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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  December 28, 2016 10:30am-11:01am GMT

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there is concern that the impact on insects, reliant on short grass, being overtaken by this excessive course ras growth, one of the big features of 2016. —— excessive course grass growth. just to bring you some further news about that crash on the a40, we now understand from the ambulance that this that one person is being treated with various life—threatening injuries and another with serious injuries. that is after a series of road accidents on the a40 near witney in 0xfordshire. we understand six vehicles suffered significant damage. a thames valley police spokesman has said, "thames valley
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police officers were today called at about 8:25am following reports of a collision involving multiple vehicles on the a40 near witney". we will bring you more on that when we get it. let's get the weather. good morning. the coldest weather has been across england and wales, frost inland but that is lifting. a few fog patches going into the afternoon but most areas bright and misty, there will be some sunshine too. a bit milder. and in northern ireland. more in the way of cloud, some sunshine perhaps and sunny skies away from the fog in england and wales. that fog develops more widely across england and wales this coming night and there will be some frost around as well. again further north for scotland and northern ireland with that south—westerly breeze, most areas will be cloudy and asa breeze, most areas will be cloudy and as a result will be frost free. a bit of rain sneaking into the far
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west of scotland during the day, otherwise another dry day, probably a bit greyer and as a result a bit colder across england and wales and the fog turning into low cloud. always that it milder with those south—westerly winds further north. hello. this is bbc news with me, rebecca jones. the headlines at half past ten. 80% of middle—aged people in england are overweight, don't exercise or drink too much, experts have warned. public health england says the medical system is facing a crisis because of unhealthy lifestyle. campaigners for an early brexit write to business leaders across europe, to try to build support for a free trade agreement with the eu. for accidents involving up to 20 vehicles have taken place within a mile and a half stretch of the a40
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in 0xfordshire and one person has died. south central ambulance service say there are multiple casualties and serious injuries. nhs hospitals in england have made more than £120 million last year from parking charges, a new report has found. nhs trusts have defended the charges, saying that the money goes back into patient care or maintaining car parks. now on bbc news, victoria derbyshire takes a look back at the exclusive interviews and films which have featured on her programme in 2016. this programme contains a description of domestic violence that some viewers may find upsetting. hello and welcome to the programme. over the next half an hour we'll bring you some of the exclusive interviews and original stories that we have brought to you over the last year. actor and film director adam deakin
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is one of britain's brightest talents, winning a bafta in 2012. but he was sectioned and later diagnosed with having bipolar disorder. he was one of the main people that i would find myself youtubing. you had a public breakdown yourself. i'm almost certain, as certain as i could be that had i lived later, i would have been diagnosed as having
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attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, my school report i was unbelievably disruptive, ebullient, annoying, couldn't stop speaking. i got expelled from this school and that school and the other school, i eventually went to prison. then i thought everything was fine, i kind of got over it in my early 20s and that's when everything started to go wrong. i realised that i was somehow prayed to these terrible moods. i was ina prayed to these terrible moods. i was in a play and ijust... had a kind of collapse of confidence and a general feeling that my life was kind of over. got the proper diagnosis then. i thought i had faced the beast but i was kidding myself. several years after that...
