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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 7, 2017 5:00pm-6:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm martine croxall. labour accuses the government of slashing spending on the nhs. it comes after the british red cross warned hospitals were in a "humanitarian crisis", a claim the nhs rejects. on the international scale for the red cross of humanitarian crisis, i really don't think the nhs is at that point. for the first time for probably 30 years, school budgets are falling, the nhs is in crisis. we're campaigning on all of those issues. we want real social justice in this country. a 26—year—old us army veteran is in custody on suspicion of shooting dead five people at fort lauderdale airport in florida. more than a0 people are killed in a bomb blast in northern syria. the islamic state group is suspected of carrying out the attack. and wayne rooney equals sir bobby charlton's record number of goals for manchester united. the striker reached
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the landmark in united's 4—0 victory over reading in the third round of the fa cup. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the nhs in england has denied claims from the british red cross that there's a ‘humanitarian crisis‘ in its hospitals. latest figures show a&e departments have had to shut their doors to patients more than 140 times in december because of a lack of beds. the red cross, which helps patients return home from hospital, is calling for more government money. but nhs england say plans are in place to cope with additional demand, and that talk of a humanitarian crisis is overblown. our health correspondent smitha mundasad reports. winter pressure on accident
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and emergency, nothing new. but the red cross now says the strain on hospitals in england amounts to a humanitarian crisis. the charity claims social care cuts mean patients are being sent home without the right support so they end up back in a&e. red cross volunteers support nhs staff and say they've seen patients sent home without clothes. some, who don't receive the care they need to get washed, even some who have fallen and not been found for days. a&e staff recognise the problems too. the pressures on the nhs and especially in emergency care are particularly intense at the moment. but what is more concerning is the number of patients who have been managed within four hours and then the delays to admission into the hospital bed base which unfortunately are very, very significant and our staff are working under some pretty intolerable conditions at times. and sometimes they just can't manage.
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figures from nhs england show that overflowing a&e departments had to close their doors to new patients more than 140 times over the last month. compare that to the same month in 2015 and it's up more than 60%. so is the strain costing lives? the humanitarian crisis? no, i think that's an overstatement at this stage. clearly, demand is very high and it's higher than it has ever been, but we have the most comprehensive plans in place that we ever had, but it is very difficult at the moment. the death of two patients on emergency trolleys at worcestershire royal hospital are being investigated. one of them had waited 35 hours for a bed. the department of health says it's providing billions more each year to ease the pressure. beds are actually not quite as full as they were this time last year. but everyone in the health service knows things could get worse before they get better. smitha mundasad, bbc news.
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a little earlier, i asked the leader of the opposition, jeremy corbyn, why he thought the situation was so bad this year. it's got worse this winter compared to last and it's got worse over the last few years and it's a combination of underfunding of the national health service, terrible pressure placed on a&e departments, lack of beds to move people on to and, of course, part of the problem is the backup caused by the lack of social care provided by local authorities, so many cannot leave hospital when they should have been discharged in order to be cared for at home. how much though of a responsibility do we, as the public, bear in that we turn up sometimes at a&e with anything that we feel might needs urgent treatment but it's not actually a proper emergency? i think it's the wrong emphasis to start blaming the public for this. the issue is the lack of funding of the health service and social care. obviously, people should only go
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to the a&e when they need to be there and i think most people behave in a proper and responsible manner. one of the problems is that the delays on getting a gp appointment or a shortage of gps means people go to a&e because they can't get access to any other form of health care. we need to deal with the social care crisis urgently, the funding crisis urgently for our hospitals, most of whom are in debt and many of whom would have been on emergency alert over the past few weeks because of the crisis and it needs government intervention now. to be criticised by the red cross is unprecedented, in my memory, when the red cross, essentially a voluntary organisation, is helping out the nhs. now, obviously thank you to everyone that helps people out, that's how of course good society work, but we have health care as a human right in this country.
