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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  February 20, 2017 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. gridlocked — a report finds the uk's roads are the most congested in europe. researchers say most drivers spend more than 32 hours each year stuck in traffic, as they warn of a significant cost to the economy. good morning, it's monday 20th february. also this morning: almost every council in england is planning to put up taxes to help meet the cost of social care. angelina jolie talks exclusively to us as she talks about her new film set in cambodia, and for the first time, about her separation from brad pitt. i don't want to say very much about that, except to say that it was a very difficult time, and...
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and we are a family, and we will always be a family. and we will get through this time, and hopefully be a stronger family for it. more than half a million people with a disability are self—employed. i'll be looking at why it's such a popular option as part of the bbc‘s disability works series. can another non—league club join lincoln in the quarter finals of the fa cup? sutton united take on arsenal later — the winner will play lincoln. the holders, manchester united will face chelsea next after coming from behind to beat blackburn rovers yesterday. it is blast off for plans to create the first spaceport. we it is blast off for plans to create the first spaceport. we are in cornwall, where they will track the space kraft. after 8:00 we'll be joined by tv royalty. joanna lumley and jennifer saunders will be on the sofa as they celebrate 25 years of ab fab. and carol has the weather. good morning, iwill start
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good morning, i will start to the day and cloudy. the cloud producing drizzle in the north—west where it is windy. in the sunshine we could hit 16 or possibly 17 celsius. good morning. first, our main story. the uk has the worst traffic congestion in western europe, with drivers spending an average of 32 hours a year stuck in tailbacks during peak periods. that's according to the travel information company inrix. congestion is the most severe in london, followed by manchester and then aberdeen. the department for transport says it's investing record amounts to keep the country moving, as jane—frances kelly reports. drivers across the uk who face the daily history of trafficjams are using not just daily history of trafficjams are using notjust their patient but also time and money and surprisingly, london is the most congested city in the uk drivers
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spending more than three days every year stuck in traffic. manchester is the second worst. aberdeen is third and surprisingly beat london as the ha rd est and surprisingly beat london as the hardest city to drive in and out. in cardiff, businesses suffer the most based on the amount of traffic during daytime. southbound was found to be the most congested route. other than drivers getting frustrated, why is this a problem? experts calculated that it costs the economy £31 billion last year, £1000 per driver on things like fuel, being late for work and childcare. there is also more traffic on the road because of growth in online shopping. the department for transport says it is making the most extensive improvements to road since the 1970s but money may not be the
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only solution. researchers are said to stop standing still any better traffic management, more flexible working hours and to consider congestion charges. we'll hear from two traffic experts atjust after 8:00 this morning on what they think should be done to ease congestion on our roads. if you have any ideas, send them through. i expect you probably do. deep cuts to services will still be needed despite plans by most local authorities in england to raise council tax according to the organisation that represents them. the local government association says social care services for the elderly and disabled are at breaking point and will swallow up any extra money raised. here's our social affairs correspondent alison holt. this is social care in action after several false borini is this is social care in action after severalfalse borini is getting support to gain independence and rebuild her confidence. it will help
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her and husband cope in her home. rebuild her confidence. it will help her and husband cope in her homeli grateful for all they have done for me, i really am and... without them, ido me, i really am and... without them, i do not know what i would have done. it is good, really good. council fund most social care and today's surveys shows they are all struggling to meet growing costs. there are 151 local authorities in england, 147 planned to raise council tax. but that will not plug the funding gap and that could mean cuts to other services. there has been a united voice of local government to say they need more funding and social care and that the crisis in social care is immediate now. the funding for local
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government needs to be resolved immediately. the government says extra money is being put into social ca re extra money is being put into social care and authorities will soon be able to put all the money they raise into it. peers get their first chance to debate the so—called brexit bill later — the legislation which kicks off the formal process for britain leaving the eu. the bill passed through the commons unamended, but it's thought opposition peers in the house of lords will seek guarantees about the rights of eu citizens in britain, and the role of parliament in scrutinising brexit. our political correspondent tom bateman is in westminster. good morning. how likely they will be changes made by the lords? the first thing to say is for those that like to see records broken, here is one, 190 peas are due to speak, more than in any debate in the house of lords and that gives you a sense of
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the appetite of their lordship to have some influence on this process. as you say, the two areas that will tried to make changes in is demanding parliament gets our vote before any deal is signed off by theresa may with the other eu member states and guaranteed citizens rights. if they make changes to the bill, it could get back to the commons and they would wipe them. i sure they will be successful in the end in making any changes to this bill and ministers are urging lords to do their patriotic duty and respect the will of the people. in that case it would mean theresa may could start the whole brexit process towards the end of next month. iraqi government forces have resumed their offensive to regain the last major stronghold of so—called islamic state in iraq. thousands of troops are involved in the assault
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on western mosul, which is now in its second day. last month, the iraqi government forces secured the eastern part of the city after weeks of fighting. campaigners have described the current maximum jail term for animal abusers in england and wales as "laughable". battersea dogs and cats home is calling for prison sentences to be increased from six months to five years to bring the punishment in line with crimes such as fly tipping. dan freedman reports it is images like these, campaigners say, that show a need for animal abusers to receive tougher sentences. these rescued dogs have been underfed and badly mistreated but even the most serious acts of violence against animals can carry shorter prison terms than nonviolent crimes such as fly—tipping. today's report from battersea dogs & cats home, calls the current six—month maximum sentence for animla cruelty calls the current six—month maximum sentence for animal cruelty
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in england and wales shocking and laughable, arguing it should be increased tenfold to match northern ireland and ireland's 5—year maximum. in scotland, the maximum is one year. we have a situation where northern ireland has much stronger sentences than the rest of the uk. and what we have seen is, for example, some of the people involved in the international dogfighting industry, coming over to britain to ply their trade here because they know we are a soft touch, they know that if they do get caught, they are likely to get away with just a smack on the wrist. latest figures show the average prison term for someone convicted of animal cruelty is little more than three months and the majority of offenders face fines or community sentences. the government says it shares the public‘s high regard for animal welfare and kept these strict regulations under regular review, but ahead of a debate on the issue in parliament later this week, the report argues that public opinion would support tougher sentences. at shelters like this one here in battersea, it is often the victims of animal cruelty that end up behind bars. campaigners say it is high time the perpetrators face the same fate and for longer.