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i was lying in a hospital bed thinking i was a lunatic, not a sane person. i look back at the work i have done and i think maybe this stemmed from the bipolar. i wrote it, i directed it, iwas stemmed from the bipolar. i wrote it, i directed it, i was acting stemmed from the bipolar. i wrote it, i directed it, iwas acting in it, i directed it, iwas acting in it but when i look back to outsiders looking at me, everyone seemed to say the same thing, is quite manic. they band red bull on the set, they thought it was that at the time. one of the things i know from my experience and it still shocks me is that the people who love me best read my mood more quickly than i can myself. my husband knows when i'm manic, he sees it in my face and my eyes. i once had it so badly, i'm the least superstitious person in the least superstitious person in the world but i thought, had i even had a grain of religion in me, i would have thought god was talking
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to me, ifelt like would have thought god was talking to me, i felt likejoan would have thought god was talking to me, ifelt likejoan of arc. it was quite ripening in the end. you're obviously dealing with your own demons in the first place, going through hell, you are all over the place and then it's everywhere. how did you cope with that? i've always lived my life in a strangely public way in terms of being open about things. in the 80s, when it was quite unusual, i came out as being 93v, quite unusual, i came out as being gay, there were plenty of gay people in show business but not many who we re in show business but not many who were out at all. it was a similar thing inasmuch as, in our business it is much easier to talk about your emotions because our business is one in which emotions and experience are the kind of ingredients for the films and the books that we cook up. i ended up having this kind of breakdown but because of twitter, i was writing all this kind of crazy stuff on twitter without even realising it. sometimes ijust wish someone realising it. sometimes ijust wish someone took my phone away and just
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made me calm... i did and i feel much the better for it. next, an unprecedented admission by the former head of the british army. in an exclusive interview with this programme, he told us about how he had refused to take a controversial anti—malaria drug because of concerns over its catastrophic side effects, even though he knew the drug was being given to the troops. he was in africa shortly after taking his first couple of doses and became very unwell very quickly. he became very unwell very quickly. he became extremely depressed, not the sort of person he would normally be. normally very bubbly and personable sort of individual. he got very withdrawn and we got very worried about him. have you ever taken
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lariam? no. because bertie had that effect, every time i have taken antimalarial drugs, i have said i will take anything but i'm not taking lariam. i made myself very ill but realised very quickly i didn't have a mental health issue. that was happening, you knew you would not take lariam at the same time as members who were serving under us chief of general staff who we re under us chief of general staff who were taking lariam? —— serving under you as chief of general staff. yes, thatis you as chief of general staff. yes, that is true. but again, i think that is true. but again, i think thatis that is true. but again, i think that is because the organisation hadn't reached a settled view over whether lariam was more efficient... if it wasn't good enough you, should it not have been good enough for eve ryo ne it not have been good enough for everyone serving under you 7 it not have been good enough for everyone serving under you? because i had first—hand experience of what
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could happen, i can put myself in the same position. but other people we re the same position. but other people were being put in that position. this is true. but i come back to the fa ct this is true. but i come back to the fact that the ministry of defence as an organisation was still trying to come to a conclusion in general terms whether the beneficial and harmful effects of lariam were greater or less. the effects were almost immediate. it was as if the wiring in your brain had completely gone or had completely rewired. i did get depressed to the point of suicidal thoughts. since 1997, the british nationalformulary, which gps consult when prescribing medicines, has made absolutely clear what anyone being given lariam should be told about it. there's a series of neuropsychiatric side—effects and say that the drug must be stopped immediately if any
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of them are experienced. we've spoken to many members of the military who say they were simply not made aware of that. we were just told, this is what you're taking on the way you go. you were told there might be side effects? no, not at all. in a statement, the ministry of defence said the vast majority of deployed personnel already received alternatives to lariam and where it is used, it is only prescribed after an individual risk assessment. in many respects, i'm a broken man. the army has broken me, the government has broken me. why do the british government continue to give this drug to its serving members? reina holden was 18 when her boyfriend beat her unconscious and left her for dead in a pub car park in washington, tyne & wear. the attack was caught on cctv. she came on to our programme back in february to
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tell her story and encourage others to speak out and get help. he always used to put me down, if things didn't go his way or if he wanted to do something and i didn't want to do it, that is when the abuse would happen. also when he had no money, when he didn't have money for alcohol, his drugs. i took all the backlash of that. can i ask you, rayna, what kind of things he used to do to you? he used to pick me up, throw me against the radiator, he used to rank me about with my hair, punch me in the face, slapped me. he would call me nasty names. —— used to rag me about. he wasjust would call me nasty names. —— used to rag me about. he was just a horrible man. and i think as well, as well as that horrific physical abuse, on the controlling side of things, he would try and control access to your phone or do you were allowed to see. yeah, who i was
