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tv   World Business Report  BBC News  February 9, 2017 5:30am-5:46am GMT

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this is bbc world news. the headlines: the british parliament has voted overwhelmingly to let the government begin the uk's departure from the european union. prime minister theresa may says she wants to trigger formal talks by the end of march. during the vote, some dissenting mps were reprimanded for singing ode tojoy, the eu anthem. senators in the us have confirmed president trump's controversial choice for attorney general. alabama senator jeff sessions‘ appointment was approved by 52 votes to a7. the un has launched an emergency appeal for yemen, which is on the brink of famine after two years of civil war. it's calling for $2.1 billion to support two—thirds of the population. the international committee of the red cross says it's temporarily halting its aid work in afghanistan. it follows an attack on one of its convoys in the north of the country that left six staff dead and two missing. it's time for aaron.
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will open skies stay open under president trump? us airline bosses take their grievances to the white house today. top of the list, their fast—growing rivals from the gulf. plus — hail to the tweeter in chief. could the president's love of twitter stop the rot for the struggling social network? welcome to world business report. some of you are going, what is he doing, it isn't even friday? i will
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tell you what, give me a minute and i will give you a snapshot of the world of business and money. we start in washington, where the bosses of america's top airlines and airports are due to meet president trump in the next few hours. there are some major issues on the table that could affect the global aviation industry. as we know from his inauguration speech, mr trump said he would follow two simple rules. "buy american and hire american". that could mean a major boost for boeing. if he leans on us airlines to buy from them. but it's not as simple as that. european rival airbus also operates factories in the us, and buys billions of dollars worth of us components, like engines. it claims to support 245,000 usjobs. then there's the issue of foreign airlines operating in the us. this one, norwegian,
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was given a foreign carrier licence, allowing them to expand their routes to and from the us, as one of the last acts of the obama administration. this caused howls of protest from us airlines and unions. again, there's another side to it. norwegian says its creating at least 150 new usjobs and has ordered more than $18 billion worth of planes from boeing. so, what about the whole question of open skies, the deals that mean countries open their routes to each other? will they stay open under mr trump? the us currently has 120 open skies agreements. us airline bosses are particularly unhappy about the expansion of emirates, etihad airways, and qatar airways in the us. last week they wrote to the government claiming gulf carriers have received $50 billion
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in handouts from their governments over the past decade, something the gulf airlines deny. the president of emirates has long argued that an attack on their business by washington would only damage the us economy. here's what he told us back in 2015. it is far too important for the us economy for multiple reasons — for the activities of the gulf carriers to be cut back, because once you do that and you close the open skies that and you close the open skies that you have today it has enormous ramifications. the us economy would be severely affected by a closure, a shutting down of the open skies arrangement, which has manifestly produced huge amounts of wealth for aerospace, boeing, general electric as well as everything else.
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you and i know him quite well, tim clark, he is a big figure in the industry. john strickland, director ofjls consulting, joins me now. thank you for coming in at this horrid hour. you always do it, you need a medal. so, tim clark has a point, doesn't he, and it is interesting because he is the boss of the airline emirates which is the one the us airlines are gunning for, are they? yes, the big airlines put ina complaint are they? yes, the big airlines put in a complaint about the gulf carriers. they wanted to go to congress. they made allegations of unfair competition, these carriers from the gulf came into the market, and the document originally produced, which was about 50 pages, the three gulf carriers issued rebuttals into the hundreds of pages, evidence countering the arguments, these carriers have increased their services, the boss of kata airways told me last year, i
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have at world us mayors in my office imploring me to start services to the us —— imploring me to start services to the us -- qatar airways. the key beyond the end services and what it means for access to major us cities which of course is all part of the economy and job creation and so on is these guys by large numbers of boeing aircraft and a massive customers for boeing. if there is any poster boy for jobs customers for boeing. if there is any poster boy forjobs it is boeing. you are right that all three are fast—growing and emirates has been around since the 1980s but they are all fast—growing and they purchase a lot of aircraft, they seem purchase a lot of aircraft, they seem to have the money compare to others, but is it at a point where the worry is if president trump says, 0k, the worry is if president trump says, ok, you know what, iam scrubbing the open skies with the uae and the gulf regions, they will save goodbye to boeing and go to airbus. with the buyback and jobs
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for america, the aerospace industry, not only boeing, sub suppliers and engine manufacturers, are a massive pa rt engine manufacturers, are a massive part of the economy and supportjobs at home. we don't have a unified view in the airline community. the d3 might lobby against gulf carriers but others like federal express have the reverse id and they say the open skies agreements which allow the allied in our positive —— idea. they are positive forjob creation. the message is not even united in the industry. and the irony of it is open skies, which many countries use, is a us concept. i have to ask, if president trump listens to airline bosses and rips up the open skies with parts of the gulf area, that will have a huge ramifications for the global aviation industry. that will have a huge ramifications for the global aviation industrym could have a massive effect because the us is the origin of these open skies agreement and they have been seen as skies agreement and they have been seen as positive to global trade, positive to economic development in tourism and airlines from the us and
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other countries, in whichever partnership of open skies the us has formed, have developed air services in part of a 21st—century economy. aviation is so fundamental not only directly for what it creates but how it supports and catalyses economic growth more broadly so it will be a very interesting meeting today. indeed, we are going to be watching it closely. thank you for coming in. we appreciate it. let's move on quickly. we are also looking at twitter. it reports results later today. its problems are well—known. it has been struggling to grow its user base and to make money from it. those are the main reasons why twitter shares are down by almost a third since it floated. but could the election of avid twitter user donald trump be giving it a new lease of life? analysts have been pointing out a rise in people downloading the app. they say that could help twitter finally find a buyer. james erskine is director of the online marketing company social circle. he's on our newsroom camera.
