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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  December 20, 2016 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello. this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. a lorry has ploughed into a packed christmas market in berlin. according to police, it was probably an act of terror. at least 12 people are dead and dozens more are injured. the carnage happened just off a main shopping street as the vehicle mounted the pavement and crashed through wooden huts filled with christmas shoppers. we heard it knocking down stalls and there was no skidding wheels, clearly no attempt to try to slow down. police think the lorry was stolen from a building site in poland. we'll be live in berlin all morning with the latest. good morning. it's tuesday the 20th of december. also this morning:
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a huge leap forward in the treatment of prostate cancer. doctors manage to eliminate tumours without such severe side—effects. president putin describes the assassination of russia's ambassador to turkey as an act of provocation. little kicks, little punches, stuff like that. we'll hearfrom men who abuse their partners, as breakfast is given exclusive access to a new way of preventing domestic violence. good morning from one of the oldest gin distilleries in the uk. sales are up and we will tell you why. and sport news. sadio mane secures the bragging rights for liverpool in the merseyside derby. victory over everton moves them up to second in the premier league. and carol has the weather. good morning. good morning. some rain at the moment in western parts
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of england and wales. for most, dry with variable amounts of cloud and some sunshine. rain coming in from the west with some gales in the northern and western isles. and i'll have the full weather details in 15 minutes. thank you. good morning. first, our main story. 12 people have died and around 50 have been injured after a lorry crashed into a christmas market in berlin. police say it's a suspected terror attack. it happened at around 8:15 yesterday evening when the christmas market was packed with people. eyewitnesses say the vehicle ploughed into the busy market square without slowing down. the market is close to the popular tourist site of the kaiser wilhelm memorial church, berlin zoo, and one of the main shopping streets in west berlin. german police say they're investigating reports that the vehicle was stolen from a building site in poland, as greg dawson reports. under the lights of one of berlin's biggest christmas markets, investigators examine the lorry that has caused so much death and destruction.
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it was loaded with steel beams when it turned off the road and smashed into crowds. this footage shows the immediate aftermath. just moments earlier, people had been enjoying food and drink here. rhys meredith, from cardiff, was visiting the market with his girlfriend. we heard it knocking down the stalls at an amazing rate of knots. there was no skidding wheels, clearly no attempt to slow down, despite him veering out of the market. the driver of the lorry then fled on foot, but was captured shortly afterwards. reports claim he is an asylum seeker from either afghanistan or pakistan. he arrived in germany in february. the vehicle had come from poland, and police say a polish citizen was found dead in
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the passenger seat. the lorry‘s owner says his driver could not have been responsible. translation: the person who was driving and jumped out of the truck was not my driver. i can vouch for my driver. they did something to him, and hijacked his truck. 48 people were injured. some of them are in a critical condition. the scenes are a reminder of the lorry attack on bastille day crowds in the french city of nice injuly, when 86 people were killed. the so—called islamic state group claimed responsibility. police say there is no evidence there will be further attacks in berlin. but the german government has said the evidence so far points to this being a deliberate attack. greg dawson, bbc news. investigations are ongoing this
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morning. we can she do live pictures. you can see in the centre of your screen where the flashing lights are the articulated lorry. it went through the centre of this christmas market and you can see the damage it caused on its way. it happened less than 12 hours ago. still in the initial stages of the investigation. one man has been arrested and is being talked to buy the authorities. we have talked to an eyewitness nearby when it happened and we will bring you news from him later. the un secretary general, ban ki—moon, has described the killing of the russian ambassador to turkey as a "senseless act of terror." ambassador andrei karlov was shot dead yesterday by a turkish policeman, apparently in protest at russia's involvement in aleppo. our reporter, rengin arslan, is in istanbul. surgeons have described a new treatment for early stage
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prostate cancer as "truly transformative." the approach, which uses lasers and a drug made from deep sea bacteria, can eliminate tumours without causing severe side effects that commonly occur with surgery. more than four 100 men took part in the trial. here's our health and science reporter, james gallagher. gerald is now free from cancer and feeling good. but when he was diagnosed he had taken done from, treat the tumour or let it grow to avoid side effects. but he was offered something pioneering. avoid side effects. but he was offered something pioneeringlj wa nted offered something pioneeringlj wanted the same way of living that i had enjoyed in the past for the future. and i feel like had enjoyed in the past for the future. and ifeel like the treatment i have had has allowed that. this drug is made from
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bacteria that grow is in the dark is of the ocean. it is only toxic when it is exposed to light. up to ten of these lasers are inserted into the tumour to activate the drug and killed just the cancerous tissue. more than 400 men took part in the trial and nearly half had no signs of cancer after treatment and no patients had serious side—effects. the harms with traditional treatments have always been side effects, urinary incontinence, sexual difficulty occurring in the majority of men who have treatment. and to have a new treatment we can administer two men who are eligible thatis administer two men who are eligible that is free of those side effects is truly transformative. gerald says he is lucky to have been on the trial but it is not yet ready for patients. doctors want more long—term data before it can be offered to the general public. bbc news. the scottish first minister, nicola sturgeon, will today set out plans for how scotland could stay
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in the european single market after brexit. she says leaving the single market would be potentially devastating to scotland's economy, and is expected to propose more powers are devolved to the holyrood parliament to stop it happening. earlier this month, the chancellor, philip hammond said a separate brexit deal for scotland was "not realistic." the us electoral college has confirmed donald trump's election as the next president of the united states. this was in spite of a last—ditch attempt by opponents to block mr trump's path to the white house, after his rival, hillary clinton, won the popular vote. mr trump has promised to "work hard to unite our country and be the president of all americans." figures from more than 100 hospital trusts in england show that overseas patients not entitled to free healthcare left the nhs with an unpaid bill of thirty million last year. the debt appears to have increased sharply over the previous twelve months. the government has reminded hospitals of their legal duty to recover the money, and has encouraged them to ask to see passports before giving treatment. glastonbury festival could move to a new site 100 miles away
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in three years' time to protect the land at its current location in somerset. the event's founder, michael eavis, says the new location "towards the midlands" would be used every five years. however, mr eavis indicated that he would be reluctant to see the festival move from its home permanently. that is in somerset. some people would agree. those are the stories and we will have the weather soon. sally is here and we will start with cricket. the football is coming up $0011. cricket. the football is coming up soon. that finished late last night. i like cricket as well. you may not like this. english cricketers are trying to save the fifth and final test against india in chennai. they have made it to lunch without losing a wicket. they are 97 without loss, 187. liverpool have sadio mane to thank for victory in the merseyside derby. his injury—time goal gave them a 1—0 win over everton, and moved them up to second in the premier league. but they're six points behind leaders, chelsea. the fa says they'll appeal against a fine of over £35,000 for wearing poppies on their armbands when they played scotland on armistice day. scotland, wales and northern ireland were also fined for their acts of remembrance. the package at the centre of a uk
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anti—doping investigation contained an over—the—counter decongestant, according to team sky boss, sir dave brailsford. fluimucil is legal in sport, and used on a regular basis. the package was delivered to the team bus on the final day of the 2011 criterium du dauphine, which was won by sir bradley wiggins. that is sir dave brailsford talking about that yesterday. that mystery package we have heard about a lot was a decongestant. thank you. only one story makes the front page. a couple actually. what happened in berlin. that happened last night. christmas carnage in berlin. inside, many papers have more details and of course more photographs as well and maps. everyone is tried to piece
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together, including police, this morning, exactly what happened. they are talking about the lorry going at 40 miles an hour hitting pedestrians in the christmas markets and various buildings etc. and we have seen pictures this morning of where it came toa pictures this morning of where it came to a standstill. it appears to bea came to a standstill. it appears to be a large road, but it is not clear at this time why it actually stopped there. that is why they are trying to investigate at the moment. pictures like this dominate at the moment. nine dead, it says, but that has been updated to 12 confirmed deadin has been updated to 12 confirmed dead in berlin after this lorry drove into the christmas market. carnage at a christmas market. and the front nature of the daily mirror. a bloodbath massacre at the christmas market. that is the front page. and that is the front page of the daily telegraph. 0nly page. and that is the front page of the daily telegraph. only two stories. the killing of the russian
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ambassador is the other story in turkey which makes up the front pages of many stories. another critical photo taken by a photographer. let's get more on our top story, at least 12 people have died and almost 50 are injured after a lorry crashed into a christmas market in berlin. officials say they suspect it was a deliberate attack. the market was full of people at the time, many of them tourists. these are live pictures. you can see on the right hand side. we can speak tojon campbell from pontypridd now. he's on holiday in berlin, and joins us on the phone now. thank you so much forjoining us. i understand your hotel is very close to where this happened. described to us to where this happened. described to us what happened last night. -- describe. where we are staying, the
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christmas markets are 200— 300 metres away. we came here as tourists. we spent the last few evenings there. my girlfriend is a stickler for plans. we went at 8pm last night. it was only at a whim that we decided to pop into a restau ra nt. that we decided to pop into a restaurant. we had a phone call. we we re restaurant. we had a phone call. we were sat in the restaurant and ambulances and police vans were speeding past and we thought, what happened? my sister said, are you quys happened? my sister said, are you guys 0k? happened? my sister said, are you guys ok? i was like, what happenedthought something happened at home. she told me that a truck had gone through the christmas markets in berlin. that is when eve ryo ne markets in berlin. that is when everyone in the restaurant started watching the news. that is where we we re watching the news. that is where we were supposed to be. it is hard to
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describe. i am shocked. i could be eating a hot dog and having a beer and then suddenly there would be a lorry ploughing through. tell us about the atmosphere last night. did you go back to the hotel? what happened? yeah, it was quite intense. maybe the events of paris we re intense. maybe the events of paris were in some people's minds. you hear about this and you think, it happened in one place, will it happened in one place, will it happen in another? the advice was given quickly. instinctively people stayed where they were. but we were under the impression it would be safer to go straight back to our hotel. so we got a taxi straight there. when we were getting the taxi back we realised the disruption going on. the entrance was blocked near the memorial church. all the
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roads were totally closed. you could not actually see the market when we we re not actually see the market when we were driving past. but it really gave you a sense of what was going on there. ok, thank you very much for joining on there. ok, thank you very much forjoining us. let's get some more reaction from a security analyst in berlin. thank you forjoining us. we are hearing from authorities it is a suspected terror at. had germany been on high alert for a while? yes. security forces have been warning people for sometime that germany is threatened and that from various sides there we re and that from various sides there were plans to attack german citizens on german soil. so far it seems we have been lucky until last night. you know the area of berlin well. can you describe the location of the market where this happened?m
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can you describe the location of the market where this happened? it is in the western part of berlin, it is the western part of berlin, it is the heart of the old west berlin. in the heart of the old west berlin. in the centre you have the emperor william memorial church, which was partially destroyed in world war two, and remained his way as a symbol for peace. and around the church, you have this neat square with a fountain, where we have lots of festivities in the summer and each year in the wintertime there isa each year in the wintertime there is a christmas market. authorities have said that it is a suspected terror attack and it happened at a time when the market was packed with tourists and with germans as well. yes. traditionally, after work people go with colleagues for one last line to the christmas market to get in the mood and you meet with family, or after the shopping trip you go there, and of course the many
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tourists who have come to berlin love to go to these christmas markets. yes. and what is the feeling like in berlin this morning? the city is still relatively quiet and, of course, in a few minutes or so and, of course, in a few minutes or so life will have to continue but surely the mood will have to be relatively sober. like last night, i came back home, used public transportation, everyone was quiet. it wasn't the normal mood you experience when you come to berlin. understandable. thank you very much. a security analyst in berlin this morning. that is of course the main story this morning. it is. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. we will take you back to that story. the main stories this morning:
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at least 12 people have died and dozens more have been injured after a lorry drove into a busy christmas market in berlin. police now say they suspect terrorism. the german authorities are questioning a man thought to be the driver. we will catch up with the weather this morning. we can have a we will catch up with the weather this morning. we can have a second glimpse with carol. good morning. todayit glimpse with carol. good morning. today it is relatively quiet, however we have heavy rain and windy conditions coming later on. currently we have rain, not for scotland, here there is clear skies and dry weather. it is cold without and dry weather. it is cold without a lot of frost and fog. it is the same for northern ireland with frost around, patchy fog, clearskies. for england and wales it is a murky start with a lot of cloud around and a few breaks here and there, for example is —— in east anglia at a weather front brings patchy rain for western wales and also south—west
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england. that is courtesy of this weather front which will tend to fizzle but the next comes in with wet and windy weather. for the bulk of eastern and central scotland, and also england, we have a dry and fine day with some sunny spells. this rain will be heavy as it comes in across northern ireland and scotland later, accompanied by strong wind. we are looking at gus up to gale force with exposure at the outer hebrides we could have 60 or 70 mph —— gusts. these are the kind of gusts to expect into the evening. if you are travelling in a high sided vehicle, bear that in mind, or even a light vehicle or even a bike. the next comes in with some squalyl showers. some of them will be wintry even at low levels. it will affect some of the higher level routes —— squally showers. and also the hills and mountains, where we will see