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dan freedman, bbc news. in a bbc world news exclusive, angelina jolie has spoken to yalda hakim about her new film, and love for the country in which it is set. she has also spoken for the first time about the difficulties her family have faced in the last year, since splitting from husband brad pitt. she first visited the region of the filming of lara croft. she later adopted a son from the area. 17 years ago i came to this country and fell in love with its people and learned about its history and in doing so realised how little i actually knew in my early 20s about the world so this country for me has been... was my awakening and my son
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changed my life. do you think in many ways you have come full circle? became a mother here, your humanitarian work started here. yes. yes. i will always... humanitarian work started here. yes. yes. iwillalways... i humanitarian work started here. yes. yes. i will always... i will always be very grateful to this country and i hope, be very grateful to this country and ihope, i be very grateful to this country and i hope, i hope i have given back as much as it has given me i don't think i could ever give back as much. i understand this is a very sensitive issue. we know that an incident occurred which led to your separation, we also note you have not said anything about these but would you like to say something? only that... i do not want to say very much about that except to say it was a very difficult time and...
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and we are a family and we will a lwa ys and we are a family and we will always be a family and we will get through this time and hopefully be a strongerfamily for through this time and hopefully be a stronger family for it. you can see the full interview on the bbc news website it is 6:12 a.m.. you fa cup talking today? we are. it has been quite interesting. there's a place in the fa cup quarter—finals on the line for non—league sutton united tonight. they play arsenal for the right to take on fellow giantkillers lincoln in round six. holders manchester united will go to chelsea after they came from behind to beat championship blackburn rovers 2—1. spurs cruised through — they're at home to millwall next. harry kane scored all three as they beat fulham 3—0 at craven cottage yesterday. 2016 super league winners wigan warriors won the world club challenge for a record
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fourth time yesterday. a hat—trick from joe burgess gave them a 22—6 win over nrl champions cronulla sharks. and late last night stuart bingham won the welsh open — he beatjudd trump in the final frame to win his first tournament since the world championship in 2015. it was 7—7 when i went to bed. it was 7-7 when i went to bed. like the fa cup job it was 7-7 when i went to bed. like the fa cupjob because it was 7-7 when i went to bed. like the fa cup job because they could be a non— league team getting through. i think it is worth explaining. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. this morning, if you are stepping out, it is a very, very mild fool ‘s top already 15 celsius up up in wales. you are getting the picture.
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a mild start and it is going to be a mild day for most of the uk. for some part in any sunshine we could possibly hit 17 celsius but this morning there is also a lot of cloud around, some low cloud, mist and merck and also some rain as well. across south—west england, we continue with the cloudy theme. some murkiness and for guinness. but look at the temperatures, cloudy generally across much of england and their hill fog as well. for northern ireland and we have a weather front coming in, introducing some rain and some of that will be rain and rather windy across northern ireland and scotland, especially for the next few hours, as it will be a cross paths of northern england. writs like the a1 may be effected via that. —— routes. in the northern
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england and north wales, weakening but you will notice of the rain. the hyndburn, some sunshine but also showers. with the crowd breaks, don't forget we could see those temperatures of16— don't forget we could see those temperatures of 16— 17, way above average. there will be dry weather around overnight. easy night, you can see where we have the rain, as it starts to move backwards, it will rejuvenate and again, overnight temperatures into the eight — ten. in southern counties, more rain coming in across the north—west. a fair bit of cloud around and temperatures will be potentially in the mild category. in some parts, not absolutely everywhere fool ‘s top temperatures for some will be
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down. a range between seven and 13. as we head into wednesday, the weather front will still be producing the clouds and rain. temperatures by then starting to come down. we are looking at seven — ten, more like where they should be. in the south 11— 13. towards the end of the week, it will not be as mild and it will become a bit more on settled. shall we look at the headlines the papers? i was going to do the headlines. all right, we will do those first. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: inajam. the uk has the worst congestion in europe, with drivers spending around 32 hours a year stuck in traffic. angelina jolie talks exclusively to the bbc about her new film, set in cambodia, and her separation from brad pitt. for 32 hours, i bet if you were
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sitting in trafficjams, i bet it feels more like 48 hours, orfive days. i am surprised it is so low. 32 hours is an awfully long time, and we are the worst. 32 hours is an awfully long time, and we are the worstlj 32 hours is an awfully long time, and we are the worst. i will get my stats out later, thailand is the worst in the world. shall we look at the papers? writes, so excited about the papers? writes, so excited about the papers, i wanted to do it early today. —— right. uk troops to prevent afg ha n today. —— right. uk troops to prevent afghan meltdown on the daily telegraph, the uk facing a new refugee exodus. michael fallon talking about this, and loads of pictures as ever of various models at london fashion week making quite at london fashion week making quite a few of the front pages this morning. that is also the front page of the times, they have a stunning
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picture from hindmarsh, their main story being a revolt where they say number ten is on a collision course with small businesses. we talked about this last week, ministers enraging small businesses by claiming it was rooted in distortion and half—truth. claiming it was rooted in distortion and half-truth. the government had taken a pretty tough line, businesses have taken a tough line over these changes in taxes. lots of businesses seeing a fall as well but it would be until the budget when we find out what is actually going on. the daily mirror, she was here last week talking about staying young, and all that. this is a horrible story from over the weekend, former boxer michael watson was attacked and they are trying to get to the bottom of it in launching a campaign as well. some horrible pictures from that over the weekend. and danny dyer, saying that his friends are
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slightly concerned about him and he needs to calm down a bit, apparently. i know you are going to the scheme later, from sutton united, which is a big game. —— this game later. this is a list of the dayjobs, we game later. this is a list of the day jobs, we have game later. this is a list of the dayjobs, we have a lumberjack and a special needs teacher. my favourite is one that says he has no nuggets ina is one that says he has no nuggets in a pre—match meal, which is exactly what you need when you are about to play arsenal. we will interview him later! he needs all night, don't take any of them. it talks about the fact that they get perspective from their dayjob which means that when they play football it is maybe not as big a deal as other people make it. and their dressing room is the only dressing room which is... how can i describe it? chocolate brown. they paint them chocolate round. and the guy who was the manager also puts a lot of money
