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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 27, 2016 12:00pm-1:01pm GMT

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a warning that four in every five young carers are not receiving the help they need from social services — according to the children's commissioner for england. this is often systematic support for vulnerable family members who may have mental illness or physical disabilities. voters in some parts of the country are to be asked to show id in pilot schemes — to try and counter electoral fraud. recovered from the black sea — the flight data recorded from the russian military aircraft which crashed, killing 92 people. the "prevent" anti—extremism programme is defended by leicestershire‘s chief constable — simon cole says the initiative has described some of the criticism as "hysterical". also: tributes to the character actress, liz smith, who's
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i def the age of 95. does this thing play cassette? no, it'sjust cds. the bafta winner played nana in the royle family, amongst many roles. choreographer, sir matthew bourne, described her as a "true british legend." and, be careful what you wish for for your daughter's 15th birthday... what happened when a million facebook users responded to mexican father's invitation. the children's commissioner for england says the vast majority of young carers receive no support from local authority
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social services. anne longfield says four out of five are "going under the radar". the local government association said funding cuts meant councils are being forced to make difficult decisions. helena lee reports. this is daniel, one of thousands of young carers in england. he's ten and lives with his mum, florella, who has a brain tumour. daniel is her main carer at home. when he's not at school, he helps around the house, but he constantly worries about his mum when he isn't there. i started becoming more responsible and i started doing the cleaning. started doing cooking better. i started paying more attention to what my mum was doing. then, because i wasn't around, i was always worried about how she was. today's report by the children's commissioner found of the 160,000 young carers in england, just over 128,000 children aged
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5—17 may not be known to local authorities. and councils identified 160 young carers in england who are under the age of five. this is often systematic support for vulnerable family members who may have mental illness or physical disabilities. they need to be able to flourish at school, they need to be able to enjoy childhood and grow up, whilst they're still offering the familial support that you would expect. the local government association says funding cuts to children's services means councils are being forced to make difficult decisions about what support they are able to provide. but it says all young carers should receive an assessment to find out if they need help. england's chief nursing officer has
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urged the nhs to invest more in caring for people at home. professorjane cummings says money is being wasted on keeping elderly patients in hospital unnecessarily. she says reform is needed to make sure patients don't get caught between different parts of the system. doctor mike smith is a trustee of the patients' association and agreed with the comments, explaining why some parts of care can work away from a hospital board. at the moment there are about one in ten people sitting in hospital beds that don't need to be there, blocking places for others who do need to be there for others who do need to be there for acute services, costing the best pa rt for acute services, costing the best part of 1% of the nhs budget and it could be so much betterfor their life and health, there are figures to show they get better quicker in a place they are happy with. in most cases, this is when they are not in need of acute services, it is their
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own home. there are places in the uk where it is working well. health ca re where it is working well. health care professionals would be happy for themselves or their nearest and dearest to be treated in these places because they are working so much better, if you look at the figures in terms of health and also 0utlook figures in terms of health and also outlook and life itself, mortality figures, they are better as well. people are happier when this happens, that's where the majority of them want to be and so would the taxpayer be. its £3500 a week to keep somebody in hospital and if you are doing that when they don't need to be there, eating up the nhs budget, it's not good, in a variety of ways, not least in terms of life and health. a senior police officer has defended the government's often criticised anti—extremism programme known as prevent. simon cole, who is chief constable of leicestershire and one of those in charge of implementing the strategy, said some recent criticism had been ‘hysterical‘. speaking on bbc 5 live, he responded to the claims
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by the national union of teachers that the prevent strategy often causes suspicion and confusion in schools. it could do those things, if it wasn't presented as a sensible safeguarding operation, and of course, the duty has been extended to include people like teachers, parts of the health sector, because that's often wear these vulnerabilities show in google safeguarding work, so it would be unsurprisingly didn't show in relation to the world of counterterrorism. how does teach teacher spot extremism, they are not qualified to spot it?|j teacher spot extremism, they are not qualified to spot it? i have kids at school and i would hope my teachers try to make sure that they are safe. i think teachers are hugely skilled, able to identify where children potentially vulnerable, starting to change their babies, and all this is
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is about making sure those children are ok. have you got the numbers, how many people are identified as being a potential problem end up not being? about one in ten of the people referred we think we have concerns about, going forward, typically about two thirds of those, we believe we have... hold on, one in ten who are referred, you have got concerns about, so in other words, nine out of ten are wrongly identified? they're not wrongly identified, they are often going to be vulnerable in other ways. they are not extremists. that is identified by a calm and mitchell, thoughtful process which i think we would all agree is good at a time when the counterterrorism risk level is severe, and has been for a long time. voters will have to show proof of identity before being allowed
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to vote in a government pilot scheme to reduce electoral fraud. a number of councils in england, including birmingham and bradford, will trial the scheme at local elections in 2018. northern ireland already requires voters to show id before casting their ballot. a british man is in a critical condition in hospital in antigua after being shot in the head. 37—year—old christopher tester from torquay was injured during an attempted robbery at his parent's restaurant on christmas day. he is being kept in an induced coma and friends have launched an appeal to fly him back to the uk for treatment. liz smith, the actor best known for playing nana in the sitcom the royle family, has died at the age of 95. a spokesperson for her family announced she passed away on christmas eve. peter ruddick has been looking back at her life. what is she?