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some light snow. it is a cold night in prospect in the north. tomorrow we start off with those squally showers and we carry them on through the day, and snow at low levels. in southern scotland and northern ireland it is likely in the hills. the first band of rain meanwhile sinks south, weakening in doing so, and behind it we see something bright, and in fact in between the showers something bright comes our way as well. moving into thursday, it is quieter weatherwise. we will have some showers for northern parts, it will be wintry and cold, the top temperature only four degrees in aberdeen, but at least there is sunshine in between the showers, not just there is sunshine in between the showers, notjust in the north, but in the south. as we had from thursday into friday things will up weatherwise once again. we have an active area of low pressure coming oui’ active area of low pressure coming our way. the rain will rattle through quickly through the course of friday but it will once again be
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very windy, particularly so in the north of the country. in the run—up to christmas, expect spells of wind and rain, although the rain will go through quite quickly. thank you very much. it does not look lovely. look at that. even though you have tried to make it look lovely. thank you. there was a bit of sunshine in the bottom part of the picture. as christmas approaches, police are preparing for a sharp rise in domestic violence. it's the time of year when incidents of abuse traditionally spike. as part of our in—depth look at policing britain this week, fiona trott has been to visit a project in sunderland trying to identify men who are at risk of becoming abusers. welcome, everybody. the new way of tackling domestic abuse. ok, somebody mentioned money. these men are learning how their abc of behaviour is affecting their partner. is it a reason to stay or
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to go? she would be better off if she left. the 26 week course involves the charity barnardo is, it can get up to 20 referrals a month just in sunderland. little kicks, little punches, stuff like that, then she was starting to hit me. this man was referred by his gp. so how has the course helped you? take time to think about stuff. it learns you how to take time—out. so even if lam you how to take time—out. so even if i am texting until it is getting out of hand, i might take time—out. i am texting until it is getting out of hand, i might take time-out. this project means we can get two men and help them change their behaviour before they get involved with the criminal justice system. before they get involved with the criminaljustice system. we want to stop things escalating to that point, because we know when the
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police get called it is usually quite serious injuries and incidents. there is another element to this early intervention program. the local housing association is also involved. hello, how are you. they check that perpetrators are a attending the course and they checked up on the victims themselves. they might have something like a broken window, broken bathroom door locks, for example, things like that. we might be looking at an antisocial behaviour complaint or a noise nuisance, or is it actually domestic abuse? he was kicking the dorian in the middle of the night, my windows we re the middle of the night, my windows were going out. this woman was so afraid of her x partner that she carried a knife. her words are spoken by someone else. it finally came to the day where he assaulted us came to the day where he assaulted us and put us in hospital. he got 16 months injail. i was so pleased. i know it sounds crazy. you know, i
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was lying in a hospital bed covered in blood. i was so happy he had done it because, to me, i was free. in every community there is a woman like her. here in sunderland charities hope working with the local housing association, abusive relationships can stop before women are put in more serious danger. 0ur series on policing britain continues all week. later in the programme, we'll be reporting on ourfear of crime and how that impacts on our lives. very specifically about domestic violence and we will speak to the police and crime commissioner at northumbria police. coming up on breakfast. could this be the year mistletoe and wine becomes mistletoe and gin? steph‘s at a gin distillery in cheshire finding out why sales of some spirits are up this year. we will speak to her a little bit later on. i have seen her, that is
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why i said hello. we will have more on what is going on in berlin. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. a £20,000 reward is being offered for information about the disappearance 30 years ago of a 16—year—old boy who is now believed to have been murdered. kevin hicks went out to buy some eggs for a school project in croydon in march 1986 and was never seen again. after a review earlier this year, the met now believe he is more than likely to have been murdered. 0verseas patients have wracked up an unpaid bill of nearly £20 million for nhs treatment in the capital, with the nine most out—of—pocket hospital trusts all here in london. migrants must pay for nhs care, and the trusts owed most last year were barts, guy's and st thomas's and university college. barts and the government say they're doing more to charge foreigners. the mayor of london is to spend £50 million building affordable housing for london's homeless people. it's designed to help them settle into permanent accommodation when they are ready to move out
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from a hostel or refuge. the money is part of a £3.15 billion pound settlement the mayor received from the government to build affordable homes. rough sleeping has doubled over the last eight years. in the last year it has increased again. it is important we find rough sleepers, especially women, at this time of year, andi especially women, at this time of year, and i am pleased to confirm the funding we are going to give to help people move on from hostels and refuges. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, there's a good service on all lines. 0n the trains, southeastern services are disrupted via sittingbourne due to a signalling problem. and its day two of two of current strike action on southern services. reduced service across the network. 0n the roads, and in kennington, the contraflow on brixton road at south island place due to gas works. in catford, temporary traffic lights on the a205 atjutland road due to a burst water main. hampstead heath and spaniards road is closed from heath street to winnington road due to a burst water main. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella.
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hello, good morning. there is less mist and fog around this morning. we still have some cloud. hopefully something more like this later today. some clear spells developing and sunny spells as cloud brea ks developing and sunny spells as cloud breaks up. the wind is reasonably light. it is south—easterly, quite gentle. there is the risk of a shower from the south to the west coast and south of london. most places to the east steine dry and bright with sunshine. the maximum temperature six or seven. we head into this evening in the same vein with clear spells at first, but through the night we see the cloud increase, coming from the west, thick enough to produce rain heading into wednesday morning. the wind will start to strengthen, south—westerly wind starts to
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strengthen as we head into tomorrow morning. the minimum temperature in some places higher than today's maximum. that heavy rain for a time spreads across through wednesday. it will clear away and it will leave a dry and bright day with sunshine on thursday, although there is cloud as we head into the christmas weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment. but also on breakfast this morning: we'll speak to a british tourist who was in the christmas market in berlin last night and tried to help some of those who were injured. our special series on policing britain looks at the "fear of crime," and finds out why it often doesn't match up with the reality. and if you're a fan
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of the award—winning last tango in halifax, we've got two of the stars of the christmas special with us. nicola walker and dean andrews, who play gillian and robbie, will be here on the sofa after 8:30. and also 0re from strickly come dancing will be here. all that still to come. good morning. first, our main story. 12 people have died and around 50 have been injured after a lorry crashed into a christmas market in berlin. police say it's a suspected terror attack. a man, thought to be the driver, has been arrested. they are questioning him. here is greg dawson with more. under the lights of one of berlin's biggest christmas markets, investigators examine the lorry that has caused so much death and destruction. it was loaded with steel beams when it turned off the road
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and smashed into the crowds. this footage shows the immediate aftermath. just moments earlier, people had been enjoying food and drink here. rhys meredith, from cardiff, was visiting the market with his girlfriend. we heard it knocking down the stalls at an amazing rate of knots. and, you know, there was no skidding wheels, or there was clearly no attempt to slow down, despite him veering out of the market. the driver of the lorry then fled on foot, but was captured shortly afterwards. reports claim he is an asylum seeker from either afghanistan or pakistan who had arrived in germany in february. the vehicle had come from poland, and police say a polish citizen was found dead in the passenger seat. the lorry‘s owner says his driver could not have been responsible. translation: the person who was driving and jumped out of the truck was not my driver.
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i can vouch for my driver. they did something to him, and hijacked his truck. 48 people were injured. some of them are in a critical condition. the scenes are a reminder of the lorry attack on bastille day crowds in the french city of nice injuly, when 86 people were killed. the so—called islamic state group claimed responsibility. authorities say there is no indication of any further threats in berlin. but the german government has said the evidence so far points to this being a deliberate attack. greg dawson, bbc news. this happened under 12 hours ago. we can show you what is happening in berlin at the moment. we have looked at this picture for the last half an hour also. police are investigating.
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you can see the flashing lights on your screen of the lorry. they are trying to figure out why it came to stop at that point and how it got in. we were told all police measures are operating at full steam with full diligence to figure out what happened in that christmas market in berlin last night. and they are calling it a suspected terror attack. in a moment on breakfast we will get more reaction to developments in berlin and what it could mean for security both over there in the christmas period and in there in the christmas period and in the uk as well. and to give you advice from the foreign office here, you are supposed to avoid the area and follow the advice of local authorities. they say there is a high threat of terrorism. the german government has announced increased security as a proportion of transport hubs and large public
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gatherings and events. that is the advice from the foreign office this morning. that is if you are travelling to germany. we will keep you up—to—date on all the latest developments. the un secretary general, ban ki—moon, has described the killing of the russian ambassador to turkey as a "senseless act of terror." ambassador andrei karlov was shot dead yesterday by a turkish policeman, apparently in protest at russia's involvement in aleppo. 0ur reporter, rengin arslan, is in istanbul. surgeons have described a new treatment for early stage prostate cancer as "truly transformative." the approach, which uses lasers and a drug made from deep sea bacteria, can eliminate tumours without causing severe side effects that commonly occur with surgery. more than four 100 men took part in the trial. the scottish first minister, nicola sturgeon, will today set out plans for how scotland could stay in the european single market after brexit.
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she says leaving the single market would be potentially devastating to scotland's economy, and is expected to propose more powers are devolved to the holyrood parliament to stop it happening. earlier this month, the chancellor, philip hammond said a separate brexit deal for scotland was "not realistic." the us electoral college has confirmed donald trump's election as the next president of the united states. this was in spite of a last—ditch attempt by opponents to block mr trump's path to the white house, after his rival, hillary clinton, won the popular vote. mr trump has promised to "work hard to unite our country and be the president of all americans." figures from more than 100 hospital trusts in england show that overseas patients not entitled to free healthcare left the nhs with an unpaid bill of £30 million last year. the debt appears to have increased sharply over the previous 12 months. the government has reminded hospitals of their legal duty to recover the money, and has encouraged them to ask
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to see passports before giving treatment. glastonbury festival could move to a new site 100 miles away in three years' time to protect the land at its current location in somerset. the event's founder, michael eavis, says the new location "towards the midlands" would be used every five years. however, mr eavis indicated that he would be reluctant to see the festival move from its home permanently. i expect all the hundreds of thousands of fans may feel similar. i love the magnificent vagueness of towards the midlands. sally is he with the sport and... well, average cricket news. the best result for everybody today would be a draw and to make their plane home in time for
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christmas. everyone has had enough. they have had a nightmare in india. a really difficult time. they are trying to save the fifth and final test in chennai. they need to back the day to get to a draw. they need to bat out the day to avoid defeat, and they've made it to lunch without losing a wicket. alastair cook and keaton jennings making good progress. they're 97 without loss. that's 185 runs behind. india, remember, lead the series 3—0. liverpool are up to second in the premier league after securing the bragging rights in last night's merseyside derby. but it wasn't until injury—time at goodison park that sadio mane was able to break the deadlock. the 1—0 win moves liverpool above manchester city, but they're six points behind leaders, chelsea. i think we deserved to win. there we re i think we deserved to win. there were some close situations. this was one of them. we were still awake and wa nted one of them. we were still awake and wanted to win. with the changes we made i think we gave the side some kind of stability and some
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experienced striker with daniel. so it was good. of course, a bit lucky. we are really disappointed. we conceded a goal in extra time. eight minutes, that is difficult. it was already difficult to keep one point until 90—95 minutes. the eighth minute was hard for us. football's world governing body has fined all four home nations for displaying poppies during their world cup qualifiers last month. england and scotland players wore poppies on their armbands, on armistice day. wales and northern ireland's games featured displays on the pitch or in the stands. england got the biggest fine of £35,000, the fa say they'll appeal. the package at the centre of a uk anti—doping investigation in cycling contained an over—the—counter decongestant, team sky boss sir dave brailsford has told a committee of mps. fluimucil is legal in sport and administered on a regular basis. the package was delivered to the team bus on the final day of the 2011criterium du dauphine,
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which was won by sir bradley wiggins. at the pdc world darts championship, adrian lewis safely booked his place in the second round. it's been four years since the man known as jackpot last won the title at alexandra palace but he eased past sweden's magnus caris without dropping a set. and finally from me. britain's scott brash finished joint third, as germany's daniel deusser won the london 0lympia grand prix, and the international horse show came to an end last night in its customary theatrical fashion. the olympic crowd were treated to the usual showjumping competition but there were also dogs riding horses from spain, a bit of slapstick humour, and even father christmas made an appearance before the busy period begins for him at the end of the week. i think this is really what you wa nted i think this is really what you wanted to see. a spectacular stunt.
