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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  February 19, 2017 7:00am-8:01am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with rachel burden and christian fraser. an instant pay rise for prison officers in some of england's most violentjails. officers will get up to £5,000 extra, to try and ease the dangerously low staffing levels, but only in london and the south—east. good morning, it is sunday 19 february. also ahead: in the past hour, iraqi forces have begun an offensive to drive islamic state militants out of western mosul, their last remaining stronghold in iraq. donald trump defends his first month in office, claiming there is a new spirit of optimism sweeping the us. you've seen what we've accomplished in a very short period of time. the white house is running so smoothly. the row over business rates rumbles on. now, the boss of sainsbury‘s demands fundamental reform. sinkholes, mudslides and deadly winds. the powerful storms hitting california are now sweeping north. in sport: a non—league team will play in the fa cup quarter—finals, for the first time in over a century. lincoln city, from the fifth tier of english football, shocked premier league side burnley, to go through to the last eight of the competition. the fa cup quarter—final draw takes place tonight.
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after 7:00am, we will ask the managing director of lincoln city what it was like for him watching that historic win. and darren has the weather. good morning. as well as a giant snowdrop, we've got some springlike temperatures in the next few days, but it comes with a lot of cloud. the best of the sunshine in the east. more details a little later. good morning. first, our main story: thousands of prison officers in london and south—east england are getting an immediate pay increase of between £3,000 and £5,000. ministers have made the decision to try to boost recruitment and retain staff numbers, in the face of increasing violence. but the prison officers association says it is a divisive quick fix, and specialist and more experienced staff won't benefit. our home affairs correspondent tom symonds reports. they are on the frontline of the troubled prison service. their numbers have been falling in recent years. now, the government is putting in place a £12 million pay offer to keep them in theirjobs
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and attract new people. but only officers in 31 prisons in london and the south—east, including this one, wandsworth, will benefit. they are the jails under most pressure, struggling to maintain staff. the offer is for standard, grade three prison officers, not more senior supervisors or specialists. each will receive at least £3,000. the pay package for new recruits will be boosted by £5,000, to attract them into the job. but the prison officers association believes this offer won't satisfy its members. we're going to welcome additional money for our members. of course we are. but we don't think this goes far enough to solving the prison crisis. we believe it needs to be a national issue. we weren't properly consulted on this, either. so we believe that if the secretary of state wants to make these arbitrary decisions on pay, then she should consult us fully, and we can point out
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the inconsistencies and problems that will arise as a result of this policy. the government is also increasing training, vital if it is to deal with the growing threats to order behind bars. mental health issues, along with what ministers describe as drugs, drones, and mobile phones. the iraqi prime minister says an operation has begun to retake the western part of the city of mosulfrom islamic state militants. it is the last major is stronghold in iraq. government forces started their offensive in october, and last month secured the eastern part of the city, after weeks of fierce fighting. the united nations has urged all parties in the conflict to do everything they can to ensure the safety of hundreds of thousands of civilians trapped in the area. 0ur correspondent quentin somerville is with the iraqi troops who are preparing to do battle in the narrow streets of western mosul. in the distance, american aircraft have been launching air strikes
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against the outskirts of western mosul. large booms have been sounding all morning, and around me are tanks and armoured vehicles of iraq's emergency response division. special forces are getting ready to move over the area in front of me and begin the assault on western mosul, the last remaining city here in iraq that is still in the hands of the so—called islamic state. these men are not expecting an easy day of it, as this battle begins, because they know from drone footage that the islamic state are deeply embedded. they have dug tunnels into the surrounding villages that lie just before western mosul‘s outskirts, and before the city's airport. they are also expecting to face suicide car bombs. but, as you can perhaps hear behind me, the men are in an ebullient mood just as this battle gets underway. that was quentin sommerville, who is embedded with the iraqi troops who are preparing to do battle in western mosul. president trump has made a robust
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defence of his first four weeks in office, and insisted that a new spirit of optimism is sweeping the us. speaking to supporters at an airport hangar in florida, he repeated his campaign pledges to create jobs and improve the nation's security. mr trump again turned his fire on the media, accusing it of being dishonest about his administration. 0ur correspondent laura bicker reports from florida. to do you would be wrong. afterjust four weeks in office, president trump asa four weeks in office, president trump as a more years. the first lady also made an appearance, starting her remarks with lord's riu. our father, who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name. the kingdom come, thy will be done. but there is
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more to this rally. donald trump is trying to change the subject after headlines of chaos and controversy in his administration. he is back where you appears to be more co mforta ble, where you appears to be more comfortable, behind the campaign podium, rather than a desk in the 0val podium, rather than a desk in the oval office. i am here because i wa nt to oval office. i am here because i want to be among my friends, and among the people. he enjoys an audience, and takes heart from his fans. 0ne even made it on stage, after waiting since the early morning. when president trump promised all these things that he was going to do for us, i knew he was going to do for us, i knew he was going to do for us, i knew he was going to do this for us. he also had tough words for some of his alleged foes, the media. he has a new term for them, the enemy. these supporters are his people, and this is his message. a chance to appraise his first month of office, one he sees as a success. make america
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great again, that is what it is. he has kind of been up and down, i kind of feel like he is not 100% doing good but i want to give him more time. january 20 2017, a presidency died. in new york, protest held a fa ke died. in new york, protest held a fake funeral for the presidency, died. in new york, protest held a fake funeralfor the presidency, the political ideals of america seem further apart than ever. this rally will be hugely popular with his voting base, but it won't help him in washington. if president trump is to push through his campaign promises, he may need to take his message to capitol hill, rather than an adoring crowd. the boss of sainsbury‘s has joined the growing row over the re—evaluation of business rates, the commercial version of council tax. the supermarket‘s chief executive, mike coupe, says changes being introduced to reflect the value of property could leave high streets facing serious challenges and closures, while internet operations could see their bills cut. simonjones reports. big changes ahead for businesses.