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she's a vegetarian, nana. 0hhh! could you have some wafer thin ham? could she have wafer thin ham, barbara? no! 0hhh. from dotty nana norma speakman in the royle family to eccentric baker letitia cropley in the vicar of dibley, liz smith carved out a niche playing scatty but hilarious older ladies. it's chocolate spread! chocolate? yeah, yeah. you promise? yeah, yeah, yeah. yeah. all right, i will. very...unusual taste. well, i put in a little taramasalata as well. she had been through a tough childhood, and an even tougher early career as a single mother of two with a series of part—time jobs. it was only when she was nearly 50 that she got her breakthrough after being offered a theatre role by mike leigh. it was like a wonderful
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realisation that at last i was being given a chance. it had come, it had come at last. she may have started late, but she made up for lost time with award—winning roles in tv and film, resulting in her being awarded the mbe in 2009. but it will be as nana, the queen of sheba, for which she will be most remembered. russian investigators have found one of the flight recorders from the military plane that crashed into the black sea on sunday killing all 92 people on board. the plane involved was a tupolev15a — they have now been grounded until a cause is determined, although officials say terrorist involvement is unlikely. angus crawford has this report. recovered from the sea bed, twisted
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and broken, part of the plane's fuselage. thousands of people are still involved in the search, scouring the area where the search you rolled tupolev15a scouring the area where the search you rolled tupolev 154 came down. you rolled tupolev154 came down. sinai traces show part of the aircraft in shallow water a mile out to sea. —— sound harsh races. specialist teams have found one of the plane's black boxes, it's has been taken away for analysis. the military flight from moscow to syria had more than 90 passengers and crew on board. it touched down to refuel in sochi but crashed shortly after taking off again. translation: all found parts have been taught sure
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and handed over to investigators. the search operation has gone on the 24—hour no breaks, during the day, one more body was found and recovered. aci’oss one more body was found and recovered. across russia, they have been services to pray for the dead. a day of national mourning was declared. 0n a day of national mourning was declared. on board were more than 60 members of the russian army's world—famous members of the russian army's world —famous choir. their members of the russian army's world—famous choir. their base in moscow has become a shrine. in sochi, recovery teams use the latest technology, the cause of the crash unknown. pilot error or mechanical failure, focus for investigators. terrorism has been all but ruled out. so in the waters of the black sea, the search for answers continues. the american astronomer vera rubin,
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one of the pioneering scientists who discovered compelling evidence of dark matter, has died — she was 88. she won numerous awards and honours for her groundbreaking work, although many questioned by she was never awarded a nobel prize. in 1993 she was awarded the us national medal of science. the headlines on bbc news: 8 out of 10 young carers are not receiving the help they need from social services according to the children's commissioner for england. voters in some parts of england will be asked to show id under pilot schemes to curb electoral fraud. russian crash investigators recover a flight data recorder from the military aircraft, which crashed into the black sea, killing 92 people. time now for a look at the sport.