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showjumping! wanted to see. a spectacular stunt. show jumping! he is wanted to see. a spectacular stunt. showjumping! he is going rather quickly. i went there on saturday. the dogs on the horses was quite extraordinary. so well-behaved. i am not trying to play down the dogs, but are they just sitting there? not trying to play down the dogs, but are theyjust sitting there? no, there is some tricks that they do. let's get more now on our top story this morning. the lorry crash at a berlin christmas market that has left 12 people dead and more than 50 injured. germany's interior minister said there were indications it had been a deliberate attack. it left devastation. it crashed through some stalls. it is believed the truck was stolen in poland. let's speak now tojoachim krause, a german security analyst. joachim, had there been any warning of an attack? good morning. thank you forjoining us. good morning. thank you forjoining
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us. the investigation is very much ongoing at this stage. police said in the last hour or so that they suspect this is a terror attack. 0bviously for at least the first four or five hours german officials we re four or five hours german officials were reluctant to frame the incident asa were reluctant to frame the incident as a terrorist attack. but after a few hours it almost came impossible to frame it in any other way. just like every witness we talked to talk about the fact that this attack was absolutely deliberate. in the early hours of this morning, things became even more clear. that actually the attack was 100% deliberate. by looking at various platforms, islamic state has already kind of claimed responsibility for what happened that night in germany. we we re happened that night in germany. we were speaking to a security analyst based in berlin this morning and they said that germany had been on
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high alert like many european countries at the time. and that included people in a confined space like a christmas market. remember, what happened in germany, in berlin, was an isolated event. 2016 was one of the most fateful years when it comes to terrorism. in the recent history of europe. what happened in germany and only over the summer in the south of france when a similar incident kind of took place, u nfortu nately, over incident kind of took place, unfortunately, over 80 people lost their lives. and of course, the german market, very much like bastille day in france, has a lot of significance. so obviously they thought very carefully about choosing the right time and the right place or this type of atrocity. we have to say that so much is unknown this morning and not confirmed. there is one news agency, the dpa newsagency, that says he is
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either in afghanistan or pakistan asylu m either in afghanistan or pakistan asylum seeker. what is your knowledge on that? we do not know the identity of the driver. but what we know is that obviously terrorism predates the syrian civil war. but there is no doubt that the syrian civil war has more than anything contributed to the globalisation of terrorism. even for a minute i cannot disconnect what is happening right now in syria, what is happening right now in the middle east, and what is happening right now in europe in terms of kind of security and terrorism. and what happened in berlin last night, the world is reacting. will there be increased security in the uk it and europe over the christmas period? that is that may be the case over the last few years. just before coming here i read the news that france has decided to increased
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security. various officials have been talking about a possible attack. so we are definitely going to see increased security in the uk before and around christmas. ok. thank you very much for your time. i think we will talk to you later. thank you. the foreign office is talking about going to germany and say they advised staying away from the area where the incident happened and follow the advice of german authorities. they have announced increased security around the area. news coming in all the time this morning and we will bring you the latest when we get it. plenty other news to get you this morning, including the weather. we are often fairly quiet start with frost dan fogg as well. later it will turn much more windy —— frost and fog. we have some frost and some patchy fog. it is the same for northern ireland, clear skies means temperatures tumbled. for england
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and wales, there is more cloud around, he and their one or two brea ks around, he and their one or two breaks in east anglia with frost developing before the day really brea ks developing before the day really breaks and then as we drift to the west we have spots of rain for western wales and south—west england and it is dank on the south coast. it will brighten up as dry air moves in from the continent. we will see some sunshine for many parts of england, east wales and scotland. hanging on to the dank nurse in the west and then substantial rain comes from the west for northern and with that strengthening wind as well. the wind will be gale force, even severe for some, that is the dusts. if you are travelling later this afternoon through the evening, bear that in mind if you are in a light vehicle, high sided vehicle or a bike. through the night the rain will sing south, it will be quite windy. it will weaken. there will be dry
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conditions behind it but a band of showers pushing across northern ireland and scotland and they will likely fall as snow in scotland north of the central belt, possibly to low levels by the end of the night, which might affect high—level routes. tomorrow we start off with a similar —— similarvein. routes. tomorrow we start off with a similar —— similar vein. north of the central lowlands. we will have some hail and thunder mixed in. rain showers across northern ireland and sunshine here. sunshine for northern england and wales. meanwhile, the band of rain moving south, which was weakening, peps up once again. temperatures in the south but it will be cold further north. into thursday, the band of rain to the new continent. thursday is quieter. much more dry weather. some sunny spells and a peppering of showers across scotland and northern
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ireland. some of those in scotland will be wintry. as we head through thursday into friday the next potent area of low pressure comes. that will introduce heavy rain. it will push through quite quickly because it will be a windy day. the strongest wind with gales more likely in the north. that takes us in the run—up to christmas, more spells of wind and rain, so keep in touch with the weather if you are travelling. we will. thank you. we a lwa ys travelling. we will. thank you. we always stay in touch with carol. how much we worry about crime in our neighbourhoods may not bear much resemblance to the amount of criminal activity that's actually taking place. that's according to police, who say younger people — who are statistically more likely to be victims of crime — often don't take the risks seriously, whereas older people aren't targeted as much as they may think. as part of our policing britain series, breakfast‘s graham satchell has been to nottingham to find out why our perceptions of crime don't always reflect the reality. this is clifton in nottingham. it
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doesn't look or feel like a hotbed of crime and it isn't. 0f doesn't look or feel like a hotbed of crime and it isn't. of the 20 ward in nottingham clifton came 17th in terms of overall reported crime with just 70 incidents in terms of overall reported crime withjust 70 incidents reported in terms of overall reported crime with just 70 incidents reported to the police last year. and yet almost 40% of people here in clifton think crime is a big or very big trouble. the fear of crime is the second—highest here in the whole of nottingham. we have a link with the clifton police. pat is chair of the clifton police. pat is chair of the clifton residents association. their facebook page is a way to keep in touch about every incident. 0ne reason why the perception of crime and reality is out of sync. pat says there are others. we used to get regular updates from the police of the crime figures for the area. with the crime figures for the area. with the police having to have cutbacks
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we no longer get them so that may skew people's perceptions. part of iti skew people's perceptions. part of it i think is the amount of media that people are sitting with. mike is the chief comes to durham and the uk police lead on crime. media reporting on crime is one reason he says. fear of it continues to rise. i think the other thing is we have become better at making sure that people know about crime. 0ne become better at making sure that people know about crime. one of the ways we can galvanise the public is to make sure they know that there is a risk and they can do something about it. we might even be partly to blame in the rising fear of crime. will he come and rescue the lorry which has broken down" a children's nursery in staple field, nottingham. thieves took a computer and empty the safe. why would somebody do that toa the safe. why would somebody do that to a nursery, and what were they
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expecting to find? absolutely devastating. i have had my house broken into in this area twice. in the last 10 years. it is definitely on the rise. it is getting worse? definitely. the truth is overall crime has been falling and it has fallen since 1995 every year. the police are investigating this glory but
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falls, police are out on the town. young drunk people statistically most likely to be victims of crime and surveys show the least likely to be afraid of crime. perception and reality once again at odds with each other. that report from graham is all part of policing britain, which we will be covering up until friday. yes. lots of people talk about getting into the christmas spirit, but steph's really taken it to heart this year. with a news story behind it. with sales of gin and rum booming in the last year, she's at one of the uk's oldest distilleries to find out how they're coping with demand. how on earth have you landed with thisjob this how on earth have you landed with this job this morning? how on earth have you landed with thisjob this morning? laughter i love that you clarified it. im here for a news reason. i am love that you clarified it. im here for a news reason. i am not here just to drink spirits. i am at one
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of the oldest distilleries in the uk. they make something like a quarter of a million bottles of spirits every single day. that is a lot. we are interested injune. this is one of the distillery bits which helps to make it. i will bring in john mann. she can explain how it works. tell us what is injune?m is essentially three building blocks —— gin. grain spirit, we use british wheat, we have botanicals and local water. one of the key botanicals we have to put in isjuniper berries. let's have a look. we get these from the toscana region in italy and it gives it the beautiful perfume notes which you recognise gin is all about. we also have coriander seeds which we get from morocco which give you the citrus and spice notes and then we have a lemon peel which is
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just here. this is from, this is hand peeled. this is from spain. people sit around in spain peeling lemons. how do you make, then, you have your ingredients? we place the botanical, water and spirits, and today we are making greenall‘s gin, we place it all in the pot, we close the manhole and we hit it up with stea m. the manhole and we hit it up with steam. when we get to 80 degrees the alcohol will boil away from the water. it takes all other flavours from the botanicals. faber travels up from the botanicals. faber travels up the column, over the line and hits the condenser and back into the receiving tanks. excellent and quality control. we are here talking about gin because sales are up 10% in the last year. it is a spirit at
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the moment that is booming. we have simon, the head of buying beer, alcohol and wine for the co—operative group. have you seen a change in the way people purchase alcohol? absolutely. people are looking for more distinctive products. that is great for us. and gin is leading the way in terms of seeing the trend to products with providence or an artisan background, which is great for an industry. so, ruc in that people are buying premium at cheap and it is the middle ground where less is going on? are we alljust buying more alcohol? our home brand is doing really well. and then at the weekend people are trading up. if they are buying a gift they want something more premium with a premium feel,
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which could be packaging or a flavour they are looking for. as i say, that is more exciting and we can put more interesting products on the shelves. why do you think gin is doing well? it is an industry that is uk—based, which is exciting, and it is engaging for customers. people understand the different chemicals you put in give a different flavour andi you put in give a different flavour and i think when people went into the bar and ordered a gin and tonic has ended. people specify the preferred gin and a different route they put in and they will personalise the drink to their taste. thank you for your time. we will show you more of this process. we will get it going shortly. the smell in here is gorgeous and you can really smell the botanicals. you will be back with me in a bit to get more of this. it is fascinating. i was taking a lot of notes.
