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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  December 22, 2016 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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very good morning. this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. an international man—hunt for the main suspect in the berlin christmas market attack, as it emerges he was being watched until just market attack, as it emerges he was being watched untiljust a few months ago. he was known to have ties to a radical islamist group. now german police are facing questions about why they dropped their surveillance operation. good morning everybody. it is thursday 22 december. also this morning: a boost for rural broadband. £400 million is going to be spent on getting remote areas faster connections. i will have more on where the money has come from and what it is going to be spent on. investigation reveals the big rise in violent crime being carried out by the over 65. we will
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look at the possible causes. good morning from durham police headquarters. we are here as part of a series on policing britain. i live in the call centre where they are dealing with the 999 called this morning. more on that a bit later on. in the sport, head injuries in by on. in the sport, head injuries in rugby union must be taken more seriously, according to a review into an incident involving wales international george north, which has made nine recommendations to change the way concussions are handled. and carol has the weather. this morning across england and wales we have some patchy fog and some frost. some of that will be slow to clear but most will see a dry day with some sunshine and just a few showers. scotland and northern ireland, still very windy, especially across scotland, with some showers, some of which will be wintry. more in 15 minutes. 0ur our main story: german security services are facing questions about why they ended a surveillance operation on a suspect who is now
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the subject of europe wide man—hunt following the berlin lorry attack. anis amri was known to have ties to a radical islamist group. this residence permit was found in the lorry which drove to christmas market on monday, killing 12 people. catriona renton reports. still on the run, the most wanted man in europe. two images of anis amri are shown on this poster. police are offering a reward of 100,000 euros, and warn he may be armed and dangerous. and he has used six different aliases, and three different nationalities. vital clues about the suspect were found inside the hijacked lorry. amri's residence permit was found in its cab. more details are emerging rapidly about anis amri. his family said he left tunisia for italy in 2011, where he was jailed forfour years for arson. last year he moved to germany, where his claim for asylum was rejected. but german officials did not have the correct paperwork to deport him.
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he had links to an islamist network, and was known to the authorities. he was under surveillance, as it was believed he was planning to buy guns, possibly for use in an attack. but this was stopped because of a lack of evidence. 12 people were killed and dozens injured in an attack on the christmas market on monday evening. so far only one of those who died has been identified, the man who should have been driving the lorry, lukasz urban, from poland. missing, feared dead by herfamily, fabrizia di lorenzo, from italy. dalia elkayam, from israel, also has not been seen since. her husband, rami, is seriously ill in hospital. valuable time was lost when police arrested and later released another man, giving their chief suspect time to get away. last night the christmas market
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reopened, no longer a place filled with noise and laughter. instead, berliners came to pay their quiet respects to the victims, as the investigation goes on. we will get the latest from berlin inafew we will get the latest from berlin in a few minutes' time. we will talk about how they are approaching that man—hunt as well. the government is to invest heavily in expanding high—speed broadband. it is expected that the funds could bring better connectivity to an extra 600,000 rural homes. 0ur technology correspondent has more. connecting rural homes across the uk to fast broadband has meant an investment of £i.7 billion of public money. and nearly all of that has gone to bt. the compa ny‘s contracts with councils and local authorities mean it has to return some of that money if more than 20% of homeowners sign up when the fast
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broadband service arrives. now, the government says that this cash clawback, coupled with efficiency savings, means another £440 million can be reinvested in the programme. there is a target of reaching 95% of homes with superfast broadband by the end of 2017. ministers believe that is within reach, and that up to 600,000 more homes and businesses could be hooked up with the new programme. but critics say bt has been using the wrong technology, connecting homeowners via a copper wire to a cabinet, rather than laying fibre—optic cables straight into homes. rivalfirms, including sky and talktalk, are now promising that they can deliver faster fibre connections than bt, and without needing public money. violent crime committed by people aged over 65 in england and wales
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has increased by almost 80% since 2012. the figures obtained by freedom of information requests by bbc breakfast relate to offences ranging from minor assault to murder. the rise in the number of crimes recorded is in part being put down to police changing how they log crimes. you know, ithink you know, i think officers might have gone to an incident five years ago and use their professional judgement. two people in their late 60s and 70s having an argument, that my qualify now as violent crime, which they would then record. i don't think they would have done that five years ago, so i think that will have a significant impact. and we will have a full report on the rise in violent crimes among older people and what might be causing it in about ten minutes' time. doctors and charities have called a new treatment for multiple sclerosis a landmark development. the disease
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most a landmark development. the disease m ost ofte n a landmark development. the disease most often causes difficulty in walking. it is hoped that the new treatment will offer hope for patients, after a successful trial of around 2000 people. this is really good news for people with primary progressive forms of ms, for which there are no treatments available on the nhs. primary progressive ms means people's disability will worsen. what this drug has shown is that it can slow the progress of disability for those people, so this offers real hope for the future. the nhs will paper ten blind patients to have bionic eyes to treat an inherited form of blindness. it is a retinal implant which interprets images captured by a miniature video camera worn on a pairof a miniature video camera worn on a pair of glasses. five patients will be treated at manchester royal eye hospital and five at moorfields eye hospital and five at moorfields eye hospital in london next year. they will then be monitored for a year afterwards to see how they can on in everyday life. spending too long looking at sites
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like facebook could be making us more miserable and envious. the study from copenhagen is the latest to suggest social media could have a negative effect on our mood. the impact is worst for those who do not leave comments, apparently, but scan through and read about the success of other people. that is interesting, isn't it? they often say that, today, because people don't really put the truth on. say that, today, because people don't really put the truth onlj say that, today, because people don't really put the truth on. i am interested that not leaving comments makes people more miserable. you just rage. it has been a stellar week for the bbc breakfast team, first with 0re winning strictly. and tim muffett, you may not wash celebrity mastermind, and tim took on a double paralympic gold—medallist, a journalist, and a bbc reporter to
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lift the famous trophy. his specialist subject was the films of danny boyle. enormous congratulations to him. have you done it? i have done it. john humphrys had asked me the name of my children as the first question, i don't think i would have remembered. it is terrifying! i was proud of my score, but i actually lost to martin lewis, the money man. he did me in. he knows far too much. lewis, the money man. he did me in. he knows far too muchlj lewis, the money man. he did me in. he knows far too much. i lost. let's return to our top story and get the latest from berlin, where authorities are hunting for a man responsible for a lorry attack which took place on monday evening. 0ur correspondent damien mcguinness is in our berlin studio. good morning to you. there really is a focus and a lot of criticism on the german security services. that's right, louise. the big question, firstly, is why, if the authorities knew he had a criminal background, which they did, and they
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also knew he had links to islamist extremist groups here in germany, why he was not as observed. he had been placed under observation and his phone had been tapped for a couple of months earlier this year, at that observation was lifted even though authorities say he was judged to be potentially dangerous. the other problem and the other question the authorities are going to be facing is why he wasn't deported, because his application for asylum was rejected after he came here last year. and a lot of people now saying, well, you should have been deported back to his home country of tunisia. the problem they are, though, germany can legally only do that if the country of origin cooperates. in this particular case it seems tunisia did not accept that this man was actually a tunisian citizens. but that is still going to create a lot of questions about germany's right to asylum, where the people who are deported should be deported, and also whether the security forces are doing enough to keep track of those people who they
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judge as potentially dangerous. so many questions, still. later on brea kfast we many questions, still. later on breakfast we will speak to a former undercover police officer as well. michael is here with the sport this morning. another winner of celebrity —— celebrity mastermind. you did the alan patridge. it wasn't exactly ha rd to alan patridge. it wasn't exactly hard to research. it was like looking in the mirror!|j hard to research. it was like looking in the mirror! i can't have agoat looking in the mirror! i can't have a go at your suit after my electric blue number. talking head injuries. george north, this incident on three december when he went off with a head injury. he seemed to be unconscious, playing for northampton against leicester. the review found that although saints maybe shouldn't have brought him back on, they haven't punished saints. a lot of people saying that is not going far enough so doctor barry 0'driscoll,
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former rugby medical adviser says he accuses the authorities of experiment players' brains, and says the current protocol isn't worth the paper it is written on. a big accusation, but there are changes coming thanks to this review. northampton saints will not face, for the moment, any punishment for allowing george north to be played on after being knocked out. the report has found that he shouldn't have been allowed to continue but that saint medics had acted in his best interest. it will be at least six months before the wimbledon champion kvitova can play again. surgery on her hand is said to have gone well following the knife attack on her hand, but recovery is said to be slow progress doormat process. steve holland has worked together with england's under 21 ‘s and with the senior team, while gareth southgate was interim manager. and the £500,000 goal. graham
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kerry's penalty earns league to plymouth argyle a third—round fa cup tie against liverpool. it is a trip to anfield. they will be looking forward to that, won't they, the plymouth fans. papers. you are being joined your suit twin over there as well. you really are wearing swimsuits, i am fairly similaras really are wearing swimsuits, i am fairly similar as well. i have let the team down. the main story is the fallout from the attack in berlin, and they have a picture of the man they are hunting for, this international man—hunt for anis amri, who is being sought by german police in connection with that berlin christmas market attack. his picture on the front page of the times this morning. it is one of our main headlines this morning, and on the front page of the express they have the story about the healthcare for the queen and rinse fillip, the
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royal couple told to get well soon as they delay their christmas getaway this year. the sun has a real mix on their front page, including that story about the queen and prince philip missing their christmas trip in front of the st, if you thought bank bailouts were over, one could be imminent in italy. the oldest bank in the world could be bailed out and the next couple of days, 20 billion euros. we will keep an eye on that, it knock—on effect of the banking system knock—on effect of the banking syste m ca n knock—on effect of the banking system can be quite big. and a lot of the papers today, unfair funfairs taking us for a ride. the monopoly. an issue with funfairs across the uk, a trade body oversees a lot of them, the competition in markets authority are saying that they have too much control. if you want to set up too much control. if you want to set upa too much control. if you want to set up a rival too much control. if you want to set upa rivalfunfair too much control. if you want to set up a rivalfunfair in a town, or your local council does, it gets quite tough to do it. the protest, things like that happen. there may be some changes in the funfair sector. good headline, unfair funfairs. do you know that sting did a song
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called an englishman in new york. there is the new footballing club and they are trying to find the next messi to find new players for the city of angels team. it could make a lot of sense. how about this for a headline? lady and the trampoline. johanna konta aiming to be world number one. and her secret is going on the trampoline and rock climbing as well. very good for your core strength. yes, rockclimbing is now an olympic sport as well. excuses, you know when you hand in things late, the classic my dog ate it, hmrc have released some notes,
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people explaining why they handed in a late tax return. 0ne people explaining why they handed in a late tax return. one was, a wasp in my car caused me to have an accident and my tax return was inside and was destroyed. i had inside and was destroyed. ihada inside and was destroyed. i had a wasp go in my shorts when i was driving once and i did crash the car. but the car wasn't damaged, so it wouldn't have affected my tax return. did you get stung? i didn't, actually. we have this story about ikea. they are going to try to ban teenagers living in their stall. but i don't have a picture of that, so instead i have a picture of cute pandas. they are really lovely pictures. we've now set a new cute bar. it's a little bit higher. this is the zoo in toronto, i believe. the beheading of a snowman. the
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impressive! you know on planet earth wendy bob katter was plummeting into the earth, it's a bit like that. —— when the bobcat. he arrived from china in 201380 seriously loves snowmen. he is trying to make a new head! we love that. that's what we were waiting for! we couldn't leave before the face plant. carol's got a special, fantastic necklace, which we will hopefully see all day! it does flash, but not for now. there's a lot of weather to get through over the next few days and today we have some sunshine when we lose the fog but also some squally showers across northern ireland and scotland. this morning across northern ireland it is still very
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windy. showers wintry on the hills, at lower levels there is more likely to be rain. across scotland there could be sleet at lower levels, snow on the hills, hail, thunder and lightning. watch out for ice if you are travelling and in northern england at blustery start, with showers. as we drift into wales a lot of dry weather around this morning, but equally there are a few showers here and there and the same for south—west england. more dry weather than wet weather, but still a few showers around. crossing southern counties of england there are also bits of that patchy fog. when it does form some of it will be slow to clear. it may take until 110011 slow to clear. it may take until noon before we see the back end of it. before it does we will have sunshine and a few showers across england and wales. for northern ireland and scotland we hang on to the strong winds. gale force, especially with exposure. blizzard along with that snow. sleet even at some lower levels and it will feel
