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tv   World Business Report  BBC News  December 29, 2016 5:30am-5:46am GMT

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this is bbc world news. the headlines: the hollywood actress, debbie reynolds, has died just one day after the death of her daughter, carrie fisher. she was 8a. she's best known for starring opposite gene kelly in singin' in the rain. the us president—elect donald trump has made another attack on the united nations after last week's security council resolution condemning illegal israeli settlements on occupied palestinian land. israel's prime minister has described as "biased" a speech by the outgoing us secretary of state, john kerry, that was one of the most highly critical in years, by any senior american official. mr kerry said israel would never find peace until it resolved the settlement issue. german prosecutors have detained a ao—year—old tunisian man in connection with the truck attack that killed 12 at a christmas market in berlin. his number was found on the phone of anis amri, who actually drove the truck. those are the latest headlines from bbc world news.
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now for the latest money news with aaron and world business report. yeah, building bridges — us president—elect donald trump promised a trillion dollars during his campaign to resseract promised a trillion dollars during his campaign to resurrect america's crumbling infrastructure. question is, will he be able to deliver? the dream thatjust won't die — we take a look at supersonic air travel, past and future. lights. they're coming. lights, camera, action, yeah, we are
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trying to put some money in the metre. welcome to world business report. one of president elect donald trump's main promises is to rebuild america's infrastructure, we're talking, of course, everything from its railways, airports, roads and bridges. the task, well, needless to say, will be formidable and the rebuilding costs high. dollars on rebuilding. the plan is to spend in the region of one trillion dollars on rebuilding. or better yet, to get someone else, investors, to spend that money. our north america business correspondent michelle fleury reports from allentown, pennsylvania. mid—morning in pennsylvania. traffic is flowing smoothly over this bridge built in the 1920s but underneath it is not ageing gracefully. this bridge was built in 1929, almost 90 yea rs bridge was built in 1929, almost 90 years old, it is an open spend all arch bridge. engineers tasked with checking the strength are worried. you can see the worst place is near
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thejoint area, so you can see the worst place is near the joint area, so that is where the most corrosion happens. this bridge, like many of america's roads, ports and airports, are starved of funds. lack of funding is a problem in the sense that there is so much money, so sense that there is so much money, so you have to decide what comes first. money isn't the only problem when it comes to building the country's roads, bridges and pipes. under president 0bama the republican—controlled congress was opposed to spending on infrastructure projects. will they change that position now that they hold the white house? their man made a point of mentioning infrastructure in his election night victory speech. we are going to rebuild our infrastructure. it will become, by the way, second to none. and we will put millions of our people to work
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as we rebuild it. mr trump's pitch is to spend $1 trillion, notjust using government money. he is also hoping to get the private sector to fund these projects with tax credits. in 1986 mr trump successfully used this model to rebuild this ice rink in new york's central park. doing the job cheaper, faster and better than the public sector. it is an experience he hasn't forgotten. so, is the private public partnership always the right tool? that depends. it is not necessarily the best will in the toolkit for every project. it is suited to large and complicated projects. the reason for that is those other projects which give you the opportunity to drive in —— innovation and the result is more bang for the taxpayer buck. in pennsylvania the need for repairs is urgent. americans want to update their nation but as donald will find
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their nation but as donald will find the overwhelming sticking point is likely to be how to pay for it. good on you, michelle. let's turn oui’ good on you, michelle. let's turn our attention to this : the head of japanese advertising group dentsu, that's him there — he's the chairman — has resigned following the suicide of an employee who had worked — well, apparently, hundreds of hours of overtime. he'll step down in january. mariko 0i in our asia business hub in singapore has been following this tragic story. it is good to see you. a tragic story. what is going on here? you know better than i do, there is a japanese phrase which basically means death by overwork. indeed it is unfortunately not so uncommon, some 2000 people die from overwork each year. in this particular case, where a 24—year—old employee, who has only been working at dentsu for
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some time, took her life on christmas day a year ago and even though it is, as i said, death from overwork, which is not uncommon, in this case she was tweeting for months before she took her own life, at 4am she said, i am still at work but i can't complain because eve ryo ne but i can't complain because everyone else is still working as well and she also said something like, you know, her bosses have criticised her for lacking femininity because she doesn't have make—up on after pulling an all—night. all of those tweets after death came to the spotlight. it wasn't picked up immediately by mainstream media because dentsu is one of the really big advertising agencies in japan but one of the really big advertising agencies injapan but it got picked up agencies injapan but it got picked up online and the criticism continued to mount against dentsu and the company has been under investigation for just over a and the company has been under investigation forjust over a month 110w investigation forjust over a month now and as you mentioned maze last night boss of the company announced he is stepping down. interesting you say the company is under
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investigation but again i am looking at reports which says japan is a country that imposes very few limits on employers regarding overtime and hours and things like that, but this particular suicide and i guess the outcry triggered japan's first white paper. yes, i think it is there to say that even though it is not uncommon in this story really broke many hearts in japan uncommon in this story really broke many hearts injapan but i think it is also important to emphasise it is not just a is also important to emphasise it is notjust a problem at dentsu. a lot of people have been coming out to share their own experience of similar working conditions in which they feel like they have really been reaching their own limit and also of course as an advertising agency it has affected clients, some employees have spoken out anonymously about this resignation of the boss and the fa ct this resignation of the boss and the fact that company has put the rule in to say that all lights must be turned off at 10pm sharp. they still have clients demands and when they