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genuinely. she is going to buy one of those massive pipes for her back garden. i don't thinki have of those massive pipes for her back garden. i don't think i have a of those massive pipes for her back garden. i don't thinki have a pot that big. you need some juniper berries. still to come on breakfast. 0re! he'sjoining us back on the breakfast sofa, strictly champion 0re 0duba will be here to tell us how he's coping with the dance withdrawal symptoms. i think the truth is he is going to dance again, isn't he? of course he is, he can't stop! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm alex bushill. a £20,000 reward is being offered for information about the disappearance 30 years ago of a 16—year—old boy who is now believed to have been murdered. kevin hicks went out to buy some eggs for a school project in croydon in march 1986 and was never seen again. after a review earlier this year, the met now believe he is more
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than likely to have been murdered. the mayor of london is to spend £50 million building affordable housing for london's homeless people. it's designed to help them settle into permanent accommodation when they are ready to move out from a hostel or refuge. the money is part of a £3.15 billion pound settlement the mayor received from the government to build affordable homes. rough sleeping has doubled over the last eight years. in the last year it has increased again. it is important we find vulnerable rough sleepers, especially women, at this time of year, and i am pleased to confirm the funding we are going to give to help people move on from hostels and refuges. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, there's a good service on all lines. 0n the trains, southeastern services are disrupted via sittingbourne due to a signalling problem. and its day two of two of current strike action on southern services. reduced service across the network.
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0n the roads, and in barking, one lane blocked on the a13 westbound after goresbrook interchange due to an accident. in kennington, the contraflow on brixton road at south island place due to gas works. in catford, temporary traffic lights on the a205 atjutland road due to a burst water main. hampstead heath and spaniards road is closed from heath street to winnington road due to a burst water main. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. there is less mist and fog around this morning. we still have some cloud. hopefully something more like this later today. some clear spells developing and sunny spells as that cloud breaks up. the wind is reasonably light for today.
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it is south—easterly, quite gentle. there is the risk of maybe a shower from the south coast to the west and south of london. most places to the east of that staying dry and bright with sunshine. the maximum temperature today around six or seven celsius. we head into this evening in the same vein with clear spells at least at first, but through the night we see the cloud increase, coming from the west, thick enough to produce rain heading into wednesday morning. the wind will start to strengthen, south—westerly wind starts to strengthen as we head into tomorrow morning. the minimum temperature in some places higher than today's maximum. that heavy rain for a time spreads across through wednesday. it will clear away and it will leave a dry and bright day with sunshine on thursday, although there is cloud as we head into the christmas weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker.
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a lorry has ploughed into a packed christmas market in berlin. according to police, it was probably an act of terror. at least 12 people are dead and dozens more are injured. a man thought to have been driving the lorry has been arrested. the carnage happened just off a main shopping street as the vehicle mounted the pavement and crashed through wooden huts filled with christmas shoppers. we heard it knocking down stalls and there was no skidding wheels, clearly no attempt to try to slow down. police think the lorry was stolen from a building site in poland. we'll be live in berlin all morning with the latest. this is the scene there this morning as they are preparing to tow that lorry away. we will bring you live updates as they come to us. good morning.
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it's tuesday the 20th of december. also this morning: president putin describes the assassination of russia's ambassador to turkey as an act of provocation. a huge leap forward in the treatment of prostate cancer. doctors manage to eliminate tumours without such severe side—effects. little kicks, little punches, stuff like that. we'll hearfrom men who abuse their partners, as breakfast is given exclusive access to a new way of preventing domestic violence. tackling it before it even happens. good morning from one of the oldest gin distilleries in the uk. spirit sales have gone up by more than 10% over the last year. sales are up and we will tell you why. and sport news. england is trying to salvage the final tests against india. they need
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to continue in the daily to survive. in scotland and northern ireland, a fine start. later, wet and windy conditions moving in. for england and wales, cloudy and murky. rain in the west. for you it will brighten up the west. for you it will brighten up with some sunshine. i will have more details on all of that in 15 minutes. thank you, carol. good morning. first, our main story. 12 people have died and around 50 have been injured after a lorry crashed into a christmas market in berlin. police say it's a suspected terror attack. it happened at around 8:15 yesterday evening when the christmas market was packed with people. eyewitnesses say the vehicle ploughed into the busy market square without slowing down. the market is close to the popular tourist site of the kaiser wilhelm memorial church, berlin zoo, and one of the main shopping streets in west berlin. german police say they're investigating reports that the vehicle was stolen
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from a building site in poland, as greg dawson reports. under the lights of one of berlin's biggest christmas markets, investigators examine the lorry that has caused so much death and destruction. it was loaded with steel beams when it turned off the road and smashed into the crowds. this footage shows the immediate aftermath. just moments earlier, people had been enjoying food and drink here. rhys meredith, from cardiff, was visiting the market with his girlfriend. we heard it knocking down the stalls at an amazing rate of knots. and, you know, there was no skidding wheels, or there was clearly no attempt to try and slow down, despite him veering out of the market. the driver of the lorry then fled on foot,
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but was captured shortly afterwards. reports claim he is an asylum seeker from either afghanistan or pakistan who had arrived in germany in february. the vehicle had come from poland, and police say a polish citizen was found dead in the passenger seat. the lorry‘s owner says his driver could not have been responsible. translation: the person who was driving and jumped out of the truck was not my driver. i can vouch for my driver. they did something to him, and hijacked his truck. 48 people were injured. some are in a critical condition. the scenes are a reminder of the lorry attack on bastille day crowds in the french city of nice injuly when 86 people were killed. 2016 proved to be one of the most
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fateful years especially when it comes to terrorism in europe. what happened in germany only over the summer happened in germany only over the summer in the south of france as well, like bastille day and this christmas markets, they have a lot of significance. they thought carefully about choosing the right time and place for this kind of atrocity. authorities say there is no indication of any further threats in berlin. but the german government has said the evidence so far points to this being a deliberate attack. greg dawson, bbc news. leaders from around the world have been reacting to events in berlin on social media. angela merkel‘s spokesman steffen seibert tweeted this. "we are in mourning for the dead and hope that the many injured can get help." the uk's foreign secretary boris johnson went on twitter to say "my thoughts and condolences are with the people of germany following tonight's terrible tragedy in berlin." the french president francois hollande tweeted this.
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"i express my solidarity and compassion to chancellor merkel, to the german people and to the families of the victims of berlin." and the us president—elect donald trump also took to twitter to list a number of incidents which took place in europe and beyond saying the "civilized world must change thinking!" let's go live to berlin now where we can speak to our correspondent, jenny hill. she is in the city. she has been updating various sources from social media in the last few hours as well. what is the latest? we understand we are to expect to see the lorry taken away are to expect to see the lorry taken r are to expect to see the lorry taken away very shortly. yeah. in fact, you can see the scene behind me is moving pretty fast as they are preparing to tow that lorry away. what is eerie is that the lights on the christmas trees are still twinkling in what remains of the
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christmas markets. when you see the lorry close—up you get the sense of the horror that those people must have felt as it careered towards them as they were eating and drinking. there is a sense of shock and horror here this morning. that is compounded by the fact police are describing it now as a suspected terrorist attack. not only do they feel it was deliberately driven towards the crowd, they now feel it was a terror inspired attack as well. that means this is taking on a political dimension as well. there are unconfirmed reports that the man police are holding as there means suspect was of pakistani or afghani heritage. already this is being seized upon by the anti immigrant party who blame angela merkel for what has happened. this will reignite a political debate about
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the policy and what it has meant for the policy and what it has meant for the country. 48 people are in hospital, some seriously injured. 12 people are confirmed dead. it may be that the death toll rises through the morning. we have spoken to a number of security analysts this morning. germany, like many other european countries, are ready on a high state of alert, as we know, and this was expected to happen. there we re this was expected to happen. there were specific warnings about large gatherings of people around christmas time. yeah. germany has been really very nervous as a country ever since the summer when the first two, what was thought to have been the first two, islamic state terror attacks happened on german soil. they injured a few people but no one was killed. since then there has been a feeble atmosphere in the country. there was concern about the safety of the thousands of christmas market that ta ke thousands of christmas market that take place in this country at this time of year. it is very difficult
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to entirely secure a christmas market like this. how do you make sure it is entirely secure? do you check people as they come in? most markets increased security patrols. and that was it. i think for a long time people have expected something like this to happen. that is of course no comfort to anyone who has lost loved ones here or who were perhaps injured themselves. and the authorities and the government who are still trying to persuade this country they can keep it safe. thank you for the latest on that, jenny hill, the correspondent in berlin. as she was saying, they are reporting that the driver was probably an afghani or a pakistani refugee. that is not confirmed by the police. but there is a strong rumour in germany at the moment. that is bringing a lot of pressure on chancellor merkel and her foreign policy. more on that and anything else we get from berlin throughout the morning. we will speak to a
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terrorism expert about that shortly. to other news now. the un secretary general, ban ki—moon, has described the killing of the russian ambassador to turkey as a "senseless act of terror." ambassador andrei karlov was shot dead yesterday by a turkish policeman, apparently in protest at russia's involvement in syria's civil war. turkey's president said the attack was aimed at hurting ties with russia. the scottish first minister, nicola sturgeon, will today set out plans for how scotland could stay in the european single market after brexit. she says leaving the single market would be potentially devastating to scotland's economy, and is expected to propose more powers are devolved to the holyrood parliament to stop it happening. earlier this month, the chancellor, philip hammond said a separate brexit deal for scotland was "not realistic." lorna gordon is in holyrood this morning. what will happen later this morning? good morning. there has been a lot of political positioning over the last six months since the uk as over the last six months since the ukasa over the last six months since the uk as a whole voted to leave the eu. but a majority of people in scotland voted to remain. today we expect
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quite a lot of detail, actually, about what nicola sturgeon wants to do to protect scotland's interests going forward. she is calling for a soft brexit, not a hardline. that means maintaining the single market. ideally she would like that to happen with the uk as a whole, maintaining that access. if that is not possible, she wants scotland is to have that access. see things in orderfor that to to have that access. see things in order for that to happen significant powers need to be devolved to the scottish parliament in edinburgh for things like immigration, employment rights, and if none of that is possible, the option of a second independence referendum. theresa may, the prime minister, said she will look seriously at these proposals and there is a meeting next month to discuss them. lorna gordon, thank you. surgeons have described a new treatment for early stage prostate cancer as "truly transformative." the approach, which uses lasers and a drug made from deep sea bacteria, can eliminate tumours without causing severe side effects that commonly occur with surgery.