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cold. cold in the north and colder in the south, then it felt yesterday afternoon. into the evening and overnight the winds ease a little bit. showers fade for a time and there will be dry weather around. it is only in sheltered rule areas that we might see frost. by the end of the night we have the first signs of the night we have the first signs of the second named storm of the season, storm barbara, introducing heavy rain. the prepared, as we are looking at very strong winds. up to severe gale force. we have the rain coming in with barbara, heavy rain at that. it will move smartly across england england and wales will be windy and you will notice it. also into scotland and northern ireland we will have the full impact of storm barbara. the forecast has changed ever so slightly as the track of the low pressure has moved
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a bit further north, so we think now it is the far north of mainland scotla nd it is the far north of mainland scotland and northern isles that will have cost of mph. 80 in the west and across northern ireland and northern england 60 mph gusts. this is enough to do structural damage and it could also cause power outages and disruption to transportation, so ferries and temperatures could be affected. if you are travelling on friday and bear this in you are travelling on friday and bearthis in mind. you are travelling on friday and bear this in mind. but i will have the whole christmas forecast through the whole christmas forecast through the morning. still looking unsettled for some of us. thank you. love that necklace as well! magnificent. this morning with been hearing about a rise in violent crime committed by people over 65. it is one of the many challenges facing police officers today. it is part of our series on policing in britain. you are ina series on policing in britain. you are in a call centre this morning,
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steph? good morning. yes, iam in the control room where they are dealing with all of the 999 and 101 calls that come in. a lot of these guys are coming to the end of their shift. if you look at the types of calls they deal with, national research shows that only one in five calls that the police get our crime related, so the rest of them are things like welfare, people concerned about their welfare, people missing, concerns about mental health as well. on that side of the room that's where they are despatching their police officers to deal with different situations and over here is where the initial calls first coming. catherine isjust finishing the end of her 12 hour shift. what has it been like overnight? it has been all right. quite slow at times. i don't want to tempt fate by mentioning the q word. what kind of calls are you dealing
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with? you never know what's coming in next. it can range from a crime, burglaries, orjust someone asking for a bit of advice or reassurance, what they don't know what to do and whether it is someone else who needs to deal with it. whether it is someone else who needs to dealwith it. it whether it is someone else who needs to deal with it. it was you end up doing afair to deal with it. it was you end up doing a fair bit of counselling on the phone, i guess, trying to calm people down in situations. the thing i've noticed is you are all incredibly calm. that's a key part of yourjob, i guess? we've got to keep calm because the person on the other end of the phone, it might have been the first time they have from the police and you don't want to get them are upset and get them worried about what they are trying to report to you. at this time of year what's the big issue you are dealing with? a lot of alcohol—related issues, to be honest. it is the festive season. alcohol—related issues, to be honest. it is the festive seasonlj will let you go. you are so calm and cool will let you go. you are so calm and cool, i love it. how good does she look, considering she has been here for 12 hours? very impressed! as we mentioned at the beginning, there is
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some research we have done for exist this week, to show there's been a huge rise in crime committed by pensioners. we've been looking into this. he was a life. he killed his wife. stuart in his 70s is talking to nick, who is 60. we are convicted fraudsters. nick is still on probation. i don't feel all that all and because people are fitter and healthier and more active, they are going to carry on doing stuff and stuff leads to problems. problems like crime. the over 60s is now the fastest growing age group in the prison population. figures obtained by this programme show a dramatic rise in police recorded crime for people over the age of 65. violence crime in the pension age group, for example, is up 79% since 2012. the numbers are relatively small, up
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from just under 4020 12 to 7000 incidents recorded last year, but almost half of all crime police recorded in this age group was violent. —— 4000 in 2012.|j recorded in this age group was violent. -- 4000 in 2012. i think we have romanticised people. within just because they are getting older they are sweet old lady. but they are not. they are frustrated, lonely, angry. he says some older people getting more island is easily explained. the frustration of being an old person with not enough to do, with social services being cut, there's a sort of failure of the social contract with the elderly that leads to anger and resentment. so our britain's pensioners really becoming sad adults? there are some other things going on. for years and yea rs other things going on. for years and years police recorded crime figures we re years police recorded crime figures were massage to meet certain targets. today, the way police records crime has completely changed. police forces are now looking to make sure we report
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things accurately, ethically and that's shown by the number of crimes that's shown by the number of crimes that have gone up over the past two 01’ that have gone up over the past two or three years. i think officers might have gone through an incident five years ago and used their professionaljudgement. two people in their late 60s or 70s having an argument, that might qualify now as violent crime, which they would then record. i don't think they would have done that five years ago. so this is the property, graham. we have four bedrooms, one is an emergency room. this is the first refuge in the country specifically for older women. we filmed it when it opened last year. the charity that runs it has seen women in their 60s, 70s and even 80s come here for help. many, many times he went for me. black eyes, just a variation of beatings over the years. this woman, who we are calling sarah, was abused by her husband for almost 20 years. i now 63. how old is he? 65, coming
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up, ithink. i now 63. how old is he? 65, coming up, i think. he i now 63. how old is he? 65, coming up, ithink. he hasjust i now 63. how old is he? 65, coming up, i think. he hasjust got older and nasty. when you were younger, did you feel as though if you had reported what was happening at the police would take it seriously? no, no. but now it's a different world. they do take it seriously. and that isa they do take it seriously. and that is a significant change. police are now investigating domestic violence and historic sex abuse cases much more assiduously and that's one reason for the rise in today's figures. whether it is growing anger and resentment or the justice figures. whether it is growing anger and resentment or thejustice —— that justice is and resentment or thejustice —— thatjustice is finally catching up with the families, more and more older people are ending up on the wrong side of the law. we will be talking a bit more about ray's piece later in the programme. —— graham's piece. i am in the
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armoury section of durham's hq. tell us armoury section of durham's hq. tell us what we've got here. basically we've got operational firearms that we've got operational firearms that we deploy on a preplanned job. we've also got a lot of firearms that we expect officers to be able to make safe when they come across it, whether that be crime or seized. so essentially they've been used by criminals, some of these? yes, and what we will do is we will train to make what we will do is we will train to ma ke safe what we will do is we will train to make safe at the scene, prime minister to them being packaged and recovered. —— before they are packaged. these are shotguns, so these would be loaded with shotgun cartridges, usually used by the gentry for shooting grass snakes backin gentry for shooting grass snakes back in the old days. what about these iphones? these are stun devices. these are classed as a disguised firearm. if you are caught in possession of one of these you could end up with five years. five yea rs could end up with five years. five years mandatory prison sentence for
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something like that, because that's classified as a disguised firearm, same as this. we will talk more about this later. they give letting me in. ifeel about this later. they give letting me in. i feel slightly about this later. they give letting me in. ifeel slightly scared of this room. more from me later. i don't blame you! you don't want to pick up the wrong phone! i never pressing a button on my phone again! put that away! time to get the news, travel and weather wherever you are. we will be back with steph later. good morning, from bbc london news. i'm sonya jessup. and there of london has accused the government of ignoring new evidence which shows more than four in ten southern rail trains have arrived late. reliability figures for southern over the past five weeks are the worst of any rail franchise in the country. services have been badly affected by strike action. meanwhile, a lorry carrying on of southern train's carriages caused
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delays on the roads in south—east london last night. after becoming unstuck trying to go around the corner, the vehicle apparently took a wrong turn and traffic was held up for half an hour. a chinese citizen has revealed his plans to make a buckinghamshire pub a household name back on. the company has bought the pub and he wa nts to company has bought the pub and he wants to develop a chain in asia with exactly the same name. the pub is well known in the far east after david cameron invited chinese premierfor david cameron invited chinese premier for a david cameron invited chinese premierfor a drink there david cameron invited chinese premier for a drink there last year. there is no concept like the british pub in china at the moment, for example people could drink, have brunch and also have afternoon tea, or talk about business, watching football and drink until the late evening. there is no such concept, which is why we think a huge opportunity in china like that. time for a look at the travel now. the tube bras running well but we have minor delays now the overground, so
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have minor delays now the overground, so more have minor delays now the overground, so more information on that when the get it. —— was running well. northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel, the southern approach, building up from blackwall lane heading towards knightsbridge. aldeburgh lytton road closed eastbound. good news for tower bridge. it is due to open at midday after being closed for nearly three months. they commence works being carried out to finish earlier than expected. time for a look at the weather. good morning. the chilly start to the day today. we have patches of fog around as well. this was the scene yesterday. cloudy at times and rather mild. today it will fill noticeably colder and the fog could link into the afternoon. a bit of a murky start this morning for many. we should all see some sunshine into the afternoon. some of us lucky enough to get blue skies in the morning. winds are light, which isn't helping with the fog clea ra nce, isn't helping with the fog clearance, and it will feel colder than yesterday. top temperatures between 7—9 celsius. leading to a
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mostly clear night tonight, staying dry and temperatures dropping to about 3—4. was ugly a touch of frost for a time. it is tomorrow. —— possibly a touch. this storm will make things windy. we could have gusts of up to 50 mph at times. it should stay dry on friday. 0ver gusts of up to 50 mph at times. it should stay dry on friday. over the christmas weekend, mostly dry and still very windy. christmas eve is looking cool. by the time we get a christmas day it will be very mild again and we could have temperatures all the way up to 13 or 14 celsius. quite grey, with brightness around. and settling down again into next week. i'll be back again with the latest from london news in half an hour. bye for now. programme, we will be analysing the berlin market attack investigation,
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as the europe wide man—hunt intensifies. better broadband could be on the way for thousands of uk homes. we'll find out where the money is coming from and where it is going to be spent up welcome back. this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. we will bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment. also on the programme, we will be analysing the berlin market attack investigation, as the europe wide man—hunt intensifies. better broadband could be on the way for thousands of uk homes. we'll find out where the money is coming from and where it is going to be spent after 7:00am. we will be hearing about strange christmas get traditions in the next half hour. our main story: german security services are facing questions about why they ended a surveillance operation on a suspect who is now the subject of europe—wide man—hunt, following the berlin lorry attack.
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anis amri was known to have ties to a radical islamist group. his residence permit was found in the lorry which drove into the christmas market on monday, killing 12 people. ata 10am at a 10am we will be speaking to a former undercover police officer about how german police will be co—ordinating that man—hunt across europe —— 8:10 a.m.. the government is to invest heavily in expanding high—speed broadband. it is expected that the funds, which will be recouped from the government's superfast broadband programme, could bring better connectivity to an extra 600,000 rural homes. violent crime committed by people aged over 65 in england and wales has increased by almost 80% since 2012. the figures obtained by a freedom of information request by bbc breakfast relate to offences ranging from minor assault to murder. the rise in the number of crimes
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recorded is in part being put down to police changing how they log crime. you know, i think officers might have gone to an incident five years ago and used their professionaljudgement. two people in their late 60s or 70s having an argument, that might qualify now as violent crime, which they would then record. i don't think they would have done that five years ago, so i think that will have a significant impact. doctors and charities have described a new treatment for multiple sclerosis as a landmark development. the disease, which affects the brain, often causes difficulty in walking. it is hoped that the ocrelizumab will offer hope for patients, after a successful trial of around 2,000 people. this is really big news for people with primary progressive forms of ms, for which there are no treatments available on the nhs. primary progressive ms means that people's disability will worsen. what this drug has shown
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is that it can slow the reduction of disability for those people, so this offers real hope for the future. firefighters are warning about the risk of carrying the cigarette batteries after one caught fire while the man was out shopping in leeds. you can see from cctv footage here. investigators say he was keeping batteries in his pocket and protected. it is quite grim. people should avoid storing them alongside other metal object like keys and coins. thankfully he is ok after that. the second time we have seen those extraordinary pictures this morning. the nhs will pay for ten blind patients to have so—called bionic eyes, to treat an inherited form of blindness. the bionic eye is a retinal implant which interprets images captured by a miniature video camera worn on a pair of glasses. five patients will be treated at manchester royal eye hospital and five at moorfields eye hospital
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in london next year. they will then be monitored for a year afterwards, to see how they get on in everyday life. after decades of not being able to see anything at all, seeing movement, colour, in some cases shapes, and just knowing where things are, can be quite a significant change in a person's capabilities, really. spending too long looking at sites like facebook could be making us more miserable and envious, according to new danish research. the study from the university of copenhagen is the latest to suggest social media could have a negative effect on our mood. the impact is worst for those who do not leave comments, apparently, but scan through and read about the success of other people. that surprised me, you think it is
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because they are cross inside!|j hate because they are cross inside!” hate you and your success! we will go hate you and your success! we will 9° up hate you and your success! we will go up close and personal now, as one photographer has tried to capture the expressions of the world's tiniest animals. this gecko is one of the images taken by an amateur photographer, who spends his spare time capturing close—ups in his native indonesia. he has also photographed this frog with a tiny cricket on its head. seems to be quite happy with that. and these three frogs. three frogs sitting on a camera. he says it can take a week to edit one single photograph, and he is actually a full—time nurse.” wonder whether that could be more than three frogs. i am looking for a fourth. mike is here with the sport.