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for the first time in seven years, rates are being updated in april, in line with property values. with prices rising strongly in the south—east, but falling sharply in less prosperous regions, there will be some dramatic differences, some businesses seeing increases of 400%. sainsbury‘s will see its bill rise to around £500 million, up from £483 million, while analysts predict internet giant amazon will have its business rate bill cut at the majority of its out—of—town warehouses. the boss of sainsbury‘s, mike coupe, isn't happy. mike coupe says businesses like his one, with lots of property and employees, face a bigger burden than online—only retailers. he is calling for a fundamental reform of the system, which he describes as archaic. what is needed, he says, is a level playing field, to reflect the changing retail landscape. business rates affect 1.85 million
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properties in england alone. they are set to raise £23.5 billion for the treasury this year. the government says 920,000 businesses will see their bills go down. 420,000 will stay the same. to make the sums add up, more than 500,000 will see bills go up. rates in scotland and wales are being reassessed. northern ireland won't get an overhaul for another few years. in england, the government says the changes will be phased in, and more will benefit than lose out. the biggest storm to hit california for several years has left at least four people dead and around 150,000 homes without power. giant sinkholes appeared in some roads. a fire crew managed to get out of this engine before it was swallowed on the main motorway from los angeles to las vegas. this was another sinkhole in studio city, where a woman was rescued from the roof of her car, moments before a second
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empty vehicle was swallowed up. the former boxer michael watson has been injured during an attempt to steal his car in london. mr watson, who's 51 and partially disabled, had a substance sprayed in his face, and was dragged along the road. he and a friend are recovering at home. the police have appealed for information. the rspca has begun an investigation after as many as 1,800 day—old chicks were found dumped in a field in south lincolnshire. the charity was alerted after members of the public spotted the chicks near crowland. you can hear the noise that they made. people in the area helped round the birds up into boxes, and a breeder collected the survivors. it is not yet known who abandoned the chicks. here is someone who is enjoying
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retirement. who do you think it might be? quite nifty, is in the? he is quite nifty. he has a good left foot. there is the clue. david beckham, who after years as a professional athlete is finally allowed to snowboard, on his instagram account he has been sharing this footage of him saying he is living the dream and on day four it looks like he has got the hang of it. i had a go at that, and my knees and my bomb were so sore i went back to skis. —— my bum. my knees and my bomb were so sore i went back to skis. -- my bum. to be fair, he is not going to show us the videos on him falling on his bum. that might be the final attempt. it
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is time for a look at the newspapers. 0ur tech expert is here to tell us what has caught his eye. first of all, we take a look at the front pages. we start with the sunday times, who have a story about a suspected trojan horse plot to ta ke a suspected trojan horse plot to take over the state school by islamic extremists. the observer reporting that as many as 25% of abattoirs are failing basic hygiene tests to stop contaminated meat actually reaching high street butchers and supermarkets. they also look at the rights of eu citizens hoping to stay in britain post brexit. a security conference in munich has been talking about a russian plot to assassinate the prime minister of montenegro, which was foiled, but only hours before it was foiled, but only hours before it was due to be carried out on
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election day. they are looking for russian intelligence officers who a p pa re ntly russian intelligence officers who apparently hatched the plot. pictures of lincoln city fans on the front of the telegraph, which you may have missed. the sunday express has calls for the national association —— calls from the national association for the children of alcoholics, saying that children of alcoholics, saying that children are calling the hotline asking to be read bedtime stories, because their parents are to drop. there are a lot of interesting things in the papers out there. we are looking at the idea of automation and the world may be going over to robots that we may have something cold universal income and there may be a chance that eve ryo ne and there may be a chance that everyone gets paid to almost do nothing. the left-wing candidate in france, he is talking about this. it was laughed out of court last week
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when he said there should be a tax on robots. that is interesting. he is not the only person to have said this. bill gates says this as well, that we should tax robots. because if they are coming to take jobs, shouldn't the manufacturers pay something towards income tax? it is coming from bill gates, you think about it and that sounds amazing. because more people and more robots isa because more people and more robots is a dangerous mix? in this report they have looked at a scheme in finland where they have introduced something similar. this is different toa something similar. this is different to a living wage or a minimum wage, isn't it? number one, there is an idea that it could be dangerous. it is almost the exact opposite, it could liberate society nicely. if you think about what is happening 110w you think about what is happening now with us moving over to the right because people are worried about
