we'll tell you why the cambridge oxford university boat race is going to make history. be in an accident. which is why no one wants insurance. so we go cheap. you know, because we're never gonna need it. until one day, we do. now that cut-rate policy is costing us big. makes you wonder if there's something better out there . see car insurance in a whole new light. liberty mutual
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women brought into europe to work as prostitutes come from one country, nigeria. we have a rare first-person account from a trafficked woman called ope, and we should warn you, the story of what happened to her is harrowing and graphic. her words are spoken for her. >> translator: my early members of nigeria. i had a nice childhood growing up. my parents are not very wealthy, but at least they managed to send me to primary school. in 2005 i met this guy who takes people abroad to work. he said i would be working in a factory or as a nanny. they never tell you that you are coming to work as a prostitute. we stayed in the boat for four days and four nights. the water kept splashing inside and we had to bail it out.
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it was really cold. we had little food and water. i was lucky to be alive. then on the fifth day, we got to an island in spain. police and the ambulance came. then they flew us to the mainland to madrid. my trafficker was waiting outside the airport. he took me to his flat. that's when i found out the other girls are working on the streets, as prostitutes. i'd never done such a thing in my life. i was worried and scared. i found out later, there is a specific amount of money they make you bring home every day. if you go home empty-handed you get beaten up really badly. on the day i was raped, this man
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stopped next to me in a van. the direction he was driving to was lonely and dark so i told him to let me out. the next thing, he brings out a pistol. i'd never seen a pistol before. so i didn't argue with him, i just sat still. and after that they decided to traffic me again to england. we landed in the airport and spent a day in london before they moved me to coventry. it was a normal house, just a normal house in a normal street. they said i would be working as a prostitute but not for long because it takes time to get a good job. the first year it was just
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work, sleep, eat. even if you are sick they don't care. they still bring the men in. i could not leave. it was like i was a slave to them. after a while, they let me out to buy things because they didn't think i would run away. one day, i went to the market. i saw this wallet on the floor. when i opened it there was this i.d. card. it was a belgium i.d. card. that night, i had a small suitcase and put some clothes in it. i went to their bedroom and took some money. i wanted to leave, to get to france, so i took a bus to the town center and they sold me a one-way ticket to london. i went to kings cross to board
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the train, then the immigration officer, he looked at me and said what other i.d. do i have? i said i don't have anything. i spent the night in a police cell. then they sent me direct to hmp holloway. i was thinking i shouldn't have run away. if there was a way i could go back to my traffickers, i would have gone back instead of me being in this place, in prison. >> it was like a dream, you know? i never believed the judge would have set me free. now, i would like to go to uni and hopefully one day get married. my life is getting better than
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the way it used to be. >> that is the rather dreadful ordeal of ope there. and now sort of a twist on a modern day sporting. >> two teams of women, one thing on their minds. history will remember their race as the first to reach parody with the men but for them tomorrow is all about winning. >> it is absolutely great that women are recognized right away and whatever happens, i'll be proud of being part of that event, but i'm gunning for that victory and that's what matters to me. >> we know it's going to be exciting, for us it really is about the race. >> reporter: fighting talk off a caused a scandal in their first race. in 1927 their fight was to wear shorts instead of skirts and a
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straight race was considered too vulgar so they raced separately. fast forward to the '60s and the shorts got shorter, but the race still held in henley. by the '90s, the girls were shouting as loud as the boys. >> now! right now! let's go! >> reporter: but rowing on the same course in the same race was still 20 years away. >> there was a huge difference in provision and budget which looking back on it now, even at the time we knew as sort of unaccountable and difficult. and you know there wasn't much we could do about it. >> and it's money that's brought change, the race sponsors have funded world-class equipment and coaching of up to fife hours a day. however much training they put in the race will still be 4.2 miles of agony.
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on a day like today, it's virtually impossible to imagine that this river could be crawled. but up towards that bend if a wind from the west goes against the tide it can become incredibly choppy. now, most competitions would then be canceled. but come what may, the boat race goes on. >> it can look lovely from one second to the next and be very changeable especially with the bends as well. what are very nice conditions on the one side of the river, you'll turn around the bend and suddenly there'll be a huge wave or wind. >> the first lady's time race is based on grace. how graceful do you think you'll be? >> i would like to think we'll be very graceful. but the tideway conditions can be very unpredictable. and if it's windy or wavy it can be a slug fest. it's not going to look pretty. >> reporter: when they take to the waters tomorrow millions
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around the world will be watching. it will be their race. it's also one which represents the physical and social battles of the women who went before them. >> here we are. and if it floats your boat you can watch the boat races live on bbc world at 3:15 "gmt" on saturday.
