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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 29, 2016 1:30pm-2:01pm GMT

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hello. this is bbc news with simon mccoy. the headlines at 1:30pm... vladimir putin has announced a ceasefire between the syrian regime and the armed opposition. the russian president said that both sides had signed documents to start fresh peace talks. translation: the first document between the syrian government and armed opposition on cessation of fire on the territory of the syrian arab republic. the second document isa arab republic. the second document is a set of measures on control over the ceasefire regime. singin‘ in the rain star debbie reynolds has died aged 84 after suffering a stroke — just a day after the death of her daughter carrie fisher. the head of the royal college of gps has warned that patients could be waiting more than a month to see a doctor this winter. nhs england says it's boosting funding for the sector. two men have been found dead at a flat in st austell. devon and cornwall police are treating the deaths as unexplained. now a look at the sport.
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bradley wiggins may have retired yesterday but but mps on the culture sport and select committee say that the package —— that the was not enough evidence that it did not contain a legal decongestant. one of his former team—mates says his achievements in cycling won't be repeated. he agrees his use of performance enhancing drugs from medical reasons have cast a shadow. it is a real shame that all this has come right at the end of his career and there is a cloud and it is understandable. in terms of the rules of the sport he has broken none. the world governing body have said there is nothing to answer for. but there is still obviously a question of has it been ethical and i think that is a separate issue, but it is certainly not the ideal way that bradley wiggins would have wanted to retire. has that been potentially a little
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bit of a push into him making this decision now? potentially. will we see him back in six months racing? who knows? former world champion ricky hatton has called for more support for boxers once their careers are over. hatton said if there were a professional boxing association in place, others may be able to avoid the depression that hit him when he retired. hatton fell into heavy drinking and drug—taking, and tried to take his own life on several occasions. he said boxers who retire tend to spend the rest of their lives on their own. england all—rounder david willey was in good form for perth scorchers, as they beat melbourne renegades by four wickets in their latest big bash match. willey took 2—15, as melbourne got to 148 from their 20 overs. and perth looked to be cruising towards their target, with former england batsman ian bell making a rapid 22. but there was a batting collapse, it went down to the last ball
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with perth needing three to win — and ashton agar hit it for six. australia captain steve smith has enjoyed himself in melbourne overnight — and not for the first time! he scored a century for the third test match in a row at the mcg, as his side ended day four of the second test against pakistan with a 22—run lead. the aussies are a65—6 in theirfirst innings — with smith 100 not out — but it's unlikely they'll be able to make anything of it, after four days of bad weather. as swansea city continue their search for a new manager, west ham boss slaven bilic says bob bradley wasn't given a fair chance. the american was in charge forjust 11 games and 85 days, before he was sacked after swa nsea's boxing day defeat to west ham.
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bilic has felt the pressure of speculation over his own job, so has sympathy for bradley. andy murray is in abu dhabi for his first event of the new season — he'll face the winner of the match between david goffin and jo—wilfried tsonga, which is underway now. the first grand slam is only a couple of weeks away too — the australian open — and while murray has lost in the final five times, he goes in as world number one this time. i played really well there in the past and it hasn't happened for me, so i need to do something a little bit different this year. but i love the conditions there, i enjoy the tournament a lot. i'll be going in hopefully playing well with a lot of confidence, because of the way i finished 2016. that's all sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. that's bbc.co.uk/sport and i'll have
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more in the next hour. more now on our top story — and... the russian president, vladimir putin, says the syrian government and main opposition groups have agreed to a nationwide ceasefire, which will come into effect tonight. the truce was brokered by russia and turkey, which will also act as guarantors. our russian correspondent steve rosenberg has the latest from moscow. russian television showed pictures of president putin meeting his defence minister and his foreign minister and at this meeting it was announced that three agreements had been signed in the syrian conflict. the first was a ceasefire between the syrian government and the syrian rebels. the second dealt with the nuts and bolts of the ceasefire, how to monitor it and so forth. the third agreement was an agreement to start peace talks in the capital of
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kazakhstan. president putin said that this was the moment that russia had been waiting for and had been working hard to achieve. he said that the agreements were fragile and that the agreements were fragile and that a lot of attention had to be given to them to make sure they actually happened and were successful. but he praised the defence ministry of russia and the foreign ministry and said it was their efforts in working with moscow's partners in the region that brought this about. we believe the ceasefire will go into effect from midnight. it wasn't clear whether that was moscow time or damascus time. but certainly this has been presented in moscow as something of a diplomatic coup. turkey's foreign minister had hinted that a bit earlier but it would appear that turkey and russia will act as guarantors. what will that mean in practice? it has been clear over the last few months that russia has been working very closely with turkey and also with iran in trying to push the
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peace process in syria. certainly the fall of aleppo was a key here. it seems if the us administration, president obama, they have been left behind completely by this. it was interesting in this televised meeting the russian foreign minister said it was important that other countries in the region be involved in these peace talks like saudi arabia, qatar, iraq, jordan. there was no mention at all of the current administration of the us, although he did say that he hoped that when donald trump got his feet under the table in the white house that the us administration would join these effo rts administration would join these efforts for peace. but no mention of john kerry and the efforts he has been making over the last few years to bring peace to syria and no mention of president obama. it is a big snub a thing for the current us administration. we would appear to have some idea as to who will be affected by this but do we know who it is not going to apply to, islamic state presumably not part of this?