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immigration... if you squeeze on jobs coming from the tech sector, you may get the fact that we get even more right wind. however, another nice thing you could think about is that if if you have something like a universal income that may prevent people from worrying about whether or not they have a safety net. you could find that after a swing to the ride there could be a swing back left. thank you. that is what technology can do. during ptsd in the telegraph by deleting memories. this is a wonderful idea. the idea that you can go into the memory and isolate different areas and take out the bad memories inside your rain. you can 110w memories inside your rain. you can now do this, potentially, with hills technology. they can take out the new roms in your mind. technology. they can take out the new roms in your mindlj technology. they can take out the new roms in your mind. i can not my mind around that. there is only
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speculation at the moment. they think with a certain drug that you can put in there it does not actually take out the brain cells. increasingly we are learning about how the mind works and which parts are responsible for what. absolutely. there is a chance now as technology improves that we can start controlling the mind a little more. stored in small networks of souls called engrams and scientists discovered that they could turn off memories by removing engrams from mice. we can do a eyes, not in humans yet. be careful. i kind of think i want my memories reinserted. technology is quite a theme this morning. switching of digitally, on the observer. the idea that we may be coming to wii addicted to our mobile phones and social media. it isa mobile phones and social media. it is a really good point. maybe we are a little bit too switched on
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digitally. this talks about the fact that if you are one of these new type of workers, you do not have any time off. if you work for uber or do delivery... this gig economy, you must always be on. it would cost you to turn your phone off because if you make money from this technology, turning off your phone will cost you. and if you have a mobile phone surgically implanted in your hand... dan brought his into the studio. surgically implanted in your hand... dan brought his into the studiom has my notes in it. and most of us will do this. we keep that a few metres away from us. i was caught using mine yesterday. you do use it for work. what is this? ten reasons to meditate. what that phone down. the idea is to do instead of having your mobile phone now, to be more mindful. there are some famous
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people who meditate... yoda is not one of them. i love the different reasons. very typically mail. "it is good for the gut." —— typically masculine. the next generation of people, ironically, they have meditation app on their phone. thank you so much. lettuce checks in on the weather now. —— let's have a look at the weather now. sunshine coming through today but that will be limited. a lot of cloud nevertheless it will be another mild day and most of us are starting cloudy this morning. it has been misty with patchy fog in the south—east of england and cold as
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well. temperatures are beginning to lift. a little light rain coming in to west wales through the morning. the clouds breaking up and notjust around the wash marchers but to the east the pennines in particular. northern ireland and western scotla nd northern ireland and western scotland are not faring quite so well. the cloud will thicken and lower and there will be hell for the round. we will seek some pockets of light rain and drizzle. it will also turn damp and dull across the west of england and wales. so the best of the sunshine will be in the sheltered eastern areas of england, wales and scotland. 13 degrees is possible if you get some sunshine. a mild day on the way. mild for the football today. another day full of shocks in the fa cup. rather damp of black burn with low cloud and drizzle. there is a band of rain coming into the north—west of the uk by evening. that will be heavy at
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first, think southwards and become light and patchy. it leaves us with a lot of cloud, freshening breeze as well. hill fog and a mild night tonight. you will not need the heating. nine or 10 degrees is the temperature. the mild there is coming from a long south, from the tropics, pushing across the uk. however with the mild weather you get a lot of cloud and monday you will be windy as well, especially gusty winds east of scotland, the eastern side of england, is that the pennines. a band of rain moving southwards with more showers and cooler air across the north. to the south, a good part of england and wales is having a mild day. if we get some sunshine, temperatures could be locally 16 or 17 degrees. the rest of the week, temperatures will not be as high. could be chilly by the end of the week. windy conditions to come at times as well. but is it from me. we will watch out for that wind. nowjust one month at
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saint donald trump became president of the united states and he is already back out on the campaign trail. promising supporters in florida last night that he would wind, wind, wind, president trump launched another stinging attack on the media, accusing them of continuing to spread fake news. joining us from texas is one of this supporters. thank you forjoining us. i know it is late night over there. tell us first of all, what do you make of yesterday's rally? what was the purpose? the purpose was for him to do a couple of things. to go to this base, the people who came forward in the election and supported him which, if you recall, pa rt supported him which, if you recall, part of the reason he won was because of that sleeping giant of americans who felt that the mainstream press, the elite politicians had forgotten them. they call them, in fact, the forgotten men and women. he wanted to demonstrate that they were with him.