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good afternoon. chelsea's smile is getting wider after club record 12th league win which extended their lead to seven points. that advantage could be trimmed to six if liverpool win later today. jurgen klopp's side can move into second and reduce the gap, if they beat stoke in today's only premier league game. atmosphere changes everything. so hopefully all our supporters are recharged after the 25th and 26th, full of good food and in the best mood for this game. and, erm, give everything you can. stoke beat liverpool at anfield last january in the league cup but they don't have a great record at the ground, manager mark hughes says that doesn't weigh on his mind, though. it took us 40 years to get a win
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there, so we hope it's not going to be as long next time. i don't think there is any pressure on us, we're going there with the intention of getting a positive result like we always do. we never go there with the intention of protecting what we have got. we always think at some point in the game we will have opportunities so it's about staying in the game and taking them when they come. qpr have lost their last five league games. england batsman ian bell could only manage 21 runs for perth scorchers as they set sydney sixers a target of 131 in australia's big bash league. in reply his compatriot sam billings
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is currently on 39 runs with the sixers 48 for one after seven overs. ashley giles has been released from his contract to allow him to join warwickshire. giles, who steered lancashire to promotion to division one of the county championship and to the g20 title, willjoin his home county in the new year. england forward chris robshaw has withdrawn from the harlequins team to play gloucester today at twickenham due to injury. that's the only fixture in the premiership. in the pro12 there's an all welsh encounter as 0spreys play scarlets. that's all the sport for now. details are emerging of george michael's charity work, as tributes continue to pour in since his death on christmas day.
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for years the singer had donated money to organisations, and worked undercover at a homeless shelter. nick quraishi reports. he was a huge personality, whose life played out in the headlines. but behind this onstage persona, details of george michael's charitable donations are now emerging. he had volunteered to work in a homeless shelter, provided it was kept quiet. he paid for a game show contestant to have ivf treatment. and gave sport relief £50,000 when david walliams swam the english channel in 2006. children, cancer patients and many other charities also received donations. last night, tributes came from those closest to him. george michael's partner, fadi fawaz, said he'd neverforget
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this christmas, having found him dead, peacefully in bed, first thing in the morning. his former long—term partner kenny goss paid tribute to "an extremely kind and generous man", saying he loved him very, very much. at his home in goring—on—thames in 0xfordshire, friends came to remember their icon. there were emotional scenes at another of his houses, highgate in london, from people struggling to come to terms with his death from suspected heart failure. i know that 2016 has been a bad year, and it is very sad for a lot of artists, but it was george michael that got me, that was. i think we grew up with him, was the main thing. george michael's career spanned nearly four decades, and these fans will make sure his music lives on. nick quraishi, bbc news. let's cross to our correspondent emily unia who's outside
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the singer's house in north london. it would seem, still, a stream of people coming to that house there. absolutely, all morning more and more people have been arriving here, they want to gather outside the house just behind they want to gather outside the housejust behind me, some quite large crowds now gathering, a police car isjust passing, large crowds now gathering, a police car is just passing, making a large crowds now gathering, a police car isjust passing, making a large noise, but people have wanted to stop, they have laid flowers, they are lighting candles, leaving m essa 9 es are lighting candles, leaving m essa g es of are lighting candles, leaving messages of love to george michael. just to express how sad they feel that he has done. these are people who grew up with his music, they remember enjoying it when they were teenagers, dancing around, it's that kind of sense of loss that so many people feel, they didn't know him
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well, but they are genuinely sad. also, we're getting a different picture emerging, he was a superstar, and incredibly famous pop singer and everybody knew him for his music but it turns out that george michael also had a different side, he was generous, kind hearted person who was volunteering a homeless shelter anonymously, that's what he was doing, donating money to all sorts of different people who had sad stories and he was able to help them with his money, and he did that secretly, not letting people know how generous he was. that is a picture that's just starting to build now, it's interesting that a lot of the celebrity tweets are saying things about his work as a musician, you can see these messages, from simon cowell, but from eltonjohn, "i have lost a beloved friend, the kindest, most generous soul and brilliant artist".
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it is both the artist and this generosity that is emerging, the true picture of george michael. for many of us, it's the time of year to either be sat around the dinner table or in front of the television. but with a rise in streaming services, gone are the days of the whole country watching the same programme at the same time. sean farrington has been looking at the boom in on—demand. we've been gorging this christmas, notjust on food but on data. this year the average household has consumed over 130 gigabytes of data each month, the equivalent to more than 200 episodes of planet earth 2, the iplayer‘s most popular programme of the year. the way we get that data into our households is through broadband and the faster the connection the more likely we are to download our favourite programmes. the better the connection, 30 or 40 megabits a second, the more likely we are then to use online video like sky tv, amazon prime, bbc iplayer or netflix.