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it is good to see you and thank you for coming in. let me ask you, twitter, you know, we are here again, facebook when it went public with were saying the same thing, it has to learn how to make money, it has to learn how to make money, it has to learn how to make money from the users and it has done that. twitter still hasn't done that. the users and it has done that. twitter still hasn't done thatm hasn't, no, and there are a number of reasons we see for that, social circle, it is ourjob to see how people engage with content across lots of different social media platforms and twitter, we are starting to see people see authentic content from real people, and slowly they are starting to engage, so twitter before was having a problem with people using it more like a newsfeed rather than a social network. one thing you need from a social network is engage in it. things to engage with.|j social network is engage in it. things to engage with. i have to ask, talking of engaging, president
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trump has been very engaged on twitter. do you think that could actually give the company a boost? you know, ithink actually give the company a boost? you know, i think it could not necessarily because of him specifically but more what it is indicative of, so fierce political discourse and debate amplified in an online environment. we also saw it with brexit as well, twitter have lots and lots of opinions around the key political issues and i suppose the next step is what else people can debate, so, does it go beyond politics, to other niche communities where they can have those back and forth opinions? 0k, will they find a buyer, yes or no, i have to go, will they? eventually, yes, it is all about the content on twitter to allow them to do that. we appreciate yourtime, allow them to do that. we appreciate your time, short and sweet, thank your time, short and sweet, thank you very much, and i will be back to look at the papers from around the world. follow me on twitter. i will see you shortly.
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a new law designed to help protect people in england from so called revenge evictions by rogue landlords isn't working. that's according to senior mps and housing lawyers. a bbc freedom of information request has revealed there may be hundreds of thousands of vulnerable tenants, afraid to report things like faulty electrics and broken boilers. daniel whitworth is in leeds to find out more. things like damp faulty electrics and broken boilers can all badly affect people's l. hello? but here in leeds there is a concern many are too scared to complaint in their landlord keeps them out. this is rented out, private rented accommodation with people living here. people paying to rent here, making complaints, nothing happening and they could be under the threat of revenge eviction. that is the reason why they are not coming forward to the council to complain.
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and that is exactly what happened to helen. her and her family and that is exactly what happened to helen. herand herfamily were and that is exactly what happened to helen. her and herfamily were hit with a revenge eviction. it was horrible. after months of complaining we got a firm of solicitors in who deal with properties and estates in disrepair. they check the property, they agreed it was damp and something needed to be done, so they wrote to our landlord and instructed that work needed to be done on the property and within a week of him receiving that we received a section 21 eviction notice pushed under a mac door. because of what happened to people like helen a new law was introduced in october 2015 to try to stop retaliatory or so—called revenge eviction is —— our door. we have seen exclusive figures gathered ina have seen exclusive figures gathered in a freedom of information request from hundreds of councils right across england that show more than half haven't stopped any at all. more than a quarter don't even record figures and fewer than one in five have taken any action. the government says revenge eviction is
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ra and thanks to its new law councils have all the powers they need to stop them —— evictions are rare. you're watching bbc world news. the top stories this hour: the british parliament has voted overwhelmingly to let the government begin the uk's departure from the european union. prime minister theresa may says she wants to trigger formal talks by the end of march. senators in the us have confirmed president trump's controversial choice for attorney general. alabama senator jeff sessions' appointment was approved by 52 votes to a7. the un has launched an emergency appeal for yemen, which is on the brink of famine after two years of civil war. now it is time for our news review. we begin with the moscow times who say russia's main opposition
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leader alexei navalny could be barred from running for president against vladimir putin next year after he was found guilty of embezzlement and handed a five—year suspended sentence. the telegraph leads with theresa may securing a historic victory as britain's house of commons gave its final approval on wednesday to a bill authorising the government to start exit talks with the european union. the times says german chancellor angela merkel will unveil plans to radically increase the number of failed asylum seekers being forcibly repatriated. ms merkel has been under pressure to tighten security following the recent spate of terror attacks in the country. the arab news reports us president donald trump's administration is considering a proposal that could lead to potentially designating iran's powerful islamic revolutionary guard corps as a terrorist organisation. and finally, the chief executive officers of three of the biggest
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airlines in the us are due to meet with president donald trump today after sending a letter to us secretary of state rex tillerson urging action against government subsidies given to its competitors in the gulf. joining us is paul charles who's ceo of the pc agency good morning. yesterday we were looking at the story of the russian political activist who is in hospital in moscow with severe organ failure. his wife is best he has been poisoned and now we have no violently be prevented to run four

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