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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 7, 2017 6:00am-7:01am GMT

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winter pressure on accident and emergency, nothing new. but the red cross says it amounts to a crisis. the charity claims social care cuts means patients are sent home without the right support so they end up backin the right support so they end up back in a&e. red cross volunteer support nhs staff and say they have seen patients at home without clothes, some who don't receive the ca re clothes, some who don't receive the care they need to get washed, even some who have fallen and not been found for days. a&e staff recognise the problems as well. found for days. a&e staff recognise the problems as wellli found for days. a&e staff recognise the problems as well. i think the pressures on the nhs and day care is intense at the moment, but what is a concern as the patients who have been managed within four hours, and then the delays for admission into then the delays for admission into the hospital bed base, which u nfortu nately a re very the hospital bed base, which unfortunately are very significant. our staff are working under some pretty intolerable conditions at times trying to manage. and sometimes they just times trying to manage. and sometimes theyjust can't manage. figures from nhs england show that overflowing a&e departments have to close their doors to new patients
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more than 140 times over the last month. compare that with the same month. compare that with the same month in 2015, it is up more than 60%. the suspicion is it is a combination of the cuts we have seen in social care in community services run by the nhs and very heavy pressure in general practice. so is the strain on the nhs costing lives? the death of two patients on emergency trolleys at worcestershire royal hospital are being investigated. 0ne royal hospital are being investigated. one of them had waited 35 hours per bed. the department of health says it is providing billions more every year to ease pressure. nhs england says plans are in place to deal with the extra demand. the beds are actually not quite as full as they were this time last year but eve ryo ne as they were this time last year but everyone in the health service knows things could get worse before they get better. we will have more on this story later in the programme. we will be speaking to dr mark holland from the society for acute medicine at 7:10am.
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police in florida have been questioning a man after five people were killed and dozens injured in a shooting at fort lauderdale airport. the suspect opened fire in the baggage claim area, after seemingly retrieving his weapon from his luggage. the fbi says it is pursuing all leads and hasn't ruled out terrorism as a motive. president 0bama said he was heartbroken for the families. 0ur correspondent gary 0'donoghue reports from fort lauderdale. it is a familiar scene at airports the world over, but the baggage claim hall at the fort lauderdale airport turned into a place of death and mayhem, as a lone gunman opened fire on those waiting to collect their luggage. passengers scattered for cover, hitting the ground, and reports say the assailant had time to reload before opening fire once again, as attempts were made to attend to the wounded. once he was done with ammunition, he threw the gun down after one round of ammunition. i was ten feet away from him. he basically through the gun
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onto the ground and laid on the ground face down, spreadeagled. the gunman has been named as 26—year—old esteban santiago. reports say he was carrying a military id and had a weapon in his checked baggage, which is legal in the united states. 0ne family member said he had been receiving psychological treatment after leaving the national guard last year. this cowardly, heinous act resulted in the deaths of five people. there were eight more people injured by way of gunshot that were transported to local hospitals. in his first reaction to the shooting, president 0bama said he was heartbroken for the families. these kinds of tragedies have happened too often during the eight years that i've been president. the pain, the grief, the shock. the fbi says its ruling nothing out, including terrorism. but the agency has confirmed it had prior contact with santiago
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in november when he was referred for a mental health assessment. the ease with which he was able to transport and use a weapon in an airport will raise serious concerns about public safety. we can join gary outside fort lauderdale international airport now. gary, this story has been developing overnight. what is the latest? well, essentially you are allowed to carry a firearm in your checked baggage in the us. now, there are some restrictions, some rules. you have to be carrying it to a state where you are allowed to possess a firearm. you have to put it in your checked baggage, as i say, you have to put it in a locked, hard sided container. the gun has to be unloaded. you can't have ammunition in it, but you can carry ammunition with you. so on the face of it he has done nothing wrong in terms of
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firearms laws. the crucial point here is that he was able to collect that baggage at the belt, he was able to go into a laboratoryjust near the baggage claim area, seemingly unpack that semiautomatic weapon, load it, go back in and open fire indiscriminately, and what's more he had time to reload and start all over again before he laid out on the floor and gave himself up. so aside from the motivations for what he did, there will be questions about whether or not security in that part of the airport at that end of the travel process is sufficient. for now, thank you very much indeed. us intelligence officials have released a report that claims vladimir putin personally ordered a cyber campaign to try and help donald trump win the presidential election. last night, after being briefed on the findings, mr trump said that hacking had absolutely no impact on the election result, but promised to set up a team to stop such attacks in the future, as catriona renton reports. the report from american
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intelligence claims russia's president, vladimir putin, personally ordered what it called an influence campaign to help donald trump's chances of winning the american presidency. the president—elect had earlier described the russian hacking claims as a political witch—hunt by his opponents. at trump tower, he met america's top intelligence officials for a classified briefing. they say russia's actions included hacking into the e—mail accounts of the democratic national committee and top democrats, and using intermediaries such as wikileaks to release the information. russia has previously denied this, and wikileaks founderjulian assange has said before that moscow is not the source. after the briefing, mr trump did not single out russia. in a statement he said: the incoming
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vice president says the us will strengthen cyber defences. the president—elect has made it very clear that we're going to take aggressive action in the early days of our new administration to combat cyber attacks and protect the security of the american people from this type of intrusion in the future. donald trump said he had tremendous respect for the work and service done by those in the us intelligence community. but, with two weeks to go until he moves into the white house, questions remain over how they will all work together to keep america safe. catriona renton, bbc news. the repair bill to fix the country's potholes could soon reach £14 billion. that is according to nearly 400 councils in england and wales, who say the government should increase fuel duty to pay for the repairs.