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i watch netflix and youtube. i use it for minecraft. i want to binge. i want to start at the beginning, watch it all night. i watch iplayer on the computer and sometimes on my mum's phone and dads phone. in the evening i will sit here and watch netflix with my husband. i will do something on my phone and my daughter will be upstairs with her laptop and occasionally, not every night at all, and occasionally the youngest will be in this bed with this best babysitter, the ipad, and he mayjust watch a bit of youtube to settle him down for the night. although there has been a big improvement on 2015, the regulator, 0fcom, says that large parts of the uk are still not able to get a decent broadband connection. 0ver1 million homes not able
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to download fast and offer a modern family's needs. broadband is so important now to families, particularly younger families, where everybody wants to be online at once doing their own thing. it is now is important to them as electricity and decent running water. the problem is that there are still frowned a thousand homes cannot stream one video will own two or three videos. it is important because the availability of faster broadband has meant we're taking more control of what we watch and more particularly when it suits us. the number crunchers at the bbc‘s iplayer think they'll see traffic on their website increased by 36% around the christmas period. when it's christmas time you watch more together. because there's nothing else to do. i don't mean that. you're around each other more. you don't go to school, you have no homework. as we enter 2017 we noticed that the kids and family space is underserviced at the moment so we will invest heavily in high quality content that does not patronise young audiences. on average we watch over four hours
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of television a day. mostly through the familiar tv channels. still lots of room for growth for the likes of amazon and netflix with a particular challenge for 2017, can they get the whole family together in the same room to watch something online? if you're someone who suffers from regular aches and pains, scientists in oxford think they may have found the reason why, and it goes back millions of years. it's all to do with the way humans have evolved, as smeetha mundasad has been finding out. 3—d printing the bones of our distant ancestors and imagining how we might look in thousands of years' time. an unconventional way to approach an everyday problem. why is it that the humans of today get so muchjoint pain? to answer, scientists looked back at hundreds of ancient skeletons and say evolution could be
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partly to blame. this is a 30,000—year—old thighbone and it's this area here which has changed. we call it the neck of the thighbone. as we have gone through evolution, this area is getting thicker and thicker whereas we know there is a direct link between this area getting thicker and early arthritis. that is not all. they can nudge their model forward, having a guess at how human skeletons may change in 5,000 years' time. these 3—d printed models show what the bones of the future human could look like. scientists say by studying them closely, it's clear that the human skeleton is changing and they say if current trends continue, it's likely that arthritis and pain will get more common. let's consider the shoulder.
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as we began walking on two legs the shape of the shoulder shifted to compensate for a new gait. look at this space getting narrower and narrower over millions of years. scientists say this leaves less room for tendons that attach muscles to bone to move. leading to more pain as we reach overhead. and if this pattern continues, its set to get worse in the future. researchers say while evolution may have left us with some unharmful hangovers, physiotherapy and using the right posture can help conquer some of the downsides of our design. they hope projects like this one might help design the joint replacements and surgery of the future. thousands of people have attended a girl's birthday party in mexico after her father's online invitation, saying everyone would be welcome, went viral.
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more than a million facebook users said they would come to celebrate the 15th birthday of rubi ibarra in a rural village in the central state of san luis potosi. rubi's father, crescencio, later clarified in another video that the invitation was meant to go to the local population but promised that nobody would be turned away. after the stormy weather that has affected northern parts of the country over the last few days, things over the next few days looking quieter, a lot of fine weather today but as you can see, some high cloud has been streaming its way in, telling the sunshine hazy in places. maybe the odd spot of rain across the far northwest of scotla nd of rain across the far northwest of scotland and wales ec some
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brightness and sunshine, six, 7 degrees, not feeling too bad, but as soon as it gets dark, it will get cold, temperatures dropping, at touch of hard frost, some folk could be quite dense, and it could hang around for quite a while. through the welsh marches and the midlands, there could be some for glenn greenwald a long, which will make it feel quite cold. something a bit milder across northwest scotland, temperatures of 11 degrees here. good afternoon. some voters in england are to be asked to provide photographic proof of identity before being allowed to vote. the measure is to be piloted as part of efforts to curb electoral fraud. a government—commissioned report, published in august, concluded that the authorities sometimes turned a blind eye to fraud in areas with large pakistani or bangladeshi communities because of "over—sensitivities about ethnicity and religion." here's our political correspondent tom bateman.