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in and has a building firm, and he had loads of leftover brown paint. here use that. now, you might be a bit surprised by this story. a us food giant scrapping the bid to buy owners of pg tips and marmite. so there was a huge deal on the cards, hundreds of billions of dollars worth of deals. teabags, marmite, philadelphia, baked beans, all of those could have been under the same banner but late last night they pulled out of the deal saying, actually, they got scared off by people not wanting it to happen. unilever were not happy. 7500 jobs in the uk, they will be pleased about that. you know how we talked about that. you know how we talked about the fiver worth £50 million, and one is still out there. the one
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with the little marker on, a little gold portrait. so keep an eye out for that. i noticed earlier you had to go out at the studio to go and get something. it was your mobile phone. you are not alone in the anxiety of being separated from your phone. i felt a little bit naked. a p pa re ntly phone. i felt a little bit naked. apparently being separated from your mobile is almost as bad as ptsd. they have done research on young people and they start to get stressed even when they are separated from their smartphone for a matter of minutes. i wasjust checking the pockets and didn't feel it. they start exhibiting the type of attachment behaviour is usually reserved for a member of the family if they are lost. even a short time apart from their phone brought on heartbeat patterns associated with post—traumatic stress disorder. do you feel better? i feel even better with this double animal story. not only have you got a cat who can open
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a door, but there is a hamster who can climba a door, but there is a hamster who can climb a seven football down here. this hamster escaped. this lad owns a hamster, it escaped from liam's house, climbed the seven foot hall dominic walcott what was found by someone else, a family member of his own and the pet shop, recognise the hamster and they got it back. thank you, see you later. he has been in thejob forjust over a month, but in a few short weeks, donald trump has managed to both delight his supporters and appal his detractors. today, mps will debate the president's upcoming state visit to the uk, after two million people signed a petition against it, and more than 300,000 signed one in favour. breakfast‘s graham satchell has been to an american comedy night in birmingham, where the audience shared their divided views on the new us president and his policies. and the thing is, living here as an
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american at the moment, i usually have to start my gigs byjust saying iam have to start my gigs byjust saying i am sorry. we are in a cafe in birmingham. when people find out i am an american now, the first thing they say to me as trump, trump, trump, trump... american comedian eric mcilroy is playing to a split audience, some who admire donald trump and some who loathe him.|j think he is racist, misogynistic, i think he is racist, misogynistic, i think he is sexist. donald trump is decisive, donald trump is his own man. i think is a realthreat decisive, donald trump is his own man. i think is a real threat to the values of freedom and equality. man. i think is a real threat to the values of freedom and equalitylj man. i think is a real threat to the values of freedom and equality. i am living in this country as a muslim. i have no issues. i think is a climate change denier, and i think he is pro— torture. climate change denier, and i think he is pro- torture. why are people scared about him? his approaches are just archaic and shocking. scared about him? his approaches are just archaic and shocking. you think is dangerous? very much so. very, very, very much so. england is the same, the establishment can't fix the broken country. if they are
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going to call a dangerous, than i am dangerous. that is what i want to do. and in one word, he is an absolute dig it. so you like and then? i think we should let him come to the country, he greeted by sadiq khan, after waiting for an hour and a half and customs, because he would appreciate that, and they should ta ke appreciate that, and they should take out for a sour chicken masala. almost 200,000 people have signed a petition to say he should be allowed to address parliament. the rights and wrongs will be in westmead today, but again our audience is deeply divided. i would love to see him here, iwould be happy deeply divided. i would love to see him here, i would be happy to greet him here, i would be happy to greet him personally, iwould him here, i would be happy to greet him personally, i would like to see him personally, i would like to see him having a drink on broad street the same as bill clinton did. not in my name. he shouldn't come? no, not at all. ifjustin trudeau, the liberal prime minister of canada, is willing to reach out, i think he should as well. —— prime minister true though. we could be seeing a
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real division, not the unifying effect that state visits are supposed to have. wu makes a much under too much but certainly we have to do the right thing, whatever that is. to be pragmatic? to be pragmatic, yes. ithink is. to be pragmatic? to be pragmatic, yes. i think so. is. to be pragmatic? to be pragmatic, yes. i think so. given the almost chew brudov disagreement within the room, it is no small mercy that our session begins and ends with laughter. and that was the first time i met borisjohnson... you can watch mps debate donald trump's state visit to the uk on bbc parliament from 4:30pm this afternoon. still to come on breakfast this morning: the uk could have its own spaceports within three years, with commercial rockets regularly blasting off into the stratosphere. breakfast‘s john maguire is in cornwall for us this morning. good morning. we were ready and waiting. where were you? good
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morning, welcome to this station, built back in the 1960s to track satellites. we have a modeljust here of the first satellite television broadcaster in the uk, way back in 1962. we are standing at the dawn of a new era in the uk's space industry. we are about to, in the next few years, if everything goes according to plan, get the first commercial space ports, and this place will monitor the spacecraft as they explore the outer atmosphere. we will tell you all about that later on in the programme, after the news, travel and weather where you are watching brea kfast and weather where you are watching breakfast this morning. good morning from bbc london news. david norris, who murdered the black teenager stephen lawrence in a racist attack, is suing the government. it is thought norris, who is serving a life sentence, is seeking thousands of pounds in compensation after he was allegedly attacked at belmarsh prison in south—east london. his lawyers claim he was put at risk
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by being moved to a part of belmarsh with black inmates. the former boxer michael watson and his carer have been injured during a suspected car jacking in east london. mr watson, who was left partially disabled after a fight in 1991, was dragged along the road in chingford as he tried to leave his car. sutton united will be aiming to pull off one of the biggest shocks in fa cup history tonight. having made it through to the fifth round for the first time ever, the non—league team will now welcome premier league giants arsenal to their tiny stadium at gander green lane. sutton‘s chairman says he can't wait to show off the club to tv audiences around the world. a huge media interest worldwide. it is quite frightening, really, when you realise how many people are going to be watching this game live all over the world, but it's such a