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that was a signal notjust for this ego but for the press and for many politicians who are running for office. maybe who are thinking about being on the fence and supporting him. he is letting them know upfront that he has a lot of support from the grassroots and they came out in record numbers. it was fun to watch. certainly interesting to watch. the mainstream media that covering it in full. 0n the other hand we have the vice president in europe discussing global security. who is being more presidential here? that is what makes a good team. vice president p has been around the washington environment for many years and he is a good person to be the number 2a donald trump. but really, i think donald trump. but really, i think donald trump. but really, i think donald trump has come in at a time when americans have felt like the old way of doing business did not
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work. politicians were elected. they promised so much. they never produced. 0ur promised so much. they never produced. our national security was compromised, our military was being um, becoming less significant and supportive financially. veterans we re supportive financially. veterans were not getting good healthcare. people were getting into a mindset, almost like 1930s kind of depression feeling that they were being abandoned. he came in. i think that in some ways he is a bull in a china shop. people need to learn how to deal with him. on the hand, we have a press that is a lot different than it was when 0bama was elected because, when you think about it, when 0bama was elected there were only 100,000 bloggers. when 0bama was elected there were only100,000 bloggers. now when 0bama was elected there were only 100,000 bloggers. now there are 27 million. you have a press that is changing, with the new york times is letting go ofjournalists. the wall street journal. you have
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letting go ofjournalists. the wall streetjournal. you have this whole array of how we get our news and it is changing fundamentally. we have a lot of social media which is also... imean in lot of social media which is also... i mean in many ways it is good because you have citizen journalists but it is problematic. and now the mainstream press, which is now operating online has become more like reality television and becoming opinion journalists. like reality television and becoming opinionjournalists. they are lowering the standard ofjournalism. they are searching for clicks to show that they have a broad base of people that like them. that is interesting. there has been a democratisation of the media and a direct line from donald trump to his audience. 0ne direct line from donald trump to his audience. one that he uses as well is being widely and extensively covered in the mainstream media. do you think that this is about him gaining reassurance when it is clear that he is failing, although courcy ‘s core support perhaps is still
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sticking with them, but he is failing to bring in any of the voters who did not give him their support back in november. that is so silly. he has already got over 200,000 jobs. he is working on trying to lower regulations for the people who worry and industry, the small business people, whether it is through the different kinds of fundamental labour problems that we have had in this country. you are talking about robots and so forth, he is trying to getjobs for the working people and that is who are showing up at the rallies. the interesting thing is that if you look at the states that he won that should have been won by democrats and they were lost to union people who felt that they were losing their jobs. he did say he would bring the country together. let me ask you this, is there anything at all that worries you about the way president
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trump is going about his business? well... i'm not so worried about how he is going about the business, because it is kind of early. but i hope that our industry can work together with him to help notjust the american people but the world understand what is at stake. national security, energy, jobs and oui’ national security, energy, jobs and our allies that we are close to you. where are you guys. i am glad that winston churchill is back in the white house. i just winston churchill is back in the white house. ijust hope that we can bridge the gap and it is too early. we need to give the guy a chance. he has been there a month. we are feeling the love this morning. thank you very much. you have a great show. a trump supported speaking to us show. a trump supported speaking to us from texas. andrew marr is online o'clock this morning. what do you have for us today? we feel the love
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here as well. mr tony blair telling the country to rise up against brexit and stop it happening. what does that actually mean? i'm joined by lord madison to explain and liz truss from the justice department will talk about the crisis in the prisons plus a wonderful actor. we have a labour prisons plus a wonderful actor. we havea labourmp, prisons plus a wonderful actor. we have a labour mp, and a ukip mp. a lot to talk about and some rather strange music from california at the end of the show. just a couple of your e—mail is on a story we touched on earlier about when it is appropriate, when it is not appropriate, when it is not appropriate to have physical contact between teachers and schoolchildren. we will speak to any roll it has played on who has come out and said that he believes that teachers not giving physical reassurance at appropriate times disk called children is a form of child abuse. that is a strong statement to make. many signs to say that children
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benefit from hugs and cuddles and we have had many e—mail is already. tracy says that children should be offered comfort. within the special school she works in they attacked are with the children and it is done appropriately and openly. and another perspective. stephen says he spent his lifetime working as a teacher in child welfare and he said asa teacher in child welfare and he said as a teacher he was told never to touch a child to prevent any risk of abuse accusations. he has never been accused when touching a child to provides a portal sympathy. please get in touch with us. —— to provide support or sympathy. hello, this is breakfast, with rachel burden and christian
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fraser. coming up before 8:00am, darren will have the weather. but first, at 7:30am, a summary of this morning's main news. thousands of prison officers in london and south—east england are getting an immediate pay increase of between £3,000 and £5,000. ministers have made the offer to try to boost recruitment and retain workers injails, which are under severe pressure from violence and staff shortages. but the prison officers association says it is a divisive quick fix, and that specialist and more experienced staff won't benefit. we're not doing anything in these latest announcements for those staff who have been in—post for years. there's nothing in those other grades, as well, that are struggling. there is a real recruitment problem in those areas, as well, so just focusing on one particular group is making it very divisive, and will cause animosity among some other staff. some breaking news in the past hour: the iraqi prime minister says an operation has begun to retake the western part of the city
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of mosul from islamic state militants. it is the last major is stronghold in iraq. government forces started their offensive in october, and last month secured the eastern part of the city, after weeks of fierce fighting. the united nations has urged all parties in the conflict to do everything they can to ensure the safety of civilians. they estimate there could be as many as 650,000 trapped in the area. president trump has made a robust defence of his first four weeks in office, and insisted that a new spirit of optimism is sweeping the us. speaking to supporters at an airport hangar in florida, he repeated his campaign pledges to create jobs and improve the nation's security. mr trump again turned his fire on the media, accusing it of being dishonest about his administration. first lady melania trump opened the rally with the lord's prayer, and promised that she would always tell the truth to the american people. i will always stay true to myself, and be truthful to you, no matter what the opposition is saying about me.