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more than four 100 men took part in the trial. that is a great story. figures from more than 100 hospital trusts in england show that overseas patients not entitled to free healthcare left the nhs with an unpaid bill of £30 million last year. the debt appears to have increased sharply over the previous 12 months. the government has reminded hospitals of their legal duty to recover the money, and has encouraged them to ask to see passports before giving treatment. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. we will have weather and sport soon. news. we will have weather and sport soon. but returning to the main story. more details are emerging this morning about the lorry that drove into crowds in one of berlin's christmas markets last night. we do know that 12 people died in the incident, which police are now calling a suspected terror attack. almost 50 people are injured in hospital, some of them seriously. in a moment, we'll be speaking
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to former counter terrorism officer chris phillips from our london studio. first, we'rejoined by rhys meredith, who was at the market with his girlfriend at the moment of the crash. thank you very much for your time this morning, rhys. you were there and quite close to the lorry when it burst into the christmas market. describe exactly what happened to us if you can. yeah. we just not long got to the market, just 10—15 minutes. we had a look around the stalls, soaking up everything in the area that it had to offer. we looked at food and we were originally going to walk around the other stalls. but we decided to sit down and eat instead which may be is incredibly lucky. the area we visited is the area that was hit before we decided
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to sit down. we heard it crashing through the stalls and going around the corner. less than ten feet from where we were sat. there is just com plete where we were sat. there is just complete and utter devastation, really. when you first heard and saw this, clearly there were stalls they are. this was a pedestrian area. everyone should have known straightaway that something was happening that shouldn't have been happening. we genuinely thought it was a small explosion. we were quite shocked. it all happened so fast. we we re shocked. it all happened so fast. we were quite shocked to see a lorry had come all the way through and there was clearly no attempt by the lorry to slow down or stop. there was no sound of breaks going off or tyres or anything like that. we are
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seeing pictures and we are talking to you as the lorry is being taken away. that was whatjenny hill was telling us. for more investigation, no doubt. we have been hearing reports this morning of some people running away after seeing and hearing this yesterday. but also some people helping those individuals who had broken limbs as it was going through the crowd. yes, we stayed around to help as much as we could. my girlfriend was looking after a mail with a pretty severe head injury and i tried helping other people, get stalls of the top of people, some still alive, some sadly not need it, but yes, there was more, sadly, police were on the scene, they were brilliant,
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there was concern from emergency services about the gas canisters that were underneath. the german police services were brilliant, they we re police services were brilliant, they were on the scene within minutes doing everything they needed to do. listening to you this morning, it is clear you are still processing what you have seen and heard. what is the mood amongst people you have spoken to this morning? what is the mood generally? we are still in a state of shock and we can't believe we have been caught up in it. you don't realise the impact when you are in the middle of it rather than watching it on television. there is a genuine state of shock around the city. don't really know what to expect the atmosphere to be like
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today, to be honest. and are you stating in berlin, were you due to come back before christmas, water your plans now? we are due to fly back tomorrow morning. we are going to stick with that. ok, well, we really it pre— share due talking to us really it pre— share due talking to us this morning, and as rhys has spoken, he is in a state of shock. —— really appreciate you talking to us —— really appreciate you talking to us this morning. 12 people, we know, have died and up to 50 have been injured after that, well, now suspected terror attack yesterday. we will speak with chris phillips, former counterterrorism officer who specialises in helping protect crowded places. i imagine somewhere like this, a christmas market, is difficult to protect. what measures would have been in place? difficult to protect. what measures would have been in place7m difficult to protect. what measures would have been in place? it is very difficult to protect. we need to
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understand that terrorists revisit sites and types and modes of attack. there are things we can learn from history which we can put in place and we have done much of that across the uk with what we call hostile vehicle mitigation and what we saw in early and was similar to what we saw in nice and we have known for some time that germany was at a high state of alert, as is france and belgium. it is a big problem protecting crowded places but there are things to do. you talk about hostile vehicle mitigation, what do you mean? we have many companies in the uk that build absolutely brilliant barriers, blockers, which are across the country and city, and if you look at many other areas of crowded places, they have specific protection with them and it is not
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a lwa ys protection with them and it is not always barriers or bollards, sometimes it is bus stops and all sorts of things we have built into the environment to protect us. tell us the environment to protect us. tell us about the impact now. we know in germany they are announcing increased security in places in germany. would you expect that to be the same in other cities as well?|j the same in other cities as well?” think the whole of europe is on a very high alert. we need to bear in mind as well that we started doing this protective crowded places work 10- 12 this protective crowded places work 10— 12 years ago. many of our cities, airports and crowded places are already protected. it is not something you can do pretty quickly. we even have something called the national barrier asset that we put into specific locations if we think there is a threat. it is not building protection against vehicles, it is quite difficult and it isa vehicles, it is quite difficult and it is a long—term process. vehicles, it is quite difficult and it is a long-term process. and if what has happened there, it is still unclear how it happened, and how it
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can to stop, because that is important to tackle it? yes, and what we try to do, and what physics tells us is if we can slow down the vehicle there is less chance of it penetrating into a crowded place. everything that you can do to slow down a vehicle will save lives. we also need to bear in mind this could have been so much worse. thank goodness the vehicle didn't have explosives in it. if it had, we would have seen a much higher death toll. thank you forjoining us. we are late for the weather, but hopefully you understand why, we are trying to cover that laurie attack we re trying to cover that laurie attack were 12 people were killed and dozens injured. —— laurie attack. it isa dozens injured. —— laurie attack. it is a quiet start to the day with variable cloud across england and wales. there is frost and patchy
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fog. it will turn windy later on. a frosty start. the fog will lift as the wind picks up. sunshine first thing for scotland. the same for northern ireland. forced it with patchy fog. for england and wales it isa patchy fog. for england and wales it is a cloudy start, it is a dank start, one or two breaks for east anglia and the south—east at this stage of the morning, they are the exception rather than the rule. showers for the south coast. west wales and england we have a weather front producing light and patchy rain through much of the day. for the rest of england it will be bright with sunshine through much of the day in eastern scotland as well. you can already see the weather front introducing rain. it won't just be rain, it will also introduce strengthening wind. the areas where we will likely see the highest ats is north—west scotland and the outer hebrides, which could have gusts up
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to 70 mph, the north—west 60 mph, and you can see it is gusty along the irish sea. through the evening and overnight the rain and windy conditions pushed further south. it will weaken all the time. behind it there will be some squally showers for northern ireland in scotland and by the end of the night we might see snow even possibly at low levels. possibly effecting the higher level roads in western scotland too. tomorrow we are off to that start again with lots of showers packing in on again with lots of showers packing inona again with lots of showers packing in on a strong wind mother squally showers will contain thunder, hail, rain and snow, possibly at low levels, above the central lowlands and for the southern uplands and northern ireland any snow will likely be in the hills. and a weak front will pep up tomorrow with rain for southern and south—eastern england. behind it there is sunshine coming through. and then on thursday the weather front clears to the nick onto it and a weak system will bring
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rain to northern ireland, northern england and scotland. some of it will be wintry. but it is a mostly dry day with some sunshine on offer. as we head through thursday into friday the next potent area of low pressure comes, introducing rain pushing through swiftly. we are also looking at the risk of gales for the north of the country, which leads us into a wet and windy start to christmas. thank you very much, we will see little bit later. as christmas approaches, police are preparing for a sharp rise in domestic violence. it's the time of year when incidents of abuse traditionally spike. as part of our series on policing britain fiona trott has been given access to a project in sunderland where they're working specifically with men who are at risk of becoming abusers. welcome, everybody. we'll make a start. the new way of tackling domestic abuse. 0k, somebody mentioned money. who mentioned money? these men are learning how their absuive behaviour
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is affecting their partner. is that a reason to stay or to go? she would be better off if she left. the 26—week course involves the charity barnardo's. it can get up to 20 referrals a month, and that's just in sunderland. little kicks, little punches, stuff like that, then it was like vice—versa, she was starting to hit me. this man was referred by his gp. so how has the course helped you? take time to think about stuff. the course learns you how to take time—out. and now i'm aware. so even if i am texting, and i can tell the text is getting out of hand, i might take time—out and chill out a little. this project means we can get to men and help them change their behaviour before they get involved
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with the criminaljustice system. we want to stop things escalating to that point, because we know when the police get called it is usually quite serious injuries and incidents. but there's another element to this early intervention program. the local housing association is also involved. hello, how are you? you all right? they check that perpetrators are attending the course and they check up on the victims themselves. they might have something like a broken window, broken bathroom door locks, for example, things like that. it could be that we're looking at an antisocial behaviour complaint or a noise nuisance, or is it actually domestic abuse? he was kicking me door in in the middle of the night, me windows were going out. this woman was so afraid of her ex—partner she carried a knife. her words are spoken by someone else. it finally came to the day where he assaulted us and put us in hospital. he got 16 months injail.
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i was so pleased. i know it sounds crazy. you know, i was lying in a hospital bed covered in blood. i was so happy he had done it because, to me, i was free. in every community, there's a woman like her. here in sunderland, charities hope that by working with the local housing association, abusive relationships can stop before women are put in more serious danger. and we will speak to the police and crime commissionerfor and we will speak to the police and crime commissioner for the area about what has been done to reduce domestic violence. 0ur series on policing britain continues all week. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm alex bushill. a £20,000 reward is being offered for information
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about the disappearance 30 years ago of a 16—year—old boy who is now believed to have been murdered. kevin hicks went out to buy some eggs for a school project in croydon in march 1986 and was never seen again. after a review earlier this year, the met now believe he is more than likely to have been murdered. they are appealing for an unnamed woman who called a local newspaper ten years after kevin disappeared to come forward. the mayor of london is to spend £50 million building affordable housing for london's homeless people. it's designed to help them settle into permanent accommodation when they are ready to move out from a hostel or refuge. the money is part of a £3.15 billion pound settlement the mayor received from the government to build affordable homes. rough sleeping has doubled over the last eight years. in the last year it has increased again. it is important we find vulnerable rough sleepers, especially women, at this time of year, and i am pleased to confirm the funding we are going to give to help people move on from hostels and refuges. let's have a look at the travel situation now.
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0n the tube, there's a good service on all lines. 0n the trains, southeastern services are disrupted via sittingbourne due to a signalling problem. and its day two of two of current strike action on southern services. around half of trains are expected to run today across the network. 0n the roads, and the m23 northbound. queueing traffic due to accident before the m25 atjunction 7. in rainham, queueing towards barking following earlier accident at renwick road. in hyde park corner, one lane blocked by a breakdown on park lane southbound at hyde park corner. in dartford, delays on darenth road near 0very liberty due to an accident. and finally hampstead heath, spaniards road closed from heath street to winnington road due to burst water main. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. there's less mist and fog around this morning. yes, we still have some cloud,
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but hopefully something more like this later today. some clearer spells developing and sunny spells as that cloud breaks up. now the wind is reasonably light for today. it is a south—easterly, quite gentle. there is the risk of maybe a shower heading up from the south coast towards the west and south of london. most places to the east of that staying dry and bright with sunshine. the maximum temperature today around six or seven celsius. we head into this evening in the same vein with clear spells at least at first this evening, but through the night we see the cloud increase, coming from the west, thick enough to produce rain, especially heading into wednesday morning. the wind will start to strengthen, that south—westerly wind starts to strengthen as we head into tomorrow morning. the minimum temperature in some places higher than today's maximum between seven and eight celsius. that rain, heavy rain for a time spreads across through wednesday. it will clear away and it will leave a dry and bright day with sunshine on thursday, cloud though as we head
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into the christmas weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. police say a lorry driven into a packed christmas market in berlin was probably an act of terror. 12 people died and dozens more were injured. a man thought to have been driving the lorry has been arrested. it happened at 815. eyewitnesses say the vehicle ploughed into the busy market square without slowing down. the market is close to the popular tourist site of the kaiser wilhelm
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memorial church, berlin zoo, and one of the main shopping streets in west berlin. german police say they're investigating reports that the vehicle was stolen from a building site in poland, as greg dawson reports. it veered into the market loaded steel beams. the area was packed with tourists and locals. the lorry driver was fleeing on foot and eventually seized. we did a crowded places work ten years ago. many cities and airports and crowded places are already protected. it is not something you can do quickly. we have even got something we call the national barrier asset we put in specific locations if we think there isa specific locations if we think there is a threat. it is not building protection against vehicles, it is a long—term process and is quite difficult. the former counterterrorism officer that i spoke tojust a counterterrorism officer that i spoke to just a little bit earlier. we have also been speaking to an
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eyewitness rhys who was there with his girlfriend a few yards away when it happened. we have been watching the pictures all morning from berlin from where the truck is. they are beginning to at least move the truck away as they are doing investigations. and we have spoken to the guardian correspondent and will talk to her again soon. to other news now. the un secretary general, ban ki—moon, has described the killing of the russian ambassador to turkey as a "senseless act of terror." ambassador andrei karlov was shot dead yesterday by a turkish policeman, apparently in protest at russia's involvement in aleppo. sarah rainsford is in moscow for us this morning. thank you very much for joining this morning. thank you very much forjoining us. what has the
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reaction been from moscow on this? first of all, deep shock that this has happened. people saw the images on tv and saw the pictures in their papers and they are horrified that this is something that was able to ta ke this is something that was able to take place. there are many questions about how that happened and why. the reaction, though, has been very strong. president putin and president erdogan spoke immediately after the attack by telephone which has been crucial. there was a lot of concern that this risked escalating relations between the two countries ona relations between the two countries on a diplomatic front and potentially militarily. already the relations were tense. but both presidents moved quickly to call what had happened an act of provocation and to point the finger outside of their own countries to some kind of what in the west that there is some sort of force trying to pull them apart. recently they
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have been trying to work together to some kind of resolution and settle m e nt some kind of resolution and settlement in the syrian conflict. in fact, the turkish foreign minister and defence minister are in moscow today to discuss what is happening in syria. president putin said it was a provocation aimed at destroying that process and he said he would act very forcibly. he said the fight against terror will be strengthened and that the bandits will feel that themselves. so a strong will feel that themselves. so a strong response will feel that themselves. so a strong response from russia and a message going out that russia and turkey will remain allied in what they are trying to achieve in syria. thank you, sarah rainsford, who is in moscow for us this morning. surgeons have described a new treatment for early stage prostate cancer as "truly transformative." the approach, which uses lasers and a drug made from deep sea bacteria, can eliminate tumours without causing severe side effects that commonly occur with surgery. more than four 100 men took part in the trial. more than half who took part went on
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to co m plete more than half who took part went on to complete remission! incredible. deep sea bacteria. incredible. the scottish first minister, nicola sturgeon, will today set out plans for how scotland could stay in the european single market after brexit. she says leaving the single market would be potentially devastating to scotland's economy, and is expected to propose more powers are devolved to the holyrood parliament to stop it happening. earlier this month, the chancellor, philip hammond said a separate brexit deal for scotland was "not realistic." figures from more than 100 hospital trusts in england show that overseas patients not entitled to free healthcare left the nhs with an unpaid bill of £30 million last year. the debt appears to have increased sharply over the previous 12 months. the government has reminded hospitals of their legal duty to recover the money, and has encouraged them to ask to see passports before giving treatment. that is the end of the news but i
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just cannot stop thinking about that deep sea bacteria. how would you ever think that would work? 0bviously they are clever. it is trial and error. and this has been something so devastating, cancer. sally, the news. i would like to explain it but i am not going to try. england have been surviving so far in india. i am not sure alastair cook is feeling that happy. not much has gone right. not much has gone right. he does not look like a happy captain. good morning. england's cricketers are trying to save the fifth and final test against india in chennai. they need to bat out the day to avoid defeat, and they've made it to lunch without losing a wicket. alastair cook and keaton jennings making good progress. they put on a partnership of over 100. alastair cook went. 0! tim
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jennings made a half—century before losing his wicket. —— jennings made a half—century before losing his wicket. -- qi jennings made a half—century before losing his wicket. -- 0! tim jennings. we expect to hear more about alastair cook's plans on whether he will remain captain in the new year. liverpool are up to second in the premier league after securing the bragging rights in last night's merseyside derby. but it wasn't until injury—time at goodison park that sadio mane was able to break the deadlock. the 1—0 win moves liverpool above manchester city, but they're six points behind leaders, chelsea. i think we deserved to win. there were some close situations. this was one of them. we were still awake and wanted to win. with the changes we made i think we gave the side some kind of stability and some experienced striker with daniel. so it was good. of course, a bit lucky. we are really disappointed. we conceded a goal in extra time. eight minutes, that is difficult. it was already difficult to keep one point until 90—95 minutes. the eighth minute was hard for us.