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that's what the nhs is for. the nhs needs the money now in order to care for everybody. but how much would that cost? if you look at labour's nhs policy about securing nhs and social care, bringing them into a publicly provided service and reversing marketisation, as your party calls it, how much would that cost and where would the money come from? it would come from a combination of ending the internal market in the nhs which is very expensive and also reversing the corporate tax cuts that the government announced it was going to put through in the autumn statement and which i raised with the prime minister during prime minister's question time. we raised it at over 500 events in december when the labour party organised a national day of action on the nhs. the crisis is now, real and it's here and surely it's the biggest wake—up call ever, that the red cross calls it a humanitarian crisis in our hospitals. how much of an issue
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is the idea of the privatisation of the nhs? last summer, the bma said about £7 billion, 6.3% of the budget was spent with the independent sector. that's a bit of a red herring, isn't it? no, because the whole plan is to grow the private sector within the nhs and indeed a number of nhs commissioning authorities are already handing services over to others, somerset are doing that, as indeed many others have. we should be proud of our national health service, the staff who work so hard in it and not threaten them with privatisation. but what would it cost? you must be able to put a figure on it, to know what your policy would require in terms of funding? what the policy requires
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is an addressing the local authority funding crisis by the department of communities and local government, because all of our local authorities report problems over social care. the government's cut £4 billion from that over the past six years. that should be put back into adult social care quickly as a way of helping out the nhs crisis. also, where nhs hospitals are running in debt or deficit and therefore, having to trim back or cut services or sell off sites and resources, which of course creates problems for tomorrow. i just think the government needs to intervene now and the prime minister needs to come to parliament on monday and explain exactly what she intends to do in the midst of this crisis. how much more tax would we need to pay, though, to properly fund social care and the nhs? what i'm saying is that we should reverse the corporation tax cuts and the privatisation process in the nhs. that would make a big difference to the hospital budgets.
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but also, reversing the social care cuts to local authorities. what the government's done is said that local authorities can put 2% on council tax. that sounds fine except what that is doing is localising what is a national problem and of course 2% in council tax raises wildly different figures in different parts of the country. in kensington and chelsea a great deal, in rotherham, it doesn't raise very much, make comparisons like that all over the country. we have to have a national approach to both health and social care. we haven't had chance to talk to you about the fabian society report from a few days ago, which is on a different matter admittedly. it's suggested that the labour party could look forward to as little as 20% of the vote come the next general election. what are you and your team going to do to try to turn that around? we are campaigning on the issues of inequality and injustice in this country.
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we have a government that's more interested in cutting corporate taxation, lowering the tax rate for the very richest and at the same time underfunding local authorities in social care and so many other areas. for the first time for probably 30 years school budgets are falling, our nhs is in crisis, we are campaigning on all of those issues. we want real socialjustice in this country so that there isn't a postcode lottery on when you're cared for if you are disabled or elderly. we want a society that actually cares for everybody. that's what the prime minister said she wants on the steps of downing street when she assumed office. the problem is, since then, there's been further tax cuts for those that could pay more and huge cuts in social services as a result of the underfunding of local government. labour is on the side of people wanting decent, good quality public services and an economy that invests for the future. if the policies don't attract more
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support but put you in striking if the policies don't attract more support that put you in striking distance of a victory at the general election, what would it take for you to step down and say someone else needs to lead the labour party? we are fighting, as a party, to protect and defend our nhs, to expand social care in our society, to properly fund education and for investment in infrastructure for a growing manufacturing economy in britain. that is the appeal we are putting out. that i believe will get a great deal of support. this is an issue facing the whole country and labour is trying to speak for 100% of the people of this country to ensure those policies are understood. but if you do not succeed in increasing your chances of victory, at what point would you say, i'm not the man to lead labour? i've been elected to lead this party by over 60% of the votes of members and supporters of this party. it's a great honour and responsibility.
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i'm carrying out that honour and that responsibility and our party is working very hard on these issues. when you were talking to me a few moments ago about the national health service, you asked about what we are doing. we organised a campaigning day. after four or five days after asking members to support us, 500 events were organised around the country. that's labour at a community level organising with people to defend our nhs like this wonderful hospital behind me was defended by people of this area which prevented the a&e area being closed a few years ago. jeremy corbyn, leader of the labour party. it's emerged that the man accused of shooting dead five people at an airport in florida yesterday had a history of mental health problems, some of which followed military service in iraq. esteban santiago, who's 26, was arrested after opening fire on people in the baggage reclaim area of fort lauderdale airport.