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i want your christmas traditions a bit later on. we will give you a bit of time to think about it. talking about the weird things we all do. let's talk about rugby union. real concern about the way that players deal with concussion. in the past it was that they came back on once they we re was that they came back on once they were treated. that has got a stop, according to experts, after the latest review and another incident involving george north. the rugby players association is saying that the northampton saints should have been punished for allowing winger george north tube play on after being knocked out. concussion review group found that george north should not have been able to continue, but said that saint medics had acted at the time and the player's best interests and so wouldn't face any punishment. 0thers, though, believe the rules need to be updated. if there is no negligence i can't
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see how they can be punishment for what is effectively a system which is not under scratch with one—day professionalism. the worrying thing is that the only thing the staff at northampton should have done is pull the player if there was any reasonable doubt. it will be at least six months before the wimbledon champion petra kvitova can play again. surgeons are confident the two—time wimbledon champion will be able to return to the court but all the fingers on her playing hand were injured and soho rehabilitation will be rather slow process. steve holland has been given thejob of england assessment manager on a permanent basis. holland, currently chelsea's assistant coach, has worked alongside gareth southgate for three years, firstly with the england under 21 team, and then the senior team during southgate's spell as interim manager. so this isn't a huge surprise. graham carey's penalty earns
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league two plymouth argyle a third—round fa cup tie against liverpool. plymouth missed one penalty and won a second, which graham carey scored to set up a tie worth £500,000. the next 0lympic the next olympic games is predicted to cost £12.4 billion, and even though the tokyo organisers are looking for savings, that would make it the most expensive games ever, beating the amount spent on the sochi winter olympics. it is six times more than originally expected. the tokyo games organising committee cite the fact that they have had an earthquake and tsunami which have increased costs and they said in the original file increased costs and they said in the originalfile they increased costs and they said in the original file they haven't allowed for costs like surrounding greenery and temporary toilets, which is a bit obvious. maybe not the greenery, but you definitely need the loose. very early to have our first 0lympics aren't going to be ready story. it is traditional, isn't it?
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we normally wait until two years before the event. they are trying to reduce before the event. they are trying to red u ce cost before the event. they are trying to reduce cost by revising the venues. i think it will be one of the best 0lympic i think it will be one of the best olympic games we have seen for a long time. we will talk about christmas traditions later. the government says another £400 million will be offered to improve broadband services. john is here to explain. this is all about the circle of doom when you're trying to buffer, trying to get rid of that in the long—term. if you live somewhere a little more rural, you might be familiar with pictures like these, because you internet connection is not fast or strong enough. the government has a target of getting 95% of the country's superfast broadband. that will be 24 megabits a second, by the end of next year.
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this money today should help achieve that. let's go through exactly how that. let's go through exactly how that might work. andrew ferguson joins us now, a broadband expert from think broadband .com. let's start with the government's target, 95%. how are they doing in that? so far, last week of common confirmed around april or may we were 89%, and using a loan figures we are sitting about 92%, which is 1.3, 1.4 million, can't get superfast broadband still. £400 million is the figure we are going to see a lot today, whereas that money coming from? loom act that money has come over a period of years. it is not all new money today, it is a series of money which kids being announced over six months. in terms of the number of homes this may help, we are talking about 600,000. at the regulator was saying there are a million households around the
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country without access to decent broadband. where is the gap? the gap is, the regulator is talking about people who get ten meg or below. that will decrease, so if the government delivers 600,000 homes, and that is? because they are talking about up to, they are not saying the minimum, it could be 400 thousand. unsurprisingly, whether big broadband rollout, bt has a big role to play in this. how much will they be responsible for making sure those 600,000 homes get the connection by the end of next year? pretty much all of this investment has been recycled from the original projects, it is down to whatever bt decide to do, and also what the local authorities and devolved administrations, what they actually decide to do as well. and finally, this is obviously a lot of money and it is in areas which are not
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necessarily cost—effective for the likes of bt. will customers pay more for their broadband in these areas? if you are on the standard adsl plus, premium prices forthe superfast services are generally £5 or £10 a month more but you generally get a lot more speed for it, and you don't have to put up with the buffering symbol. thank you very much. so next year you should have a little less of this if you are in one of those 600,000 homes, by the end of 2017. i love the way it says one moment, it is never one moment. we will be talking about that later with karen bradley, mp for culture, media and sport secretary. no one likes to see the wheel of doom. german security forces are facing questions about why they ended a surveillance operation on a man who is now the suspect in the berlin lorry attack. as we've been hearing, broadband services in some rural areas will be
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given a boost with hundreds of millions of pounds, as the government allocates more funding. carol is looking at the weather this morning. good news about barbara? yes, indeed. there's a lot of weather going on today and into boxing day. the kick off with today, some sunshine than we lose the fog across southern england. the squally showers continue. gales across parts of scotla nd showers continue. gales across parts of scotland and northern ireland. blowing in showers, some of them heavy with hail and thunder. sleet on the hills and at lower levels, especially in scotland. for england and wales when we lose the patchy fog some of it will be slow to clear. we have some sunshine and fewer showers. cold in the north today if you are heading out and called than it was yesterday in the south. even in and overnight temperatures will drop quite quickly under the clear skies. we have an early frostbite as the breeze picks
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up early frostbite as the breeze picks up we have temperatures picking up as well and we lose the showers in scotla nd as well and we lose the showers in scotland and northern ireland for a time. they will be replaced by heavy rain coming ourway time. they will be replaced by heavy rain coming our way by the end of tonight. these are the first signs of storm barbara. there is an amber weather warning, be prepared for the strength of wind, because it will bring gales, severe gales and even storm force winds. a bus. we start the day on a windy note in england and wales. —— for some of us. all of this rain is piling in from the north—west, heading south—eastwards. it is heavy, do it you are travelling there will be a lot of surface water and spray on the roads. but the wind is the feature. if we focus on the wind and where it will be strongest, it is the north. gusts of up to 90 mph in scotland and the northern isles. the bubbly about 80 in western parts of scotland, 70 mph in northern ireland and 60 in northern england. the
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strongest gust in scotland are likely to do some structural damage. it will probably also cause a lot of transport disruption, for example ferries, temperatures, possibly cancellations. so do take extra care because it is the wind, but we've also got the rain. as we head into christmas eve, a quieter day, more like today. for england and wales there will be sunshine around, and it will be windy. we have the rain coming in across the north of the country and although it will still be windy it won't be as windy as friday. that leads us nicely into christmas day. christmas day we've got a cold front thinking southwards, so to start with in england and wales a fine start to with sunshine. look at the isobars. another windy day. especially windy across the northern half of the country once again. on christmas day the other thing to mention is there
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will be mild weather. christmas day we could have record—breaking temperatures for christmas day. to do that we have to be 15.6. so we could do that somewhere like aberdeen or wales. as the cold front moves through colder air will come in behind, so we could start christmas day on a very mild note and go through much of the day on a mild note. by the end of it we could have a white christmas, the cosby could have sleet or snow coming in behind the weather front. so mild could have sleet or snow coming in behind the weatherfront. so mild on christmas day, who wants that? thank you very much indeed. i know you will keep us up—to—date about barbara as well today. the run—up to christmas is one of the busiest times of year for the police forces and this week we've been looking at different challenges they face. as pa rt of they face. as part of our policing britain series, steph has been at the headquarters of durham police to find out about the work involved. she was in the gun room earlier, i
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am sure there is a different word for it. where are you now? and having a good look around the headquarters. i have come into what's called the silver command room. here, complex decisions will be made about different operations. they watch the news to make sure they know what's going on as well. we have cctv footage and maps of the area and key information. we have the silver commander here and you have essentially mocked up a drugs raid. tell us happening. we have the silver command, so any complexes it is all operations get made in here. away from the main control room. we have lots of different units of officers from different specialists who are coming to help advise me on the best rationale. today we are doing some drugs raid at three different addresses in an area that
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we will put all of the details on the board, so who is going where, how many officers and the progress of the arrests. how often are there things going on in this room? probably about three or four times a week. it might be for a firearms job, a complex drugs raid, such as this, or any other operation, job, a complex drugs raid, such as this, orany other operation, road traffic crashes, things like that. what is your key role? you are strategically deciding what you have to do? yes. i am making the key decisions about how to read the progress, “— decisions about how to read the progress, —— held to we progress, how do we get resources together, wind we do the raids, local authority, linking that with other services, and bringing all of the different units together. fascinating. we will come back into the room at the morning to see how it is going. then she very much. 0bviously it is going. then she very much. obviously this room is about dealing with the complex crime cases and through —— earlier i was in the call
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centre where they get a triple nine calls and 11 calls. if you at the statistics, you think they will be doing —— dealing with lots of calls to do with crime, but only one in five calls to 999 are crime related. 0thers five calls to 999 are crime related. others are about mental health, people concerned about vulnerable people concerned about vulnerable people and a key part of the job of being a police officer is thinking about how best to support the victims of crime and that's what we will talk about now. i have a couple of gu ests will talk about now. i have a couple of guests with me. i have the victims commissioner for england and wales and give it them is campaigner. good morning to both of you. —— a victim's campaigner. you both know what it is like to be a victim of crime. in your case, your husband was murdered, and, lauren, your husband was murdered. given it was a couple of years ago, lauren,
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how do you feel about it now? —— your son was murdered.” how do you feel about it now? —— your son was murdered. i think there we re your son was murdered. i think there were certain police who understood how i was feeling and were quite compassionate and there were others who didn't think they were trained as well and who sort of either talked down to me are made me feel as if... as if... ifelt uncomfortable. but overall there we re uncomfortable. but overall there were some amazing people.” uncomfortable. but overall there were some amazing people. i think training could really make a difference. you clearly had a mixed experience. what you think would improve its? i think being able to understand the feeling. so they need the train behind them to understand what bereavement, especially a post— dramatic situation, is like. at 1.1 had —— at one stage i had an important document delivered to me ona important document delivered to me on a friday night, when i was alone without support. to read this document about what happened to my son on the day was devastating and i didn't know who to go to and i think that a training issue, it should
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have been someone to deliver it at an appropriate time when i could have had that support with me at an appropriate time. in your case, you've taken on the role of victim's commissioner. what are you trying to do to change the way people are supported? on trying to change the way victims are treated, in that they are treated with dignity and respect. like lauren says, there are some fantastic police officers out there, but there are some atrocious ones. until i start having victims to me saying they wouldn't recommend anyone coming forward, i will keep going. —— stop hearing victims. it is about the bedside skills. victims are going through traumatic times and you have to understand it and when they are left on their own we've got to make sure that they are supported as well. it is a big task, one that i am quite happy to keep challenging the powers at ease.” know we will be talking to you throughout the programme. thank you both very much forjoining us this
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morning. more from me a little bit later. thank you. we will be seeing you later, steph. tomorrow we will have a final look... sorry about the crackers. at the policing britain series. it is breakfast. anything can happen. i was positioning them nicely. tomorrow is about people with dementia going missing. there is a reason for this. go! exchanging presents, mince pies, crackers, maybe even a quick peck under the mistletoe. there are a whole host of christmas traditions that many of us embrace at this time of year. later we will be hearing about the origins of, i like this, one of those spinning things. what the joke? we ask people what their traditions are and what they wouldn't want to be without. father christmas, that's important. he comes to our house. they wake us
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up he comes to our house. they wake us up so they can have their stockings. i like watching the reaction of your family when we give them presents. and i also like it when you have your nan has got you a knitted jumperand you your nan has got you a knitted jumper and you have to give a fake reaction to it. my dad gives an easter egg every christmas. he thinks it is hysterical. the main thing for me is mince pies. for me it is champagne! i love it! i do. the real christmas tree that smells like christmas. we've got a io—month—old little boy so we are just starting traditions with him and we have a christmas eve book that we will read to him before bed and new pyjamas. new pyjamas. fresh pyjamas every christmas eve. boardgames with your pyjamas every christmas eve. boa rdgames with your family pyjamas every christmas eve. boardgames with your family seems to be the big thing. arguments with my sisters over boardgames. it isn't
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christmas without a good argument, some sort of technicality over a rule. anything. i love all of those different ideas, especially the clean, new pyjamas. a lot of people say pyjamas on christmas eve. send in your ideas. new pyjamas on christmas eve. this one from tommy, he does in activity seen, the figures start on one side of the room and work their way towards the tv for the sixth of january. lovely. tell us your traditions. we would love to hear from you. lovely. tell us your traditions. we would love to hearfrom you. time lovely. tell us your traditions. we would love to hear from you. time to get the news, travel and weather wherever you are. good morning, from bbc london news. i'm sonya jessup. the mayor of london has accused the government of ignoring new evidence which shows more than four in ten southern rail trains have arrived late. reliability figures for southern,
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which has been badly affected by strike action, are the the worst of any rail franchise in the country. services have been badly affected by strike action. meanwhile, a lorry carrying one of southern train's carriages caused delays on the roads in south—east london last night. it became tuck trying to go around the corner. traffic at crystal palace was delayed for half an hour. a chinese citizen has revealed his plans to make a buckinghamshire pub a household name back home. peter zang's company has bought the pub and he wants to develop a chain in asia with exactly the same name. the pub is well known in the far east after david cameron invited the chinese premier for a drink there last year. there's no concept like the british pub in china at the moment, for example people could drink, have brunch and also have afternoon tea, or talk about business, watching football and drink
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until the late evening. there is no such concept, which is why we think there's a huge opportunity in china like that. time for a look at the travel now. minor delays on the overground between euston and the junction because of a faulty train. a look at the blackwall tunnel. the usual problems. northbound traffic on the southern approach slow. and good news on tower bridge. it is due to open at midday after being closed for nearly three months. the maintenance works have finished earlier than expected. time for a look at the weather. good morning. a chillier start to the day today. we've got patches of fog around as well. this was the scene yesterday. quite cloudy at times, but also rather mild. today it will fill noticeably colder and the fog could linger into the afternoon. a bit of a murky start this morning for many. we should all see some sunshine into the afternoon.