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allowed to see. yeah, who i was allowed to see. yeah, who i was allowed to see, who i was allowed to speak to, who i had on my facebook. there was one occasion i was on the phone to my grandad and he actually snatched the phone out of my hand and took the battery of the phone so i couldn't have any contact with him. why was he doing this to you? i don't know the reason why he was doing it to me but i think, i don't know... i think it's more to do with having control over a person. he used to like controlling me and telling me what to do. can i ask you about the attack that he committed on you in that pub car park in november 2014? yeah. i was meant to be going to meet him so i have walked down to the cross keys pub in the village in washington. i've walked into the pub and daryl was stood with his mate and two other women and he was playing pool with them. he was smacking their
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and his mate followed me out and i was just talking to a friend and ten minutes after darryl came outside and he was telling me, how come you are getting jealous? you're not my girlfriend any more... telling me that i'm worthless, that i meant nothing to him, that i was just a child to him that my family had given me too. it ended up in a massive argument and that argument led to him chasing me out of the car park. he had a pint glass in his hand and he tried to smash it on my head. it hit me six times before it shattered. he grabbed me by my hair when the blast shattered, he dragged me behind a car and he kept punching me, kicking me, punching me. when i
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was unconscious, he picked me up by my hairand was unconscious, he picked me up by my hair and dragged me halfway across the car park to a set of bins where he dropped me again and stood over my body. that was rayna holden, speaking about abuse at the hands of an ex—partner. i can tell you that she has now found happiness again with someone else. now, . can .cani . can i ask you about victoria wood? is devoted was a huge shock and people felt really close to her even though they didn't know her. you we re though they didn't know her. you were actually close to her which must have made it very difficult. were actually close to her which must have made it very difficultm was. the fact that it is kind of in the public domain as well makes it really strange. i couldn't kind of respond to it very much at the
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beginning. even though we all knew that it was probably close, still a huge shock. death is anyway, isn't it? still a huge shock. huge shock. death is anyway, isn't it? stilla huge shock. ifound huge shock. death is anyway, isn't it? still a huge shock. ifound i couldn't respond. sometimes. ifelt hugely anxious first of all, massive anxiety about it. when i was able to relax and see my husband, he just went... yeah. huge loss. still today i can't think what brought it up. we we re i can't think what brought it up. we were in the taxi coming here and chrissie with my make—up, she was very close to her and i thought, why would i think about her in the taxi? but i think everyone goes through that thing with grief where they think, they're not here! you can't believe it. 62. it's nothing, is it? no, these days it isn't. before she
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got ill, sheila fantastic. she looks really, really well. not a mark on her skin. so yeah. you may not want to a nswer her skin. so yeah. you may not want to answer this and that is fine. richie ramsay lies —— could she rationalised the diagnosis? yes. i don't want to say anything else really. that's fine. victoria's legacy is her work. people are going to enjoy her work and your work together for evermore. i hope so. that would be brilliant if it is the case. her brother wants a statue to erected in bury, where she obviously went to school. a statue of her sitting at a piano. what do you think of that idea? statue of her sitting at a piano. what do you think of that idea7m sounds gorgeous. so long as it's flattering. she wouldn't like it if it wasn't! it somehow doesn't seem
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enough, a statue, does it? you know, her work is the thing, isn't it? it's her work that, as you say, is the legacy and that stimulates everyone's memories of her and keeps her alive, it is the work. before you met victoria, which was i thinking the mid—devon tees and towards the late 70s, before that you were part of a kind of generation of working—class actors who originated from the everyman theatre in liverpool. you, peter postlethwa ite, bill theatre in liverpool. you, peter postlethwaite, bill nye. and now as you know, eddie remmer -- eddie —— eddie redmayne, tom hiddleston, they all went to eton. is that an issue for you? they are wonderful actors. i've worked with tom. they are all fantastic. it's not the fact
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that they are all doing brilliantly, it's the fact that it is very hard for working—class kids, like, it's the fact that it is very hard forworking—class kids, like, in it's the fact that it is very hard for working—class kids, like, in my day, all of us, victoria, we came through subsidised theatre and we got grants. these days, you can't get a got grants. these days, you can't geta grant got grants. these days, you can't get a grant for drama school at all. so that's a worry, then. where is the next generation of working—class actors going to come from?” the next generation of working—class actors going to come from? i don't know. presumably not through drama school, obviously. buti know. presumably not through drama school, obviously. but i think things go in cycles, i really do believe that. i was lucky to be on the wave of the michael cain, tom courtenay, albert finney, we all started in the 60s and in the 70s we really cashed in on that. it was really cashed in on that. it was really not good to have a middle—class accent. you were here posh people trying to talk like that, so that they would be accepted. because it wasn't trendy. soi accepted. because it wasn't trendy. so i was very lucky to be part of that, there was no feeling... before that, there was no feeling... before that you had to get rid of any