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earlier the the fbi gave this update on the investigation. we have positively identified the five deceased victims and we are in the process of notifying their family members and loved ones. we have concluded the interview of the suspect. the suspect remains in custody and is currently held at the broward countyjail on federal charges. we are working very closely with the us attorney's office office and this afternoon the united states attorney's office will issue a press release with regards to the charges that the suspect will be facing. we are conducting interviews and investigated leads in numerous locations, not only here in south florida, but really throughout several other locations in the united states. we have conducted roughly 175 witness interviews, we've recovered video, physical evidence and we continue to pursue every investigative lead. we have not ruled out anything, we continue to look at all avenues
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and all motives for this horrific attack and at this point we are continuing to look at the terrorism angle with regards to the potential motivation behind this attack. one of the unions involved in negotiations to avert a 24—hour strike on london's underground has ended talks, dashing hopes of a last minute deal. the rmt said the talks had failed. the other union involved, the tssa, is still at the conciliation service acas. the stoppage is due to start on sunday evening, causing travel misery for thousands of commuters on monday. our business correspondent joe lynam gave me the latest on the talks. the tssa represents around 10% of station staff on london underground. that's around 500 people, a lot of people. but the vast majority are represented by the rmt trade union and they have walked out
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of the talks, the conciliation service acas resumed their efforts to find a solution this morning at around 11am but the rmt walked out at around 2 this afternoon. the talks will continue with a small rump of the workers but it looks now very likely that the strike will go ahead at 6 tomorrow evening, a 2k hour strike. what impact is it likely to have? four million people on a normal work day use the london underground so you can imagine they are currently scurrying around to find alternative routes into the city. it's one of the biggest transport networks in europe and shutting it down will make getting around the city very difficult. this is a dispute about station ticket offices. for the last three or four years, the london underground's attempted to save money so it doesn't have to increase the cost of tickets to the public by closing down ticket offices. the union representing most of the workers in the rmt say that is dangerous because customers won't have access to the support
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they'd otherwise get and there is a security issue as well as helping customers' issues because there's nobody there. the management say there'll be people patrolling the platforms and in and around the station, theyjust won't be behind the booth. it's a protracted negotiation and, at the moment, we are no closer to a solution. in southern thailand, at least 18 people have died in a week of heavy rains and floods, and thousands of villages have been submerged. according to the country's interior ministry, 700,000 people have been affected. forecasters are warning that the unseasonal downpours will continue for at least another two days. as david campanale now reports, the deluge has also disrupted beach holidays in several destinations popular with tourists. heavy rains are hammering thailand's flood—ravaged south, taking the death toll higher and leaving thousands of villages partially submerged. in some parts, the water has risen to the rooftops. the rain is turning roads
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into rivers, making them impassable. it has also inundated farmland and damaged more than 1500 schools. the downpour is expected to persist for another 48 hours, with thailand's meteorologists warning of possible flash floods. its severity is testing the capacity of locals to cope. translation: now we lack food and trending water but the water translation: now we lack food and drinking water but the water level is almost stable. many flights and train and bus services have been delayed or suspended, and power lines toppled in the region. boats are being used to evacuate flood victims, while military bases have been mobilised to help in the process. for many, the downpours and flooding could not have come at a worse time. tourism plays a vital role in the thai economy and this is usually peak holiday season, with weather normally both cool and relatively dry.
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social media showed some tourists making light of the floods, using inflatable rings to float down waterlogged streets. but others may choose to cancel or cut short their visits, taking away a desperately needed source of income for many ordinary thais. the us department of homeland security says it will increase protection of the country's voting machines and data bases, to guard against cyber attacks. it's in response to a report by intelligence officials which, for the first time, directly accuses president putin of trying to boost donald trump's election bid. catrina renton reports. the report from american intelligence claims russia's president, vladimir putin, personally ordered what it called an influence campaign to help donald trump's chances of winning the american presidency. it said that its goals were to help
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denigrate hillary clinton. the president—elect had earlier described the russian hacking claims as a political witch—hunt by his opponents. at trump tower, he met america's top intelligence officials for a classified briefing. they say russia's actions included hacking into the e—mail accounts of the democratic national committee and top democrats, and using intermediaries such as wikileaks to release the information. russia has previously denied this, and wikilea ks' founderjulian assange has said before that moscow was not the source. a former cia director gave his opinion. it depends, russian involvement seems plausible in no small measure because they were able to come up with the identities of the intermediaries between the russian government and people who did some of the hacking. and that, i
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think, was one thing that got a lot of people's attention, including mine. after the briefing, mr trump did not single out russia. in a statement he said. and the incoming vice president says the us will strengthen cyber defences. the president—elect has made it very clear, where going to take aggressive action in the early days in our new administration to combat the cyber attacks and protect the security of the american people from this type of intrusion in the future. donald trump said he had tremendous respect for the work and service done by those in the us intelligence community.