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some of us lucky enough to get the blue skies into the morning. winds are light, which isn't helping with the fog clearance, and it will feel colder than yesterday. top temperatures between 7—9 celsius. it'll lead onto a mostly clear night tonight, staying dry and temperatures dropping to about 3—4. possibly a touch of frost for a time again. this is tomorrow. storm barbara will make things windy. we could have gusts of up to 40—50 mph at times. it should stay dry on friday. over the christmas weekend, mostly dry and still very windy. christmas eve is looking quite cool. by the time we get to christmas day it will be very mild again and in fact we could have temperatures all the way up to 13 or 14 celsius. quite grey, with brightness around at times. all weekend in fact, and settling down again into next week. i'll be back again with the latest from london news in half an hour. bye for now. this is breakfast, with dan walker
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and louise minchin. an international manhunt for the main suspect in the berlin christmas market attack, as it emerges anis amri was being watched until just a few months ago. he was known to have ties to a radical islamist group. now, german police are facing questions about why they dropped their surveillance operation. good morning, everybody. it is thursday 22 december. also this morning: a boost for rural broadband. the government pledges to provide nearly all houses with high—speed connections within a year. only one in five households owns their own
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home, that is fewer than 20 years ago. a breakfast investigation reveals the big rise in violent crime being carried out by the over—65. we will look at the possible causes. good morning from durham police headquarters. we are here as part of a series on policing britain. i'm live in the call centre where they are dealing with the 999 calls this morning. and in sport, players who suffer concussion should not be allowed back on to the pitch, that is a finding of the review into the concussion of george north, as the sport looks to change the way concussions are handled. and carol has the weather. some patchy fog, some of that is dance. it will lift slowly. a dry day with a few showers and some sunshine. for scotland and northern ireland squally showers, some of which will have a wintry element. more details and 15 minutes. —— in
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15 in its. our main story: german security services are facing questions about why they ended a surveillance operation on a suspect who is now the subject of europe—wide man—hunt, following the berlin lorry attack. anis amri was known to have ties to a radical islamist group. his residence permit was found in the lorry which drove into the christmas market on monday, killing 12 people. at 8:10am we will be speaking to a former undercover police officer about how german police will be co—ordinating that man—hunt across europe. catriona renton reports. still on the run, the most wanted man in europe. police are offering a reward of 100,000 euros, and warn he may be armed and dangerous. his residence permit was found in the lorry. and he has used six different aliases, and three different nationalities. more details are emerging rapidly about anis amri. his family said he left tunisia for italy in 2011, where he was jailed forfour years for arson. last year he moved to germany, where his claim for asylum was rejected.
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but german officials did not have the correct paperwork to deport him. he had links to an islamist network, and was known to the authorities. he had been under surveillance, but this was stopped because of a lack of evidence. 12 people were killed and dozens injured in the attack on the christmas market on monday evening. so far only one of those who died has been identified, the man who should have been driving the lorry, lukasz urban, from poland. missing, feared dead by herfamily, fabrizia di lorenzo, from italy. dalia elkayam, from israel, also has not been seen since. her husband, rami, is seriously ill in hospital. last night the christmas market reopened, no longer a place filled with noise and laughter. instead, berliners came to pay their quiet respects to the victims, as the investigation goes on. 0ur correspondent damien mcguinness
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is in our berlin studio. good morning to you. there really is a focus and a lot of criticism on the german security services. that's right. the german officials and authorities are going to have two a u nts and authorities are going to have two aunts are certain questions to the public. 0ne being why this man had not been deported even though his asylum application had in rejected. that is because tunisia did not accept he was a tunisian citizen. you need the cooperation of the country of origin to deport someone the country of origin to deport someone but the government is going to have to explain to people why thatis to have to explain to people why that is the case and why it can't be got around. when you talk the germans on the streets, that is one of the questions being asked, that he shouldn't have been there in the first place. security services knew he had a criminal record and suspected he was potentially dangerous. he had been under surveillance, his phone had been tapped. that surveillance was lifted and security services are going to
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be underfire and security services are going to be under fire for dropping that surveillance. 0ne newspaper editor this morning told the bbc that this could all turn into a major scandal here in germany. later we will be speaking to a former undercover officer about how that searches being automated. how that search is being co—ordinated. the government is to invest £440 million in expanding high—speed broadband. it is expected that the funds, which will be recouped from the government's superfast broadband programme, could bring better connectivity to an extra 600,000 rural homes. the government aims to deliver high—speed internet to 90% of properties by the end of next year. the queen and the duke of edinburgh will soon make a decision about when they will travel to norfolk this year. they postponed their annual trip to sandringham yesterday because they both had heavy colds. they spent the day at buckingham
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palace instead, recovering. 0n tuesday they hosted their traditional christmas lunch for the extended royal family as well. violent crime committed by people aged over 65 in england and wales has increased by almost 80% since 2012. the figures obtained by a freedom of information request by bbc breakfast relate to offences ranging from minor assault to murder. the rise in the number of crimes recorded is in part being put down to police changing how they log crime. at 65 now i am more able, socially active, probably fitter, so the things that i might have done at 65 in the 1950s might be different to what i would do in 2016. so that as an enabler, isn't it, for people to act ina an enabler, isn't it, for people to act in a different way. doctors and charities have described a new treatment for multiple sclerosis as a landmark development.
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the disease, which affects the brain, often causes difficulty in walking. 100,000 people in the uk are affected by ms. it is hoped that the ocrelizumab will offer hope for patients, after a successful trial of around 2,000 people. this is really big news for people with primary progressive forms of ms, for which there are no treatments available on the nhs. primary progressive ms means that people's disability will worsen. what this drug has shown is that it can slow the reduction of disability for those people, so this offers real hope for the future. firefighters are warning about the risk of carrying e—cigarette batteries, after one caught fire while the man was out shopping in leeds. investigators say he was keeping batteries in his pocket unprotected, and people should avoid storing them
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alongside other metal object like keys and coins. thankfully, as we say, only minor injuries. the nhs will pay for ten blind patients to have so—called bionic eyes, to treat an inherited form of blindness. the bionic eye is a retinal implant which interprets images captured by a miniature video camera worn on a pair of glasses. five patients will be treated at manchester royal eye hospital and five at moorfields eye hospital in london next year. they will then be monitored for a year afterwards, to see how they get on in everyday life. dense fog is causing problems at major european airports. flights from heathrow are likely to be delayed, flights from gatwick and london city are also affected, and passengers are being advised to check with their airline before travelling. carol will have the latest weather in six or seven minutes' time. spending too long looking at sites like facebook could be making us more miserable and envious,
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according to new danish research. the study from the university of copenhagen is the latest to suggest social media could have a negative effect on our mood. the impact is worst for those who do not leave comments, apparently, but scan through and read about the success of other people. that is what the research came up with. leave comments, and you will feel better. well done on your lovely new job. feel better. well done on your lovely newjob. if feel better. well done on your lovely new job. if you want to contact us and leave comments, please do. it has been a stellar week for the bbc breakfast team, first with 0re winning strictly. and tim muffett, you may not watch celebrity mastermind, and tim took on double paralympic gold—medallist kadeena cox, journalist david aaronovitch, and cbbc‘s lauren layfield, to lift the famous trophy. his specialist subject was the films of danny boyle. enormous congratulations to him. both of us have failed miserably. what was your specialist subject?
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mine was the gunpowder plot.” what was your specialist subject? mine was the gunpowder plot. i think this is probably why we failed. the government says another £400 million will be offered to improve broadband services. the superfast scheme is being funded by savings from other programmes and is expected to help 600,000 homes and businesses. connecting rural homes across the uk to fast broadband has meant an investment of £1.7 billion of public money. and nearly all of that has gone to bt. the compa ny‘s contracts with councils or local authorities mean it has to return some of that money if more than 20% of homeowners sign up when the fast broadband service arrives. now, the government says
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that this cash clawback, coupled with efficiency savings, means another £440 million can be reinvested in the programme. there is a target of reaching 95% of homes with superfast broadband by the end of 2017. ministers believe that is within reach, and that up to 600,000 more homes and businesses could be hooked up with the new programme. but critics say bt has been using the wrong technology, connecting homeowners via a copper wire to a cabinet, rather than laying fibre—optic cables straight into homes. rivalfirms, including sky and talktalk, are now promising that they can deliver faster fibre connections than bt, and without needing public money. lets get more from the culture, media and sport secretary. thank you for joining media and sport secretary. thank you forjoining us. as soon as we talk about this on bbc breakfast, people
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get very exercised that they simply don't have sufficient broadband. when is it really going to start changing? good morning, and as a constituency mp for a rural area, i can assure you that this is an issue which is raised with me regularly as well. i think what people should know today is that we have connected 4.5 million premises to superfast broadband, of which 1.5 million have taken up the option of superfast, and that take—up has led to more money being put into the system, which means we can connect those harder to reach premises and make sure they have faster broadband as well. you say you can, but when? well, local authorities are delivering these schemes and i want to see it as soon as possible. but we need to recognise that there are some very difficult to reach properties and there is not a one size fits all solution. this £440 million will help 600,000 properties, and i think that is really good news, and something that
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will be welcomed by many of my constituents. and as far as i understand it, a lot of money goes into getting the fibre to the cabinet which is at the roadside, but not on to houses. is that the right strategy? should not be going straight to the houses? as i said, there is no one size fits all solution which is right for everybody. for businesses, fibre to the premises is very important, and thatis the premises is very important, and that is why we the announcement in the autumn statement of an extra £1 billion to help visitors and public what to is be able to get fibre to the premises. but for most households, superfast speeds of about 24 megabits per second will deliver really, really fast broadband access that means they can have multiple use of different devices in the premises at any one time, and that they can access the internet in a way that many others have been able to do for some time. iam have been able to do for some time. i am looking forward to seeing this
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being rolled out to as many firms as possible. so you don't think it is necessary to really focus on getting it right to people's houses, then? you think the right strategy is being pursued at the moment? well, look, i think the fact that any article you just ran it was clear there are many different options, we have a great competitive market here in the uk, and there are fibre to the premises options, there are fibre to the cabinet options, they are different prices and different accessibility. what is important is that we get the super fast access to as many people as possible. the fact that you can get fibre to your premises for about £20 a month is a fantastic consumer offering being made by many, many of the providers. we are making sure that we get fibre access through either to the cabinet or to the premises, to as many premises as possible. is it a super
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competitive market, as you said? in november there was a ruling that bt had to be separate from its subsidiary 0pen reach. is that the right thing to do, do you think? off, right thing to do, do you think? 0ff, have been working with bt 0pen reach on this issue. they will report soon. we have a market in the uk where we have access to superfast broadband for nine out of ten premises, and we want to get that up to 95% by the end of next year, and we wa nt to 95% by the end of next year, and we want to deliver 100% on the universal service obligation by 2020, something we are legislating for at the moment in the digital economy. we understand there is an agreement on a takeover deal. would you like 0fcom to look at that as well? no formal arrangement has been made. i have a quasi—judicial role in that process and i don't wish to make any further comment at this
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stage. they give for your time. this is breakfast. the main stories: german security services are facing questions about why they ended a surveillance operation on a man who is now the suspect in the berlin lorry attack. as we've been discussing, broadband services in some rural areas will be given a boost by hundreds of millions of pounds as the government allocates more funding. we are talking christmas traditions today and thankfully as ever you have come up trumps, telling us the sorts of things you get involved with. alastair says croissant with pigs in blankets in bed! i like chocolate, then wine gums, then breakfast. loads of others. peter says there can only be one breakfast on christmas day, oiled eggs. susan says the first drink of the day has to be fizz.