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the government says it is already putting £250 million into fixing the problem. but the local government association says that is not enough, as duncan kennedy reports. councils six 2 million potholes every year. that is about 12,000 for every year. that is about 12,000 for every local authority in england and wales. but it never seems to be enough. now the council the repair bill could soon reach £14 billion. hard—pressed councils, who are mending, you know, pothole every five seconds in this countryjust cannot get to the core of the problem, which is actually many of oui’ problem, which is actually many of our roads arejust problem, which is actually many of our roads are just being patched now. they need to be fully repaired. the council say the government must do more to help. they suggest increasing fuel duty by a couple of pence a litre, a figure they say the public would support. it is notjust
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the cost of repairing all these potholes that seems to be on the increase. today's report also found that the time it is taking appears to be on the rise as well, going up from ten years in 2006 to 14 years today. last year, the government announced a £250 million pothole repairfund to announced a £250 million pothole repair fund to help 100 announced a £250 million pothole repairfund to help 100 councils fixed 4 million potholes. today's report by local councils suggest thatis report by local councils suggest that is not enough, and that the pothole problem is actually getting worse. for the first time, the nhs is providing disabled children with prosthetic limbs that are specially designed for sport. 13—year—old ben from brighton was amongst the first to benefit, after being given a running blade. nhs england says it hopes the programme will allow several 100 children a year to receive limbs, allowing them to participate in more sports. we will be hearing from him later on
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in the programme. i want to go back to the story we mentioned earlier, the shooting at fort lauderdale, in florida, which has drawn attention to possible wea knesses has drawn attention to possible weaknesses in us aviation security. local authorities say the gunman opened fire in the baggage claim area yesterday, after retrieving a weapon from his checked luggage. five people were killed in the attack and eight others were injured. joining us in the studio is the independent‘s travel editor simon calder. i think for a lot of people waking up i think for a lot of people waking up this morning, they will be surprised to hear that it is perfectly 0k to carry a gun in your luggage, but that is the case, isn't it? it is, notjust in the us, worldwide. certainly in the us it is easier. you turn up at check—in and say i have a firearm in my bag and they will make a note of that but there is no formalities. elsewhere it is tricky. for instance british
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airways requires three days of advance notice and there are various rules about permits and so on. south africa and italy say you have to have your weapon and ammunition in separate tags. but generally it has done all over the world. what is different about fort lauderdale and florida and the us is that you have a nation with liberal gun laws and culture of carrying firearms, which means that when tragedy like this happens there are, very sadly... it is very easy for somebody to be in that position, because probably on a typicalflight that position, because probably on a typical flight you might have three 01’ typical flight you might have three orfour typical flight you might have three or four people having weapons in their checked bags. but it does expose some really serious questions about aviation security. again, not just in the us, but worldwide. you we re just in the us, but worldwide. you were speaking earlier to your correspondent, gary 0'donoghue, he was standing right outside from what i could make out the terminal to baggage reclaim. you have a glass door and a road baggage reclaim. you have a glass
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doorand a road —— baggage reclaim. you have a glass door and a road —— terminal 2. there is nothing to stop people going into that area as they have done, for example, in moscow. aviation security professionals are saying they spend all this time and effort stopping people getting weapons on the aircraft, but that leaves the very high—profile aviation target, airports, very exposed because whether you are going through check—in, retrieving baggage or picking someone up at the airport, there are really no checks on who comes and goes. we saw president 0bama in gary's he's talking about another incident, and he has thought about trying to do more to control guns and has failed, by his own admission, to do much. is there a move to try and change things within aviation, within the plant industry, 01’ aviation, within the plant industry, or is that equally difficult to change? that i think is exactly right. there will be questions about, well, yes, you have obvious targets which are airports, with lots of people, you have a culture
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of not wanting any harm to come to people in those circumstances. there seems to be, from what we have heard so far, and issue involving someone with mental health problems in the country with very relaxed gun laws, that happens to have taken place in an airport, rather than specifically an airport, rather than specifically an aviation security issue. however it does, once again, as with russell ‘s airport, as with istanbul, remind us ‘s airport, as with istanbul, remind us that there is all sorts of uneasy questions —— brussels airport. you can come and go wherever you like as long as you are not going through to the area where you bought the aircraft. thank you. quarter past six and you are watching breakfast. helen is the weather for us this morning. watching breakfast. helen is the weatherfor us this morning. is it murky? iam weatherfor us this morning. is it murky? i am afraid it is a bit grey out there. it is not all doom and gloom but it may have impact on travelling. a thick mist and hill