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but, with two weeks to go until he moves into the white house, questions remain over how they will all work together to keep america safe. catriona renton, bbc news. good afternoon. the nhs in england has rejected claims that there‘s a ‘humanitarian crisis‘ in its hospitals. the comments, from the british red cross, come as figures show a&e departments have had to shut their doors to patients more than 140 times in december, because of a lack of beds. this afternoon the labour leader jeremy corbyn called upon the government to take urgent action, but nhs england says plans are in place to cope, and that talk of any humanitarian crisis is overblown. our health correspondent smitha mundasad reports. there are some flashing images in this report. winter pressures on accident and emergency — some patiens waiting winter pressures on accident and emergency — some patients waiting a long time to be seen, beds closed because of the winter vomiting bug. this picture isn‘t new. but the british red cross says the strain on hospitals is so great it amounts
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to a humanitarian crisis. the charity claims social care cuts mean patients are being sent home without the right support so they often end up back in a&e. at the very least it is a significant human crisis and if you think about it, someone waiting on a trolley to be seen at an a&e departmnent, not knowing what may happen, perhaps with no famnily or friends around them i can assure you when we talk to people, they describe that as a crisis. the red cross says its volunteers are seeing increasingly complex and chaotic situations in people‘s homes — people discharged without clothing, others with no food at home and no—one to look after them. figures from nhs england show that overflowing a&e departments had to close their doors to new patients more than 140 times over the last month. compare that to the same month in 2015 and it‘s up more than 60%. nhs england denies the situation is at such an extreme breaking point.
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a humanitarian crisis? no, i think that‘s an overstatement at this stage. clearly, demand is very high and it‘s higher than it has ever been, but we have the most comprehensive plans in place that we ever had, but it is very difficult at the moment. eyebrows may have been raised by the red cross choosing to use words more often used to describe a war—torn country, but last year‘s figures show there were some 350,000 more visits to a&es like this one between december and february 2016 and that‘s a pattern that front line staff are worried is set to get worse. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn is calling on the prime minister to give an urgent statement on monday about what the government is going to do. this is a wake—up call to properly fund our nhs and the social care so that those who are in a desperate situation needing care outside of hospital are able to get that care. local authorities don‘t
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have the money to do it. the department of health says it is providing billions more every year to ease the pressure. beds are not quite as full as they were this time last year, but everyone in the health service knows that things could get worse before they get better. smitha mundasad, bbc news. millions of commuters in london will face disruption from tomorrow night and all day monday after talks to avert a strike on the london underground broke down. members of the rmt union will walk out for 2h hours from 6pm tomorrow in a dispute overjobs and the closure of some ticket offices. talks are still ongoing between transport bosses and the smaller tssa union. at least a0 people have been killed by a massive bomb in a fuel tanker in syria. so—called islamic state is suspected of carrying out the attack. the blast ripped through a central market in the town of azaz, which lies on the border with turkey. from neighbouring lebanon, alex forsyth sent this report. fear, panic and chaos —
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the aftermath of this morning‘s explosion. many were killed, others wounded by the attack outside a courthouse in a busy commercial district in the centre of the city. translation: a car bomb went off in the city centre near civilians. there are no fighters here, all of them civilians. as rescue workers searched for survivors and bodies, no—one had claimed responsibility for this attack, but the city is no stranger to such scenes. azaz is a stronghold of turkish—backed syrian rebels involved in a major operation to clear so—called islamic state from northern syria, close to the turkish border. in recent days, turkish forces and rebels have continued to target is, which isn‘t included in a fragile ceasefire covering much of syria. azaz has become home to people who
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have fled fighting elsewhere. the ceasefire, while largely holding, does not mean that people are not buying. donald trump has said that when he‘s president, russia will have far more respect for his country than it does now. the us president—elect tweeted that having a good relationship with russia was a good thing, and only "stupid people orfools would think otherwise." an intelligence report yesterday accused russia of influencing the us election. it‘s emerged that the man being questioned over the shooting dead of five people at a florida airport has a history of mental health problems. esteban santiago, a veteran who served in iraq, had been receiving treatment at his home in alaska. from fort lauderdale, gary o‘donoghue sent this report. this is this is the man who police
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say killed five people at fort lauderdale airport, opening fire indiscriminately as travellers collected baggage. he is esteban santiago, a former member of the military. his family said he had been receiving psychological help after his discharge last august. his aunt said he was never the same after returning from serving in iraq in 2011. police say that santiago used a semiautomatic handgun in the attack in the baggage hall, scattering terrified passengers before throwing away his weapon and laying spread eagle on the ground as police moved in to arrest him. as things started to return to normal at the airport, it has emerged that santiago had been interviewed by the fbi as recently as november last year. one anonymous source has said that he told agence that the government was ordering him to watch videos from the islamic state group.