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i would maybe have a cup of tea first, but i agree. 0ne says his grandparents used to let him put the decorations together and now he lets his eldest daughter do the same. i bet carol has some lovely traditions. she is going to talk to us traditions. she is going to talk to us about the weather and barbara is on her way. she is brewing up in the atlantic. good morning. the weather today, compared to what we are going to get, is quiet. some of us could see sunshine, but scotland and northern ireland, squally showers. this morning there is the patchy fog. some of that is dense and some of it will be slow to clear. not clearing until about lunchtime. when it does for england and wales, we have a lot of sunshine around and a few showers. for northern ireland and scotland, strong winds. dust into gale force. squally showers. rain, some hail, under and lightning and some hail, under and lightning and some sleet, even at lower levels, and hill snow. feeling cold in the
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north and a bit colder than it was yesterday in the south. through this evening and overnight under clear skies the cabbage will drop rapidly. there will be frost in lower areas and by the end of the night we've got the first signs of storm barbara arriving, bringing heavy rain and gales, even at this stage. tomorrow worth noting that the met office has gotan amberwind worth noting that the met office has got an amber wind warning out, meaning be prepared. 0ne level down from the top level, which we don't often see lately. tomorrow we have the rain, which will be heavy. something else to factor in if you are travelling, as it sinks southwards. not getting to the far south—east until later in the day but the winds will pack a punch. if we have a look at the kinds of wind speeds you could expect, in the far north of mainland scotland and the northern isles gusts of up to 90 mph. gusts of 80 mph in western parts of scotland. still windy
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across all of scotland. northern ireland, 70 mph. 60 mph in northern england. with strong force winds thatis england. with strong force winds that is likely to cause structural damage. certainly the wind is likely to cause some travel disruption. not just ferries and temperatures, but also flight disruption, so do check before you set out. as we go into christmas eve, a quieter day. the weather is more likely to be dry, england and wales, for southern and northern ireland some rain, still windy, but not as windy as it will be on friday. for christmas day unusual weather. you can see from the isobars it will be windy wherever you are, especially in the northern half of the country. we have this cold weather front bringing rain to the south. ahead of it we still have mild air and we could have record—breaking temperatures on christmas day if we beat 15.6dc. that's really warm for christmas. as the cold front goes
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through it introduces colder air, so by the end of the day some parts of scotla nd by the end of the day some parts of scotland could end up having a white christmas, having had a record—breaking temperature earlier in the day. that's really unusual! it is! i don't know what i am talking about, but well done, you are correct! see you later. thank you. this morning we've been hearing about a rise in violent crime committed by people over 65. it's one of the many challenges facing police officers today. it's part of our series on policing in britain. steph has gone behind the scenes at the durham police headquarters to find out how they cope with the different pressures. good morning! good morning. yes, iam in the control room where they deal with all of the 999 call that have been coming in throughout the night and this morning. malcolm is one of the inspectors here who has been in charge of the night shift. tell us a
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bit about how it has been overnight. it hasn't been as busy as it was the night before. we don't like to use the q word. you don't like to tempt fate with the word quiet. what kinds of calls have you had? quite a few domestics and a couple of pursuits. so domestics being people in their homes, violence? yes, male or female partners, often drink involved. and how does this compare to other nights? the tuesday night was very busy. volume wise and with quite a few pursuits, quite a few aggravated assaults. it was busy. no doubt this weekend, with christmas, will be even busier. i know you've stayed on to have a chat with us and you are desperate to go to bed, so thank you for having a chat to us. you go to bed. thank you. you mentioned in the
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beginning the research the bbc has found as part of our series, looking at how crime committed by pensioners has hugely increased. graham satchell has been looking into this for us. you said it was a long sentence? he was a lifer. he killed his wife. stuart, in his 70s, is talking to nick, who is 60. both are convicted fraudsters. nick is still on probation. i don't feel old at all, and because people are fitter and healthier and more active, they are going to carry on doing stuff and stuff leads to problems. problems like crime. the over 60s now the fastest growing age group in the prison population. figures obtained by this programme show a dramatic rise in police recorded crime for people over the age of 65. violent crime in the pension age group, for example, is up 79% since 2012. the numbers are relatively small, up from just under 4,000 in 2012
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to 7,000 incidents recorded last year, but almost half of all crime police recorded in this age group was violent. i think we have romanticised older people. we think thatjust because they're getting older they'll be the sweet old lady. but they're not. they're frustrated, lonely and angry. this criminologist says some older people getting more violent is easily explained. the frustration of being an old person with not enough to do, with social services being cut, there's a sort of failure of the social contract with the elderly that leads to anger and resentment. so are britain's pensioners really becoming saga louts? there are some other things going on. for years and years police recorded crime figures were massaged to meet certain targets. today, the way police record crime has completely changed. police forces are now looking to make sure we report
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things accurately, ethically and that's shown by the number of crimes that have gone up over the past two or three years. i think officers might have gone through an incident five years ago and used their professionaljudgement. two people in their late 60s or 70s having an argument, that might qualify now as violent crime, which they would then record. i don't think they would have done that five years ago. so this is the property, graham. we have four bedrooms, one is an emergency room. this is the first refuge in the country specifically for older women. we filmed it when it opened last year. the charity that runs it has seen women in their 60s, 70s and even 80s come here for help. many, many times he went for me. blacked eyes, just a variation of beatings over the years. this woman, who we are calling sarah, was abused by her husband for almost 20 years. i'm now 63.
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how old is he? 65, coming up, ithink. he has just got older and nastier. when you were younger, did you feel as though if you had reported what was happening that the police would have taken you seriously? no, no. but now it's a different world. they do take it seriously. and that is a significant change. police are now investigating domestic violence and historic sex abuse cases much more assiduously and that's one reason for the rise in today's figures. whether it's growing anger and resentment, or that justice is finally catching up with offenders, more and more older people are ending up on the wrong side of the law. i've come down from the control ce ntre i've come down from the control centre into the armoury room, which
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as you can see is basically full of weapons. mark is in charge of this room. what have we got here? basically when we have a preplanned firearm operation, officers will come in here and we will issue weapons that they require for thejob here and we will issue weapons that they require for the job from this room. 0ur armed response vehicles can therefore still cater for the spontaneous jobs and then we will cater for the preplanned operations. the rest of the weapons you can see ourfull the rest of the weapons you can see our full training the rest of the weapons you can see ourfull training officers, how to make different types of weapons safe when they come across them at crime scenes. it was before we can remove it from the crime scene or wherever it from the crime scene or wherever it has been found we need to be able to make it safe. so they've been recovered from crime scenes and you have some of them here which, in all honesty, to look like guns or weapons, but they are? basically, these two walking caines have been handed in. —— walking canes. they are weapons and take
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shotgun cartridges and it's a single shotgun cartridges and it's a single shot type weapon. this one here is a home—made shotgun. so basically you stick your shotgun cartridge in there. it is quite crude, fire from nissan and slam it so it goes. this one here was originally a blank firearm and it has been converted, so we firearm and it has been converted, so we get a few of these. it is so fascinating, but i will be honest, we are not a society that is used to feeling guns and ifeel quite intimidated in this room with so many guns. as chief constable, are we seeing more officers with guns? to winnie to be worried about it? i'm glad you are intimidated, because i think most people would be andi because i think most people would be and i think that's what sets us about any and i think that's what sets us aboutany uk, and i think that's what sets us about any uk, that guns are not at normal currency. but what i would
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hope would reassure people is that we are ready to deal with people who are armed, but it's a rare occurrence. that's good to hear. before we go, can you show the iphone again? this looks at the normal iphone but look what you can do with it! —— looks like. five yea rs do with it! —— looks like. five years in prison if you get caught with one of them. anyway, more from me a little bit later. don't pick up the phone, steph! it has some serious juice on it! let's get the news, travel and weather where you are, while you are recovering from back! —— that! good morning, from bbc london news. i'm sonya jessup. the mayor of london has accused the government of ignoring new evidence which shows more than four in ten southern rail trains have arrived late over the last five weeks. reliability figures for southern, which has been badly affected by strike action, are the worst of any rail franchise in the country. city can't want transport for london
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to ta ke city can't want transport for london to take control instead, but the transport secretary has only said he wa nts tfl transport secretary has only said he wants tfl to be closely involved in developing services. —— the mayor wa nts developing services. —— the mayor wants transport for london. meanwhile, a lorry carrying one of southern train's carriages caused delays on the roads in south—east london last night. it became stuck trying to get around the corner. traffic at crystal palace was delayed for half an hour. a chinese businessman has revealed his plans to make a buckinghamshire pub a household name back home. peter zang's company has bought the pub and he wants to develop a chain in asia with exactly the same name. the pub is well known there, after david cameron invited the chinese premier for a drink there last year. there's no concept like the british pub in china at the moment, for example people could drink, have brunch and also have afternoon tea, or talk about business, watching football and drink until the late evening. there is no such concept, which is why we think there's a huge opportunity in china like that. time for a look at the travel now.