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let us pray. 0ur father, who art in heaven... mr trump again turned his fire on the media, accusing it of being dishonest about his administration. the dishonest media, which has published one false story after another, with no sources, even though they pretend they have them — they make them up, in many cases... the chief executive of sainsbury‘s has joined the growing row over the re—evaluation of business rates, the commercial version of council tax. mike coupe says changes being introduced to reflect the value of property could leave high streets facing serious challenges and closures, while internet operations could see their bills cut. the government says the majority of firms will pay the same or less. the biggest storm to hit california for several years has left at least
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four people dead and around 150,000 homes without power. giant sinkholes appeared in some roads. a fire crew managed to get out of this engine before it was swallowed on the main motorway from los angeles to las vegas. this was another sinkhole in studio city, where a woman was rescued from the roof of her car, moments before a second empty vehicle was swallowed up. tha nkfully thankfully nobody was hurt in either of those incidents, but incredible pictures. and in the sport, any good news? well, you might want to disappearfor the news? well, you might want to disappear for the next 15 minutes, while we talk fa cup. a spoiler alert that match day highlights are coming soon, so if you want to get a
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cup of tea, it could be a good time to do that but only out of the fa cup is the reason —— burnley out of the fa cup is the reason you are not happy this morning. and lincoln's managerjoining us happy this morning. and lincoln's manager joining us later this morning. and dyche perhaps not so happy this morning. i was at molineux. we will talk about that later. the first time in over a century that a non—league side has made it through to the quarter—finals. lincoln city are the national league leaders, and they beat the premier league's burnley1—0, with a dramatic 89th—minute winner at turf moor. tim hague watched the action. in a competition famous for its shocks, this result was one of the greatest in history, non—league lincoln city matching and beating a burnley side who drew with premier league leaders chelsea last weekend. raggett thought it was in! it is in! and lincoln city take the lead, with a minute to go. i am lost for words right now.
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that wasjust mad. i can't believe it. this is a special group of boys, and unreal, unreal. i didn't really know what to do with the celebration. but a non—league side into the quarterfinals, it is crazy. crazy maybe, but true, nonetheless. 81 league places separated these guys, but lincoln followed up wins over ipswich and brighton in the previous rounds with a strong start at turf moor, and while the premier league team had their own openings, it would become an increasingly frustrating and edgy afternoon's work for them. just askjoey barton. harassed all match, he was lucky not to be sent off. but it didn't matter for lincoln. they pushed the end, and with headlines waiting to be written, sean raggett and company duly obliged. not even five minutes of injury time could stop this fairytale from happening. lincoln have made history. this is one of the great shocks of the competition. for a non—league team to be in the last eight of the fa cup, and coming away from wembley, and two games away from
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the final, is unbelievable. people said to me, it may be a football miracle. i don't know. it is certainly a miracle when you consider no non—league side had made it into the fa cup quarterfinals for 103 yea rs before yesterday. this quite some raggett—to—riches story. that was by no means the only fa cup shock of the day. league one side millwall beat the premier league champions leicester city 1—0, to secure their place in the quarter—finals. and that was despite millwall being reduced to ten men for much of the second half. shaun cummings grabbed the 90th—minute winner to put the league one side into the next round, adding to leicester's problems. you have to say why and react as soon as is possible. the premier
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league, they may be better than us. they are better than millwall, but m illwa ll they are better than millwall, but millwall deserved to win. championship club huddersfield town held manchester city to a goalless draw in front of a record crowd at thejohn smith's stadium. they will replay the game at the etihad a week on tuesday. league 0ne's oxford united recovered from two goals down against middlesbrough, but ended up losing 3—2. cristhian stuani scored four minutes from time, to avoid a middlesbrough upset and to send them through to the last eight. there were no dramas for chelsea. goals from pedro and diego costa earned the premier league leaders a 2—0 win at championship side wolverhampton wanderers. it was the biggest crowd for 36 yea rs it was the biggest crowd for 36 years at molineux. today's fa cup games sees championship sides hosting premier league opposition. fulham entertain tottenham, that's on bbc one at 2:00pm, while blackburn rovers welcome manchester united. and tomorrow, sutton united will try to emulate lincoln city to reach the last eight, when they face arsenal.