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we are hearing that contact, that the agents noted the erratic behaviour and that it concerns them and motivated them to call the local authorities to have him taken into custody and evaluated at a medical facility for his mental health. questions are being raised about the ease with which santiago was able to transport and use his weapon in a supposedly secure a place like an airport. it is legal to put a gun in checked baggage in the us as long as it is locked in a case and unloaded but you can carry ammunition in the same case. santiago will appear on monday in court on federal charges. while his motivations will be probed, there will be serious questions about how a man who had already appeared on the authorities‘ radar could go on to commit such a
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crime. wayne rooney today equalled sir bobby charlton as manchester united‘s all—time top goal scorer. his 249th goal helped defeat reading 4—0 in the fa cup. adam wild watched the match. arriving at the theatre of dreams, for wayne rooney a moment to fulfil his. this, is the stage on which he‘s been a leading man for more than a decade. amongst the audience for this special performance, the man whose goal—scoring record he was now chasing. rooneyjust one goal away from that, and no one would have to wait long. commentator: it's in, wayne rooney equals the all—time goal—scoring record of sir bobby charlton for manchester united. in off his knee, but in all the same, and that‘s what the history books will now show. record equalling goal—scorer, but rooney‘s role goes
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much further than that. his pass playing in anthony martial for united‘s second. such was their dominance, the lead could, perhaps should, have been greater by half—time. but whilst rooney couldn‘t quite add another, marcus rashford could. his captain the first to congratulate him. for the cup holders, this was very comfortable. rashford‘s second — united‘s fourth — couldn‘t have been any easier. a landslide win for a landmark occasion. to be up there in terms of goals with sir bobby, it‘s a really proud moment for me. hopefully i‘ll be out there on my own soon, but today, i‘ll enjoy today. it‘s a real honour. a record equalled — now to break it. for such a player that surely won‘t take long. more throughout the evening. now on
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bbc one, time for the news where you are. hello. after a particularly grey day for the majority at least another fairly murky night to come tonight. if you‘re on the move through the night into the morning, there could be some dense patches of fog here and there. generally misty, really, certainly over the hills, but that fog will thicken up in one or two spots. even where you have clearer skies, east of scotland, eastern parts of england, even here one or two fog patches could develop. but it‘s here we see temperatures drop the furthest, even a touch of frost for parts of scotland. for most, another frost free, mild night, temperatures six to eight celsius. grey start to the second half of the weekend. little changes. murkiest in the morning. patchy rain or drizzle here or there. later, something wet to the west, especially the west of scotland. the breeze will pick up. highlands. the odd heavier burst of rain expected. wetter in the afternoon. north east scotland will see glimpses of sunshine. dampest in the middle part of the day, pushing to the isle of man.
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misty across the hills of the north of england and north wales. north east wales could see sunshine but for most, rather grey skies so if you are heading to any of the fa cup third round games watch out for fog and hope the matches are more exciting than the sky colour! sunday into monday, high pressure gives way. breezier but wet and windy to start in scotland and northern ireland. lively winds across north west scotland. milder in the south east corner. into a colder spell through latter monday, midweek mild atlantic air pushes in, occasional rain then blue colours are back.
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surging south to other parts of western europe. next week, winds pick up from monday onwards then turning colder, bit wintry and for some, snow. this is bbc news. the headlines: labour has accused the government of plunging the nhs into crisis through lack of funding. it comes after the british red cross warned some hospitals were suffering a "humanitarian crisis" — a claim rejected by nhs england. police in florida are continuing to question a 26—year—old us army veteran after five people were shot dead at fort lauderdale airport. more than a0 people have been killed in a bomb blast in northern syria. it‘s thought the islamic state group could be to blame. they‘re not part of the recent ceasefire. and wayne rooney has equalled sir bobby charlton to become
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manchester united‘s biggest ever goal scorer, in the club‘s 4—0 fa cup victory over reading. the repair bill to fix the country‘s potholes could soon reach £14 billion. that‘s according to councils in england and wales, who say the government should pay for the repairs from fuel duty. the government says it‘s already putting £250 million into fixing the problem, but the local government association says that‘s not enough. duncan kennedy reports. the shudder of the wheels and the judder to the spine. we have all been over, round and through potholes. councils fix two million potholes every year. that is about 12,000 for every local authority in england and wales. but now they‘re saying the overall repair bill could soon reach £14 billion. hard—pressed councils, who are mending, you know,