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an election victory, but one steeped in claims of corruption. this man became mayor of tower hamlets in east london two years ago. the people of this borough willjudge me on my reputation. he wasjudged instead by an election court which threw him out of office. he'd heard claims of voter fraud and intimidation. it prompted a wider view of election practice, carried out by sir eric pickles. the call for the introduction of id checks at polling stations in england. today, the government backed his proposals. it undermines electoral systems. which is why we need to make sure when it comes to vulnerable individuals inserting communities who want to exercise their individual right to vote, they are
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given the opportunity of doing so without intimidation. the report said authorities were turning a blind eye to corruption, what he called the worrying and covert spread of electoral fraud. called the worrying and covert spread of electoralfraud. he accused some bodies of denial and failing to challenge electoral rigging because of the threat of violence. some people vote to the will of elders in some pakistani and bangladeshi backgrounds. some voters will have to bring proof of identity, a passport or with photo photo id. but changes to the voting register had already harmed the party and some claimed this would make things worse. the people most likely not to have a passport or driving licence are going to be the poorest. like the decision last year to knock a lot of people off the
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electoral register will basically had the labour party. the number of voter fraud claims had the labour party. the number of voterfraud claims are had the labour party. the number of voter fraud claims are relatively low. the government hopes these plans will help reduce them further. the children's commissioner for england says the vast majority of young carers receive no support from local authority social services. anne longfield says four out of five young carers, who look after sick and disabled family members, are invisible to the authorities. the local government association says funding cuts mean councils are being forced to make difficult decisions. helena lee reports. this is daniel, one of thousands of young carers in england. he's ten and lives with his mum, florella, who has a brain tumour. daniel is her main carer at home. when he's not at school, he helps around the house, but he constantly worries about his mum when he isn't there. i started becoming more responsible and i started doing the cleaning. started doing cooking better. i started paying more attention to what my mum was doing.
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then, because i wasn't around, i was always worried about how she was. today's report by the children's commissioner found of the 160,000 young carers in england, just over 128,000 children aged 5—17 may not be known to local authorities. and councils identified 160 young carers in england who are under the age of five. this is often systematic support for vulnerable family members who may have mental illness or physical disabilities. they need to be able to flourish at school, they need to be able to enjoy childhood and grow up, whilst they're still offering the familial support that you would expect. the local government association says funding cuts to children's services means councils are being forced to make difficult decisions about what support they are able to provide. but it says all young carers should
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receive an assessment to find out if they need help. helena lee, bbc news. a senior police officer has defended the government's anti—extremism programme, known as prevent, saying some criticism of the initiative has been hysterical. simon coles, who is responsible for implementing the strategy, said prevent is ‘absolutely fundamental‘ in helping tackle terrorism. england's chief nursing officer has urged the nhs to invest more in caring for people at home. jane cummings says money is being wasted on keeping elderly patients in hospital unnecessarily. she says reform is needed to make sure patients don't get caught between different parts of the system. rescue teams have recovered one of the flight recorders from a russian military plane that crashed into the black sea shortly after takeoff on sunday. the russian defence ministry said an engine, landing gearand parts of the fuselage had also been found.
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all 92 people on board the aircraft are thought to have died when it came down near the resort of sochi. angus crawford reports. recovered from the sea bed, twisted and broken. part of the plane's fuselage. thousands of people are still involved in the search, scouring the area were at the 30—year—old 154 came down. specialist teams have found one of the flight recorders. it has been taken away for analysis. the military flight from moscow tula tauqir in syria had more than 90 passengers and crew on board. it touched down to refuel in sochi, but crashed shortly after taking off
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again. across russia, there have been services to pray for the dead. a day of national mourning was declared. 0n a day of national mourning was declared. on board, one more than 60 members of the russian army's world—famous members of the russian army's world —famous choir. they‘ re members of the russian army's world—famous choir. they're based in moscow has become a shrine. in sochi, recovery teams use the latest technology. the cause of the crash, unknown. pilot error or mechanical failure of focus for investigators. terrorism has been all but ruled out. so, in the waters of the black sea, the search for answers continues. angus crawford, bbc news. the japanese prime minister, shinzo abe, is in hawaii, for an historic visit which will see him pay his respects at the site of the japanese attack on pearl harbour in 1941. shinzo abe will be accompanied by the us president barack 0bama, making the visit the first by the leaders of both
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countries since the attack. japan's prime minister will pray for the dead, but will not issue an apology. the magistrates association has expressed concern about plans to allow people to go online to enter a guilty plea, or pay fines for some minor offences. it says an internet—only system could lower public confidence. the ministry ofjustice said it received "a significant number" of responses to a consultation about the plans, which it will now consider. the actress liz smith, best known for playing nana in the bbc sitcom, the royle family, has died, at the age of 95. she acted in numerous television series and films, and won a bafta for her role in ‘a private function' in 1985. daniela relph looks back at her life. what is she? she is a vegetarian.