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minor delays on the overground between euston and watford junction because of a faulty train. calori has broken down on the m25. three mild of queues towards junction 26. —— the m25. tower bridge is due to reopen again at midday after being closed for nearly three months. the works being carried out have finished earlier than expected. time for a look at the weather. good morning. it's a chillier start to the day today. we've got patches of fog around as well. this was the scene yesterday. quite cloudy at times, but also rather mild. today it will fill noticeably colder and some of the fog could linger into the afternoon. a bit of a murky start this morning for many. but we should all see some sunshine into the afternoon. some of us lucky enough to get the blue skies into the morning. the winds are light,
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which isn't helping with the fog clearance, and it will feel colder than yesterday. top temperatures between 7—9 celsius. it'll lead onto a mostly clear night tonight, staying dry and temperatures dropping to about 3—4. possibly a touch of frost for a time again. this is tomorrow. this is storm barbara towards the north of scotland. it will turn very windy. we could have gusts of up to 40—50 mph at times. it should stay dry on friday, though. over the christmas weekend, mostly dry and still very windy. christmas eve is looking quite cool. by the time we get to christmas day it will be very mild again and in fact we could have temperatures all the way up to 13 or 14 celsius. quite grey, with some brightness around at times, all weekend in fact, and then settling down again into next week. i'll be back again with the latest from london news in half an hour. bye for now. welcome back. this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. thank you for being with us on the
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thursday morning. our main story: german security services are facing questions about why they ended a surveillance operation on a suspect who is now the subject of europe—wide man—hunt, following the berlin lorry attack. anis amri was known to have ties to a radical islamist group. his residence permit was found in the lorry which drove into the christmas market on monday, killing 12 people. at 8:10am we will be speaking to a former undercover police officer about how german police will be co—ordinating that man—hunt across europe. the government is to invest £440 million in expanding high—speed broadband. it is expected that the funds, which will be recouped from the government's superfast broadband programme, could bring better connectivity to an extra 600,000 rural homes. the government aims to deliver high—speed internet to 90% of
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properties by the end of next year. violent crime committed by people aged over 65 in england and wales has increased by almost 80% since 2012. the figures obtained by a freedom of information request by bbc breakfast relate to offences ranging from minor assault to murder. the rise in the number of crimes recorded is in part being put down to police changing how they log crime. doctors and charities have described a new treatment for multiple sclerosis as a landmark development. the disease, which affects the brain, often causes difficulty in walking. it is hoped that the ocrelizumab will offer hope for patients, after a successful trial of around 2,000 people. vladimir putin has ordered the government to restrict the sale of a whole not intended for human consumption after 60 people died and 40 were hospitalised in siberia. the
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victims drank our solution containing methylated spirit. mr putin also wants new rules involving tougher penalties for bootleggers. —— bath solution. the nhs will pay for ten blind patients to have so—called bionic eyes, to treat an inherited form of blindness. the bionic eye is a retinal implant which interprets images captured by a miniature video camera worn on a pair of glasses. five patients will be treated at manchester royal eye hospital and five at moorfields eye hospital in london next year. they will then be monitored for a year afterwards, to see how they get on in everyday life. spending too long looking at sites like facebook could be making us more miserable and envious, according to new danish research. the study from the university of copenhagen is the latest to suggest social media could have a negative effect on our mood. the impact is worst for those who do not leave comments, apparently, but scan through and read about the success of other people. so if you are going to look, if you
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don't want to feel too miserable, comment, apparently. and back in again for tiny animals. we will go up close and personal now, as one photographer has tried to capture the expressions of the world's tiniest animals. this gecko is one of the images taken by an amateur photographer, who spends his spare time capturing close—ups in his native indonesia. it looks like it is laughing, doesn't it? earlier we said this was a frog with... what did we say? when isa a frog with... what did we say? when is a cricket not cricket, when it is an orchid mantis. that is on the head of that frog. thank you to the eagle eyed viewers who spotted that. he says it can take a week to edit one single photograph, and he is actually a full—time nurse. with a real talent for getting triple frog action when needed. that
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sounded... no, no. sort of wrong. carol will have the weather for you, she will tell you about a storm on its way, barbara. storm barbara is here, storm michael is in the building. and a storm in rugby union. what to do with players with concussion, this is the latest incident coming from the north. the rugby players association is saying that the northampton saints should have been punished for allowing winger george north to play on after being knocked out. the concussion review group found that george north should not have been able to continue, but said that saints medics had acted at the time in the player's best interests, and so wouldn't face any punishment. 0thers, though, believe the rules need to be updated. the protocols these players go
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through when they go off the field is not worth the player it is written on. it is experimenting on players' brains, five, ten, 30 minutes... if you have to take a player off to have a concussion assessment you must suspect concussion and they should stay off. experimenting in that part of the game which is most brutal, it means when a player goes back the impacts will be huge, and this is what is wrong. in that review has made nine recommendations, so watch this space. it will be at least six months before the wimbledon champion petra kvitova can play again. surgeons are confident the two—time wimbledon champion will be able to return to the court, but all the fingers on her playing hand were injured, and doctors say her rehabilitation will be rather slow process. graham carey's penalty earns league two plymouth argyle a third—round fa cup tie against liverpool. it went to extra time at rodney
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parade. plymouth missed one penalty and won a second, which graham carey scored to set up a tie worth £500,000. steve holland has been given thejob of england assessment manager on a permanent basis. holland, currently chelsea's assistant coach, has worked alongside gareth southgate for three years, firstly with the england under—21s, and then the senior team, during southgate's spell as interim manager. so this isn't a huge surprise. at the world darts championship, the three—time semifinalist james wade made it through to the second round. the man nicknamed the machine had a few faults against his dutch opponent, beating him 3—0. and the next 0lympic games is predicted to cost £12.4 billion, and even though the tokyo organisers are looking for savings, that would make it the most expensive games ever, beating the amount spent on the sochi winter olympics. it is six times more than originally expected. the tokyo games organising committee cite the fact that they have had an earthquake and tsunami,
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which have increased costs, and they said in the original file they hadn't allowed for costs like surrounding greenery and temporary toilets. and christmas as expensive as well. the terrible link. talking about christmas traditions, you have some in yourfamily. christmas traditions, you have some in your family. gemma christmas traditions, you have some in yourfamily. gemma says christmas traditions, you have some in your family. gemma says every year they bring down their mum's old christmas tree with the icicle lights. it goes in the roof with a black bin bags over it every year but we bring it out and she says the year the light do not work it will go in the bin. they have a drumroll and they switch the lights on, and they have never let them down. that is lovely. i love your one, dan. we have a family pantomime. it is the same script, always cinderella, but a different theme every year. so strictly cinderella, cinderella on ice, cinderella on water, i am a cinderella get me out of here... we doa cinderella get me out of here... we do a murder mystery, so this year i
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am alfred hitchcock on christmas eve. you look like you are the organiser of this, michael.m eve. you look like you are the organiser of this, michael. it is my mum, actually. she sent us the part so mum, actually. she sent us the part so that we can get it ready in advance. i make sure we all go out, and we lay a trail of flour wherever we are, and they have to find the right trail. we have to negotiate, because it is also my husband's birthday. so basically we have to negotiate and protect... he is allowed a whole hour. he gets one hourfor his allowed a whole hour. he gets one hour for his birthday. we really have to protect it, this is his birthday for one whole hour. that is a nice tradition to have. keep sending them in, they are great to hear. we hear lots about how difficult it is the own your own home and get the first rung on the property ladder. homeownership rates amongst 25 —year—olds have dropped
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by more than half in a generation, a staggering statistic. it is amazing how much has changed in the last couple of decades. lots of different reasons, which we will have a look at. these figures from the local government association have been looking at this issue of home ownership among 25 your olds, and they found that only 20% of 25—year—old is now owned their own home. in context, a couple of decades ago it was more like 50%. we asked a handful of young people out christmas shopping in manchester about their plans for owning their own home. i think it would be financially hard, but obviously with the help of mum and dad, i think it is possible, but it will be very hard. but mac it is not even something i can consider at the moment. the kind of money that someone my age terms moment. the kind of money that someone my age terms is moment. the kind of money that someone my age terms is never moment. the kind of money that someone my age terms is never going to be anywhere near enough to start thinking about looking at mortgages, things like that. the best thing you can do is rent. i think it will take mea
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can do is rent. i think it will take me a while to save up for a deposit, andl me a while to save up for a deposit, and i think it is a sign of independence. i'm 24, and i recently moved back with mum and dad, trying to save for a deposit. that is where iam at. to save for a deposit. that is where i am at. at the moment i live with my mum and dad, looking at buying a house rather than renting, because i feel it is a bit throwaway money, renting, but it is a struggle trying to save up. my nan has helped me out a bit, and i managed to get a promotion recently, so getting there. so you need a helpful man and a promotion, it seems. —— helpful nan. what more do you need, a helpful nan, a promotion, how difficult is it for 25 your olds to get on the housing ladder?m difficult is it for 25 your olds to get on the housing ladder? it is hugely difficult, and the fundamental reason is we have a shortage of housing. we should be building 250,000 new homes here and
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we have been falling woefully short of that target for many years. it stands to reason that, you restrict the supply, the price of it is going to go up. there is still a huge appetite for home ownership among my generation. although a lot of people have embraced the renting lifestyle, there are still so many people who see it as a way of having your own asset and having a home you can call your own. you see headlines in the papers all the time, cheapest mortgage rates of all time. if you can't get on the housing ladder now, when will you be able to? it is all very well having cheap mortgage rates, but with rising housing prices, you need a huge deposit to get on the housing ladder, and at the same time you are paying more and more of your net income on renting. so i think this new report shows that without state subsidies, the average amount that renters are spending on housing is 61%. that is huge. 20 years ago we did not have student loans are size they are now,
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stu d e nts student loans are size they are now, students graduating with tens of thousands of pounds of debt. is it even possible to get a mortgage within the first few years of leaving university, when you have that debt on your bank balance?m is interesting that we have become so is interesting that we have become so accustomed to debt. if our generation have come out of university they have been used to living on an overdraft and then they have a student debt. it is really quite strange for them to get into the mindset of saving 10% of their income every month, that they would need so much more to be able to get on the housing ladder anyway, so they need help from the bank of mum and dad. what about looking at the other side, the spending habits which might have changed? these days you have mobile phone bills, tv subscriptions, are we spending a bit more in our early 20s than we might have been 20 or 30 years ago?” think that is possibly a fair point, because the older generation would say that houses were not handed out free when we were younger. we still had to save a huge amount and buy property that was a bit down at heel property that was a bit down at heel, that needed the life breathed back into it. i think this
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generation perhaps wants to have the housing set up in a much more clean cut way, you know, we see all these pictures on it to grahm, on facebook, on twitter, on social media, of the perfect lifestyles, and perhaps our generation wants to set foot in a house and not necessarily have to put the work into it, and have the roll up their sleeves and do it up. thank you very much. still pretty tricky for 25 —year—olds at the minute. as we have talked about it often, you have to get the deposit and it is taking longer and longer, isn't it? this is breakfast. the main stories: german security services are facing questions about why they ended a surveillance operation on a man who is now the suspect in the berlin lorry attack. broadband services in some rural areas will be given a boost worth hundreds of millions of pounds, as the government allocates more funding. let's get the weather forecast from carol. barbara is in town and she is
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not pretty? that's right. storm barbara is moving across the atlantic now and will affect us tomorrow. different degrees of how we will be affected, but today we have patchy fog in southern counties of england. that could take until lunchtime to clear. then we will have squally showers. lots of e—mails about the word squally coming in. that's when the wind speed changes by more than ten knots for the duration of one minute and then goes back down. these conditions are dangerous. so you could have a wind speed of 30 mph, gusting to 54 a minute, then back down to 30. what we have is patchy fog in the south of england, which will slowly lift. then we have sunshine. a few showers for england and wales. squally showers continue across northern ireland and scotland, the gusty winds around the showers. we also have a wintry element to it, with hale, thunder,
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and sleet at lower levels. it will be cold in the northern half and cooler than it was this time yesterday and through the afternoon across southern counties. it evening and overnight temperature under clear skies will drop quickly and in rural areas we will have frost. just malaria is because the breeze is picking up. in scotland and northern ireland for a time the showers fade, the wind eases and then here comes storm barbara. by the morning parts of north—west scotland will have gales. the met office has an amber weather warning out, this is to be prepared. 0ne down from the top level, which is red, for wind. wind will be a feature of the weather. we've also got heavy rain, which will produce a lot of surface water and spray if you are travelling. towards the south—east and getting into the south—east after dark. behind it we have showers. the winds will pack a punch. storm force gusts
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of wind across the far north of scotla nd of wind across the far north of scotland and into the northern isles. across western areas, 80 mph. windy across northern ireland, up to 70 mph, and 60 across the north of england. likely to be travel disruption, possibly some structural damage, especially further north. as we get into christmas eve things are quieter and more like today. there will be some dry weather in england and wales variable amounts of cloud, but we have rain across the north of the country, eventually getting into northern england and also north wales, accompanied by gusty winds. the difference between squally and gusty. into christmas day and interesting day. look at the isobars. that's telling you it will be windy across the land, but the tightest squeeze in the north. here we will have the strongest winds and again gusting to gale force. we also have the weather fronts sinking south. this is a cold fronts are
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behind it we import cold air. for it sink south we could have very high temperatures for christmas day. record—breaking potentially. we have to be 15.6 for that. aberdeen for example could hit 16. if it does it will be a record breaker. then cold air comes will be a record breaker. then cold aircomes in and will be a record breaker. then cold air comes in and we could see a white christmas in parts of scotland. just tell us a bit, you've been talking about storm barbara and what might she mean for travel plans? she could have an impact? absolutely. we could have slight delays or cancellations for the fairies, power outages, that kind of thing if you are travelling in a light vehicle that could be quite treacherous as well. and the strongest winds are going to be across the far north of mainland scotla nd across the far north of mainland scotland and the northern isles. here we have gusts of up to 90 mph will stop across the rest of scotla nd will stop across the rest of scotland it will be very windy, especially in the north. gus of 80 mph, do the same thing applies. for