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fog, mostly fog around the manchester and liverpool regions. we will keep a lot of leaden skies this week in cronulla should be mostly dry and temperatures are considerably higher than this time yesterday, especially for england and wales. but chilly in ireland but largely forced free. another spot of rain as well. the remnants of a weather front as we had south across the southern half of england. as i mentioned around the chest of playing it feels sick and that may be an issue for travellers. and across the english channel, temperatures are said to be quite icy for some of the airports over here and for travellers as well. we got rid of the cold air is so it is milder across uk for the weekend. there will be some brightness, probably across the north—east of scotland, eastern parts of north island but on the whole it will be a
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great day. there could be drizzle lingering in the south—west but overnight high pressure will build and dry things up a little bit here. again it should be largely forced free because we keep a blanket of cloud that stops temperature from falling. more misty, murky weather to contend with as the breeze picks up to contend with as the breeze picks up across to contend with as the breeze picks up across the west of scotland there isa up across the west of scotland there is a chance to break the cloud or more. eastern parts of scotland and north—east england, slightly brighter day across the south—west. still relatively mild with temperatures average. it will not feel warmer but nowhere near as cold as it is across eastern parts of europe. —25 in moscow! 0f as it is across eastern parts of europe. —25 in moscow! of the most bitter weather of the season across central and eastern parts of europe. how about next week? it is all change here in the uk. weather
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fronts change here in the uk. weather fro nts m ove change here in the uk. weather fronts move through so a set of benign weather this weekend. it will benign weather this weekend. it will be replaced by something more settled in next week. we'll be back with the headlines at 6.30. time now to take a look at some of the week's big cinema releases — in the film review. hello, and a very warm welcome to the film review. to take us through this week's cinema releases is antonia quirtke. we are going to start with silence, martin scorsese's new film, liam neeson, andrew garfield, adam driver, they are playing jesuit priests in 17th—century japan. passengers, starring chris pratt, jennifer lawrence, about two passengers sleeping in suspended
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animation for 120 years on their way to a new colony on a far—away planet and they wake too early. and also, assassin's creed, michael fassbender‘s big movie, based on the computer game. let's kick off then with silence, a great passion of martin scorsese, trying for years and years to get this made. first talk of it in 1990 with daniel day lewis, gael garcia bernal and benicio del toro have been attached to it. he was famously brought up a devout catholic, had a great and genuine interest in the priesthood, at one point he was going to join the priesthood, so catholicism has been a real thing for him. religion in his films, the last temptation of christ and kundun, but even something like mean streets,
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marvellously there. what is the religious martin scorsese like? this is a difficult film to watch, it is about the persecution and torture of priests and their flock. 161 minutes, incredibly long, and relentless, long conversations reflecting martin scorsese's own ambiguity towards his own faith. i know that it has been very highly praised, and not many people have gone to see it, but it has been critically tremendously well received. ifound it... i think that there is a pulse of confusion in it, i was not clear what martin scorsese was trying to say. the directors he admires, religious directors, carl dreier, joe navarre, robert bresson, there is a euphoria in those sorts of films. things likejoan of arc. and yet, you can't help think, this was scorsese's moment to join
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the ranks of those kind of directors. i'm not sure that he has done it, but i know that many people disagree with me. let's take a little clip here, for a preview. padre. we have fought to travel, for the lord. you must pray for courage. if we do not do what they want, then there could be danger for everyone in the village. they could be put in prison, they could be taken away forever. what should we do? trample. trample! it is all right to trample. what are you saying? you can't! you can't. .. as you were saying, a long watch, a pretty gruelling watch,
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but the performance is good? absolutely, andrew garfield, when he played spider—man, that role did that young actor no favours and here he is, he has a quality of deeply inherent youthfulness and vulnerability, anyone who saw him in never let me go will remember that, and also, a japanese actor, issey 0gato, he plays the grand inquisitor in this, and he is an incredible actor, ingenious casting for martin scorsese. and this is a comedic actor, but he playing someone who does the most terrible things, he's a comedic actor, he has wonderful kabuki gestures, and the performance are something else. something pretty different, passengers — silence, gruelling, is passengers something easier? a lot fluffier, a lot more fun, this is about two passengers in suspended animation, hibernation for 120 years
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on their way to a new colony on a new planet and for reasons we will not go into, spoiler alerts, they wake up early. wonderful idea, so two strangers facing an eternity together, walking endless corridors, gigantic spaceship, and, breaking into the entertainment facilities, and with their little wristbands, one of the funniest things is the ways in which there is even if no—one else existing, you are still slaves, your life had been formalised before you left earth. also this lovely simmering sexual tension between the two main stars... it would have been all right to leave it at that, but there is this derring—do, in the third act, not entirely necessary. you can feel moments where it is reaching for some tougher kind of glory, think of something like alien and wandering the corridors of that spaceship, intensely sinister and threatening place to be, but this place looks pretty nice. i would not mind