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could she have wafer thin ham? the unforgettable nana. liz smith was the eccentric, lovable centre of the royle family. very unusual taste. the eccentric, lovable centre of the royle family. very unusualtaste. i put ina royle family. very unusualtaste. i put in a bit of taramasalata as well. in the vicar of dibley, more of her comic timing. wonderful birthday, frank. success came late for liz smith, a successful single mother of two children, had a series of part—timejobs mother of two children, had a series of part—time jobs and mother of two children, had a series of part—timejobs and did not mother of two children, had a series of part—time jobs and did not start acting seriously until she was 50. it was like a wonderful realisation that at last, i was being given a chance. it had come. it had come at last. what was it. what was what? it
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was cheese. she owed the first acting role to the director, mike lee. she loved playing batty old ladies. because she was a batty old lady, but underneath she was really focused person. but she loved it, the more eccentric the better. she adored being a bonkers person. does this thing play cassettes as well? she may have started late, but made up she may have started late, but made upfor she may have started late, but made up for it. don't do curly this time barbara, last time it was like jeremy clarkson. never more so as nana, liz smith at her best. the actress liz smith who has died at the age of 95. the next news on bbc one is at 6.00pm. now on bbc one we join the bbc‘s news teams where you are.
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goodbye. you're watching the bbc news channel. the time is 12:40 p.m.. 2016 has been rollercoaster year. game—changing events such as the us elections and britain's vote to leave the eu have had a major impact on the global economy. so what might 2017 have in store? the bbc‘s economics editor, kamal ahmed has been looking into his crystal ball. as we look forward to 2017, three big issues will dominate the economic landscape. america and a new man in the white house. europe, the struggle for growth and what will happen when britain leads the european union. and china, the economic powerhouse, will it continue to perform? we have
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gathered together some of the biggest experts in the world to ask them their opinions in the year ahead. let's start with america and the big unknown, the new president, who does not come out of a box marked conventional or predictable. wattel donald trump's policies be on things like global trade, relations with china and on the huge fiscal stimulus tax cuts on investment and infrastructure he has promised the world's largest economy? he doesn't have a track record in politics. analysts have said the markets have given him a thumbs up, and the new president has promised higher growth and has been taken at his word. they decided to focus on the fiscal stimulus, tax cuts, corporate tax cuts. we actually think those things are likely to come. again, not as much as trump is talking about, but
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the us economy probably needs three times as much spending on its crumbling infrastructure. when it comes to political risk, companies, governments, markets and find it ha rd to governments, markets and find it hard to prize that risk? what is different about these political risk compared to previous decades, being an advanced economy, they can move markets. amid the seismic political events of 2016, europe and in america, it is sometimes easy to forget that one country at the beginning of the year was worrying the markets, one country was worrying global economists. and that country was china. after a strong 2016, what will the country serve up next year? the 2017, i think china will do 0k. next year? the 2017, i think china will do ok. but there are some international challenges china will be worried about. the attitude of the us towards china under a trump administration. donald trump has already threatened china in one
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sense, with trade sanctions, in particular a whopping great big ta riffs particular a whopping great big tariffs on chinese exports to the us. whether that will ever happen, is probably quite unlikely. but as a bargaining chip, it is something the chinese will be worrying about. worries, worries everywhere. europe, 2016 was the year of the big brexit shock. 2017 is likely to give the continent plenty more to digests. europe is facing its first set of challenges. you have elections in france, the netherlands, france and germany. you have the european central bank trying to support the economy. you have fears over growth and of course, overhanging all this, is the issue of brexit. 0ne country is the issue of brexit. 0ne country is leaving the european union. the hope is, with the elections in europe, you might see some momentum follow. more momentum for more active fiscal policies to try to
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booth police and crime commissioner boost gross in europe are selections and try and lower the inherently employment transition you have there. how much of an effect is brexit having on other european economies? if we have more tension in europe because the election results are not necessarily as pro—europe, not necessarily as progrowth, there is more friction as a result, then it may be more difficult for the uk to negotiate with the eu. financial markets across the world will be watching and waiting, as the new year approaches. they note 2017 will be dominated by three words, trump, trump, and trump. and his leadership of the world's largest economy. as we were hearing, japan's prime minister is in hawaii. where 75 years ago, an attack