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that is right. it would apply to islamic state and it won't apply to almost wrapped and other groups who are considered terrorist groups by the united nations. we'll waiting for further details. the united nations. we'll waiting forfurther details. the the united nations. we'll waiting for further details. the other interesting point that president putin made was that he he said he agreed with the proposal of the russian defence ministry to reduce the number of russian troops in syria, so russia preparing to reduce its military contingent in syria. we have heard before promises by the kremlin to cut the number of russian troops. i think we heard back in march, president putin said that it was mission accomplished back then. and yet the military operation continued. russia's troop numbers remain high. we have to be a little bit wary about that especially since he made it clear that russia would maintain its airbase, the main airbase in syria. and deep value to
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this is the situation in aleppo which president putin can point to say it can work in practice. -- the to do this. that is right. in recent months russia has been criticised heavily by a number of western governments for its military operations, particularly in aleppo. a number of western governments accused russia of war crimes or complicity with war crimes, but i think today is the moment that russia tries to say to the world, look, we have wanted a diplomatic solution to this conflict, we have been calling for a peace process, america hasn't delivered, we have delivered, this is the best chance that syria has or has had for a long time to achieve peace. and now russia is calling on the world to join this peace process. but it does feel as if the us administration has been totally sidelined here and the russians believe that by teaming up with turkey and iran they could really create a meaningful peace
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process. more now on the news that the hollywood actress debbie reynolds has died at the age of 84 — the day after the death of her daughter carrie fisher. hollywood's finest have been paying their tributes. the star trek actor william shatner described her as "one of the last of hollywood royalty. " he wrote on twitter... "it breaks my heart that she is gone." his fellow star trek actor george takei said... "there is nothing harder than having to bury a child. debbie died of a broken heart, but she's with her daughter now." damejoan collins hailed her as "a wonderfully warm friend and colleague", tweeting that she was praying for debbie's son todd fisher and granddaughter billie lourd. and chat show host larry king tweeted a picture of himself interviewing the actress on his show, saying... "debbie reynolds was pure class. she was loving, talented, beautiful, unsinkable." six years ago, when debbie reynolds was a guest on the bbc‘s hardtalk programme, she opened up about her three divorces, going bankrupt and bringing up five children as a single mother. doi
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do i have to work? yes, everybody has to work and it is always bills, i raised my children. they went to university and they always had a mother that worked, so they had a lot of cars, colleges, you know, so i think that all parents work, don't they? especially if they have a divorce. your third husband loved you bankrupt, didn't he? my second husband to be bankrupt. and the third one. my third husband just left before the money, he didn't leave me bankrupt. that must have been very difficult because of a hollywood star you had a huge amount of money until the marriage. the husband spent a lot of money. i could shop all day on spent. do you regret that you trusted your husband so regret that you trusted your husband so much financially and in the end it didn't work out for one reason or another in the case of your second husband, he gambled a lot from the third husband was a hotel complex
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investment that didn't work out. as a womani investment that didn't work out. as a woman i have to answer you honestly that when you fall in love you don't really ask is the man in love with me? you really think that he is. otherwise you wouldn't get married. hejust he is. otherwise you wouldn't get married. he just really do believe. iam married. he just really do believe. i am rather victorian and i think if the man says i love you, debbie, and i want to be with you the rest of your life, you must believe him or your life, you must believe him or you wouldn't marry him. i am not a com plete you wouldn't marry him. i am not a complete fool until after the fact, but then i was. yes, i have been married three times, twice, the second one went bankrupt, the third one went bankrupt but he didn't get everything, he took all the money and run, but he didn't get everything. and i have a great resilience. they don't tackle me on the way out, theyjust leave me fallen like a good punch. back in 1988 it all look very different. recorded interview saying two more