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moving there myself! there are moments when you are shown howjerry—built this craft is, hammering away against things, putting fuses together to get things to work, that ought to have been frightening and made me feel how vulnerable these people are and yet it does not quite do that. there is a wonderful cameo, michael sheen plays a bartender, rather sinister. he is a robot. and you can see that he is struggling with the part, trying to bring more to it than is there on the page, unfortunately, it is not on the page but it is fun. let's talk about assassin's creed, which video game players will be very familiar with, based on the video game. movies used to be based on novels... now they are based on video games(!) this is catastrophic... nine instalments in this video franchise, one of those movies that has been long in production, lots of re—shoots, rejigs, starring michael fassbender,
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marion cotillard, jeremy irons, charlotte rampling, incredible cast. to even begin to describe the plot, i am not sure there is any point! the assassins... assassins against knights templar, let's take a look. do you recognise this? it is an assassin's blade. this is the actual one that your father used to take your mother 's life. he's here, you know... your mother's death, not something a boy should ever be made to see. so, catastrophic, you said... charitably(!),
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i am surea lot of people will go to see it nonetheless. why do you think it doesn't work? unbelievably incoherent, extraordinary, it is... it opens... it opens with three flashbacks, three flashbacks! what a flashback does in a film, someone is standing there and saying, hang on a sec, let me fill you in, and then they do that twice more. hang on, if you don't know this... the rest won't make any sense... three times, 15 minutes! feels like the movie never starts, then you are in there and you feel like the movie will never end! i went to the cinema to see this, two people were asleep at the end of the row that i was sitting on, that sums it up. probably does! never mind. so that is assassin's creed. best movie out at the moment, in your opinion. a monster calls, now this is the most extraordinary sell, actually, it is a fantastical terminal illness melodrama for children.
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maybe it is not for children, it stars a 12—year—old boy. he's visited by a yew tree, over a few evenings, and it is played by liam neeson, it has a wonderful shape, dickensian shape, visited three times to be shown things that may help you deal with life. it is a flat—out classic, it has the emotional heft of the railway children, moments of iron man by ted hughes and pan's labyrinth, i think it is a masterpiece, go and see it and take all of the family. good recommendation! best dvd? a terrific film which is just... featured quite a lot in the golden globes nominations. hell or high water, ben foster and chris pine, they play bank robber brothers, and jeff bridges is the texas ranger who is tracking them down, which sounds terribly familiar, that kind of plot, and features
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a great deal in cinema. one of them is on a roll, the other brother is a little too wild, the texas ranger is always a step ahead of them. it feels like a movie of the mid—19705 or early 1980s, like midnight run, where you come away from it thinking, you will look through the tv listings and think, hell or high water is on tonight, unmissable, fantastic! it has slotted into that classic film territory already, jeff bridges has been nominated for a golden globes for his best supporting actor and he does the most fantastic thing towards the end of the movie. there is a death scene and just in a couple of seconds you see everything that jeff bridges can offer as an actor, the way that he absorbs the shock, it is a magical moment, such a terrific film. thank you very much the joining us. that is it for this week, thank you so much for watching, goodbye. hello, this is breakfast,
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withjon kay and rachel burden. coming up before 7:00am, helen will have the weather for you. but first, at 6:30am, a summary of this morning's main news: the british red cross is warning of a humanitarian crisis in nhs hospitals in england, and is demanding the government allocates more money to improve social care. dozens of a&e departments were forced to divert ambulances to other hospitals last week, while one patient died after spending 35 hours on a trolley. the royal college of emergency medicine says the system is on its knees, but the department of health says it is investing more money to improve services. police in florida have been questioning a man after five people were killed and eight injured in a shooting at fort lauderdale airport. the suspect opened fire in the baggage claim area
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after seemingly retrieving his weapon from his luggage. the fbi says it is pursuing all leads, and hasn't ruled out terrorism as a motive. us intelligence officials have released a report that claims vladimir putin personally ordered a cyber—campaign to try and help donald trump win the presidential election. last night, after being briefed on the findings, mr trump said that hacking had had absolutely no impact on the election outcome. his running mate, mike pence, says a team will be set up to stop future attacks. the president—elect has made it very clear that we're going to take aggressive action in the early days of our new administration to combat cyber attacks and protect the security of the american people from this type of intrusion in the future. for the first time, the nhs is providing disabled children with prosthetic limbs that are specially designed for sport. 13—year—old ben from brighton was amongst the first to benefit, after being given a running blade.