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yeah, really disappointing for everton last night. football's world governing body has fined all four home nations for displaying poppies during their world cup qualifiers last month. england and scotland players wore poppies on their armbands, on armistice day. wales and northern ireland's games featured displays on the pitch or in the stands. england got the biggest fine of £35,000, the fa say they'll appeal. the package at the centre of a uk anti—doping investigation in cycling contained an over—the—counter decongestant, team sky boss sir dave brailsford has told a committee of mps. fluimucil is legal in sport and administered on a regular basis. the package was delivered to the team bus on the final day of the 2011criterium du dauphine, which was won by sir bradley wiggins. at the pdc world darts championship,
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adrian lewis safely booked his place in the second round. it's been four years since the man known as jackpot last won the title at alexandra palace but he eased past sweden's magnus caris without dropping a set. now this is going to make you feel really properly christmassy. britain's scott brash finished joint third, as germany's daniel deusser won the london 0lympia grand prix, and the international horse show came to an end last night in its customary theatrical fashion. the olympic crowd were treated to the usual showjumping competition but there were also dogs riding horses from spain, a bit of slapstick humour, and even father christmas made an appearance before the busy period begins for him at the end of the week. now, you were there! it was amazing. sa nta now, you were there! it was amazing. santa is going very fast because he
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has a lot of houses to visit. a last—minute dash to the shops. has a lot of houses to visit. a last—minute dash to the shopsm sounds like you are a regular to that event. thank you. a lorry ploughed in to a crowded german market in berlin yesterday evening, killing 12 people and injuring dozens more, in what officials suspect was a deliberate attack. tourists have been describing the carnage. the vehicle, a large articulated lorry, crashed into the market which is situated in one of the city's busiest shopping districts. it was the busiest time of the night. 12 killed and 48 injured. kate connolly is the guardian's berlin correspondent, and joins us now. good morning. thank you forjoining us. good morning. thank you forjoining us. tell us, what did you see and where were you last night when this happened? good morning. iwas where were you last night when this happened? good morning. i was there later on after the incident. it was a scene of carnage. this morning it is not much better. lots of bottles
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strewn around and christmas stalls collapsed where a juggernaut had ploughed through the market and shouted their wooden frames and there were splinters everywhere. —— shattered. a christmas tree, a huge christmas tree, flattened and lying in the path of the christmas market. and people gathered there this morning, police are urging them not to ta ke morning, police are urging them not to take pictures of the scene out of respect. but at the same time they have launched a website where they are asking people to upload film and footage and anything people have that it took last night that may help them put together the events that led up to and happened during the attack last night. this was a busy time at the market, wasn't it? there must have been some security in place, but not much? there were
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some plainclothed security around. but this is a typical market. a very open market. it is something where you go off the main shopping street into this market around this church. there is no checking of people's baggage when you go in. some of the markets are sealed off and you paid an entrance fee to get in and that is supposed to increased security. this is typical of most of the 2500 christmas market is happening this morning. police said it would be impossible to control everything. how could they have possibly been able to monitor this juggernaut that made its way there? we understand it came from italy, came up through berlin, and the suspicion at this stage is that the polish driver of the vehicle was hijacked and he was very possibly in the cabin at the time helping the alleged attacker to
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steer it into the market. and the juggernaut is still there this morning. it is still in front of the church, the church where we are expecting a vigil to take place later on today. we have just been watching over the last half an hour, kate, and they are beginning to move the lorry. what can you tell us? there are various reports that the driver was a pakistani or afghani asylu m driver was a pakistani or afghani asylum seeker. the main news outlets here are quoting that and are quoting security sources saying that some believe he entered through bavaria, a typical entry point, earlier this year, and took the vulca n earlier this year, and took the vulcan route into germany. —— balkan. they say he was apparently living under various identities and was known for small things like
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pickpocketing, we understand. but this is pure speculation at this stage. we are expecting those reports to be firmed up through the day. kate, thank you. interesting details. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: at least 12 people have died and dozens more have been injured after a lorry drove into a busy christmas market in berlin. police now say they suspect terrorism. the german authorities are questioning a man thought to be the driver. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. yesterday you were talking about a feisty jetstrea m. yesterday you were talking about a feisty jetstream. what have yesterday you were talking about a feistyjetstream. what have you got today? through the week it will be quite feisty at times. not all the time. we will have quiet interludes. this morning we have a relatively
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quiet start. there is quite a lot of cloud for england and will. for scotla nd cloud for england and will. for scotland and northern ireland it is cold, frosty with patchy fog —— england and wales. it will brighten up england and wales. it will brighten up nicely. this weak weather front will be with us producing dank conditions and another one coming in with heavy rain and strengthening wind through the course of the afternoon. the strongest winds will be in north—west scotland and the 0uter be in north—west scotland and the outer hebrides. we are looking here at gusts possibly 60 mph in the north—west, 70 in the outer hebrides, and generally it will be gusty through the irish sea and areas adjacent to it. move away from that and we are into quiet conditions. the wind will pick up and we hang on to this cloud and dank conditions but for other areas we see sunshine through the afternoon. these are the wind speeds
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you can expect across the north—west. if you are travelling in a high sided vehicle, light vehicle, maybe a bike, to bear it in mind. through the evening and overnight, the weather front will weaken. it will be windy but not as windy as it will be windy but not as windy as it will be windy but not as windy as it will be later in scotland and northern ireland and then we have squally showers following in to scotla nd squally showers following in to scotland and northern ireland. in scotla nd scotland and northern ireland. in scotland by the end of the night some could be bringing some snow, possibly even to low levels, which might affect higher level roads across western scotland. we start tomorrow with all the squally showers and once again we have an extra of hail, heavy rain, thunder and lightning. in the southern uplands and northern ireland any snow is likely to be in the hills. meanwhile the rain in the south will p9p up meanwhile the rain in the south will pep up tomorrow and so we have a period of heavy rainfall southern and south—eastern counties. in between there will be some sunshine. in between the showers there will be
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some sunshine. then as we move wednesday into thursday we go into a quieter period. there goes the rain. things settle down. we see sunshine coming through. 0ne things settle down. we see sunshine coming through. one or two showers into northern ireland and parts of scotland. most of us will miss them. then as we had on from thursday into friday it livens up once again, as dan said, with a strong jetstream and we have a potent area of low pressure developing on it. it will introduce heavy rain. that rain will push through quickly and we are looking at gales again for the northern half of the country. we are not finished yet. towards christmas, there are further spells of rain and strong winds. the strongest winds a lwa ys strong winds. the strongest winds always in the north. we have been warned. thank you. see you later. how much we worry about crime in our neighbourhoods may not bear much resemblance to the amount of criminal activity that's actually taking place. that's according to police, who say younger people — who are statistically more likely to be victims of crime — often don't take the risks
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seriously, whereas older people aren't targeted as much as they may think. as part of our policing britain series, breakfast‘s graham satchell has been to nottingham to find out why our perceptions of crime don't always reflect the reality. this is clifton in nottingham. it doesn't look or feel like a hotbed of crime, and it isn't. of the 20 wards in nottingham, clifton came 17th in terms of overall actual reported crime, withjust 70 incidents reported to the police last year. and yet almost 40% of people here in clifton think crime is a big or very big trouble. the fear of crime is the second—highest here in the whole of nottingham. we've got a link with the clifton police. pat rice is chair of the clifton residents association.
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their facebook page is a way to keep in touch about every incident. one reason perhaps why the perception of crime and reality are out of sync. but pat says there are others. we used to get regular updates from the police of the crime figures for the area. but with the police having to have cutbacks, we no longer get them, so that may sort of skew people's perceptions. part of it i think isjust the amount of media that people are subsumed with. mike barton is the chief constable to durham and the uk police lead on crime. media reporting on crimejust one reason, he says. fear of it continues to rise. i think the other thing is we have become better at making sure that people know about crime. one of the ways we can galvanise the public is to make sure they know that there is a risk out there and they can do something about it.