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miracle-gro. life starts here. our top stories. will history be made in panama? president obama and cuba's leader, raul castro are due to meet formally for the first time during the summit of the americas. a plane chartered by the red cross brings much-needed aid to the yemeni capital, sanaa. in myanmar, opposition leader awningung san suu kyi holds rare talks with the military's top political leaders.
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also it's good-bye to the voice of cricket. tributes pour in for the australian commentator and former cricket captain, richie benaud. >> hello and thanks for joining us. the summit of the americas gets underway later in the day at a time of great transformation, great challenges and considerable opportunities for the region worthy of history. let's have a look at the headline acts. president obama expected to meet the cuban leader raul castro. well when john kerry held talks with his cuban counterpart, bruno rodriguez on thursday night, that was already the highest level meeting in more than half a century. the last comparable meeting, when fidel castro met the vice
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president, richard nixon, back in 1959. just a year later, though diplomatic relations were broken off when cuba nationalized all american businesses. fast forward to 1982 the u.s. added cuba to its list of state sponsors of terrorism. that was for offering sanctuary to basque separatists and colombian farc rebels. now there are reports that the u.s. state department has recommended removing cuba from the list. it would have a huge impact leading to the opening up of diplomatic and trade relations. sylvia pedraza is a cuban historian from the university of michigan. she outlined which each side has to gain. >> the united states will be rid of what has been a thorn at its side for half a century, an item that is only 90 miles away and that lends itself to all kinds of things you know such as nuclear missiles, way back in 1962.
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and at the same time you know, cuba will also gain a great deal from it. with respect to opening its society to trade and commerce with the united states and some influences that are positive coming from this country also. >> well hernandez spent 16 years in prison and is now being tipped by some as a future president in cuba. and john sobel spoke with him and asked if he thought president obama was being brave in trying to improve relations between the u.s. and cuba? >> i believe so. i believe it was a brave decision, yes. >> reporter: do you worry that if relations are normalized and there's open trade between cuba and the united states yes, you might sell a lot more cigars but you're going to have all the american brands coming into cuba and cuba will stop feeling like cuba? >> i certainly hope that that's
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something that won't happen in cuba. i believe and i hope and i expect the cuban people or the cuban government to be ready to face that kind of a situation and i hope and believe and trust that the cuban people will be capable of building a system that we'll know how to work with that but without letting what happen in cuba what is happening now in many other countries. >> well there is plenty going on in the summit of the americas. we'll take an opportunity to highlight some of those issues for you. one of the other anticipated encounters at the summit is between barack obama and the venezuelan president, nicolas maduro. mr. maduro will be attending the summit armed with a petition which contains thousands of signatures condemning the obama administration for imposing
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sanctions against venezuela. the bbc's panel is in crack cast, where those sanctions have led to widespread shortages of some basic goods and queues have become a very familiar sight around the city. >> if you want to know what the economic crisis in venezuela looks like this is pretty much it. hundreds of people have been gathering here over the last two hours in the pretty searing sun, and what they're queueing up for is one of the products that you can't find or are very difficult to find now on the shelves of goth supermarkets even private supermarkets. so people come here, they present their i.d. card and if it ends in one of two digits they're given access to this. just one succeed. if i can borrow that. it's powdered milk. should be something that's easy to find on the store shelves. was up until fairly recently. but the collapse in oil prices, economic mismanagement, and according to some people here the actions of america and others means you can't find it
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on the shelve. the people who organize it are also organizing something else that's politically resident. here on the table, they're collecting signatures from ordinary people to be presented to president obama and the idea is that this is calling for the order, freezing the assets of seven venezuelan government officials, and declaring venezuela as a national security threat to be repealed. and president maduro of venezuela, when he meets president obama, is hoping that he'll present this petition to him and call for a repeal of this specific order. sympathies also politics and the relationship between america and venezuela, and you can see the damaging affect it's having on the local population and the economy. we've got some breaking news to bring you from pakistan, as the authorities there have released the alleged mastermind of the 2008 mumbai attacks. he's been released on bail.