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nhs england says it hopes the programme will allow several 100 children a year to receive limbs, allowing them to participate in more sports. a killer whale which was involved in the deaths of three people and featured in an influential documentary has died at sea world in florida. tilikum featured in the film blackfish', which led to a global campaign against the keeping of orcas in captivity. sea world says staff are deeply saddened by the death of the whale, who was thought to be 36 years old. the doors of one of the country's biggest nightclubs reopened last night, ending months of enforced closure. fabric in central london had its licence revoked in september, after islington council found what it called a culture of drug use there. the club was allowed to reopen after agreeing to a raised entry age and tougher security measures.
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i wonder if those people are home yet. mike is here with the sport. a big weekend, fa cup. 0ne yet. mike is here with the sport. a big weekend, fa cup. one of those special weekends of the year. i love trying to pick whether big upsets are going to be. he and arsenal, bournemouth, southampton and crystal palace will be travelling nervously. the potential for an upset, palace will be travelling nervously. the potentialfor an upset, the lowest ranked team is star bridge, and they go to weaken today. bobby gould, who won the cup in 1988, his grandson is in goal today. all those coaches criss—crossing the country. a lot of players will be wondering if it is baird bay to be on the back page. fa cup third round weekend got under
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way, with manchester city the first side through to round four, thanks to a 5—0 thrashing handed out to west ham. city were already out of sight by half—time, leading 3—0, thanks to an own goal, a yaya toure penalty, and that tap—in for david silva. the gloss on an impressive night was added byjohn stones. the england defender scored his first goal since a summer move from everton. he needed goal—line technology to confirm that he had actually scored it though. hopefully it can help us to make our players are levers, that they are good enough to play every game, and try, in both ourfans and good enough to play every game, and try, in both our fans and the people in manchester city. and they can believe that we are good. they know what happened in the past, but we are good guys. so they run a lot, fight a lot, playing good. but they have to believe. it will be a special fa cup reunion
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today for one of the members of the treble—winning manchester united team of 1999. former netherlands centre—half jaap stam is now the manager of championship side reading, who go to old trafford hunting for a giant killing this lunchtime. asa as a player, there is nothing better to play over there, in a stadium like that in front of so many fans. and we know as well, we have our own fa ns and we know as well, we have our own fans over there as well. hopefully they arejoining in and fans over there as well. hopefully they are joining in and supporting us. there are 25 games in all today. non—league barrow are playing rochdale and non—league eastleigh travel to championship side brentford. preston host arsenal at deepdale. sir andy murray, will play world number two novak djokovic in the final of the qatar 0pen today. murray beat czech tomas berdych in straight sets in their semi final, to reach his
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fourth final in doha. the win was murray's, 28th in a row on the atp tour, and another title and victory over his main rival, would be the ideal preparation for the australian open. that starts a week on monday. may be at the beginning of the year you are focusing a little bit more on yourself and how you are playing on yourself and how you are playing on how you want to play, moving into the aussie open, rather than just solely focusing on the outcome. newcastle falcons produced a stunning late comeback to beat bath 24—22 in rugby union's aviva premiership. bath led by 12 points halfway through the second half, but ben harris barged his way over to draw newcastle level, less than four minutes from time. man of the matchjoel hodgson, kept his nerve to slot home the conversation, and send bath to their third defeat in a row. newcastle move up to sixth. scarlets also came from behind,
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to beat ulster 16—13, to stay fourth in the pro 12. the winning score was a penalty try. scarlets scrum half aled davies was on the receiving end of a high tackle, as he tried to cross the line. elsewhere, leinster beat zebre, and newport gwent dragons beat treviso. tour de france champion chris froome says he turned down the chance, to use a therapeutic use exemption in 2015 because of moral concerns. the exemption allows athletes to take medication would normally be banned, and although froome had used them twice in the past, when given the option two years ago, he chose not to. they basically said that your condition is severe enough that you could use one, and i didn't feel as if having a tue in the last week of the tour de france was something that i was prepared to... itjust
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didn't sit well morally with me, but that was something i was going to do. earlier we saw how sir andy murray got on. this afternoon sir mo farah is in action at the edinburgh cross country. the four—time olympic champion, who insists he's happyjust to be called mo, was surprisingly beaten into second place last year. he is using the event as part of his preparation, for the track world championships, in london later this year, and admits he'll have his work cut out against some cross country specialists this afternoon. it is going to be tough, they will try and put me down and beat me as quick as possible. i am not going to come out there and go i am not going to...i come out there and go i am not going to... i will fight for it, but it suits certain athletes better, and it is going to be tough. i think it might be. he was training with his beloved that arsenal, giving wenger a bit of