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northern ireland we have 70 mph, still take x care. strong winds. in northern england we have gusts of up to 60 mph. —— take extra care. into southern england the winds inland are more likely to be about 30 mph, so are more likely to be about 30 mph, so noticeable but not as strong as the north. and we heard earlier there have been a few problems in heathrow and gatwick as well. we will keep you up—to—date with that. thank you. the run—up to christmas is also a busy time of year for our police forces. we've been looking at the different challenges they face. this morning as part of our special policing series, steph has been behind the scenes of the new headquarters at durham police headquarters to find out about the work involved. good morning. what you are seeing here is one of the call handlers. this is not the tea m the call handlers. this is not the team who will deal with the 999 call that come in and they will decide who to dispatch to. police say it
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has been fairly quiet overnight, but i've also been told not to say the "quiet" word. 0verall crime is falling, by the violent crime has seen a falling, by the violent crime has seen a rise. that's what we are going to talk about. we've got the president of the police officers association, the chief constable here, and the youth violence co nsulta nt here, and the youth violence consultant and campaigner. first of all, why do you think violent crime is on the rise? two things. the first is that violent crime encompasses a wide area, so harassment, stalking, things like that are included. the 60% of all violent crime doesn't involve any injury. but when we look at the top end, which is knife crime, if you actually ask offenders what induces them to still committed that crime it is the fear of getting caught. so
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if they don't fear getting caught then they are more likely to commit that sort of serious crime. what do you think on that? you work with young people and people who have been involved in gangs and knife crime. i would say it is the need for a better partnership with the community and with services, that will prevent a young person from even carrying out a crime. it is and prevention, it is getting into the minds of young people, why they feel the need to carry knives in the first place. so you don't think stop—and—search is good ? first place. so you don't think stop—and—search is good?” first place. so you don't think stop-and-search is good? i think it is necessary but the challenge for the police if they never have the proportionality and it keeps breaking down relations between the community and police. as someone who has been on the frontline as a police officer for over 20 years, what do you think? i think young people carrying weapons, there are numberof people carrying weapons, there are number of reasons. some of them carry for protection, there is a
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gang culture at the moment which actually... people feel they have to be safe leaving their homes and all the rest of it. when it comes to stop—and—search, it is necessary, however it needs to be intelligence led, do we need to have the intelligence there to be able to stop the right people with regards to the crimes we are looking at. there has been a fall in stop—and—search cases, by about a quarter. the thing that made a difference? the evidence isn't there to be able to answer that question, but what i am really pleased with is four out of ten stop searches now result in an arrest and further action. so it is very clear that police officers are listening to the sort of advice about janet and kat have spoken about, but it has to be fair. if the public sees it as being done with proceduraljustice and if the police officers are seeing to be
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acting ina the police officers are seeing to be acting in a fairway, in a proportionate way, then they will help the police. we don't want young people to carry knives, we want the community to help us to dissuade people from carrying knives in the first place. so you are all talking about the partnerships and relationships between the community and the police officers. do you see that actually been a reality, that there could be a relationship there? i would like to hope there could be one, but i don't see one at present. what would change it, what would make the community happy to liaise with police? i think the sergeants, the commanders, actually having conversations with the mentors and youth workers within their areas and understanding the young people. once that's done then i think we can say safely that we are building better relations and also for the police when they stop—and—search it isn't what's being done, it is how it is being done and the level of either
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aggression or condescending tone or sarcasm that's against young people is what makes young people and the police not have the relationship that they could have. and that results in lower convictions because if you are dealing with young people ina if you are dealing with young people in a particular way and unfortunately one of their peers get murdered, to them come and get them to give evidence or co—operate with police will be far and few between. there is the diversity issue as well. how can police better reflect communities they serve? you have to have effective engagement at the root of it and there needs to be some sort of long—term plan around diversity. at the minute it's a bit ad hoc. you will go from different constabularies with different measures being put in place. positive action potentially isn't used as effectively as it could be and itjust used as effectively as it could be and it just needs used as effectively as it could be and itjust needs to be a long—term plan which is consistent across all constabularies, equals the issues
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that black and asian officers and communities face within the uk are more or less similar up and down the country, but there's nothing in place to address those issues. there's so much more we could talk about. thank you very much your time. we will be showing off more of this fascinating headquarters in little bit later in the programme. hopefully go back to the armoury as well! and keep your traditions coming in. andy has a pork pie with bread and butter every single christmas day. excellent. time for the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, from bbc london news. i'm sonya jessup. the mayor of london has accused the government of ignoring new evidence which shows more than four in ten southern rail trains have arrived late over the last five weeks. the figures for southern, which has been badly affected by strike action, are the worst of any rail franchise in the country. the mayor wants transport for london
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to take control instead, but the transport secretary says he only wants tfl to be closely involved in developing services. meanwhile, a lorry carrying one of southern train's carriages caused delays on the roads in south—east london last night. that was after it became stuck trying to get around the corner. traffic in crystal palace was held up for half an hour. a chinese businessman has revealed his plans to make a buckinghamshire pub a household name back home. peter zang's company has bought the pub and he wants to develop a chain in asia with exactly the same name. the pub is well known there, after david cameron invited the chinese premier for a drink there last year. there's no concept like the british pub in china at the moment, for example people could drink, have brunch and also have afternoon tea, or talk about business, watching football and drink until the late evening. there is no such concept, which is why we think there's a huge opportunity in china like that. time for a look at the travel now.
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problems on overg round problems on overground have cleared up problems on overground have cleared up and it all seems be running well. have a look at the fog on the roads. this is the a4 in chiswick. there is no woolwich ferry. some delays to flights at gatwick and heathrow as well. the good news is tower bridge is due to reopen again at midday after being closed for nearly three months. the maintenance works have finished earlier than expected. time for a look at the weather. good morning. it's a chillier start to the day today. we've got patches of fog around as well. this was the scene yesterday. quite cloudy at times, but also rather mild. today it will fill noticeably colder and some of the fog could linger into the first part of the afternoon. a bit of a murky start this morning for many. but we should all see some sunshine into the afternoon. some of us lucky enough to get the blue skies into the morning. the winds are light, which isn't helping with the fog clearance, and it will feel colder than yesterday. top temperatures
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between 7—9 celsius. it'll lead onto a mostly clear night tonight, staying dry and temperatures dropping to about 3—4. possibly a touch of frost for a time again. this is tomorrow. this is storm barbara up towards the north of scotland. it will turn very windy. we could have gusts of up to 40—50 mph at times. it should stay dry on friday, though. over the christmas weekend, mostly dry and still very windy. christmas eve is looking quite cool. by the time we get to christmas day it will be very mild again and in fact we could have temperatures all the way up to 13 or 14 celsius. quite grey, with some brightness around at times, all weekend in fact, and then settling down again into next week. i'll be back again with the latest from london news in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast. with dan walker. and louise minchin. an international manhunt for the
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main suspect in the berlin christmas market attack as it emerges he was being watched until a few months ago. anis amri was known to have ties to a radicalface questions anis amri was known to have ties to a radical face questions about why they dropped their surveillance investigation. —— a radical group. german authorities face questions. good morning. also on the programme. a boost for oral broadband. the government pledges to provide nearly all houses with high—speed connections within a year. we have made 1.6 million cars in the uk this year, the most since 1999, 80% of them are sold abroad. an investigation reveals a big rise in violent crime being carried out by the over 65 is. we look at the possible causes. good morning, iam
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possible causes. good morning, i am at durham police headquarters, as part of hours series on policing in britain, so i will show you around the building. and we will have a chat with the newly promoted sergeant. more from me later. in sport. rugby players' brains are at risk, according to an expert after a review into an incident, involving wales international george north, a doctor says suspected concussion must be taken more seriously. a real christmas! mince pies. that is christmas. and obviously, christmas pudding. and obviously, christmas pudding. they're the traditions we think of as quintessentially festive — but what's really behind our christmas customs ? we'll be finding out. and carol has the weather. good morning. we have got patchy fog across southern counties of england this morning which will be slowed
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good morning. first, our main story. german security forces face questions about why they were ended asa questions about why they were ended as a veil operation on a suspect now the subject of a europe—wide manhunt following the berlin lorry attack. anis amri had ties to a radical islamist group and his residence permit was found in the lorry that killed 12 people on monday. still on the run, the most wanted man in europe. anis amri. police are offering a reward of 100,000 euros, and warn he may be armed and dangerous. his residence permit was found in the lorry. and he has used six different aliases, and three different nationalities. more details are emerging rapidly about anis amri. he was 24 years old today. his family said he left
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tunisia for italy in 2011, where he was jailed forfour years for arson. last year, he moved to germany, where his claim for asylum was rejected. but german officials did not have the correct paperwork to deport him. he had links to an islamist network, and was known to the authorities. he had been under surveillance, but this was stopped because of a lack of evidence. 12 people were killed and dozens injured in the attack on the christmas market on monday evening. the man who should have been driving the lorry, lukasz urban, from poland. missing, feared dead by herfamily, fabrizia di lorenzo, from italy. dalia elkayam, from israel, also has not been seen since. her husband, rami, is seriously ill in hospital. last night the christmas market reopened, no longer a place filled with noise and laughter. instead, berliners came to pay their quiet respects to the victims, as the investigation goes on. we will speak to a former undercover
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police officer about how the german police officer about how the german police officer about how the german police of coordinating the search and what should be their priorities. the government is to reinvest more than £440 million to improve high—speed broadband coverage across the uk. it is expected the funds, which have been recouped from the superfast broadband programme, could bring better connectivity to an extra 600,000 rural homes. our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones reports. connecting rural homes across the uk to fast broadband has meant an investment of £1.7 billion of public money. and nearly all of that has gone to bt. the compa ny‘s contracts with councils or local authorities mean it has to return some of that money if more than 20% of homeowners sign up when the fast broadband service arrives. now, the government says that this cash clawback, coupled with efficiency savings, means another £440 million can be
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reinvested in the programme. there is a target of reaching 95% of homes with superfast broadband by the end of 2017. ministers believe that is within reach, and that up to 600,000 more homes and businesses could be hooked up with the new programme. but critics say bt has been using the wrong technology, connecting homeowners via a copper wire to a cabinet, rather than laying fibre—optic cables straight into homes. rivalfirms, including sky and talktalk, are now promising that they can deliver faster fibre connections than bt, and without needing public money. the queen and the duke of edinburgh are expected to make a decision this morning about when they will travel to norfolk for christmas. they postponed their annual trip to sandringham yesterday, because they both had heavy colds. they spent the day at buckingham palace recovering. on tuesday, they hosted their traditional christmas lunch
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for the extended royal family. you can see fog which is affecting some of the airport in london, more on that later. violent crime committed by people aged over 65 in england and wales has increased by almost 80% since 2012. the figures, obtained by a freedom of information request by bbc breakfast, relate to offences ranging from minor assault to murder. the rise in the number of crimes recorded is, in part, being put down to police changing how they log crimes and people staying active for longer. doctors and charities have described a new treatment for multiple sclerosis as a landmark development. this disease most often causes difficulty with walking. 100,000 people are affected by ms in the uk and it is hoped this will offer new
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hope to patients after a successful trial of nearly 2,000 people. this is really big news for people with primary progressive forms of ms, for which there are no treatments available on the nhs. primary progressive ms means that people's disability will worsen. what this drug has shown is that it can slow the reduction of disability for those people, so this offers real hope firefighters are warning of the risks of carrying e cigarette batteries after one caught fire in somebody‘s pocket. the man was left minor injuries when the device caught fire. he was out shopping in leeds. investigators said he was keeping batteries in his pocket protected and that people should avoid storing them alongside other metal objects such as keys and coins. and he had minor injuries, but other people around him had a lucky escape. fortu nately, lucky escape. fortunately, that couple had already walked past his pocket. the nhs will pay for 10 blind patients to have so—called "bionic eyes" to help treat an inherited
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form of blindness. the bionic eye is a retinal implant which interprets images captured by a miniature video camera worn on a pair of glasses. five patients will be treated at manchester royal eye hospital and five at moorfields eye hospital in london next year. they will be monitored for a year afterwards to see how they get on in everyday life. after decades of not really being able to see anything at all, seeing movement, colour in some cases, shapes and just knowing where things are can be just shapes and just knowing where things are can bejust quite shapes and just knowing where things are can be just quite significant change ina are can be just quite significant change in a person's capabilities really. change in a person's capabilities really. dense fog is causing problems with flights at some of britain's major airports this morning. departures from heathrow are likely to be severely delayed due to low visibility. flights from gatwick and london city are also affected. passengers are advised to check with their airline before travelling. spending too long looking at sites like facebook could make people
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miserable and envious, according to danish researchers. the study from the university of copenhagen is the latest to suggest social media could have a negative effect on your mood. the impact is worse for those who don't leave comments, but scan through the success stories of others, it found. it does not say what happens if you do read the comments, that could make it worse. that is often the most interesting bit! that is often the most interesting bit! it's been a stellar week for the bbc breakfast team, first with ore 0duba's strictly victory and now, breakfast reporter tim muffett has won celebrity mastermind. you'll be used to him covering stories from around the uk, but last night, tim took on double paralympic gold medalist kadeena cox, journalist david aaronovitch and cbbc‘s lauren layfield to lift the trophy. his specialist subject? the films of danny boyle. well done, tim!