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unbelievable opportunity for this very special football club. travel now. the tube is off to a good start. no reported problems on any of those lines there, as you can see, at the moment. we have still only got one woolwich ferry running, because of mechanical problems. here is how it looks heading towards the blackwall tunnel. traffic is already building northbound on the a102. and some good news. hammersmith bridge is open again. it was closed for the whole of last week, of course, for repairs. let's get the weather now, with kate kinsella. good morning. well, after a very mild weekend we are in for a mild monday. but unfortunately that doesn't mean wall—to—wall sunshine. there is a lot of cloud today, but yes, it is going to stay very mild. now, the chances are you make a spot of rain first thing that is dry. the cloud quite thick, but through the afternoon the cloud could then and if you get a burst of sunshine that temperatures could rise that bit higher, but widely 15 or maybe 16
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celsius as the maximum is pretty warmth of february. now, tonight, of course, the fa cup fifth round, sutton united versus arsenal. it is looking dry at the moment, may get a spot of rain but cloudy and it is still going to stay mild. now, further through the night, spots of rain arriving and some light, patchy rain arriving and some light, patchy rain as we head to the early hours of tomorrow morning. that is likely to last through to tuesday, but the minimum temperature is staying mild, it is barely dropping, ten or 11 celsius. so another mild if a little damp starto celsius. so another mild if a little damp star to tuesday. now, the rain will gradually start to fizzle out as we go through the day, it is going to stay rather cloudy, though. quite breezy as well as we had to tuesday afternoon. that mild air staying with us, between 13 and 15 celsius were tuesday. now, through the rest of the week we are hanging on to the cloud. gradually, though, that she will start to get a little bit cooler but in the meantime we are still up double figures. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it is back to dan and louise. bye for now.
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hello this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. it's 6:30.. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. with british drivers spending 32 hours a year struck in traffic, we'll find out why the uk's roads are the most gridlocked in western europe — and look at potential solutions. sepsis kills more than 40,000 people every year — more than bowel, breast and prostate cancer combined. we'll look at calls to raise awareness of the deadly condition. pats, come on, darling. it's official, sweetie. absolutely fabulous is 25 years old. eddy and patsy — or should we say jennifer saunders and joanna lumley — willjoin us right here on the sofa. probably not just like
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probably notjust like that. probably not just like that.|j probably notjust like that. i was thinking, to you think you will get on the sofa like that! the uk has the worst traffic congestion in europe, with drivers spending an average of 32 hours a year stuck in tailbacks during peak periods. that's according to research from the travel information company, inrix, which found that congestion is the most severe in london, followed by manchester and then aberdeen. the department for transport says it's investing record amounts to keep the country moving. we'll hear from two traffic experts atjust after 8:00 this morning on what they think should be done to ease congestion on our roads. to send your suggestions in as well, we will read some of those later. peers get their first chance to debate the so—called "brexit bill" later — the legislation which kicks off the formal process for britain leaving the eu. the bill passed through the commons unamended, but it's thought opposition peers in the house of lords will seek guarantees
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about the rights of eu citizens in britain — and the role of parliament in scrutinising brexit. council tax rises are planned by most local authorities in england in the coming year to help meet the increasing cost of social care. the government says extra money is being put into social care and councils will soon be able to keep all the money they raise from council tax and business rates. but the local government association who represent councils say deep cuts will still have to be made to other services as the cost of care for the elderly and disabled will account for all of the extra money raised. campaigners have called the current maximum jail term for animal cruelty in england and wales "laughable". battersea dogs & cats home is calling for prison sentences to be increased from six months to five years to bring the punishment in line with crimes such as fly—tipping. england and wales currently have the lowest maximum sentence in the uk. donald trump has treated about why
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he made comments about an incident in sweden which did not happen. you look at what is happening last night in sweden, sweden! who would believe this, sweden. they took in large numbers and they are having problems like they never thought possible. numbers and they are having problems like they never thought possible. he said the following day that the information was from a fox news article. 6:33am. i probably need to explain why i was excited about the fa cup draw. we could have a nonleague side
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into the final which is a good part of the draw. although i still reeling about your description of the dress! non—league sutton united take centre stage in the fa cup when they take on arsenal tonight for the last remaining place in the fa cup quarter—finals. they already know who they will face in the next round after yesterday's draw. sutton or arsenal will play the heroes of the weekend, lincoln city for a place in the semi finals. tottenham hotspur and manchester united came through yesterday. united had to come from behind to beat championship side, blackburn rovers, 2—1 with zlatan ibrahimovich scoring the winner. united now go to manager jose mourinho's former club chelsea in the quarterfinals. they had brilliant attitude and if we did not have this professional attitude with everybody playing with focus and responsibility, we would
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be in real trouble. tottenham will host millwall in the next round, after harry kane scored a hat trick against fulham yesterday. the england striker says the win will also help them later this week when spurs attempt to come back from i—nil down in the europa league against belgian side gent winning games gives you confidence so we go into thursday coming off this result and buzzing to go to wembley. we are looking forward to it. it is never easy in the fa cup as you see from the results. we came here to do a job and we did that. aberdeen have strengthened their grip on second place in the scottish premiership after a late comeback against kilmarnock aberdeen were a goal behind going into the last ten minutes before substitutes jayden stockley and peter pawlett scored to seal the victory. the result cuts celtic‘s lead at the top — but they're still 24 points clear. dundee picked up theirfirst home league win over rangers for 25 years. goals from mark o'hara and kevin holt put them 2—nil up at half—time. rangers got a goal back but they were unable to find an equaliser