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a pothole every five seconds in this country, just cannot get to the core of the problem, which is actually many of our roads arejust being patched now. they need to be fully repaired. councils say the government could increase fuel duty by a couple or 2p a litre to pay for the repairs. but the government says it‘s already created a £250 million fund to fix four million potholes by 2021. one, two, three, four. this isjust one road in southampton that is heaving with holes. but it is notjust the cost of repairing potholes that seems to be on the increase. today‘s report also finds the time taken to repair them is on the rise, going up from ten years in 2006 to 14 years today. devon thinks it might have one solution. it has become the first county to recruit members
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of the public to fill the holes, creating what they are calling a community of road wardens. devon county council are telling us they haven‘t got the funds to do it and so there are two ways of looking at that, you could either say, "ok, that is a shame, let the potholes reign," or you can actually say, "well, let‘s do something about it." potholes potmark roads everywhere and midwinter is the worst time for damage. national and local governments agree they are a problem but no one, it seems, has the bottomless pit of money required to really fix them. for the first time, the nhs is providing disabled children with prosthetic limbs that are specially designed for sport. nhs england says it hopes to equip "several hundred" children a year with the limbs, to allow them to participate in more sport. here‘s our health correspondent, robert pigott. right, how have you been doing, then, since you had your blade? when ben made the decision
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at the age of ten to have his stunted right leg amputated, his dream of a future in sport seemed remote. would you like to put it on for me and show me what you can do with it? three years on, ben is one of the first children to receive a running blade on the nhs. as if he were changing a shoe, he can swap his false leg for the blade and feel a new freedom and energy. the spring of it is the bit that makes me go faster. i used to not be able to, like, be able to run as fast or able to kick a ball as well, but now i‘ve got a good amount of power in my leg, and i‘ve got the right size, so i can do loads of skills and hit a ball really well. the blade and the treatment cost around £1,000, but clairejohnson, a health service expert in prosthetic limbs, says the nhs will more than recoup the cost by keeping children active. we're hoping that it will give him a level playing field, so that he can compete with his peers and be able
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to participate in a lot more sports. it does help in the wider scheme of things, and hopefully give a longer longevity to their lives by giving them the opportunity to do sport. ben is among 2,500 children in england with limbs that are either absent or which don‘t work properly. the nhs hopes to fit several hundred of them with a sports prosthetic every year. the scheme not only opens the way to sport for a group of disabled youngsters, but it comes with an added message. at a time when so many teenagers are couch potatoes, it makes an example of an extraordinary few who overcome all the odds to carve out a life in sport. the new blade, for me, can do a lot more than my prosthetic can do, cos now i can run with more freedom. ben‘s mother kathleen says running blades can change a disabled child‘s whole outlook on life. he seems more confident, and more
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eager to get out and about now. he's wanting to put it on and go out more, and do more sports, more activities. now he has got the blade, the sky is the limit. ben says he is now training for the paralympics, and he‘s talking dates — 2024, at the very least. 2020? who knows? nasa have released a rare detailed photo of the earth and the moon, as seen from mars which is some 127 million miles away. the image was taken from nasa‘s most powerful telescope orbiting the red planet. the reddish feature near the middle of the face of earth is australia. now, if you are tea drinker, have you ever wondered how tea—bags are made? well there‘s a cafe in portsmouth, that can satisfy both your curiosity — and your tastebuds. dougal shaw reports. meet tea entrepreneur
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andrew gadsden, standing to attention outside his teashop in portsmouth. a decade ago, he left the navy to set sail on a new career. he decided to follow his twin passions, tea drinking and surfing the internet. back on dry land, he bought himself a tea bag making machine... and ran an online shop from his flat. as his business grew, he had to move his operation to a warehouse. people started peering through the window and wanted to come in and asked us if they could have some tea and it was getting very awkward having to say no all the time. they would say, "well, what do you do?" we would say, "well, we sell tea." "well, can we have some?" "no." but eventually he bowed to customer pressure and built a tea room inside the factory. entirely by accident, we were running a little cafe. i don‘t know if you can hear it right now but we‘ve usually got the machines running.