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yea rs recorded interview saying two more years and i will have enough money to retire, prior to the marriage crumbling and leaving you pretty penniless. i have always said that you can make it back and give myself not really a two—year period, a five—year plan, i always say there isa five—year plan, i always say there is a light at the end of the tunnel, so is a light at the end of the tunnel, soi is a light at the end of the tunnel, so i can get through because of there is a tunnel there is light and ican make there is a tunnel there is light and i can make it. i never give up. when you first discovered at the age of 16, what would you like to be on the verge of a hollywood career? who knew that? i was 16 and i was in school, i entered a local beauty contest just for fun because school, i entered a local beauty contestjust for fun because they gave away a free blouse and scarf. that is why you did it? a silk scarf. i never had a silk scarf or a beautiful blouse. did you want to be an actress? i was just a kid beautiful blouse. did you want to be an actress? i wasjust a kid going to school, i wanted to be a gym teacher and i was working really ha rd to teacher and i was working really hard to go to college and the way i could go was a bag at a scholarship. i had to keep my grades up and that
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is what i wanted to do and hope to be, i had this local contest in california and i won the contest and there was it talent scouts there. they took me to warner brothers and they did a screen test and they asked me did i want to be in movies andi asked me did i want to be in movies and i said, i don't,... the must be and i said, i don't,... the must be a bit surprised by that because every young girl in those days wa nted every young girl in those days wanted to be an actress especially in california. i truly had no thought about it. i knew a lot to go to movies, but why would you think you're going to be in the movies? it is wanting to go to the movies and see movie stars, but why would you think you were going to be in the movies if no one in yourfamily, if you want exposed at all. i had no dream of that. all of a sudden i guess i thought it was so crazy that i would fit into show business. you have to be a little crazy to be in show business, i have decided that. the headlines on bbc news: the russian protestant dutch
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president plummeted and has announced a ceasefire between the syrian government and the rebels to come into force at midnight tonight. the hollywood actress debbie reynolds has died just one day after the death of her daughter carrie fisher. she is believed to have suffered a stroke. the royal college of gps is warning that some patients could be faced more than a month wait to see their doctor this winter. as we've been hearing — the nhs in england is to put barcodes on medicines and medical equipment. it's hoped that the scheme will reduce the likelihood of patients being given the wrong treatment — and make it easier to trace people if they are. earlier i spoke to jan spivey, who campaigns for women who had faulty pip breast implants — she told me the checks should have been introduced years ago. the issues of surveillance and traceability are inextricably linked to the devices and these were dealt
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with in 2003 in the european union so with in 2003 in the european union so why are we still sitting here in 2016 and the facilities and the resources like the registry and other registries and the traceability issue which has become apparent today, it is still on the agenda, it is very disconcerting. apparent today, it is still on the agenda, it is very disconcertingm is being introduced but that is being piloted in several trusts in england, what is your reaction to that? in particular with breast implants it affects large numbers of women throughout the uk and the majority of surgeries take place within the private sector in cosmetic surgery clinics. it doesn't appear to be affecting those private clinics. the other concern would be whether or not the system is volu nta ry whether or not the system is voluntary and so far with the registry that is the case. we're not quite sure when the registry office
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bar—coding system would be efficient and effective within the health system for patients. in the context of the pip difficulties scandal, what would bar—coding difference have made? the problem for all the women in the uk with pip breast implants, an opportunity to find out whether or not they were directly affected. the news was reallyjust before christmas in 2011 and everybody had gone on holiday. some clinics had closed down. some didn't wa nt to clinics had closed down. some didn't want to have the responsibilities of dealing with large numbers of pip patients so it became very difficult for women to know whether or not they were affected or not. and they battle continues because many of you are still suffering. the battle continues because it transpires that there is now a cancer that is clearly linked to breast implants and a particular type of implant, a textured surface implant. at the
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moment the countries that are motoring breast implants such as france and australia are publishing high numbers, increasing numbers of women affected by this form of cancer that is directly linked to breast and plans. so the bar-coding system, to be blunt, would help people to find out why, if there we re people to find out why, if there were problems, why and who put them there and trace at right back to the manufacturer if that is required?” am not really sure how it is planned to work, but it strikes me as a very simple straightforward procedure of connecting bar—coding and item that has been surgically implanted and keeping it on a medical record, that seems to me to be fairly basic technology, but overly it will work, but it doesn't provide —— hopefully it will work. it doesn't provide any reassurance, oi’