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by japanese warplanes drew the united states into world war ii. mr abe will pay his respects alongside barack 0bama this tuesday, after already marking a moment of silence at the national memorial cemetery of the pacific. 0ur washington correspondent, laura bicker, reports. archive: december 7th, 1941 - a date which will live in infamy. the japanese attacks came in waves during a deadly two hours. bombs ripped through us battleships, crippling the pacific fleet and killing over 2,000 americans. survivors recalled that the once bustling port burned for hours. i had a fire hose in one hand, trying to put out the fires, and with the other i went around memorising these nametags so i could write to their parents and tell them what happened to their sons. after 75 years, a sitting japanese prime minister
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will attend a service to pray for those lives lost. shinzo abe arrived in hawaii to reaffirm a solemn promise never to repeat the horrors of that war. he'll also hold a final meeting with the outgoing us president. the two leaders have developed strong ties over the last eight years. barack 0bama was the first sitting president to visit hiroshima, a powerful symbol of reconciliation. we force ourselves to feel the dread of children confused by what they see. we listen to a silent cry. shinzo abe spoke of an alliance of hope, as the first japanese prime minister to address the us congress. i offer my eternal condolences. this bond of friendship is hugely important to japan. tokyo feels under threat from a strengthening china and a north korea which is developing nuclear weapons.
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cheers. kanpai. some fear for the future of the relationship under a new president. archive: those who lost their lives at pearl harbor would never be forgotten. but these few days will be about remembrance and laying to rest the final ghosts of a world war which brought out the worst in humanity. it's estimated that four out of every 10,000 babies is born missing either a hand or the lower part of theirarm. prosthetics can be extremely expensive and children soon outgrow them, which prompted two british dads to use their spare time and cash to see what they could do to help. zoe kleinman reports. nine—year—old isabella was born without a hand. a video of her receiving her first 3—d printed prosthetic went viral, after it was picked up by google as a highlight of the year.
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mum sarah said it has given her a huge boost. when she took it into school, and just the reaction from her friends, they were lie, "0h, cool. i wish i had something like that." so what you need to do is like bend your elbow and then the string, um, it will tighten the strings and it will bring... it will make the fingers make a fist so then you can like hold things. isabella's hand was made 60 miles away, here in swansea, in wales, by team unlimbited. and you won't believe the size of this operation. hello, guys, what's happening here? this is where we build, design, print 3—d printed arms for children. stephen and drew met because stephen was searching for an affordable prosthetic for himself. the pair now work together
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in their spare time and rely on self—funding and donations. stephen was my sixth recipient who i build a device for. show us your hand, stephen. this is the hand that drew originally built me. it got me so enthused and so excited, i knew straightaway i wanted to get involved and do the same thing. it has been a passion, really — when you see all the children who are waiting where they have got either no option or a poor option, i think that is where i needed to make a change. the 3—d printed arms cost less than £30 each to produce but the methos does not work for all prosthetics. but the method does not work for all prosthetics. the reason that 3—d printing is not normally used in a prosthetic is because the materials used cannot take the stresses and strains associated with the weight of the body and its running, twisting, walking et cetera. isabella can now
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walk the family dog. the only question is whether he can keep up. zoe kleinman, bbc news let's return to the death of the actor liz smith, who played nana in the royle family and mrs cropley in the vicar of dibley, has died aged 95. a little while ago my colleague joanna gosling spoke to the director mike leigh, who gave liz smith her breakthrough role in 1971 in his independent film bleak moments. everyone has a photograph in spotlight. we used to say, who is that funny looking woman wearing the hat. it was liz smith. i was a bit cautious, but when i met her and she hadn't acted for a while. she was demonstrating toys in hamlets,
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raising her kids. she was charming, and likea raising her kids. she was charming, and like a duck to water, a serious trooper. she came into this great single scene in bleak moments and insisted on taking her teeth out, which became one of the focal moments of the whole scene. a few yea rs moments of the whole scene. a few years later, i was asked to do my first film for the bbc which was called hard labour. i gave her the main part. if anybody has the wisdom, she is so extraordinary, so unique, so unlike an actress, so special, she should have a career. and the great thing is, she did. the fa ct and the great thing is, she did. the fact she had got to that age and hadn't done lots of acting enhanced the fact she was just a very natural character? that is not really the