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wigan have won the world club challenge series for the first time since 1994. the series is between the best in the northern and southern hemispheres. a hat—trick from winger joe burgess helped wigan beat australian champions cronulla sharks, 22—6. please week that. on friday, we want to perform really well. the players have so much desire and guts and determination to get these winds. this wind is all for them. —— win. there was a surprise result in rugby union's premiership yesterday as leaders wasps lost to tenth place sale sharks. denny solomona scored a hat—trick for the sharks who inflicted wasps' third league defeat of the season. they remain six points clear at the top. elsewhere newcastle beat northampton. late last night stuart bingham
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won the welsh open — he beatjudd trump 9—8 in the final frame to win the tournament for the first time. bingham had led 4—0 in the early stages before trump battled back to lead 8—7 in the evening session. but bingham held his nerve to take the final two frames, sealing his first welsh open win with a break of 55. hopes of a first medal for a british man at an alpine world championships ended in disappointment for dave ryding in the slalom in st moritz. the 30—year—old was well placed sitting in fourth place after his opening run, but he was more than two seconds slower on his second run. by the end of the competition he was in eleventh but that was still the best performance by a male british skier in 32 years. we have had a british woman winning in 1936. a little bit like wimbledon. we will get there. are
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you talking about the world championships wrong russian and them later. yes i will. they do try and disfigured and it is a fun and video. 630 ait a.m.. -- 638. the legislation approved in the comments but many in the lords say they want to force through changes. one of those peers joins us now. good morning and thank you for joining us. it will be under intense scrutiny today that this bill. they are talking about some changes wa nted are talking about some changes wanted to be forced through. what are the prior year it is from your point of view? two areas, first of
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all how do we protect things that are all how do we protect things that a re really all how do we protect things that are really important to this country such as the future of the united kingdom and indeed our borders with ireland. there will be other issues such as what happens with eu nationals and then there will be the question of how to keep tabs on this process as it recedes, how do we know when it comes to the final decision, we are not being given wilson ‘s choice —— hobson. decision, we are not being given wilson 's choice -- hobson. this was voted for by the british public. some say the lords should not be interfering in that boat. look, there was a clear majority in the referendum to leave the european union and! referendum to leave the european union and i do not believe the laws will seek to block the bill, or indeed delay hit significantly. the
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keyissueis indeed delay hit significantly. the key issue is the lords has a job to do, to review and scrutinised legislation and while people voted to leave, they are a lots of issues they did not vote or express a view on, such as leaving the single market or taking actions that might put at risk the future of the united kingdom stop it is right and proper for parliament and the house of lords to debate. you say the lords are unlikely to block it all delay yet, but how would you make progress? we make progress by having a debate in the next two weeks. there will be some detailed amendments forward across the house and across the bench. from political parties as well. they then go back to the house of commons who can either accept or reject them and i do hope that if iraq considered amendments of that come out of a
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genuine debate in the lords that the comments and indeed the government will see fit to give them the proper consideration. with regard to these amendments if you are hoping all, if the lords are seen to be interfering — there are some people it may lead to more lessons about the future of the house of lords? there is a proper debate to have about whether you have the current model of the house of lords or are elected second chamber but while we exist in the current form, we have a job to do andi current form, we have a job to do and i would be most unhappy if the house of lords, where it felt it had proper issues to consider, in effect, curtailed this debate and its role because it was worried it might be abolished. if you get into that sort of decision everytime we are threatened, we might as well pack up and go home full of which have been hearing in our news
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bulletin that the local government association that almost every council in england is planning to put council tax up by 5% in order to pay for social care. when it comes to the crunch, do you think that is what they will do? i think they will do and! what they will do? i think they will do and i think the whole financial deal on local government this year is based on the fact that council tax will go up. i do not think authorities ever want to put up council tax more than they need to but government funding has gone back and there is still an essential need for social care and services like libraries and maintaining the roads. if we want good local services, they are going to have to be paid for. thank you for your time here. let's ironed out what is happening in the weather with a rather foreboding sky behind her. a cloudy start to the
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day but also an exceptionally mild one. ealing north wales —— in north wales up to 18 degrees. 13 degrees high than expected. today and tomorrow, the amber colour is showing its hand. thejet stream tempered by the atlantic ocean but the origin is the caribbean where it is in the midst of high 20s. what we have this morning is a lot of cloud around and some mist and hill fog and drizzle coming out of the vicar cloud and some rain. some of us will see some sunshine. hill fog across wales, ploughed through the midland and east anglia, cloudy as you continue your journey
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and east anglia, cloudy as you continue yourjourney into northern england. some heavy rain through north—east scotland, it will edge to northern ireland but even say the temperatures are still pretty high for this time of day. across parts of its —— of east scotland... gusts of its —— of east scotland... gusts of 50 mph in northern england so ta ke of 50 mph in northern england so take extra care. the weather front sleeping through northern ireland into northern england but by then it will be light patchy rain. where we see the sunshine, we could hit 17 degrees celsius, more likely 16. as we head onto the evening and overnight, rain in the south rejuvenate because it starts to come back northwards. ahead of that, in scotland, under clear skies, we are
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looking at an overnight low of four. across parts of wales, southern england, a lot of cloud around. some sunshine and high temperatures in that. generally nine — 13. more rain across north—west scotland. rain across north—west scotland. rain across wales and a northern england and then six down to east anglia. a lot of cloud associated with these but brighter skies further north but you can see the temperatures are starting to come back down. thank you, carol. always nice to see you. 16% of working disabled people identify as being their own boss, higher than in the non—disabled population. is this difference due to the flexibility that going it alone offers disabled people, or are disabled people pushed in to it through lack of opportunity.