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it will work. it doesn't provide any reassurance, or regulatory compliance for a system that should be operating here and now today for patients that are still undergoing surgery. pakistan's request for all three million afghan refugees to leave is causing chaos on its borders and plunging families into uncertainty. many afghans have spent all their lives in pakistan and fear their home country cannot provide the same standard of living. our correspondent shaimaa khalil has followed one refugee on hisjourney from pakistan to afghanistan. this man left from a war—ravaged afghanistan with his family 13 years ago to settle here in pakistan. -- 30 —— 30 years ago. tonight he goes back to a homeland still marred by violence. he is one of tens of thousands of afghans who have decided to leave. a result of pakistan's intensive campaign to send more than 1.5 million refugees back. translation: it will be difficult compared to here, it feels as if i'm going to a new country.
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i have spent my life in pakistan. this is like my own country. the unhcr says that on average 5500 people have been making their way back daily. pakistan says it is facing economic and security challenges. and recent clashes between afghan and pakistani troops have made life very difficult for refugees. many have reported harassment by the police. they say they are now being forced into an unknown and dangerous situation. there are serious challenges right now. unless the returnees are able to access basic services, lands and livelihoods they will not to be able to be successfully reintegrated. in kabul trucks carrying families arrive every day. after a long overnight drive across the border, the man's wife and two boys start the registration process
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of this unhcr centre. they learn about mines and explosives. a daunting new reality of life in afghanistan. he gets financial aid from the un refugee agency. $400 per person. just enough for basic needs to last them a few weeks. but he has no idea what comes next and is worried about the violence here. translation: i have to look for a house now. i am worried if something happens to me, who will take care of my family? for months thousands of refugees have been crossing the border into afghanistan packing up whatever they could from a life they left behind. when you look at their faces, men, women, children, they are so exhausted from the long and draining journey. but the hardship doesn't end here. most refugees have nowhere to go. especially those who come
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from areas where fighting is still ongoing with the taliban. they left the only life they knew back in pakistan. and for now these trucks seems the closest thing to home. people across the uk are gearing up for new year's celebrations this weekend — and in central london partygoers are being urged to be vigilant as they enjoy the annual fireworks celebrations. our correspondent frankie mccamley is at the met police headquarters in central london to see how they've been preparing. we are in the special operations room for the metropolitan police, which on new year's eve will be a hive of activity, not only will you have hired the great cruise but also ambulance crews and police officers —— monitoring the screens around us making sure london is as safe as it can be forgiven. joining me now is
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superintendent phil langworthy. thanks forjoining us. you are expecting more than 100,000 people, how long have you been planning this? we spent a long time carefully planning this operation with our partners, the mayor 's office, the city council and many others to make sure people can come into central london on new year's eve and have a fantastic time. security is a big thing and will be on the minds of people following the events in berlin, what extra measures have you put in place this year? we want people to feel reassured that they can come and have a great time, i asked them to look at the website to make sure it would bring items that they need, but warmly and when they come to give us extra time because there will be a search regime in place. there is something like 3000 police officers on duty in central london alone and there will be stewards as well. thank you. just to say, make sure you give yourself extra time this year and only turn up extra time this year and only turn up to the event if you have a ticket. migrating birds are arriving