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customers can peek through the shelves to see the tea being made. and by special arrangement, they can also inspect the tea making process. the two worlds of the cafe and the factory live side—by—side, connected by sound. clacking. teas imported from around the world are blended and packed on—site. 123,000 tea bags are made in the factory each month. around 700 pots of tea are served in the cafe. having a physical shop suddenly changes the whole business. to actually meet someone, even see someone drinking your tea, you‘ve blended and flavoured, and enjoying it, is uniquely rewarding. and, of course, sometimes something isn‘t 100% right and they can tell you face—to—face. the way the internet has gone,
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that physical face—to—face connection in a place is, i would say, far more important than ever. now you know! artists from around the world are gathering in northern china to compete at the annual harbin ice and snow festival. ice and snow carvers have been putting the finishing touches to their work — on big chunks of ice dragged out of the nearby river. the sculptures range from animals and cartoon characters to replicas of famous world monuments and landscapes. the contest has attracted over thirty teams from countries around the world. this is bbc news. the headlines: labour has accused the government of plunging the nhs into crisis through lack of funding. it comes after the british red cross warned some hospitals were suffering a "humanitarian crisis" — a claim rejected by nhs england. police in florida are continuing to question a 26—year—old us army veteran after five people were shot dead at fort lauderdale airport. more than 40 people have been killed
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in a bomb blast in northern syria. it‘s thought the islamic state group could be to blame. now on bbc news, it‘s time for the film review. hello, and a very warm welcome to the film review. to take us through this week‘s cinema releases is antonia quirtke. what have you got? we are going to start with silence, martin scorsese‘s new film, liam neeson, andrew garfield, adam driver, they are playing jesuit priests in 17th—century japan. passengers, starring chris pratt, jennifer lawrence, about two
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passengers sleeping in suspended animation for 120 years on their way to a new colony on a far—away planet and they wake too early. and also, assassin‘s creed, michael fassbender‘s big movie, based on the computer game. let‘s kick off then with silence, a great passion of martin scorsese, trying for years and years to get this made. first got it in with daniel day lewis, gael garcia bernal and benicia del toro have been attached to it. he was famously brought up a devout catholic, had a great and genuine interest in the priesthood, at one point he was going to join the priesthood, so catholicism has been a real thing for him. religion in his films, the last temptation of christ
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and kundun, but even something like mean streets, marvellously there. what is the religious martin scorsese like? this is a difficult film to watch, it is about the persecution and torture of priests and their flock. 161 minutes, incredibly long, and relentless, long conversations reflecting martin scorsese‘s own ambiguity towards his own faith. i know that it has been very highly praised, and not many people have gone to see it, but it has been critically tremendously well received. ifound it... i think that there is a pulse of confusion in it, i was not clear what martin scorsese was trying to say. the directors he admires, religious directors, carl dreier, joe navarre, robert bresson, there is a euphoria in those sorts of films. things likejoe navarre. and yet, you can‘t help think, this was scorsese‘s moment to join the ranks of those kind of directors.
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i‘m not sure that he has done it, but i know that many people disagree with me. let‘s take a little clip here, for a preview. padre. we have fought to travel, for the lord. you must pray for courage. if we do not do what they want, then there could be danger for everyone in the village. they could be put in prison, they could be taken away forever. what should we do? tremble. tremble! it is all right to tremble. what are you saying? you can‘t! you can‘t... as you were saying, a long watch, a pretty gruelling watch,
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but the performance is good? absolutely, andrew garfield, when he played spiderman, that role did that young actor no favours and here he is, he has a quality of deeply inherent youthfulness and vulnerability, anyone who saw him in never let me go will remember that, and also, a japanese actor, issey ogato, he plays the grand inquisitor in this, and he is an incredible actor, ingenious casting for martin scorsese. and this is a comedic actor, but he is playing someone who does the most terrible things, he‘s a comedic actor, he has wonderful kabuki gestures, and the performance is something else. something pretty different, passengers — silence, gruelling, is passengers something easier? a lot fluffier, a lot more fun, this is about two passengers
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in suspended animation, hibernation for 120 years on their way to a new colony on a new planet and for reasons we will not go into, spoiler alerts, they wake up early. wonderful idea, so two strangers facing an eternity together, walking endless corridors, gigantic spaceship, and, breaking into the entertainment facilities, and with their little wristbands, one of the funniest things is the ways in which there is even no one else existing, you are still slaves, your life had been formalised before you left earth. also this lovely simmering sexual tension between the two main stars... it would have been all right to leave it at that, but there is this daring do, in the third act, not entirely necessary. you can feel moments where it is reaching for some tougher kind of glory, think of something like alien