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the national league side are in the fifth round for the first time. celtic edged closer to winning the scottish premiership title with a 2—0 win over motherwell. they have restored their 27—point lead at the top of the table. bottom side inverness shared a 1—1 draw with hearts. carl tremarco put cally thistle ahead, but arnaud djoum's second—half tap—in earned hearts a point. there were wins elsewhere for partick and stjohnstone. exeter have strengthened their position in third place in rugby union's premiership, afterfighting back to beat worcester. exeter were trailing at the break, but five second—half tries secured the bonus point win. 118—32 the final score. bath stay fourth. they overcame a battling harlequins side to come out on top at the rec. quins outscored their hosts by two tries to one, but this from max clark and some excellent kicking from rhys priestland ensured bath won 22—12. and leicester stay fifth, after a 50—17 win over bottom—of—the—table bristol. mo farah won the final race of his indoor career, taking the 5,000 metre title
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at the birmingham grand prix. farah set a new european record, winning injust over 13 minutes. he says he is going to focus on road racing after the world championships in london this summer. i can't quite believe it is my last race. i have had a great career, great indoors. something must come to an end. it is weird thinking about it, thinking about saying goodbye, because i have had great support from everyone. particular this track, breaking so many records, and it has been amazing over the years. laura muir broke the british record, taking the title in the women's 1000 metres. she beat the previous best, held by kelly holmes. it was also the second—fastest indoor 1,000 metres of all time. warrington wolves have had the first win by an english club over australian opponents for five years. they beat brisbane broncos in the first match of rugby league's world club series. three tries in the opening 20 minutes, including this from matty russell, did the early damage, and they went on to win 27—18. tonight it is the turn of the super league champions
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wigan warriors to represent great britain against the best of the nrl. wigan, who won the grand final back in october, face reigning australian champions cronulla sharks. i know you have more sport later on. so, as we have been hearing, history has been made in the fa cup. well, joining us is the managing director of leicester city, kevin cooke, and his girlfriend, jo ticehurst. we will speak to them in a moment. but first, let's take a look at how the team made their remarkable run. 0ver over the top for theo robinson. lincoln city through! in the dying
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seconds. a full out of possession, max arnold. it is a dangerous looking ball. it is an own goal. unbelievable. sean raggett! it was in! it is in, and lincoln city take the lead at burnley. joining us as one of the men who made that happen, in amongst the throng of celebrating people there. the managing director and the club's managing director, great to have you with us on the sofa this morning. met christian, a lifelong, devoted burnley fan. i know he wants to
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shake your hand. well done, mate. it isa shake your hand. well done, mate. it is a brilliant effort. if they were my team, i would be really excited. it is over 100 years since they have beenin it is over 100 years since they have been in the quarterfinal. a fantastic day football club, incredibly proud of everyone associated with lincoln city. the players were incredible, and rightly theirfamilies will players were incredible, and rightly their families will be waking up this morning proud of them and our supporters, it is just unbelievable. that is assuming they have gone to bed. they will have enjoyed last night, and we still have a game on tuesday, so there is no celebrating the players and staff, except for the players and staff, except for the supporters to have a beer on us. everybody wants to know lincoln city. so tell us about you and your story. where have you come from and how have you managed to make this into such an incredible team? well,
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by trade i am a pe teacher, at a, hence its school in essex, for 15 yea rs. hence its school in essex, for 15 years. you have never been a professional football.|j years. you have never been a professionalfootball. i have played nonleague, so i played semi— professionally, i really enjoyed my football but unfortunately it was cut short at 28 or 29 through injury, and! cut short at 28 or 29 through injury, and i managed a team called concord rangers. we started at step five in the essex senior league, so step five is non— league. national league, which lincoln city are in, i step one of nonleague. so five divisions below that, three promotions at concord, we had some success and went to braintree last year, which gave us this opportunity to ta ke year, which gave us this opportunity to take over lincoln, and manage lincoln during this season. so you have only been with them a year. just the season, yes, nicky and i. it isa just the season, yes, nicky and i. it is a great football club, and i am proud to be associated with it.