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good morning. it is quite a big difference in the jobs market, depending if you do or do not have a disability. just under half of working—age disabled people have a job, compared to more than 80% for those without a disability. self—employment is a particularly popular way for people living with a disability to get into the workforce. 500,000 people do just that, and one is kelly perks—bevington, who started her professional management business after realising the company she was working for wasn't sending her out on jobs because of her disability. my my condition is spinal muscular atrophy type three, which is a muscle wastage disorder, and that means that i do use a wheelchair on a daily basis. ijust take a little bit longer to do things than everybody else. there's quite a lot of things that you need to think about that perhaps somebody that able—bodied wouldn't need to think
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about. you just need that extra bit of time. i think that that is a big, key factor in being self—employed and having your own business, is that you can manage your time. you know what you can take, you sort of know what you can take, you sort of know your own needs, and you can actually take time out for yourself. i think that you've got that power inside you to solve those problems that able—bodied people don't necessarily have to deal with. and it does give you a strength to work out everyday business problems, and it just makes for a out everyday business problems, and itjust makes for a fantastic is this mind, in my opinion. i think maybe, in the past, my disability held me back in a business sense. i've actually i think that was just the way i view that personally, and it has been a journey to get to where i am now. but now i don't let it stop me doing anything that i wa nt to it stop me doing anything that i want to do. i always find a way to do it, and just get around it. joining me now is selina mills. she is an ambassador manager for leonard cheshire disability. good morning. good morning. we heard
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from kelly, her story about what pushed her to go into business. do you phone from people living with a disability, is it more a choice, because they want to be in the workforce, being self—employed, or is it need and because companies are not making it as comfortable for people as they ought to? not making it as comfortable for people as they ought to?|j not making it as comfortable for people as they ought to? i think people as they ought to? i think people are people, so we have to say that disabled people are part of a working community, but it is certainly true that there are barriers. so if you are an entrepreneur you kind of change those barriers by making your life flexible, having your own income, and also following your dream. and that figure i mentioned earlier, where the employment rate for people living with a disability is less than 50%. it is stark, yes. is there a fundamental issue with british business that means those figures excess ? business that means those figures excess? i think there is a deep level of misunderstanding about how disabled people can happily go to work, work hard, be talented, and also i think there is a lack
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understanding that disabled people are like everybody else. they need help sometimes, or support, are like everybody else. they need help sometimes, orsupport, i are like everybody else. they need help sometimes, or support, i think the word adaptation is a good word, adapting to things. are there certain things that businesses can do quite easily to make those figures better? well, i think the first thing to do is sit down to talk to people. disability is such a personal experience. you can't put a big rush of it and say this is what you do for disabled people. you need to be able to say this person needs a larger screen, orflexible working hours, so there are things that you can do. have you experienced difficulties with your disability,
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or even major positives that certain businesses who know how to deal with the situation? i have, actually. i have had workplaces who don't understand you needing a medical appointment, and places that don't understand the screen, or it took three weeks to get a screen, and i can't read it without a special one. i have also had places where they have said, what can we do for you? how can we make it the best person for thisjob? it how can we make it the best person for this job? it really is about sitting down, talking to people, making sure you have thought about things. often it is nothing to do with money. it is to do with inking about structures. and just finally, if anybody is self—employed, you have to remember, don't you, that your workers ' writes are not as strong as if you are staff at a company somewhere. is that something that people should bear in mind? again, it is not about being disabled or not disabled. that implies that disabled people are separate, they are not. they have the same rights as everyone else. sharing your disability gives you more rights. you are protected by a quality acts, so if you tell your employer you need this, or if you go to your bank and say you need help, they are responsible, legally, for
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helping you. we will be talking more about this through the morning. hashtag is disability works if you wa nt to hashtag is disability works if you want to follow that series throughout the week. could the uk soon boldly be going where it has never been before? detailed plans to create the country's first spaceports are being unveiled today. they could see commercial satellites being launched within three years, and even lead to the start of space tourism. ministers want to grab a share of an industry that is potentially worth billions of pounds. breakfast‘s john maguire reports. from glasgow prestwick airport, destinations include us alone, also and rome. but soon there will be another one. space —— malta. the number one target is to see the first launch from the uk by 2020. for a burgeoning and already very successful space industry worth £250 million, this is a crucial piece in the jigsaw, million, this is a crucial piece in thejigsaw, and million, this is a crucial piece in the jigsaw, and could million, this is a crucial piece in thejigsaw, and could be in place soon. thejigsaw, and could be in place soon. to start with, it will actually be rockets flying under an aircraft, for the first few years, so it won't be that different from watching an ordinary aircraft take off. but obviously, in the fullness off. but obviously, in the fullness of time, we would expect that to be a proper rocket taking off, and with
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wings that can be deployed and able to land again. to be classified as a spaceport, sites will need to be licensed. they won't need to undergo major works, but will have to be able to refuel rockets. the vast majority of takeoffs will be horizontal rather than vertical. the carrier aircraft will climb to around 40,000 feet, so above the weather, above traditional air traffic... inside the rocket will be small satellites. for the businesses involved, this is the chance of a lifetime. we find ourselves with this fantastic opportunity. nobody in the us is doing this, nobody in europe is doing it, nobody around the world is doing it, and the uk can the world is doing it, and the uk ca n ca ptu re the world is doing it, and the uk can capture this enormous economic potential and get way ahead of the market. and lift off of the falcon nine to the space station. white back once the exclusive playground of the superpowers, space is more accessible than ever and the government wants the uk to take a bigger slice of the pie. now, the
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economic benefits of hosting a spaceport are very enticing. at the aerospace spaceport are very enticing. at the aerospace park over there they already employ about 3000 people, and it is believed that they could ta ke and it is believed that they could take on another 2000 in this area if a spaceport comes to prestwick. take on another 2000 in this area if a spaceport comes to prestwick. the and of its uk wide of housing this next generation of air travel, well, they are even more significant —— aerospace travel. and here at oxfordshire they are developing the next generation of aerospace engines, capable of flying at five times the speed of sound in the atmosphere and of spaceflight, the air breathing sabre will rocket engines would revolutionise travel, london to the stars in hours. engines would revolutionise travel, london to the stars in hours.m could really transform aerospace. there has been a significant gaps in the last big development in this one, but this is potentially the closest we are going to get to the