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accident that you had. yeah. do you think hollywood has got better or not when it comes to roles for older women? no. i don't think they're very good for roles for women, are they? you see wonderful actors... meryl streep is an exception, isn't she? julianne moore, people like that. she is 50 odd. i'vejust worked with the wonderful anette benning. it is better, she doesn't look like she has had anything done to herface look like she has had anything done to her face but look like she has had anything done to herface but i know if look like she has had anything done to her face but i know if i went there i would like like a freak, because everyone else has! you would look authentic. that's all right. i wouldn't want to do that. and you can watch the full interview with julie walters on our website. it was the craze of the summer, the
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mobile phone game downloaded more than 500 million times, that had millions wondering the streets trying to find virtual pokemon go characters. but an onion as rector and an unintended consequence caught our attention, we heard from the parents of autistic children for whom the app transformed their lives. he's been engrossed and is obsessed with it for the last five years, literally living and breathing it. very good. he's gone from hardly leaving the house other than to go
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to college to wanting to go out every night. he's found another one! when he first said he wanted to go out, i said, when he first said he wanted to go out, isaid, we when he first said he wanted to go out, i said, we will see how it goes, and three hours later we were still out. i was like, oh my god. he spent two years pretty much out of school because he was like going and being sent home because he had had a bad anxiety attack, to the point where he was doubled up on the floor in pain with his stomach, he would spend days wrapped in a sleeping bag. every time you try to ta ke sleeping bag. every time you try to take him out, he would have an anxiety attack. luke, fiona, sam, daniel. therefore, he would have lasted two minutes, we
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would have had to leave straightaway. his stomach would have started hurting, just being around people who were a bit noisy and they get loud committee wouldn't have coped. but he has stayed. it's brilliant. there's none there? oh no. what are you going to do? round that way? 0k. it's helping reinstate that mum and son bond. i've spent so long being his carer. it's just nice, son bond. i've spent so long being his carer. it'sjust nice, you know? i've not seen him this relaxed and happy ina i've not seen him this relaxed and happy in a public place for so long.
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it really means a lot. you can see that he's happy and relaxed, he's smiling. he's not ticking. it'sjust so nice, it really is. it feels like i've got a bit of my son back. high five. he's made more progress than we've seen in the last four yea rs than we've seen in the last four years in him. 0bviously than we've seen in the last four years in him. obviously it's small steps of progress but what he has made has been immense. it's made a huge difference to adam's quality of life. his life pre—pokemon wasn't
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the greatest live, shut up in his bedroom and locking himself away from everyone. if anyone had told me six months ago that a simple game like this would get him out of the house, i would have laughed at them and said no, not a chance. i never ina and said no, not a chance. i never in a million years thought this would happen. it's a huge celebration. do you like being outside? good. and we're coming out tomorrow night as well. before we go, it was one of the highlights of the year. team gb finishing second in the medals table in rio. we beat china, we beat russia and in the process we became the first country ever to improve on a home medal haul at the next 0lympic a home medal haul at the next olympic games, winning 67 in total, to more than london 2012. here's a
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reminder ofjust how inspiring team gb were. it is not the critic who counts come and not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. the credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena. whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood. who strives valiantly, who errs. who comes short again and again. because there is no
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effort without error and shortcoming. but who does actually strive to do the deed. who knows great enthusiasm and great devotions. this may be the last one? possibly, yeah. i don't want to cry! who spends himself in a worthy cause. triumphs in high achievement. who in the end if he fails, at least... thank you very much for watching. we
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are back on air onjanuary the 3rd. in the meantime you can watch our films on our programme page. good morning. the coldest weather this morning was across england and wales. we've still got some areas of low cloud and fog. that should shrink a bit and england and wales should remain dry and sunny. a milder, south—westerly wind, areas seeing more cloud. where the fog is slower to clear it will be a cold day but could make double figures across the south coast of england. hardly any wind across england and wales overnight and we will find probably more fog forming, more
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frost as well. ambridge is very close to freezing even in the towns and cities inland in particular. more cloud should keep the temperature is up across scotland and northern ireland with more breeze here as well and a limited amount of sunshine. 0n the whole with more fog lifting into england and wales, sunshine will be harder to find. the south coast faring best of all. these are the sort of temperatures and with grey skies across england and wales, the temperatures could be lower than today. one woman has died — and several people injured — after four accidents on the a40 near witney in 0xfordshire. a search is still under way off the kent coast for two missing crew members of a fishing boat which capsized last night. public health england warns of a ‘middle age health crisis' with 80% of those aged 40 to 60 overweight, inactive or drinking too much. nhs hospitals have made
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more money than ever from parking charges and fines. figures from 89 health trusts across england suggest £120 million was raised parking fees last year — that's up five

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