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one of my favourite things is his marvellously understated way of accepting his victory. just a nod of the head. yes, you write, i am victorious! huge congratulations, really well done. thank you for being with us this morning. we can return now to our top story and get the latest from berlin, where authorities are hunting for the man responsible for the lorry attack on monday evening. after the attack, police detained a pakistani asylum seeker but released him afterfinding no pakistani asylum seeker but released him after finding no evidence linking him to be attack. a europe—wide manhunt is under way for a 24—year—old tunisian asylum seeker called anis amri. his identity documents were found in the lorry but police did not issue an arrest warrant until 48 hours after the attack which gave him a two date head start on security forces. and it emerged he has been under
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surveillance by security services and he was discussed by counterterrorism police as recently as last month. joining us now in the studio is peter bleksley, a former undercover police officer. more details about this man emerging, do you think mistakes have been made? clearly, he was kept under surveillance according to reports and there must have been a reason for that. there would have been a reason as to why they stopped that surveillance. clearly, their timing of that was poor as it would appear. why did they stop that? it isa appear. why did they stop that? it is a question of resources, i suspect. and priorities. you cannot keep every suspect under surveillance 24/7 ad hoc committee is very challenging for security services. but bits and pieces are creeping out about his previous activity, his criminal past. and there will quite rightly be questions as to why did they stop that surveillance? there is a huge
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forensic investigation ongoing and the principal evidence is the lorry at the scene he was meant had be known on that monday evening in berlin and that will be pored over now? yes, that lorry and the cap will contain a wealth of forensic evidence and will help investigators pieced together the history. where was this lorry hideout, what happened in that cab? how did the u nfortu nate happened in that cab? how did the unfortunate driver meet his death? there may be dna, fingerprints, other evidence they have not disclosed to the public. the other striking thing is that we appear to have quite different of cctv in the uk than in germany and that is to do with privacy rules. there does not seem with privacy rules. there does not seem to be much evidence of where he went to next. yes, we are the most watched nation on earth. our civil liberties questions around cctv and it isa liberties questions around cctv and it is a fact of life and if you move
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around a city in all likelihood in the uk, you will be captured on cctv many hundreds of times each day. other european cousins, european neighbours, they are not so keen on cctv. they have more strident and stringent privacy laws so they do not have the blanket coverage that we have. how easy is it for somebody like this ring search across europe, an international search going on 48 hours, how easy is it to grow underground? can he be found? he will need help to be on the run for any length of time can he needs money, food, shelter, change of clothing, and he will need help with that. he is very much a wanted man. his picture is europe—wide. every law enforcement agency across europe and perhaps further afield will be aware of his photograph and the fact that he is very much wanted. he will need help. is he being harboured
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somewhere in the community that is perhaps detached from police and security services? we shall see. but the one thing i can guarantee is that he be found. at the moment, police are warning he is potentially extremely dangerous. yes, of course. there have been reports a firearm was involved in the hijacking of the truck. we will see a lot of armed police involved in this operation to find him. he left the identity card in the cab, did he do it deliberately as a calling card to say catch me if you can always some kind of mistake? either way, he is now identified, there is a 100,000 euros bounty on his head, he is very much wanted. he is going to be found. thank you very much for your time. so many questions, he is your‘s number one wanted man at the moment. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: german security services are facing questions about why they ended a surveillance operation on the man
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who's now the suspect in the berlin lorry attack. broadband services in some rural areas will be given a boost worth hundreds of millions of pounds as the government allocates more funding. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. it is not looking too good at their places? tomorrow will be the scenario, but there is patchy fog affecting southern counties that will take until to clear. when it does come across england and wales we are looking at some sunshine and northern ireland and scotland, we continue with squally showers. that is the forecast. showers, rain, thunder and lightning, hill snow and sleet at lower levels. being blown around in the gales around the
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squally showers. it means, when the wind speed changes by more than ten knots, about 11 miles an hourfor at least a minute and then it reverts back to what it was, and we are talking gusts. cooler in the far south and it was yesterday but it will be cooler generally further north. heading on through the evening and overnight, the temperature will drop quickly under clear skies. battocchio frost around but not a lot because the breeze will pick up. showers across scotla nd will pick up. showers across scotland and northern ireland will fade for a time. storm barbra arrives introducing heavy rain and gale force winds across north—west scotland. it is no plus scotland and the northern isles but the met office has this amber wind warning. this is where we will see the strongest winds. i will come onto the winds in more detail, but heavy rain moving from the north—west heading south eastwards. if you are
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travelling there will be surface water and spray on the roads and it will be a windy day where ever you are. the strongest winds will be in the northern half of the country. gusts across the far north of maine in scotland and the northern islands, 90 mal an hour is storm force. 60 mal an hour gusts across northern england. particularly the further north you are, more likely to encounter some structural damage. likely to be some delays to transport with planes, ferry crossings, bridge crossings for example. do take extra care if you are on the move. on christmas eve, a little bit quieter. the england and wales, dry weather around and sunshine. the scotland and northern ireland, gusty winds as opposed to squally winds. rain to a company that. temperatures seven to about 10 celsius. as we have to beat 15 point six
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celsius. it is possible, somewhere like aberdeen could hit 16 celsius. this front going south is a cold front bearing rain and behind it we start to pull in once again colder air. he might start in aberdeen with 16 celsius in the day. the cold front with the rain going through and we could return to wintry showers. we could have the combination of record—breaking temperatures on christmas day, but also a white christmas. but we're not expecting a white christmas in the south. we have some of the business news.
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good morning. britain built more cars in the first 11 months of 2016 than any full year since 2004, data from an industry body showed on thursday, putting the sector on course to make more vehicles this year than in any other since 1999. demand around the world of the cars continues to grow. for in every five ca rs continues to grow. for in every five cars being sent overseas. the world's oldest bank looks set to be bailed out by the italian government as part of a 20 billion euros rescue package. italy's monte dei paschi di siena had hoped to raise e5bn. however, the bank admitted on wednesday evening that it had failed to secure an "anchor" investor. monte dei paschi is now likely to be bailed out by the italian government from a e20bn fund the state is setting up to rescue and is it unfairfun fairs? the competition watchdog is probing the 100 million funfair market amid concerns that punters are being taken for a ride. the competition and markets
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authority is alleging that the showmen's guild of great britain is restricting competition and reducing the potential for new attractions tojoin fairs. that is it from me this morning. back with more business news next week. hgppy week. happy christmas, thank you very much. this morning we've been hearing about a rise in violent crime committed by the over—65s. it's just one of the many challenges facing police officers today. as part of our policing britain series, steph has gone behind the scenes at the durham police headquarters to find out how they cope with the different pressures. i think she is back in the control room again. iam. this room again. i am. this is the main control room where they will be taking all of the emergency calls that come in from this area. these guys will be taking the calls and deciding which police officers to send to which locations to deal with all the different crimes they are getting here today. they deal with something like 1000
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calls here. but if you look at the national picture, it is only one in five calls which are crime related. these guys are dealing with vulnerable and missing people, mental health concerns and welfare. lots of different things. we will be speaking to the chief inspector later on. you mentioned about one of the findings from our research to do with pensioners and the fact there has been a big rise in the number of people over 65 committing crimes. graham satchell has been looking into it. you said it was a long sentence? he was a lifer. he killed his wife. stuart, in his 70s, is talking to nick, who is 60. both are convicted fraudsters. nick is still on probation. i don't feel old at all, and because people are fitter and healthier and more active, they are going to carry on doing stuff and stuff leads to problems. problems like crime. the over 60s now the fastest growing age group in the prison population. figures obtained by this
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programme show a dramatic rise in police recorded crime for people over the age of 65. violent crime in the pension age group, for example, is up 79% since 2012. the numbers are relatively small, up from just under 4,000 in 2012 to 7,000 incidents recorded last year, but almost half of all crime police recorded in this age group was violent. i think we have romanticised older people. we think that just because they're getting older they'll be the sweet old lady. but they're not. they're frustrated, lonely and angry. this criminologist says some older people getting more violent is easily explained. the frustration of being an old person with not enough to do, with social services being cut, there's a sort of failure of the social contract with the elderly that leads to anger and resentment. so are britain's pensioners really becoming saga louts?
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there are some other things going on. for years and years police recorded crime figures were massaged to meet certain targets. today, the way police record crime has completely changed. police forces are now looking to make sure we record things accurately, ethically and that's shown by the number of crimes that have gone up over the past two or three years. i think officers might have gone through an incident five years ago and used their professionaljudgement. two people in their late 60s or 70s having an argument, that might qualify now as violent crime, which they would then record. i don't think they would have done that five years ago. so this is the property, graham. we have four bedrooms here, one is an emergency room. this is the first refuge in the country specifically for older women. we filmed it when it opened last year. the charity that runs it, eva, has seen women in their 60s, 70s and even 80s come here for help. many, many times he went for me.
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blacked eyes, just a variation of beatings over the years. this woman, who we are calling sarah, was abused by her husband for almost 20 years. i'm now 63. how old is he? 65, coming up, ithink. he has just got older and nastier. when you were younger, did you feel as though if you had reported what was happening that the police would have taken you seriously? no, no. but now it's a different world. they do take it seriously. and that is a significant change. police are now investigating domestic violence and historic sex abuse cases much more assiduously and that's one reason for the rise in today's figures. whether it's growing anger and resentment, or that justice is finally catching up with offenders, more and more older people are ending up on the wrong side
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of the law. i have come from the call centre area to what is called the silver command room. it is in here they will basically make big decisions around complex cases. so it might be around complex cases. so it might be a firearms operation or drugs raid. these guys are strategically trying to work out how best to solve the crime is maybe going on. they use this room about three times a week. it is not happening every day, these serious crimes. it is very calm in here. a lot going on in terms of the decision—making. they have done a mock—up of drugs raids, so they have been working on that this morning and the information is on the board about who might be detained already, about who might be detained already, about whether subjects might be. it is fascinating. although i am
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curious about subject number one who has been detained. i am wondering what the scrubbed dab bit sad. maybe we will find out that later on and i will be showing you around the headquarters later on. steph, we can imagine all sorts of different things. conspiracy to something, we will work it out. conspiracy to steal the biscuits. christmas traditions are always important. one family dress up their pony. now iam one family dress up their pony. now i am really jealous. one family dress up their pony. now iam reallyjealous. i have one family dress up their pony. now i am reallyjealous. i have been looking for one of those for my pony for ages. it started with the pony‘s mum 30 years ago. louise has treated in to say, making streams of party poppers above the
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dining table. and diane says she always makes her own crackers. here they are. keep sending those in. we will talk more about christmas traditions later on. see you ina christmas traditions later on. see you in a few minutes. good morning, while many of us get ready for the christmas break, the web shows no sign of slowing down. towards the north and west, blustery showers. we have also had the dense fog across parts of the southeast this morning. that will clear hopefully by the middle part of the day and southern and eastern areas see a decent amount of sunshine. showers to the south—west, wales and northern ireland. heavy and thundery and wintry, especially over high ground. it will feel cold with gale force winds towards the north. this
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evening on the night, it street and in that wind strengthens towards the north west by the end of the night with rain working in here. this is the first sign of what is the comp tomorrow. the met office has issued the amber weather warning for the strength of the wind because of approaching storm barbara. this deepening area of low pressure and ice bars show very windy weather, especially across the north. 90 mph across the northern isles and perhaps 80 mph for north west scotland. and further south, 60—70 mph through northern ireland and northern england. not as windy further south but blustery everywhere with heavy rain working its way quickly southwards and eat was through the day. brighter skies with showers, a mild day, 9—12d. christmas eve is quieter. still blustery but not as windy. showers again toward the north and the west.
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dry weather, 5—11d. on christmas day itself will be very windy, perhaps destructively, some rain at at times and feeling very mild. welcome to the programme. this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and ben thompson. has the santa rally skidded to a halt? the dowjones is in touching distance of the historic 20,000 mark, but can it hit the top spot before christmas? live from london, that's our top story on thursday 23rd december. us markets have closed at record highs 17 times since donald trump won the presidential election. we'll ask an expert if the run is set to continue. and a
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