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jet engine moment in our lifetime. but first, the commercial spaceport will launch satellites and could bring the zero gravity flights to the uk. then, ultimately, even space tourism. the opportunities are huge, and not even the sky is the limit. and john is in cornwall for us now, at a site that is hoping to be mission control. it looks as though that little satellite is trying to find out what your thoughts at this morning as well. good luck with that. you know what they say about empty vessels. we are in cornwall, as you say, the earth is the british heart foundation here. 25 of these antennas monitoring what is going on up antennas monitoring what is going on up in space. and it is hoped that this would become mission control if and when these spaceport arrive. i am joined by and when these spaceport arrive. i amjoined by ian and when these spaceport arrive. i am joined by ian jones and when these spaceport arrive. i am joined by ianjones from goonhilly and professor tim harris from the university of exeter. exciting stuff. what will you be
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doing it, you hope? so when the rocket parts take off from the aeroplane it has to start going very fa st very aeroplane it has to start going very fast very quickly, and disappear out of the range of normal tracking. so what we are going to be doing here at acrid to his tracking the rocket parts up into space, up into orbit. so yes, that is what we are hoping to do. and as with all rocket scientist, you make it sound easy. is it the sort of technology now thatis is it the sort of technology now that is very much within our grasp, is it relatively easy? well, of course we have been tracking rocket since the early 1960s. this is something we are perhaps going to be to look at in terms of the technology, perhaps tracking via another satellite already in space. tim harris, from the university of exeter, i want to talk to you about the science. we have talked about the science. we have talked about the business opportunities of the burgeoning space industry. what would it mean the signs such as yourself? of course, satellites are very important for uk science. we have people starting ocean
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acidification remotely, looking at climate and weather in contact with the met office, and also in my field, in astrophysics, we like to get above the atmosphere, which causes the stars to twinkle, which makes it difficult to observe them in detailfrom the makes it difficult to observe them in detail from the earth's surfers, but above the atmosphere that goes away. and some wavelengths don't get through the atmosphere but we can study them from space. this is an exciting opportunity for uk science. more from you two later on. exciting opportunities. it is enabling scientists to do things that they just haven't been able to do before, obtain data, monitor things they haven't been able to before, much more cheaply now if and when the spaceport is arrive in the uk in just the next couple of years. spaceport is arrive in the uk in just the next couple of years.|j quite fancy being a space tourist, do you? no. really? i am quite happy
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here, thanks. iam do you? no. really? i am quite happy here, thanks. i am staying on earth. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. david norris, who murdered the black teenager stephen lawrence in a racist attack, is suing the government. it is thought norris, who is serving a life sentence, is seeking thousands of pounds in compensation after he was allegedly attacked at belmarsh prison in south—east london. his lawyers claim he was put at risk by being moved to a part of belmarsh with black inmates. the former boxer michael watson and his carer have been injured during a suspected car jacking in east london. mr watson, who was left partially disabled after a fight in 1991, was dragged along the road in chingford as he tried to leave his car. sutton united will be aiming to pull off one of the biggest shocks in fa cup history tonight. having made it through to the fifth round for the first time ever, the non—league team will now welcome
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premier league giants arsenal to their tiny stadium at gander green lane. sutton's chairman says he can't wait to show off the club to tv audiences around the world. a huge media interest worldwide. it's quite frightening, really, when you realise how many people are going to be watching this game live, all over the world. but it's such a unbelievable opportunity, for this very special football club. travel now. the tube is running well so far. no reported problems on any of those lines there, as you can see, at the moment. we have still only got one woolwich ferry running, because of mechanical problems. let's take a look at the a13, because we have already got queues heading into town from wennington. and some good news — hammersmith bridge is open again. it was closed for the whole of last week, of course, for repairs. let's get the weather now, with kate kinsella. good morning. well, after a very mild weekend, we are in for a mild monday,
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but unfortunately that doesn't mean wall—to—wall sunshine. there is a lot of cloud today, but yes, it is going to stay very mild. now, the chances are you may get a spot of rain first but most places dry. the cloud quite thick, but through the afternoon the cloud could thin, and if you get a burst of sunshine the temperatures could rise that bit higher. but widely, 15 or maybe 16 celsius as a maximum is pretty warm for february. now, tonight, of course, the fa cup fifth round, sutton united versus arsenal. it is looking dry at the moment, may get a spot of rain, but cloudy, and it is still going to stay mild. now, further through the night, spots of rain arriving, and also some light, patchy rain as we head through the early hours of tomorrow morning. that is likely to last through to tuesday. but the minimum temperature, it is staying mild. it is barely dropping, ten or 11 celsius. so another mild, if a little damp start to tuesday. now, the rain will gradually start to fizzle out as we go through the day.
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it is going to stay rather cloudy, though. quite breezy, as well, as we head through tuesday afternoon. that mild air staying with us, between 13 and 15 celsius for tuesday. now, through the rest of the week, we are hanging on to the cloud. gradually, though, that will start to get a little bit cooler. but in the meantime, we are still up double figures. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it is back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. gridlocked. a report finds the uk's roads are the most congested in western europe. researchers say most drivers spend more than 32 hours each year stuck in traffic as they warn of a significant cost to the economy. good morning, it's monday the 20th february. also this morning: almost every council in england is planning
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to put up taxes to help meet the cost of social care. angelina jolie talks exclusively to us about her new film set in cambodia and for the first time about her separation from brad pitt. uh... it was a very difficult time, and... and we are a family, and we will always be a family. and we will get through this time, and hopefully be a stronger family for it. more than half a million people with a disability are self employed. i'll be looking at why it's such a popular option as part of the bbc‘s disability works series. can another non—league club make it to the quarter finals of the fa cup? sutton united take on arsenal later, the winner will play lincoln. the holders manchester united will face chelsea next after coming from behind to beat blackburn rovers yesterday. it is blast off for plans to create
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a new generation of commercial space ports in the uk. with live at mission control in cornwall, where they'll be hoping to track the spacecraft of the future —— we're live. after 8am we'll be joined by tv royalty. joanna lumley and jennifer saunders will be on the sofa as they celebrate 25 years of ab fab. a mild start to the day but not sunny all the way through. quite a lot of cloud around producing drizzle, murky conditions, wet and windy in the north but sunshine today and where we see that in parts of the south we could hit 16 or 17. more on all of that in 15 minutes. thank you, carol, see you shortly. good morning. let's set you up for the day by talking about traffic! the uk has the worst congestion in western europe, with drivers spending an average of 32 hours a year stuck in tailbacks during peak periods.