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a helping hand. there could be one less team, on the grid for the new formula 1 season, after manor racing went into administration. manor finished last in the championship last year, and have failed to find new investment needed to carry on in 2017. the team went into administration two years ago, when they were known as marussia, with debts of £35 million, only to be bought at the 11th hour. now as the big teams enter the fa cup this weekend, i am sure we will see some silky skills on display, but none as spectacular as those performed by players in the sport of sepak takraw. it's been one of asia's biggest sports for centuries and now it's in the uk as well. i've been along to find out more. it is asia's best kept secret, the sport that has been part of the culture in countries like malaysia since the 15th century. combining
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football skills with the moves of kung fu. and now, sepak takraw is taking off in the uk as well.m kung fu. and now, sepak takraw is taking off in the uk as well. it is linking the martial art or the art of the body with this game, because you need to have the agility, flexibility and things like that. first of all, you are learning the basics of keeping up, really. and it can be fought, head... it does hurt, ican can be fought, head... it does hurt, i can tell you that, a little bit, because... look at that. that is beautiful skill. let me show you, this ball is quite hard, it is plastic now. slightly softer than the original ones, which were made of rattan, but it cause too many injuries. if you play football, death further you can play this game as well. so it is football meets volleyball and has now spread across the world. and who better to recruit
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for the new esteem forming this year than for the new esteem forming this year tha n freestyle for the new esteem forming this year than freestyle football world recordholderjohn farnworth. now, the size of the ball was a surprise. but he took it in his stride. it seems to me more power. hey! in matches it is only three aside and you only have three touches per team before it has to go over the net. so there we are, we serve, the game is in play. red shot. you do have set positions. the server, the feeder and the striker. an acrobatic smash at the net. and this can take some practice. servers should know their
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place. the flexibility these guys possessed is incredible. they are getting their legs way above their head. it is like what ibrahim of —— ibrahimovich does. if! head. it is like what ibrahim of —— ibrahimovich does. if i can do it, so can you. and if we win the point, the celebration. it has got to be worth it for that. they also encourage you to count in malaysian, so i used to do one, two, three in malaysian. but i have forgotten it. you are surprisingly agile for a man of your experience. we will see you again later. from the damage they can cause to your car to the safety risk they pose to cyclists no—one likes a pothole and there are warnings this morning that the problem is getting worse. a survey of 400 councils in england and wales estimates that the repair bill could reach £14
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billion by 2019. peter fleming is from the local government association and joins us from our studio in tunbridge wells. thank you forjoining us on a saturday morning. the figure for the cost of these repairs, £14 billion isa cost of these repairs, £14 billion is a huge amount. a couple of people have disputed it. how did you come up have disputed it. how did you come up with a? it is £12 billion at the moment and the rate of increase that we are seeing, it will easily top £14 billion by 2019. i think the issueis £14 billion by 2019. i think the issue is that this is about a backlog from many, many years of government underinvestment in what is known as local roads, which in fa ct a is known as local roads, which in fact a 97% of the road network in this country. so all the money goes on the major roads, the motorways and that kind of thing. so the government is in charge of what is known as national roads, that is 3% of the total road network. they spend about £1.1 million per mile on
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keeping those up to scratch, and give councils £27,000 a mile for everything else. you know that the big bugbear people have with this is that when potholes are... if you are lucky enough for them to be repaired, when they are filled it is quite often a bit of a hatchetjob are not long—term repair so it doesn't solve the problem ultimately. absolutely, and this is what we are saying. all the councils can do, and they are doing one pothole every 15 seconds in this country we are repairing, but we are just catching it up. we have been absolutely honest about that. that is all we can do. we need major investment in this country in the road structure, in infrastructure. and stopping this sort of patch and mend mentality, and giving us enough money to actually replace some of these local roads that desperately need proper money spent on them. what is causing the problems? is it simply road use getting more expensive, more cars on the road,
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heavier cars? i think it is a mixture of lots of things. it is the historical backlog of government underfunding of the road network, coupled with increased traffic, weather, the fact that a patch the road is not as good as a new road, clearly the patch is a weak point in the road —— a patched road. we could save money in the long—term if money was spent on the local government network. it is very easy to blame on underfunding when this is a council responsibility and perhaps councils haven't been efficient enough in dealing with this in the past. as i said, we are repairing a pothole every 15 seconds. councils are being innovative about the way they repair roads but frankly the government does fund road repairs. they are not finding it at the level that it needs to be. councils have got competing necessities. they have seen their budgets reduced on average by about 40% over the last few years. you know, there are increasing costs in other areas, such as adult social care. so it is