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and wandering the corridors of that spaceship, intensely sinister and threatening place to be, but this place looks pretty nice. i would not mind moving there myself! there are moments when you are shown howjerry—built this craft is, hammering away against things, putting fuses together to get things to work, that ought to have been frightening and made me feel how vulnerable these people are and yet it does not quite do that. there is a wonderful cameo, michael sheen plays a bartender, rather sinister. he is a robot. and you can see that he is struggling with the part, trying to bring more to it than is there on the page, unfortunately, it is not on the page but it is fun. let‘s talk about assassin‘s creed, which video game players will be very familiar with, based on the video game. movies used to be based on novels... now they are based on video games(!) and this is catastrophic... nine instalments in this video franchise, one of those movies that has been long in production,
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lots of re—shoots, rejigs, starring michael fassbender, marion cotillard, jeremy irons, charlotte rampling, incredible cast. to even begin to describe the plot, i am not sure there is any point! assassins... assassins against knights templar, let‘s take a look. do you recognise this? it is an assassin's blade. this is the actual one that your father used to take your mother's life. he's here, you know... your mother's death, not something a boy should ever be made to see. so, catastrophic, you said... charitably(!), i am sure
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a lot of people will go to see it nonetheless. why do you think it doesn‘t work? unbelievably incoherent, extraordinary, it is... it opens... it opens with three flashbacks, three flashbacks! what a flashback does in a film, someone is standing there and saying, hang on a sec, let me fill you in, and then they do that twice more. hang on, if you don‘t know this... the rest won‘t make any sense... three times, 15 minutes! feels like the movie never starts, then you are in there and you feel like the movie will never end! i went to the cinema to see this, two people were asleep at the end of the row that i was sitting on, that sums it up. probably does! never mind. so that is assassin‘s creed. best movie out at the moment, in your opinion. a monster calls, now this is the most extraordinary sell, actually, it is a fantastical terminal illness
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melodrama for children. maybe it is not for children, it stars a 12—year—old boy. he‘s visited by a yew tree, over a few evenings, and it is played by liam neeson, it has a wonderful shape, dickensian shape, visited three times to be shown things that may help you deal with life. it is a flat—out classic, it has the emotional heft of the railway children, moments of iron man by ted hughes and pan‘s labyrinth, i think it is a masterpiece, go and see it and take all of the family. good recommendation! best dvd? a terrific film which is just... featured quite a lot in the golden globes nominations. hell or high water, ben foster and chris pine, bank robber brothers, and jeff bridges is the texas ranger who is tracking them down, which sounds terribly familiar, that kind of plot, and features a great deal in cinema.
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one of them is on a roll, the other brother is a little too wild, the texas ranger is always a step ahead of them. it feels like a movie of the mid—1970s or early 1980s, like midnight run, where you come away from it thinking, you will look through the tv listings and think, hell or high water is on tonight, unmissable, fantastic! it has slotted into that classic film territory already, jeff bridges has been nominated for a golden globes for his best supporting actor and he does the most fantastic thing towards the end of the movie. there is a death scene and just in a couple of seconds you see everything thatjeff bridges can offer as an actor, the way that he absorbs the shock, it is a magical moment, such a terrific film. thank you very much the joining us. that is it for this week, thank you so much for watching, goodbye. hello.
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after a particularly grey day for the majority at least another fairly murky night to come tonight. if you‘re on the move through the night into the morning, there could be some dense patches of fog here and there. generally misty, really, certainly over the hills, but that fog will thicken up in one or two spots. even where you have clearer skies, east of scotland, eastern parts of england, even here one or two fog patches could develop. but it‘s here we see temperatures drop the furthest, even a touch of frost for parts of scotland. for most, another frost free, mild night, temperatures six to eight celsius. grey start to the second half of the weekend. little changes. murkiest in the morning. patchy rain or drizzle here or there. later, something wet to the west, especially the west of scotland. the breeze will pick up. the odd heavier burst of rain expected. wetter in the afternoon. north east scotland will see glimpses of sunshine. dampest in the middle
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part of the day, pushing to the isle of man. misty across the hills of the north of england and north wales. north east wales could see sunshine but for most, rather grey skies so if you are heading to any of the fa cup third round games watch out for fog and hope the matches are more exciting than the sky colour! sunday into monday, high pressure gives way. breezier but wet and windy to start in scotland and northern ireland. lively winds across north west scotland. milder in the south east corner. into a colder spell through latter monday, midweek mild atlantic air pushes in,
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occasional rain then blue colours are back. surging south to other parts of western europe. next week, winds pick up from monday onwards then turning colder, bit wintry and for some, snow. this is bbc news. i‘m martine croxall. the headlines at 6:00pm. labour accuses the government of slashing spending on the nhs. it comes after the british red cross warned hospitals were in a "humanitarian crisis", a claim nhs england rejects. on the international scale for the red cross of humanitarian crisis, i really don‘t think the nhs is at that point. for the first time for probably 30 years, school budgets are falling, our nhs is in crisis.
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we're campaigning on all of those issues. we want real social justice in this country. a 26—year—old us army veteran is in custody on suspicion of shooting dead five people at fort lauderdale airport in florida. more than 40 people are killed in a bomb blast in northern syria. the islamic state group is suspected of carrying out the attack. at least 12 people are dead after a week
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