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what a find. a very good find, i think it is probably the best decision we have made in 20 years. what impressed you about him? what impressed us, before we appointed them, if they have done so well with raintree. what got our minds working was the fact that if they can do so well with basically a part—time club, what could they achieve with a clu b club, what could they achieve with a club like ours, full—time professional club? i'm going to ask you, as a fan... are you a new fan? a relatively new fan, 15 or 16 years. who do you want to win? chelsea, at chelsea. i am not fast, the fa cup, we will take it as it comes. no disrespect to millwall, but if you got millwall you could be in the semifinals. well, i know the manager's sun, and we have a close
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relationship, and they are a good manager and a good team. would you prefer manager and a good team. would you p refer to manager and a good team. would you prefer to be at home?” manager and a good team. would you prefer to be at home? i would like us prefer to be at home? i would like us either to be at home or a big clu b us either to be at home or a big club where there is a big capacity and we are able to take all the supporters that we would like to take. i think we could probably take 15,000 two burnley, 5000 to ipswich. 0ur supporters are incredible. 15,000 two burnley, 5000 to ipswich. our supporters are incredible. can i ask you what you made ofjoey barton's behaviour yesterday?” ask you what you made ofjoey barton's behaviour yesterday? ijust think it was to make competitive teams. i thought we were going toe to toe, both teams were really determined and really pretty. there we re determined and really pretty. there were a few niggles. and that sometimes happens in competitive sport. he did get an elbow in the face. that is the cup, isn't it? it is allfair in face. that is the cup, isn't it? it is all fair in love and war. face. that is the cup, isn't it? it is all fair in love and warlj face. that is the cup, isn't it? it is all fair in love and war. i think he tried to duck under the arm, but he tried to duck under the arm, but he isa he tried to duck under the arm, but he is a big boy. he wouldn't want me
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sticking up for him, and doesn't need be sticking up for him. he has been great, joey, at burnley. here's a top player, and i have to say that after the game he was good with our players, he gave them to make shirts, and komla mentri.|j players, he gave them to make shirts, and komla mentri. i heard he brought the man of the match champagne. i think one of the players gave him champagne, and we let him spray it. —— complementary. and good luck with the next round. all of the mutuals will be behind you. absolutely terrific. we are going to talk to both of you in the next hour, we? thanks very much. here is darren with a look at this morning's weather. thank you very much. good morning. a lovely sunrise in milton keynes. we have got different layers of cloud today. on the whole there will be a lot of cloud, but we have got these westerly breeze is drawing in a lot
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of mild aironce westerly breeze is drawing in a lot of mild air once again. for most of us are of mild air once again. for most of us are mild start out there. there will always be more cloud across western areas, the best of the bra kes western areas, the best of the brakes and the sunshine towards the east. sunshine arriving in west wales, the far south—west of england. grey in the south—east but try the sky is already developing further north across east wales, the eastern side of the pennines. not so lucky across northern ireland and western scotland, where we will have a lot of cloud. and that will lower, it will thicken, there will be some hill fog and light rain and drizzle now and again as well. similar conditions will spread the western parts of england and wales but some sunshine arriving across some eastern areas of the country. even with all the cloud it will be quite a mild day, temperatures up to 11 degrees, typically. get some sunshine and we are looking at 13 degrees but wetter weather arriving in the north—west and drizzle likely
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for the football at blackburn. it should be dry and fulham, and probably a bit mild as well. maybe some shops on the way today. the rain in the north—west could be heavy for a while during the evening in the first part of the night. it thinks its way southwards and becomes lighter in the process. a lot of cloud and hill fog overnight. despite the freshening westerly wind, it will be very mild. these temperatures more typical of daytime maximums at this time of year. all this weather coming from a long way south, from along the tropics. it will lift the temperatures on monday and we could well find temperatures getting to 15 or 16 degrees, in the south—east. if we get some sunshine. it will be a windy day, for most of us it will be a windy day, for most of us cloudy and turning colder in the north with some sunshine. we are here on the bbc news channel until 9am this morning. but this is where we say goodbye to viewers on bbc one. this week we are in sudan to explore the vast, ancient ruins that
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tourists rarely visit. there are about 220 pyramids here which is a lot more than the entire country of egypt. you canjust see them for kind of miles. and i'm in peru getting to grips with this acrobatic and very noisy dance. first up this week, we are taking a road trip through sudan. it is a country that's been marked by conflict in recent years and some regions are still off—limits to tourists, but it is possible with careful planning to go and explore some of the country's amazing archaeological sites, pyramids and temples that date back thousands of years. we sent benjamin zan in search of the remains of an ancient kingdom 200 kilometres north of the capital
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khartoum. hey, guys, high—fives. how's it going? nice to see you. i'm going to give you a hug. how's it going? thank you for coming. no problem, sure. so, where are we going? we are going to see the pyramids? how long does it take? about four or five hours. we probably should go. do you have any sudanese card games we could play? you can put on your headphones and listen to your own music. that's not a game, that's just being anti—social. and so we were off on a very long and very hot road trip. soon it was time for our first stop, coffee. the sudanese love their coffee and for good reason. does it annoy you that not many people know about these pyramids? it actually does because sudan has a very rich history. as a country so diverse its huge,