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so we might even be partly to blame in the rising fear of crime. will he come and rescue the lorry which has broken down? a children's nursery in nottingham. thieves took a computer and emptied the safe. why would somebody do that to a nursery? i mean, what were they expecting to find? absolutely devastating. i have had my house broken into in this area twice in the last 10 years. it is definitely on the rise. it is getting worse? definitely. but the truth is overall crime has been falling and it has fallen since 1995 every year. the police are investigating this glory but richard macrae thinks lots of people have lost faith. they don't report it. because nothing happens. not fully investigating crime does add to a sense of unease. nonetheless, police say we over worry about some crimes and don't
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worry enough about where much chrome is now happening online. people still locked the doors but they virtually leave their computer open for anybody to attack. as night falls, police are out on the town. young drunk people statistically most likely to be victims of crime and surveys show the least likely to be afraid of crime. perception and reality once again at odds with each other. the series continues tomorrow and steph will be live with durham police, but today she has a slightly differentjob. today she is drinking gin. there is a proper news reason why. you had better explain. good morning. i haven't sampled anything
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yet, don't worry. and i say yet. let me explain. this is fascinating, this is one of the oldest distilleries in the uk, this is greenalls, they are making gin. this isa greenalls, they are making gin. this is a company that makes a quarter of a million bottles of spirits every single day. there are loads of products going out of this building. lots of different brands. some of them you will recognise as well. you will see them at supermarket and off—licence shelves. we are here to talk about gin. it is a big seller. they have lots of different brands. they have lots of different brands. the reason why is because sales have gone up 10% the reason why is because sales have gone up10% in the reason why is because sales have gone up 10% in the last year. mark is one of the bosses. explain a bit about what is going on in this factory. we are quite unique in that we can control the process. we work
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from their, we produce about 44 million litres ofjune per year. we are mainly into bottling and also rts and we even sell some gin to other owners. it is a fulljob. and you export a lot as well? yes, exports has expanded extremely quickly over the last 12 months with something like 60% up. how have you seen something like 60% up. how have you seen their business change? with ferdinand, you have to do more? we area ferdinand, you have to do more? we are a lot busier. —— with vita anand —— with ferdinand. we are really caching it out. we will let you get back to it. thank you. and another expert i would like you to meet. first of all, we have decided to do something magical with the bottles to try to show you exactly the sales
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gin is having at the moment, because it has reached, if you follow me, the £1 billion mark of sales for the first time, so we thought we'd recreate that with some bottles. have a look at these. and i will bring in another guest. we have kate, a drinks specialist, who has her own business, and you probably recognise her. she presents some shows for the bbc also. why is gin so shows for the bbc also. why is gin so popular? it has a great story, it is very innovative, people are making really interesting flavours. and i think it has captured peoples imagination. you have been in the drinks industry for a long time. how have you seen it change in the way people are buying alcohol?” have you seen it change in the way people are buying alcohol? i think gin is interesting because i opened my business 13 years ago and we stock about two or three gins, and now in10
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stock about two or three gins, and now in 10 stores we stalking almost 60. it is amazing. people will spend money on them. so, for things made on their doorstop, we are dealing with distilleries just up the road, they have husband and wife teams, they have husband and wife teams, they are small, high quality products, artisan producers and people love it. so it is less about price when it comes to alcohol?m is interesting with gin. i always find when people try something it is about removing the fear factor. if people have tried, and they know they will like it. they are more willing to spend more money. if you are not sure, if you are spending money on something you don't know what it will taste like, that is when it is difficult. i think it is all about getting people to try. we offer loads of samples. people can try things and be confident they will enjoy the product. sandals, i like the sound of that. thank you. i will leave you with a shot of the factory. it is fascinating. to
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think, a quarter of a million bottles co m e think, a quarter of a million bottles come off these lines every day, it is dagger in. it is, and also the artistry in your £1 billion as well. that is graphic of the year. who did that? thank you! yes, it was my lovely producer, simon. you can have a look at simon. give us you can have a look at simon. give usa you can have a look at simon. give us a wave. you can have a look at simon. give us a wave. oh, it isn't often we see him on the telly. keep your hands off that, simon. there is a song in there. it is nice to see him on the telly. all of the hard work which goes on behind—the—scenes. coming up later on the programme. we have the strictly champion 0re coming up. and the glitter ball. exciting. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm alex bushill. a £20,000 reward is being offered for information about the disappearance 30 years ago of a 16—year—old boy who is now
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believed to have been murdered. kevin hicks went out to buy some eggs for a school project in croydon in march 1986 and was never seen again. after a review earlier this year, the met now believe he is more than likely to have been murdered. the mayor of london is to spend £50 million building affordable housing for london's homeless people. it's designed to help them settle into permanent accommodation when they are ready to move out from a hostel or refuge. the money is part of a £3.15 billion pound settlement the mayor received from the government to build affordable homes. rough sleeping has doubled over the last eight years. in the last year it has increased again. it is important we find vulnerable rough sleepers, especially women, at this time of year, and i am pleased to confirm the funding we are going to give to help people move on from hostels and refuges. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, there's a good service on all lines. 0n the trains, on thameslink there is a faulty train on the northbound line at blackfriars which is causing delays. 0n the trains, signalling problem at sittingbourne,
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there is a bus replacement between sittingbourne and sheerness. and its day two of two of current strike action on southern services. around half of trains are expected to run today across the network. 0n the roads, and the m23 northbound, queueing traffic due to accident before the m25 atjunction 7, queueing from gatwick. in rainham, queueing towards rainham marhes to barking following earlier accident at renwick road. in hyde park corner, delays on park lane southbound at hyde park corner due to earlier breakdown. in dartford, delays on darenth road near 0very liberty due to an accident. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. there's less mist and fog around this morning. yes, we still have some cloud, but hopefully something more like this later today. some clearer spells developing and sunny spells as that cloud breaks up. now the wind is reasonably light for today. it is a south—easterly,
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quite gentle. there is the risk of maybe a shower heading up from the south coast towards the west and south of london. most places to the east of that staying dry and bright with sunshine. the maximum temperature today around six or seven celsius. we head into this evening in the same vein with clear spells at least at first this evening, but through the night we see the cloud increase, coming from the west, thick enough to produce rain, especially heading into wednesday morning. the wind will start to strengthen, that south—westerly wind starts to strengthen as we head into tomorrow morning. the minimum temperature in some places higher than today's maximum between seven and eight celsius. that rain, heavy rain for a time spreads across through wednesday. it will clear away and it will leave a dry and bright day with sunshine on thursday, cloud though as we head into the christmas weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. police say a lorry driven
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into a packed christmas market in berlin was probably an act of terror. 12 people died and dozens more were injured. a man thought to have been driving the lorry has been arrested. the carnage happened just off a main shopping street as the vehicle mounted the pavement and crashed through wooden huts filled with christmas shoppers. we heard it knocking down stalls at an amazing rate of knots. there was no skidding quails, there was no attempt to try and slow down. police think the lorry may have been stolen from a building site in poland. this is the scene as they prepare to tow it away. we'll be live in berlin with the latest. good morning, it's tuesday 20th december. also this morning.
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president putin describes the assassination of russia's ambassador to turkey as an act of provocation. a huge leap forward in the treatment of prostate cancer. doctors manage to eliminate tumours without severe side—effects. little kicks, punches. we'll hear about the realities of domestic violence, as breakfast is given exclusive access to a new programme aimed at tackling it before it even happens. good morning from one of the uk's old est good morning from one of the uk's oldest gin distilleries, they say sales are up 10% nationally. i have come to find out why and how they are coping with demand. in sport. england's cricketers bid to save the final test against india. they need to bat out the day, but they're losing wickets. joe root the latest to go. jonny bairstow the fourth to go.
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for scotland and northern ireland, it is cold, frosty and sunny. for england and is, it is cloudy, but it will brighten up away from the west. more details in 15 minutes. first, our main story. 12 people have died and around 50 have been injured after a lorry crashed into a christmas market in berlin. police say it's a suspected terror attack. a man, thought to be the driver, has been arrested. it happened at around 8:15pm local time last night, when the christmas market was packed with people. eyewitnesses say the vehicle ploughed into the busy market square without slowing down. the market is close to the popular tourist site of the kaiser wilhelm memorial church, berlin zoo and one of the city's main shopping streets. german police say they're investigating reports that the vehicle was stolen from a building site in poland. under the lights of one of berlin's biggest christmas markets,
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investigators examine the lorry that has caused so much death and destruction. it was loaded with steel beams when it turned off the road and smashed into the crowds. this footage shows the immediate aftermath. just moments earlier, people had been enjoying food and drink here. i was there later, a real scene of carnage. looking not much better this morning, lots of bottles strewn around. the christmas stalls where thejuggernaut had around. the christmas stalls where the juggernaut had ploughed around. the christmas stalls where thejuggernaut had ploughed over the market just completely shattered, wooden splinters everywhere. silver sheets that were used to cover up the injured lying around, broken bottles, a christmas tree that has
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just been flattened and is lying in the path of the christmas market. people gathered there this morning, police are urging them not to take pictures of the scene out of respect, they say. the driver of the lorry then fled on foot, but was captured shortly afterwards. reports claim he is an asylum seeker from either afghanistan or pakistan who had arrived in germany in february. the vehicle had come from poland, and police say a polish citizen was found dead in the passenger seat. the lorry‘s owner says his driver could not have been responsible. translation: the person who was driving and jumped out of the truck was not my driver. i can vouch for my driver. they did something to him, and hijacked his truck. 48 people were injured. some are in a critical condition. the scenes are a reminder of the lorry attack on bastille day crowds in the french city of nice injuly, when 86 people were killed. 2016 has proved to be one
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of the most fateful years, especially when it comes to terrorism in europe. authorities say there is no indication of any further threats in berlin. but the german government has said the evidence so far points to this being a deliberate attack. earlier in the programme, we spoke to our berlin correspondent, jenny hill, from the scene. the scene is starting to move fast as investigators prepare to toe the lorry away. what is eerie is that to my right the lights are still twinkling in the christmas trees and what remains of the christmas market. look at the scene. when you see the lorry close—up, you get a sense of the horror of those people must have felt as it came careering towards them as they stood eating and renting and shopping. there is a sense of horror this morning, that is compounded by the fact that the
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police are describing this as a suspected terror attack. not only do they believe it was to liberally driven into the crowds, they believe it is possible it was a terror inspired attack. that means it has taken on a political guy mentioned, because there are unconfirmed reports that the man the police are holding up the main suspect was of pakistani or afghan national t and may have entered germany in february as an asylum seeker. this has been seized upon by the anti—immigrant political party, who blame angela merkel for what has happened. this is going to reignite a political debate about her refugee policy and what that has meant for the country. in the meantime 48 people are in hospital still, some of them seriously injured, 12 people are confirmed dead, as it may be the death toll rises further through the morning. germany has been nervous as a country ever since the summer, when the first to islamic state
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inspired terror attack happened on german soil, the body was killed. since then there has been a pupil atmosphere. there has been a debate about the safety of the christmas markets that take place at this time of year. it is difficult to entirely secure a christmas market like this, how do you make sure that it is entirely secure? did you bent it off, check people? most marketsjust increased security patrols. many people have expected something like this to happen on german soil. that is no comfort to those who have lost loved ones here, who perhaps were injured themselves, and to the authorities, and the government, who are still trying to persuade this country they can keep it safe. we started to get reports that special forces have stormed a hangar at merlin's airport, which is being
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used as a refugee shelter. they stormed hangar after the attack. if we get any more, we will let you know, but we are just getting those reports. and injust a moment, we'll be getting more reaction to developments in berlin with a security expert, afshin shahi. ban ki—moon has described the killing of the russian ambassador to turkey as a senseless act of terror. he was shot dead yesterday by turkish policemen, apparently in protest at russia's involvement in syria's civil war. the turkish president said the attack was aimed at hurting ties with russia. surgeons have described a new treatment for early—stage prostate cancer is truly transformative. it uses lasers and a drug made from deep sea bacteria and can eliminate chimneys without causing the severe
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side effects that commonly occur with surgery will stop half of patients treated in a trial went into complete remission. amazing. it is my favourite story of the day, how would you begin to put them together? i have some detail, i might save it for later, it is amazing how the laser works with the tumour. i will explain as best i can! nicola sturgeon will set out plans for how scotland could stay in the european single market after brexit. she said leaving could be devastating to the scottish economy. what are we expected to hear, and how might this work? nicola sturgeon has said a lot over the last six months, she will do all she can to protect is what she sees as scotland's interests as this process moves forward. that means maintaining access to the single