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wa nt have clients demands and when they want ideas by tomorrow morning and call at nine or 10pm, they cannot say no, so they are taking the work home. it is a much bigger issue than just one company. it is something that the country as a whole will have to tackle in the new year as well. 0k. hey, mariko, iwill talk to you very soon. thank you. mariko oi to you very soon. thank you. mariko 0i from singapore. here's a question: would you like to fly faster than the speed of sound? on a more practical level, would you like to be able to fly from london to new york in underfour hours? it used to be possible to do both, if you had the money. you'd simply step on board concorde. but concorde stopped flying in 2003. nowadays, if you want to fly supersonic, it's best tojoin the military. but that could soon change. several private firms are working on brand new supersonic designs. our business correspondent theo leggett has been asking, could we be about to go back to the future? it could be another high—speed test
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as the great bird looks ready to fly, as the great bird looks ready to fly, and fly she did. in 1969 concorde took to the skies for the first time. it was a technological marvel. the world's only commercial aircraft to fly faster than the speed of sound. concorde offered its passengers something truly unique, the chance to sit in luxury and babysit champagne while crossing the atla ntic babysit champagne while crossing the atlantic from london to new york in less tha n atlantic from london to new york in less than four hours but concorde had her problems as well —— maybe sit chapaigne. she was also very noisy and so wasn't allowed to fly many of the routes she was designed for. not only that, she was extremely costly to run and use a lot of fuel, which is why the only place you can see her now is in museums like this one. three smooth landings and it was over. concorde was retired in 2003. its reputation tarnished by a terrible accident
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three years before, and its costs no longer justifiable in an three years before, and its costs no longerjustifiable in an age of budget travel. you get more aerodynamically efficient the faster you go. so could supersonic travel make a? you go. so could supersonic travel make a ? that you go. so could supersonic travel make a? that is not as outlandish as you think. the aircraft was designed to 60 years ago. now we are looking at what we can do in the 21st century and it is far more sophisticated. the aeroplanes could be more efficient and crucially more capable of flying and making real profits on any route around the world. some companies are already developing supersonic designs. this one comes from american firm aerion to build a superfast business jet. it is not alone. boom and spike aerospace have similar ideas but others are sceptical. the prospect of taking off in new york and lending before you take off technically is still impressive to be able to do but it is still very
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much a status thing, some people will pay a lot of money to travel this way, but how often and how many people? if supersonic travel can be made relatively affordable, then perhaps it will make a comeback, but we are unlikely to see another large supersonic airliner like concorde for many years. for the foreseeable future, then, the big bird will remain one of a kind. 0k, ok, that's it. i will see you very soon. mike's back, right now. goodbye. barcodes are to be printed on medicines and medical equipment such as replacement hips and surgical tools in an effort to reduce the rate of avoidable deaths in english hospitals. ministers say the scheme could also save the nhs up to £1 billion over seven years, as our health correspondent robert pigott reports. and angiogram designed to reveal the
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condition of patient‘s blood vessels is carried out in salisbury. as part of the piloting of the scan four safety scheme, barcodes recall the materials used to treat patients, the time and place of the procedure and the name of the medical staff taking part. we can trace that patient very quickly. we scan all the equipment so there should be no drug errors. some drugs look very similarand it is drug errors. some drugs look very similar and it is to the correct patient, so we scan the patient making sure the right drug or the right blood product et cetera goes to the right patient and if they are going to roll it out to orthopaedics and other type equipment, we can then trace those back in the future against those patients. barcoding will reduce the average of an hour ata will reduce the average of an hour at a nurses spent collecting medicines and alert staff to those nearing their use by date. everything from screws used in the operations to breast implants will be barcoded so that quality can be monitored. about once a week
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tragically someone dies in the nhs because they are given the wrong medicine. we also have a number of operations where the wrong implant is put into someone's body and that then has to be changed at a later date. and if we use modern bar—code technology we can deal with a lot of these problems. one of the biggest advantages of scan for safety could be in tracing patients when faulty products have to be recalled —— scan four. nearly 50,000 rikishi women had the breast implants made by the french company pip when they were revealed to be at risk of rupturing. but patchy record keeping made it difficult to trace the patients. robert pigott, bbc news. israel's prime minister has described as an a speech byjohn kerry. it was one of the most highly critical in years by any senior american official. mr kerry said
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israel would never find american official. mr kerry said israel would neverfind peace until it resolved the settlement issue. hussein ibish is a senior resident scholar at the arab gulf states institute in washington. he told me why he thought john kerry spoke so critically about israel's present government. i think it would have been potentially a very historic speech two, three orfour years ago, especially if it was backed up with real policies with consequences. so right now it's a bit of a rhetorical exercise. but, linked to the us resolution, it does send a message to israel, that the world, including many of its close friends in the us, including in the 0bama wing of the democratic party, are ultimately getting tired of the double act prime minister netanyahu has been doing, of pretending to support a two—state solution rhetorically, while working night and day to basically make it an impossibility, through settlement activity and other policies on the ground. so there is that, but i do think it's a little bit of just
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a rhetorical exercise. it does align with the current policy. it may be a nasty shock to mr netanyahu and his very right—wing government, but the new world is mr trump and he has appointed a man to be in charge of the issue has contributed heavily financially to israeli settlements. well, no, he isn't going to be in charge of the issue. he is nominated to be the ambassador to israel. the ambassador doesn't make policy. he would first have to be confirmed by the senate. secondly, ambassadors don't make policy. so we'll definitely have to wait and see what the policy is under mr trump, and i think it is probably true that prime minister netanyahu is salivating at the prospect, and is actually trying to exacerbate

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