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not a council issue. the government funds the road network, and we are saying if we use 2p out of the current fuel duty we could solve this problem. thank you very much, peter fleming. it is one of those things which is deeply irritating to many motorists. get in touch if you have been affected, if your vehicle has been damaged, if your bike has been damaged, if you have been injured as a result. you can tweet about the stories we show today using our hash tag or followers online. the potholes are weather—related. c what helen has in store for us this weekend. weather—related. c what helen has in store for us this weekendlj weather—related. c what helen has in store for us this weekend. i am worried you will not see any potholes this morning in some parts of the country. it is murky out there. just a word of caution,
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really, for the cheshire plain. it is murky in many areas with a lot of cloud of scotland and northern ireland but largely crossed free for the certainly so in the south where the certainly so in the south where the temperature is about 15 degrees higher than this time yesterday. it does not necessarily feel that much warmer users will not have to scrape your ca rs warmer users will not have to scrape your cars this morning. a weak weather fronts a lot of misty cloud and it's fairly widespread light rain and drizzle. damp and grey out their but gradually through the day that rain and drizzle will ease the way, lingering in the south—west. for the most part it is dry and best chance for bright weather will be the stump parts of scotland north—east england. leaden skies to much of the day at. temperatures up on recent days that you can will
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fill chilly with a blanket cloud. that we could have the positive of arresting falling temperature so overnight it will be frost free except perhaps the blend of north—east scotland. but will again bea north—east scotland. but will again be a really great one tomorrow morning for most of us. the improvement, i suppose, morning for most of us. the improvement, isuppose, without morning for most of us. the improvement, i suppose, without our the front across the south—west there is a better chance of bright weather and there will be some brea ks weather and there will be some breaks in the cloud here and there. not ruling out but, unfortunately, not guaranteed. it looks cloudy for all of the fa cup third round matches today and tomorrow. in fact there will be a be drizzle around today. temperatures are just creeping above average for this time of year in early january. we are doing quite well because just across the channel at the moment there is the channel at the moment there is the potential for icy conditions in freezing rain across on the low country and look at these temperatures for tomorrow across the likes of moscow. —20 five. bitterly cold at the moment across that part
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of europe. that air will stay stag na nt next few of europe. that air will stay stagnant next few days. as to the uk it is far more mobile into next week which means more wind and more rain. look at those temperatures. —11! take care, helen. we're back with the headlines at seven o clock. first, let's get all the latest technology news with spencer kelly right, let's get 2017 started in style, shall we? flashing lights. check. modest, understated hotels. check. lots of people queuing for photos of a sign. check.
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a motorcycle vest with built—in airbag? 0h! check. every january, las vegas hosts the massive consumer electronics show, and if you have a product to launch, you want to launch it here. and that's why i am being followed by a drone, specifically, the hover camera passport drone. first one i have seen which follows you not by tracking a signal from your mobile phone, but instead by locking on to a face in its camera view. come with me. you can tell it which face to follow by tapping on it in the accompanying app on your phone. and the latest version will let you scan and upload your face to the drone so it can find and recognise you automatically. the theory is that you then don't need the phone at all. the drone knows and loves your face, just like a loyal puppy.
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and, with guarded blades and sensors underneath to help it steer clear of obstacles, it certainly seems safe and light enough to fly in amongst other people, or indeed to grab it out of the air and fold it up. hence the name — passport, you see. unbelievably, ces is now in its 50th year, and in that time it's got big, very big. the show has spread beyond the walls of the las vegas convention centre to the surrounding hotels, and we have seen all sorts of ideas come and go in those five decades. the event might have grown, but the technology, of course, has shrunk. the tv screens have got so thin that they blend into the walls, so thin you can peel them on and off. and in amongst the major companies are a number of tiny companies.
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marc has been checking some of them out. most people understand that if i do this with my fingers it means give me a call on the telephone. however, if i am wearing this strap when i make that gesture my hand becomes part of the telephone itself and can send and receive calls. the strap has a little body conducting unit in here which sends vibrations down my hand and when i stick my finger in my ear, they become amplified sound. there is a microphone just in the strap there, so i can talk into it. let's just see if that works. and it does. so this is the prototype. the finished thing looks like a normal watch strap and can be fitted to any old watch. now, when you want to hang up, that's simplicity itself. all you've got to do is take your hand away from your ear.
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health is once again a big theme here at ces. and, whilst more people than ever are following gluten—free, dairy—free or other sorts of specialist diets, they don't necessarily need to be unless they've had a proper medical diagnosis. and that's something that this device aims to overcome by helping people create the perfect diet for their own personal digestive system. air connects via bluetooth, and its mission is to miniaturise a breath test that gastroenterologists have been using since the ‘90s. it analyses reaction to various forms of carbohydrate, such as lactose or fructose. this is based on the idea that, if you consume a food that you can't break down, then it will ferment in the gut, and from that point chemicals will disperse into the bloodstream. that blood will be making its way into the lungs, and then when you breathe out you'll be able to analyse how well that food has been digested.