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he was accused of that siege that left 166 people dead. he'd been jailed in the city of rawalpindi. he still faces charges relating to the mumbai killings and a separate case of kidnapping. he's one of seven men facing trial over the attack ss, which, of course, caused huge damage in the relations between pakistan and india. and india's prime minister, narendra modi has already said he did not want to see this happen. but that is the breaking news here on bbc world news. now, the united nations has called on all sides in the conflict in yemen to abide by international law. the u.n.'s humanitarian coordinator for yemen says it was unacceptable that civilians and aid workers had come under attack. earlier, iran's supreme leader ayatollah khomeini accused saudi arabia of committing genocide
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through its military intervention against the houthi rebels in yemen. the saudis themselves have long accused iran of arming and supporting those houthis. fighting has intensified in the country, in the capital sanaa, a local journalist captured the footage we're about to show you, which does contain some distressing scene. [ speaking foreign language ] >> translator: this was a saudi plane which hit woman and children. they are randomly targeting children. their targets are wrong. they are attacking innocent people. [ speaking foreign language ] >> translator: i am one of the victims of an air attack. we went to see where the next strikes would hit, when they suddenly hit us. look at what happened to us.
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>> translator: before dawn a missile hit a gas container, which caused a fire in several buildings. it resulted in women and children being badly burned. the total killed in my building was 26 with many injured. >> translator: as you can see, there is a congestion caused by shortage of petrol because of the saudi attacks. it has caused fear and panic. none of us know when the crisis will end. we just want a solution from either the government or any other party so that this crisis can be resolved. >> very difficult circumstances, indeed. reza al maui from the bbc's arabic service do feel that they do believe intervention is not
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always in their best interest. >> they're complaining from the damage they have suffered, this doesn't mean they're necessarily siding with the houthis. historically yemenis have have been foreign from intervention. egyptians intervened from 1962 to 1970 and they lost 25,000 men there. and before that there were other forces who wanted to promote their own political agenda. so they've become increasingly aware all this intervention is not for the good of the yemenis. >> we hear also from the u.n. coordinator to yemen who said this has just got to stop attacking civilians and aid workers as well. the reality is rather different, isn't it? there's no hint of any stop at all at the moment. >> the official mission statement of the saudi-led coalition is to push the houthis back to their stronghold. but the unwritten reality is
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they want to draw them to the negotiation table. the way things are going right now are not hinting to any political solution. there is no political end game to this. the saudis are up until now focusing on the strategic and the military kind of option. but as many analysts think at one point, there must be some sort of negotiations because a ground incursion and a ground invasion, boots on the ground is very very difficult in yemen. >> well here's one shaft of light. for the first time since the outbreak of the fighting in yemen, a plane chartered by the red cross has managed to bring aid supplies into the capital, sanaa. the spokesman for the international committee of the red cross for yemen is at the airport, where that plane load came in. she said that air strikes around the city have effectively grounded her and her crew but she gave us this update. >> we're still at the airport.
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we just finished off-loading 16.4 tons of medical supplies. these were part of the first plane that were due to arrive a few days ago, and this arrived today, which is good news. we are expecting another plane, hopefully we'll know tomorrow with 32 tons of medical supplies, but also ventilators, pipelines to help us fix the water systems around the hospitals, but also in the areas that have been asked, that do not have water. we are at this hour still ate the airport. we are going to leave in a while. but the plane came it off-loaded, and so far, everything is good. >> right. that sounds very encouraging, especially as you talk about possibly more consignments to come. do you feel now that you've established some sort of access? >> it's still very complicated. i mean this plane that came it took us over ten days to have it come. we have faith over the
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complicated procedures. we always thought we had all the documents that we needed but the procedures were always a bit more complicated. it's also we have to remember that it's also very complicated to fly in anything, any plane, to a war zone. for tomorrow we still have hope. we never have any gratitude of a plane coming or any other aid coming. s this definitely a positive sign, but what we need is it to have more encouraging signs and accounts on everything who is involved in this entire procedure, to help us facilitate our job and our accent. >> you're watching bbc world news. do stay with us. coming up in the program, three decades on now, remembering the groundbreaking moment when wham! brought western pop to china.