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it was one of the biggest countries in africa, so that brings a lot of diversity because we were influenced by arabs, african countries and everything. but people don't know about all of that. people only know about what the media usually shows, the wars, the starvation, blah, blah, blah. exactly, it doesn't show anything that's rich and anything that would impress people into coming here. they believe pyramids, egypt, nile, in egypt. sudan has a very rich culture, it's very diverse, but still people don't actually know about it. sometimes that kind of makes you sad because this country has like a lot of history. exactly. on arrival it was impressive. we had
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the entire place to ourselves. we made it. i can't feel my legs. so we are in the middle of the desert. we have got history for ourselves. look at it, it's just crazy. and theyjust sit here completely unguarded. look at it, this isjust like the actual desert. these nubian pyramids are over 4000 years old and are a unesco
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world heritage site. despite that, though, they are completely deserted. visitor numbers are tiny, about 15,000 a year compared to the millions who go to the pyramids in egypt. and due to being completely unprotected, the pyramids and the history here have been damaged and vandalised. clearly not many have respected it. still, it was like nothing i had ever seen. the door is even unlocked to one of the pyramids. mazin gave me a bit of a history lesson on what i was seeing. there are more pyramids in this section alone than in egypt. there are about 220 pyramids. you can notice that most of the heads of the pyramids are chopped off. that is an italian explorer. he came here in the 1830s and he chopped off like 14 pyramids searching for gold and we still don't know what he found. do you know what they were used for? yes, they were actually tombs for the black pharaohs and queens back in the days.
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they buried them here with their belongings, and clothing and everything. it's a sort of respect for the kings of course. what is the difference between these pyramids and those in egypt? it is what is inside. the pyramids in egypt are a lot bigger. these would go up to 40 metres, but then again the numbers of the pyramids themselves makes the difference. there are about 220 pyramids here which is a lot more than the entire country of egypt, like the pyramids there. just on this desert? just on this desert alone. you can just see them for kind of miles, can't you? exactly. it was coming to the end of an unexpected and surprising trip. i had seen a side of sudan that i never thought i would. the history and stories sudan holds are things you don't hear about too often. but when you see them for yourself it is something you will remember for ever. the origin of the peruvian scissor
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dance is shrouded in mystery. but many believe the tradition began in the highlands of the andes as an act of worship to the mountain gods. in the 1500s, the dance was performed to show resistance to spanish rule. the movements display the performers‘ dexterity. and the scissors represented their resistance to spain. but the conquistadors thought it was inspired by the devil and it was banned. despite the ban, the traditions survived and the twisting, turning dance moves were passed down from generation to generation. now its importance in peru's history has been recognised by unesco. and its backbreaking
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moves would put many break dancers to shame. although the scissors are not sharp, learning to control them while dancing and leaping can take years. today teams from two different towns are having a scissor dance duel.
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these battles can last for up to ten hours as the performers move and spin to the music. it seems like anything goes, but the one rule is that you absolutely cannot drop the scissors. and i'm going to get a lesson to see how it's done. don't shake hands with those. so the top ones stay still and the bottom one... 0h, 0k. it's all in the thumb, the thumb and the wrist. first i've got to get to grips with the scissors. the aim is to hit the handles together in time to the music. the blunt blades are not connected, so holding them in position is really tricky.
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there is no way i'm going to be able to do and it's not just mastering the scissors. this is the one that makes your knees bleed. learning the dance moves takes some serious commitment. does it hurt to do the jumps and land on your back? does it hurt your head, your knees? do you have injuries? oh, and i'm getting a hat. gosh, as if it's not hard enough! after a few minutes i'm exhausted. i can't even imagine how hard it would be to do these moves up in the andes where the thin air makes everything so much harder. these guys are true athletes.
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oh, that's hard work! that was so much harder than i expected. i've got new—found respect for these guys. but sadly that's all we have got time for in this week's show. coming up next week: somebody at the pub told me tonight is supposed to be the coldest night of the year. so i'm glad i'm going into an unheated church to sleep. krista's braving the english weather to find out why more and more people are camping out in old churches. dojoin us for that if you can and don't forget, if you want to follow the rest of the travel show team on theirjourneys in real—time, you can sign up to our social media feeds. all the details are on your screen now. in the meantime from me, carmen roberts, and the rest of the travel show team here in lima, it's goodbye.
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but let me leave you with some more scissor dancing. good morning. 0fficers officers will get up to £5,000 extra to ease dangerously low staffing levels but only in london and the south—east. good morning. it's sunday 19th february. also ahead... iraqi forces begin an offensive to drive islamic state militants out of western mosul — their last remaining stronghold in iraq.
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donald trump defends his first month in office, claiming there's a new spirit of optimism sweeping the us. you have seen

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