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so, once it learns what works for you, it should be able to help you customise your diet as the finished app's food database indicates how likely you are to react to any given food. so, if you find the answer, all that's left to do is actually stick to the lifestyle and diet you need to. now then, i'm officially calling it. this year's big theme at ces was cars. and, as always, it's often the most outrageous concepts that grab all the headlines. rinspeed has previously proposed a car with its own deployable drone. well, now it's got one that has a space—age cockpit, with more glass than a greenhouse, which is quite fortunate because it has a garden in the dashboard. yes, that's a garden in the dashboard. why? well, so you get a nice smell when you're driving, of course, and you can even take part of it with you when you go shopping.
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don't forget to switch the fan on, so you get that lovely whiff. actually, a lot of the more serious car stuff is happening in small steps, incrementally, so it's harder to grab the headlines. that said, marc cieslak has just been for a couple of extraordinary drives. there's a certain german car—maker that boasts of building the ultimate driving machine. but here at ces 2017, most of the motor manufacturers seem intent on building the ultimate self—driving machine. it isn'tjust motor manufacturers that are showing off self—driving vehicles here. they're doing it with the help of tech companies, as well. this vehicle is fitted with a system called bb8, which has been created by nvidia, a company most famous for manufacturing high—end graphics chips. artificial intelligence software which learns helped by sensors have
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trained bb8 to be able to make driving decisions. here, an obstacle hasjust appeared in the route that we were going to take to get to the other end of this track. the car has decided that they'd better not drive into that obstacle, so it's driven around it. driving around a car park is one thing but how do these autonomous vehicles perform out on real roads? electronic supplier delphi has partnered with driver assistance and sensor outfit mobileye and created a mini fleet of autonomous audi suvs which are driving around vegas during ces. there are 24 different sensors spread out across the body of this car which allow it to drive autonomously and what i am struck by is that you don't notice any of them. you can't really see any of those sensory devices. they're hidden. this car is an indicator, if you like, of how autonomous vehicles will look in the future, which is pretty much like any car does in showrooms today.
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those sensors include lidar, radar, and cameras all around the vehicle. here, we can see what the car sees through them. identifying other vehicles as well as pedestrians, and behaving accordingly, as it weaves its way through traffic. so, i'm a rear passenger in the back of this self—driving car. and so far zero dramas, apart from looking forward and noticing that the driver doesn't have his hands on the steering wheel. i could be forgiven for thinking that i am actually being driven around bya human being. the thing is, we've been driving around in prototype self—driving cars for a couple of years now. how long is it going to be before cars like this are available to buy in showrooms? there is quite a wide consensus among the industry that 2021 is the time where the technology will be ready, and after a number of years where society will start gaining confidence in this kind of technology, then society would be at the point where the driver can be completely out of the loop.
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with that 2021 goal in mind, mobileye announced that, in partnership with bmw and intel, it will be testing 40 autonomous vehicles on real american and european roads in the second half of this year. so, the countdown has begun. autonomous automobiles are most definitely on their way. now, if you are someone who prefers the wind to be rushing through your hair, ces also offers plenty for riders as well as drivers. this is surely the most fun you can have on a beach with your clothes on. the super 73 is an electric bike that can hold enough charge to travel for more than 25 miles. its top speed is 27mph, which on newport beach is certainly enough to get the wind in your hair. you have the thumb here.
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don't press on itjust yet and you have the two brakes right here. two brakes right here... so are you ready to go? you go first and i will follow you. follow me. go. 0h! ha—ha! the bike was funded via kickstarter, where it raised almost $500,000, and now each bike is being carefully crafted here in orange county california. we have every machine needed to create an entire bike. there's some days where we have got, you know, 30, 40 bikes being welded in a single day. that's to ensure that everything is done properly, safely, and will hold up for a lifetime. the batteries in these things are getting more affordable, they‘ re getting lighter, so it means at ces this year we're seeing a host of interesting ways to help us get around. chinese company leeco unveiled these bikes. they're powered by normal pedals, but they have the android mobile operating system built in so you can track your progress. and then there is things like the movpack.
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this is a regular backpack, that with one movement you can turn it into an electric skateboard, that's actually easier to ride than a regular skateboard. but it's perhaps more futuristic ideas like this one from honda that really get the imagination going. this concept car is more about having something that you don't necessarily own, but you kind ofjust call it up whenever you need a vehicle to pop to the shops or do some of those small errands. it will drive itself to you, pick you up, and when you are done with it you canjust let it go itself. and we will have to stop the ces coverage right there, because this is the short cut of click. we are back in vegas next week. in the meantime, you can follow us on twitter. thank you very much for watching, and we will see you soon. hello, this is breakfast,
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with rachel burden and jon kay. the british red cross warns of a humanitarian crisis in nhs hospitals in england. the charity says the government needs to provide more money to ease the strain. it is after dozens of a&e departments were forced to divert ambulances to other hospitals.
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