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you're watching bbc world news with me david eades. the latest headlines.
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as president obama arrives in panama for the summit of the americas, it's been reported that the u.s. is considering removing cuba from its official list of state sponsors of terrorism. a plane carrying aid supplies has arrived in yemen, the first since the outbreak of heavy fighting. the red cross says the plane was carrying medicine bandages and other surgical equipment. now, is myanmar ready to take a step closer towards a full democracy? well the opposition leader aung san suu kyi, and the country's top political and military leaders are currently talking to unanother and the opposition says that those talks will only be meaningful if they lead to the upcoming elections be free and fair. they feel that the country's constitution and election law put them at a disadvantage. the bbc's jonah fisher explains. >> reporter: this was a 2008
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burmese constitution. it was drafted by the generals and it entrenches the military's control over all aspects of political life here. inside here it states that a quarter of all the seats in the burmese parliament must be filled by unelected army representatives and the key ministries of defense, interior and border affairs should also be filled by soldiers. there's one particular clause in here that's pivotal to this country's immediate future. and it directly affects the woman who lives inside this house, aung san suu kyi. of course, 59s states that anyone that has a foreign spouse or child cannot become burmese president. now, aung san suu kyi's two sons, alexander and kim. sadly, they spent much of their childhood separated from their mother, because she was under house arrest here. but crucially, for now, neither of those two men have burmese
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passports. the burmese military say that clause is needed to protect the country's sovereignty, but many just see it as a crude way of blocking miss suu kyi from the top job. the voters list are already being displayed in a few areas ahead of november's general election. if that vote's fair almost everyone suspects aung san suu kyi kyi's party to win the greatest number of seats. so far, any attempt to change this constitution, to allow miss suu kyi to become president or to reduce the power of the military has been blocked by the army. it's that tension that's at the heart of this country's long struggle for democracy. >> jonah fisher. dozens of people are reported to have been killed in a crash in southern morocco. the first report suggests it was an accident involving a coach that was carrying young athletes returning from a sports event and a lorry. the crash is reported to have happened near the southwestern city of tan tan.
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the australian broadcaster and former cricketer, richie benaud, had died at the age of 84. he'd been suffering is from skin cancer. for decades, he was probably the most familiar voice of the sport around so much of the world. our reporter has been looking at the global reaction to his death. >> reporter: tributes on social media began almost immediately, many from australia, as this map shows the hashtags r.i.p. richie and richie benaud were soon trending. among the messages this one from the prime minister, tony abbott. a sad day for australia, he said. we have lost a cricketing champion and australian icon. what an inning. a feeling echoed by australia's test captain, michael clark. on iz instagram account, he wrote, what a man. extremely sad day. you were a lot more than just a cricket cricketer. pictures also being shared. this one showed flowers being
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laid near a memorial of benaud and this showing the flag at half-mast outside. a tribute, too, from the actor, russell crowe, who wrote, my deep gratitude for all you gave to the sport of cricket as a player and as a broadcaster. this church north of sydney changed its sign by way of tribute, using one of benaud's many catch phrases. a heartfelt message from former cricketer, shane ward, who said as a cricketer, commentator, and person, you were the best there's ever been. for me it was an honor and a privilege to call you a close friend and mentor. messages that give a flavor of how much richie benaud will be missed. ben bland, bbc news. >> well, joining me now is a man who worked closely with richie benaud for many years, a cricket commentator and analysis simon hughes. thanks very much for joining us. tell us a little bit about richie because he had an impact on you, didn't he? >> he was an amazing man. the two words that would sum him
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up for me would be enthusiasm about the game and a total infatuation. it was very enfek infek chous. he was all the first guy in the commentary box, building his little nest his laptop his banana sandwiches, laws of the game a little book, which he'd always be referring to. he was fascinating by new developments in the game. a lot of older people would have been a bit suspicious he totally embraced it and was very enthusiastic and actually gave the channel 4 conch which he joined in '99 9, the credible that it needed. and he had this incredible enthusiasm. i first broadcast with him in 1990 on the bbc, and he was sort of a mentor to me, in a way. he encouraged me to investigate the game to make futures about it. and i remember one thing. i wrote a piece about reverse