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market and possibly significant further devolution of powers to the scottish parliament. we expect more flesh on the bones of that idea this morning. she would like the uk to remain with access to that huge trading block. if that is not possible, she would like scotland to maintain access. she thinks there needs to be further significant devolution of powers to holyrood in areas like immigration, employment and business regulation. if that is not possible, she wants the option ofa not possible, she wants the option of a second independence referendum. theresa may says she will look very carefully at the proposals. figures from more than 100 hospital trusts in england show that overseas patients not entitled to free health ca re patients not entitled to free health care in the nhs with a bill of £30 million last year. the debt appears to have increased sharply over the previous 12 months. the government
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has reminded hospitals of their duty to recover the money and has encouraged them to ask to see passports before giving treatment. carroll will have the weather in five minutes. let's return to the christmas markets in berlin. 12 people were killed with a long careering into a busy square. the police say it is a suspected terror attack. nearly 50 people have been injured, and authorities are questioning a mana and authorities are questioning a man a believe could be a driver. 0fficials man a believe could be a driver. officials have begun touring the lorry away from the scene. a british tourist was just feet away when the lorry went into the crowds, they told us about the moment immediately afterwards. we stayed around to help as much as we could. my government was looking
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after a man with a severe head injury, i tried after a man with a severe head injury, itried helping after a man with a severe head injury, i tried helping get stalls of the top of people, some were still alive, some did not make it. the police were brilliant. most of the stalls were cooking stalls. there was a concern about the gas canisters that were underneath. the german emergency services were efficient, brilliant, on the scene within minutes. doing everything they needed to do. joining us in the studio this morning is dr afshin shahi, a senior lecturer in middle east politics from the university of bradford. pa rt part of the lorry are being taken away, the investigation is under way. the authorities said they
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suspect this was a terror attack, what do you make of it? in the first few hours the authorities were a bit relu cta nt to few hours the authorities were a bit reluctant to treat the incident as a terror act. but after four or five hours it became almost impossible to associate it to simply an accident. every evident available suggested that the attack was deliberate. in a matter of minutes after the atrocity various cyber platforms which are affiliated to islamic state started to celebrate the atrocity in berlin and islamic state claimed responsible of the. it became very clear ina responsible of the. it became very clear in a couple of hours that this atrocity was connected to the islamic state. like many european cities, berlin has been on high alert, looking for something like this that might happen. there were
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attacks in munich injuly. this that might happen. there were attacks in munich in july. 2016 proved to be a very, very dramatic yearfor european proved to be a very, very dramatic year for european security. we should not treat what happened last night in berlin as an isolated incident. if you look at various capitals around europe, the security has been already very, very tight. just before coming to the studio i read that various important capitals around the confident are going to raise the security and probably the same thing will take place in the uk as well. yesterday as well saw the killing of the russian ambassador in turkey. is this all connected? what would you make of it? it is very difficult to associate with what happened in ankara to what happened last night in berlin, but we cannot deny is that what is happening right now in the middle east, what is happening
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in syria, without any doubt has some serious influence and serious impact on what's happening here. syrian civil war has proved to be a globalised conflict. what is happening in syria definitely has some implications for us. the gunman yesterday second after shooting down the russian ambassador said this is the russian ambassador said this is the revenge for aleppo. and obviously what happened last night, was claimed by the islamic state which is obviously still relatively strong both in syria and iraq. you mentioned about how this will impact on us mentioned about how this will impact on us here in the uk. i mean, our security forces are constantly looking at things like this and where they might happen and trying to prevent them, but will there be extra special measures in the coming days and weeks? over the last few weeks a number of security officials in the uk have been warning us about
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a possible attack and this has been the case over the last few years, but we have to be very careful because statistically britain and europe is safer today than the 19705. europe is safer today than the 1970s. despite the fact that you have to be very vigilant about security and terrorism today, but we should not allow it to overshadow every facet of our lives. thank you for your time here on brea kfast. it's 8.17am and you're watching breakfast from bbc news. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. today, it is a calm start, but it is going to become much windier particularly across the north—west later on. it is a cold start across northern ireland and scotland where we've got frost around. for england and wales, it is a cloudy start with some patchy rain in the west, but the cloud will break and we will see some sunshine. but as the next band of rain arrives across northern ireland and western and northern
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scotland, it will be accompanied by gusty winds. now through the afternoon that will certainly be the scenario, some heavy rain here, but the strongest winds will be in the north—west and the outer hebrides. as we push over to the eastt north—west and the outer hebrides. as we push over to the east t should stay largely dry. heavy rain moving in across northern ireland. still this morning's rain on and off across western parts of england and wales. some of that getting in across done fees and galloway, as we push further east the sun will come out and it will be a pleasant, but a chilly afternoon. lets look at the wind gusts. across the north—west, we could have gusts up to 60mph across the outer hebrides, up to 70mph. the whole band of wet and windy weather is sinking southwards. as we go through the rest of the afternoon, evening and overnight, but it will weaken as it does so. behind it, a drier slot. and then squally showers come in, squally means a lot of wind around some heavy showers and we will see by the
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end of the night some snow possibly affecting some of the higher routes across western scotland. tomorrow then, this band of rain in the south peps up. so we will have a band of heavier rain moving across southern and south—eastern counties and we continue with this squally showers across northern ireland and scotland. now, north of the central lowla nds scotland. now, north of the central lowlands again, we could see snow at lower levels, but across the southern uplands and northern ireland, any snow is more likely to be on the hills and in this mix, there will be some hail and some thunder. but in between, there will be sunshine as there will be following on behind the rain band heading down towards the south and the east. for thursday, that clears off on to the near continent. again, we're back into a quieter regime weather wise. there will be some sunshine to boot, but we will have a few showers pepping up across parts of northern ireland, scotland and at times northern england. some of those will still be quite wintry across the west. as we head on from thursday and into friday, our next potent area of low pressure comes
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our way. coming potent area of low pressure comes ourway. coming infrom potent area of low pressure comes our way. coming in from the atlantic. introducing heavy rain which will move through smartly because the wind will be strong, but the strongest winds will be where you see the tight squeeze on the isobars across the northern half of the country. if think that's it, you maybe wrong. in the run—up to christmas we are looking at further spells of wind and rain. the strongest winds always in the northern half of the uk, dan and lou. thank you very much, carol. as christmas approaches, police are preparing for a sharp rise in domestic violence — it's the time of year when incidents of abuse traditionally spike. as part of our in depth look at policing britain this week, fiona trott has been to sunderland where they're trying to stop the violence before it becomes a criminal matter. welcome, everybody. we'll make a start. the new way of tackling domestic abuse. 0k, somebody mentioned money. who mentioned money? these men are learning how their absuive behaviour is affecting their partner. the 26—week course involves
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the charity barnardo's. it can get up to 20 referrals a month, and that's just sunderland. we know when the police get called, it is usually quite serious injuries and incidents. but there is another element to this early intervention programme. the local housing association is also involved. hello there. how are you? they check the perpetrators are taineding the course and they check up taineding the course and they check up on the victims themselves. you might have something like a broken window, broken bathroom door locks for example, things like that. it could be that we're looking at an anti—social behaviour complaint. we could get a call about noise nuisance. is it noise nuisance or
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domestic abuse. he was kicking my door in, in the middle of the night. my windows were going out... this woman was so my windows were going out... this woman was so afraid of her ex—partner, she carried a knife. her words are spoken by somebody else. it finally come to the day where he assaulted us and put us in hospital. he got 16 months injail. i was so pleased and i know it sounds crazy, you know, i was lying in a hospital bed covered in blood, but i was so happy he had done it because to me, i was free. in every community, there is a woman like her. her in sunderland, charities hope that by working with the local housing association, abusive relationships can stop before women are put in more serious danger. joining us now is vera baird. she's police and crime commissioner for northumbria police. good morning. thank you very much for joining good morning. thank you very much forjoining us. very interesting hearing about this scheme. can you even measure if it is making a
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difference? it is still quite early days. it has been going for over a year and its primary purpose, of course, although the focus is on the perpetrator is to stop offending and to keep the victim safe and it is to do so without her having the need to report. women, because this is about men on women in this case, and for this purpose. women are demeaned. 0ppressed. quite unable to complain and it is about other agencies finding out what's going on and protecting her and intervening by tackling him. so it is quite an advanced way forward. the early and it still is, i have to say, after only a year, but the early indications are that incidents reduce by about 60% on average when people have been on the programmes that your correspondent have described. these are proper respect, they are programmes accredited by
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they are programmes accredited by the charity respect which have a history of doing well to help men get over this behaviour. the point is to stop offending and to keep victims safe and we think that it is very successful in that way. and this particular programme, as you say, it is talking about men, but i mean, because obviously it is not just men, is it? it is men who are responsible for 90% of violence and 85% of victims are women. if what you're mentioning is victims who are men, you're right. there is a good deal of that. the balance, but it is largely men on men. 0ften deal of that. the balance, but it is largely men on men. often in gay relationships. and we haven't yet got a programme about that, but i think what is important is that we are tackling the major type of domestic abuse and as we learn from tackling that we will be able to
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expand this, if it really does hold water and carries on working for what we hope will be the years still to come while we can do it then we will expand it and work it out so it will expand it and work it out so it will help male victims of men and female victims of women. but it doesn't require her to report. it gets him, either voluntarily and quickly on to a perpetrator programme or he will be disrupted by the police and persuaded ultimately thatis the police and persuaded ultimately that is in his best interests. it reverses the usual position which is that the guy thinks no one know abouts this, the authorities are not going to intervene and shows stra ig htforwa rdly going to intervene and shows straightforwardly that the authorities are on her side and they will intervene and they intend to make him change in the interests of her and children who are there too. so far, it is very promising indeed. vera baird, thank you.
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and our policing britain series will continue tomorrow, with a special report about historical sexual exploitation inquiries — how many victims have come forward, how much some investigations have cost and what it's like for the victims. we will be back in berlin. coming up in a moment on the bbc news channel is business live. prostate cancer. the approach uses lasers and a drug made from deep sea bacteria to eliminate tumours. they put the drug into your blood stream and then a laser goes somewhere that i don't want to talk about and when that red laser is switched on, it activates the drug to kill the cancer and leave a healthy prostate behind. it is incredible. mind blowing. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. we have a change in our weather,
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starting today across scotland and northern ireland, wet and windy weather, gales developing. a spell of heavy rain as well. further south, a bit of rain across western wales and in towards the south—west of england. it stays murky and damp. further east, dry air of the near continent breaking up the cloud nicely. full eastern wales and central and southern england, a fine afternoon. for northern ireland, a wet end to the day, the vein popping up across western scotland, although eastern scotla nd western scotland, although eastern scotland holds onto the brightness until the evening. for this evening,
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it will be wild across scotland, northern ireland, heavy rain spreading east, and it will be wintry over the higher ground as well. the band of rain and a fairly strong wind continues to move south and east this evening and overnight across england and why. blustery showers behind, some of them will be wintry over the higher ground of scotland. across the south, outbreaks of rain continuing. the run—up to christmas is looking very unsubtle, spells of and rain, and the wind will cause most concern. for wednesday, it is a windy day, especially the north of the country, very strong wind with gales, lots of showers, hail, thunder mixed in, snow over the higher ground. for england and is, wet weather moves through. that rain halts on across the south—east later in the day.
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some brightness pushing in behind. into thursday, again it is windy across the northern half of the country, with further gales, blustery showers, hail and thunder, snow over the higher ground. something quieterfurther snow over the higher ground. something quieter further south. into friday, the next deep area of low pressure comes rattling in, a speu low pressure comes rattling in, a spell of heavy rain, with gales or severe gales. keep tuned to the weather forecast. this is business live from bbc news, with sally bundock and aaron heslehurst. are we seeing the green shoots of recovery for the world's third—biggest economy? the bank of japan speaks of better times ahead following a fall in the value of the yen. live from london, that's our top story on tuesday 20th december. could the shock election result in the us provide a boost
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to japan's flagging economy? we'll get the views of an expert. also in the programme. going, going, gone. cyrus mistry finally steps down from the boards of tata companies, but says he will bring legal action. we're live to mumbai for the latest.
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