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at their breeding grounds earlier as global temperatures rise, a study has found. the research, conducted by scientists at the university of edinburgh, says some species are missing out on vital resources like food and nesting places as a result. anisa kadri reports. up, up and away. at least 4,000 different species of birds on regular migrants, with some flying thousands of miles from one continent to another, many moving between north and south from where they breed to where they spend the winter. scientists already believe changes in temperature are having an effect on how some plants and animals behave, and now a new study from the university of edinburgh has found that some birds are reaching their summer breeding grounds earlier, on average one day sooner for every one degree increase in temperature. they say reaching their breeding grounds at the wrong time, even by a few days, might mean birds miss out on food and nesting places. and it's those with further to go
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that may miss out most, which may then affect when their young is born and their chances of survival. researchers hope their findings will help scientists improve predictions of how different species respond to current and future environmental change. earlier today the ornithological consultant david darrell—lambert told us more about why the disruption in the migration time of birds could cause problems. we have problems at both ends. we have problems with habitat loss in africa, reduced areas in which they can winter and food source availability. then when they land in the uk we have got them arriving at the wrong time, so maybe the foliage hasn't grown at the right time so reduced nesting facilities. not enough food availability. if you are a tired migrant you need to restart your energy levels as soon as possible. sometimes the plants aren't adapting with the insects aren't adapting at the same rates as the birds are changing so there is a disparity between the two. some species are young and the production time is designed for the maximum
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time for caterpillars. therefore if you are out by a few days and you are producing eight young, you don't have enough caterpillars, a higher mortality rate and then that affect the whole population. now i look at the weather. we didn't have quite as much fun as we were expecting, more sunshine to go round. bcb filed here in the valley. clear blue sunny skies. through the rest of the afternoon throughout england and northern ireland clear blue skies and sunshine for the vast majority. wales and south—west england a bit patchy cloud at the moment. it will stay dry. as we get towards four o'clock temperatures will begin to edge downwards so it
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will begin to edge downwards so it will start to get quite chilly again. across the west midlands temperatures at the moment of minus two. still be felt from the night—time lingering. one or two places where that happens. in scotla nd places where that happens. in scotland and the other sunshine. threatening to brighten up for a time in the central belt. in the western isles a bit of rain to end the day. overnight for england and wales with chris bell is in place we will see frost returning. a cold night in rural places. towards the end of the night we will see things turning cloudy across wales and western england helping glitzy temperatures. cloudy from northern ireland where it stays frost free. into friday's broadcast it will be a cloudy day but there will be some good breaks and the cloud. into worse eastern scotland, by the time
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those into the afternoon of those bra kes those into the afternoon of those brakes are more widespread. it will turn a bit milder and from new year's eve we will keep relatively mild air in place across england and wales. scotland we have a band of rain which will be heavy and persistent particularly across western areas sinking southward into northern ireland and as we come down midnight the rain slips towards northern england and wales also. it will get wetter for northern england and wales also. it will get wetterfor some. northern england and wales also. it will get wetter for some. this northern england and wales also. it will get wetterfor some. this is the cold front to the south and it is relatively mild. temperatures dropping away around midnight across scotla nd dropping away around midnight across scotland and for new year's day he cold the air will go southwards across the british isles. it will be cold enough for even some snow across parts of scotland for new year's day and i think that is a sign of things to come. the first half of january could well have some fairly cold days on the way. that is your latest weather. this is bbc news.
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i'm simon mccoy. the headlines at 2pm. president putin announces a ceasefire between the syrian government and the rebels — he said both sides had signed documents, to start fresh peace talks. translation: the first document between the syrian government and armed opposition on cessation of fire on the territory of the syrian arab republic. the second document isa arab republic. the second document is a set of measures on control over the ceasefire regime. the hollywood actress debbie reynolds has died, just a day after the death of her daughter, carrie fisher. she's believed to have suffered a stroke. a warning from gps‘ leaders that patients could be forced to wait more than a month to see their doctor this winter. devon and cornwall police investigate the discovery of the bodies of two men at a flat in st austell. detectives are treating the deaths as "unexplained". also: the birds migrating earlier — as global temperatures rise.
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