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case, she was a character actress. she never played herself. she had this extraordinary face. she had a great sense of humour. what was she like, how different was she off—screen? like, how different was she off-screen? she was an eccentric, she was a charming eccentric. she played the role of being eccentric, but she was charming and generous to a fault. she loved cats, she had millions of them. she was great. and of course, she was immensely talented as a character actor. she said she owed everything to you because you gave her break. show business is a fluke. somebody is out there now who we don't know about who is better than anybody else. there now who we don't know about who is better than anybody elsem is the way it goes. was it the fact you saw her picture in spotlight?m wasn't just that, you saw her picture in spotlight?m wasn'tjust that, everyone was saying, who is that dotty woman. i
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was making my first film, and as you know, i work with no script. you call up the agency, no script and i had never made a film before, most of the agents told me to go away. but we put it together and it happen from there. did she go back to her regularjob? no, she didn't have a regularjob? no, she didn't have a regular job, regularjob? no, she didn't have a regularjob, it was christmas time and she was demonstrating toys and she did all kinds ofjobs just to make money and raise her kids. when you saw her blossoming in the later period of her life, what did you think? i am delighted. when you watch the royle family, it is a joy to see her. she was wonderful. she was one. if ever there was a one off, liz smith was it. we are seen her now in the royle family, it is
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ha rd to her now in the royle family, it is hard to imagine who else could fulfil those roles? there is no one else like that? exactly. and there never will be. it is sad she is no longer with us. it is great she lasted until the age of 95. she will probably tell you because she was a vegetarian. those of us who aren't, still by adjusting our christmas turkey, ourjulie concern. what will be your overriding memory of her? she was always, i have just done a couple of radio interviews here at the bbc with ricky tomlinson on the line at the same time. he talked a great deal of what a great trooper she was, great team player and what fun she was to have around. and she was. she would never say a negative thing about anybody. she was com pletely thing about anybody. she was completely positive. if eccentric,
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lady. you know? mike lee, remembering the actress, liz smith who died on christmas eve at the age of 95. time for a look at the weather. after the stormy weather that affected northern parts of the country over recent days, things have become quieter. with some sunshine, but with some cold, frosty start. it was cold in dorset this morning. in lancashire, bit more cloud. you can see that on the satellite picture. cloud streaming in from the west. most of the cloud is thin and hide and there is some sunshine working through the cloud. a decent amount of hazes and shine. a decent amount of hazes and shine. a bit more cloud generally into northern ireland, some parts of scotla nd northern ireland, some parts of scotland and northern england and across the far northwest of scotland, the cloud could be thick enough to squeeze out the odd spot
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of drizzle. temperatures in single figures this afternoon but not too bad way you get the best of the brightness. the best of the cloud into cornwall, but for much england and wales, some bright sunshine. but temperatures were struggling to recover. you can see the blue reappearing on the map as we go into this evening. it is very quickly going to get cold and frosty and one thing we will have tonight, which we didn't have too much of last night is some fog. chilly night, temperatures in towns and cities close to freezing. 0ut into the countryside minus five through central and northern areas. but it is the fog that could cause the biggest problems tomorrow morning, particularly if you are heading back to work for the next few days. the fog could cause some travel disruption. it could be quite dense in mid wales, the vale of york and eastern and southern parts of england as well. some of the fog will lift the ban hang around as low cloud all day. some of it will
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linger through the veil of yours. temperatures will get much above freezing. in scotland, south—westerly wind, more cloud and a bit of rain, but it will be milder. as you can see, we have a weather front not too far away from this north—western corner. providing south—westerly winds and milder air. but at times, outbreaks of rain, particularly across the far northwest of scotland. across these north—western areas, we are likely to be in double figures by the end of the week. further south, on thursday, further problems with fog. a lot of cloud by this stage and chilly. what is in some parts of the country will be forced to show id before casting their ballot. foreign private young carers on receiving the help they need. the prevent anti—extremism programme
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has been defended by leicestershire's chief constable who says some criticism of the scheme is hysterical. also, tributes are paid to the actress liz smith
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