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swing, it's very complicated art, which no one's really ever explained very well. and richie kept this article in his briefcase. about four years later, he suddenly rang me up one day and said, can you just run this one past me again. i want to get the details exactly right. so, you know he was very very fussy and forensic about detail. but he never took himself too seriously. that was the beautiful thing. >> that's quite interesting, in a way. because it did always seem effortless for him, in a sense, because his remarks were usually quite short and to the point, could be critical but he was never vicious, was he? he had a real manner about -- >> he would always say, that's the best shot identify seen this year or -- he wouldn't be that wasn't as good as in my day. it was always about how amazing the game was all the time. obviously you say about his pared down commentary. the classic was that, the climax when england won by two rounds
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and the last wick et was taken by steve harmson, and bennette was on commentator, and he just said bouden jones! like that. the umpire and the capture. jones, bouden and that was it! and then you know joy to all the england fans and despair for the australians. but it was all beautifully state stated, understated, he believed in having pauses. but he also believed in having fun, he believed in the lighter side of the game. he had a mischievous quirk, streak in him. he was talking about captainsy, he would say, captainsy is 90% luck and 10% talent pause, but don't try it without that 10%. you know he would always have just a little wink at the end. i mean ironically it's beautiful, actually that he died at 2:22 didn't he? because the score, 222, in his language, 222 for 2, was his
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like favorite words, favorite numbers. he died at 2:22. >> simon hughes. no mean analyst and commentator himself. now, 30 years ago, the british pop duo wham! became the first western band to play in china. 12,000 people turned up to the concert in beijing for a rare glimpse of western culture in their country. chang faung wang was at the concert and had been invited to cover the band's songs at a concert. ♪ wake me up before you go go ♪ ♪ don't leave me hanging ♪ ♪ you can go ♪ >> translator: i first heard of wham! when i was asked to cover their songs back in 1985 just before the concert.
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i was sitting in the audience at the beijing concert. it was a very memorable night. a whole new experience for us. and i remember everyone was a little stunned. the chinese were all wondering why they were dancing like that. a break dancer came down from the stage and joined the crowd and people were like why, is he here? the police were trying to contain the crowd, telling them not to stand up. the chinese audience were pretty well behaved, but the foreigners in the audience were going crazy. they were all dancing. the speakers were so loud. boom, boom boom. our chinese concerts were never that loud. my heart was jumping out of my chest. they were playing guitar george was constantly walking across the stage, interacting with the
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audience singing with them. it was nothing that we've experienced before. it was so exciting, but somewhat confusing, because we had never seen anything like this. i'd never heard of them before. i wondered why they spelled it w-h-a-m with an exclamation mark. i later learned it meant bomb like this. i recorded five songs altogether. it wasn't easy, because fast-paced songs back then were a rarity. >> the police were on hand in case of trouble -- >> translator: these songs were later included in the souvenir set given to wham! concertgoers. i met the band backstage afterwards. they gave me a signed photo. i remember george michael. he had blond hair and he was wearing a flowery shirt and hat.
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he was very hand sh very cool. >> a blast from the past there. just before we go let me remind you of the breaking news this hour. authorities in pakistan have released the alleged mastermind of the 2008 mumbai attacks, accused over the siege that left 166 dead. keeping a billion customers a year flying means keeping seven billion transactions flowing. and when weather hits, it's data mayhem. but airlines running hp end-to-end solutions are always calm during a storm. so if your business deals with the unexpected hp big data and cloud solutions make sure you always know what's coming-and are ready for it. make it matter. ♪ ♪ ♪
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life starts here. so here's the story of lancaster. the year is 1890. milton hershey has a killer recipe for caramel. flash forward - milton's recipe is reimagined into buttery rich, smooth, surprisingly soft crèmes. it's lancaster. it's caramel reimagined. hello and welcome to "gmt" on bbc world news. i'm stephen sackur. our top stories. a pakistani court releases the man accused of masterminding the 2008 mumbai terror attack. india calls it an insult to the victims. he was alleged to have been a key player in the assault on mumbai which left 166 dead. today, he was released on bail. new video footage raises fresh questions about the shooting of an unarmed black man by a white police officer in south carolina. why did a routine stop end with

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