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this is according to the travel information company inrix. congestion is the most severe in london, followed by manchester and then aberdeen. the department for transport says it's investing record amounts to keep the country moving, as jane—frances kelly reports. drivers across the uk who face the daily misery of trafficjams are losing notjust their patience but also time and money. unsurprisingly, london is the most congested city in the uk, with drivers spending more than three days every year stuck in traffic during rush hour. manchester is the second worst, with motorists wasting 39 hours gridlocked during peak times. aberdeen is third and perhaps surprisingly beats london as the hardest city to drive in and out of during rush hour. research suggests businesses in cardiff, suffer the most from congestion, based on the amount of tailback during the daytime. outside of london, part of the a1 southbound in belfast
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was found to be the most congested route in the uk. other than drivers getting frustrated behind the wheel, why is all this a problem? experts calculated that hold—ups costs the economy £31 billion last year, that's an average of nearly £1,000 per driver on things like fuel, being late for work and childcare. there's also more traffic on the roads because of growth in online shopping. the department for transport said it's making the most extensive improvements to roads since the 1970s, investing a record £23 billion. but money may not be the only solution. researchers say to stop us standing still, we need better traffic management, more flexible working and to consider the wider use of congestion charges. jane—frances kelly, bbc news we'll hear from two traffic experts atjust after 8am this morning on what they think should be done to ease congestion on our roads. thank you for all your suggestions you've been sending in already,
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we'll get through some of those later in the programme. council tax rises are planned by nearly all of england's local authorities in the coming year, but the organisation that represents them is warning that deep cuts to services will still be needed. the local government association says social care services for the elderly and disabled are at breaking point and will swallow up any extra money raised. here's our social affairs correspondent allison holt. this is social care in action. after several falls, maureen edwards is getting support to regain some independence and rebuild her confidence. she needs help each day, which allows her and her husband to cope in their own home. i'm grateful for all that they have done for me, i really am and... without them, i don't know what i would have done. so yeah, it's good, really good. councils fund most social care and today's surveys shows the majority of them struggling to meet growing costs. there are 151 local authorities
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in england, 147 plan to raise council tax specifically to help pay for social care. but councils warn that will not plug the funding gap and that could mean cuts to other council services. there has been a united voice of local government to say that they need more funding into social care and that the crisis in social care is immediate now. the funding for local government needs to be resolved immediately. the government says extra money is being put into social care that and authorities will soon be able to keep all the money they raise from council tax and business rates. alison holt, bbc news. the house of lords will get its first chance to debate the so—called brexit bill later, the legislation which kicks off the formal process for britain leaving the eu. the bill passed through the commons unamended, but it's thought opposition peers will seek guarantees about the rights of eu citizens in britain
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and the role of parliament in scrutinising brexit. our political correspondent tom bateman is in westminster. what will the tone of the debate be those yellow for anyone interested in the spectator sport of watching house of lords debate, there will be a treat because 180 will speak, a record number. it gives you a sense of the appetite of lords to influence and discuss and scrutinise this process. some of the lord's will try to amend the brexit bill, that's something mps were u nsuccessful that's something mps were unsuccessful in doing because they backed this bill overwhelmingly. for others it's merely a chance to have a say on it all. in terms of that process , a say on it all. in terms of that process, we've been hearing on brea kfast process, we've been hearing on breakfast from the crossbench peer lord kerslake. the key issue is the lord's has a job to do, it's there to review and
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scrutinise legislation and while people voted to leave, there are a lot of issues on which people didn't really vote or express a view, such as leaving the single market, or indeed taking actions that might put at risk the future of the united kingdom. these are important issues and it's right and proper for parliament, and indeed the house of lords, to debate. parliament, and indeed the house of lords, to debate. you mention the rights of eu citizens and getting a parliamentary vote on any deal before signed by theresa may, it could bounce back to the house of commons and they could wipe off those amendments. in the end ministers want no changes to the bill and theresa may confident she will get to trigger the article 50 process during the course of next month. tom, thank you very much. the nhs is at breaking point as the number of overnight hospital
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beds continue to decline, that's the warning from the british medical association. its research, based on official statistics, said the number of beds in england fell by a fifth between 2006 and 2016. but department of health officials have disputed some of the report's key findings, insisting changes in the way data is recorded means historic and current figures cannot be compared. campaigners have called the current maximum jail term for animal cruelty in england and wales laughable. battersea dogs and cats home is calling for prison sentences to be increased from six months to five years to bring the punishment in line with crimes such as fly tipping. england and wales currently have the lowest maximum sentence in the uk. donald trump has explained on twitter why he made comments about a security incident in sweden on friday, which did not happen. at a rally on saturday, mr trump referenced sweden, along with other european cities which have been hit by attacks. you look at what's happening last
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night in sweden. sweden! who would believe this, sweden! they took in large numbers, they're having problems like they never thought possible. he tweeted the following day, saying the information was from a fox news report. the swedish embassy responded, saying they look forward to advising mr trump's administration about swedish immigration and integration policies. angelina jolie has spoken for the first time about her separation from brad pitt. the hollywood actor and director has been speaking exclusively to the bbc about her new film, set in cambodia under the khmer rouge. angelina jolie, a un refugee agency special envoy, first visited the region in 2000. she later adopted maddox, her oldest son, from cambodia. she spoke to our reporter, yalda hakim. i'm here because 17 years ago i came
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to this country and fell in love with its people and learned about its history, and in doing so realised how little i actually knew in my early 20s about the world. so this country for me has been... was my awakening and my son changed my life. the you think in many ways you've come full circle? your humanitarian work started here, you became a mother here, perhaps this is some kind of crossroads for you that you've come back here? yeah, yeah. i'll always... i'll always that you've come back here? yeah, yeah. i'llalways... i'llalways be very grateful to this country and i hope... i hope i've given back as much as it's given me. i don't think i could ever give back as much as this country's given me. i could ever give back as much as this country's given melj understand this is a very sensitive issue. we know that an incident occurred which led to your
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separation. we also know you haven't said anything about this. but would you like to say something? uh... only that... i don't want to say very much about that, except to say that it was a very difficult time, and... and we are a family, and we will always be a family. and we will get through this time, and hopefully be a stronger family for it. that was angelina jolie. you can see the full interview with her on the bbc news website. we promised you we would return to cruelty to animals. in 2015, just 9% of those convicted of animal cruelty were sent to prison, serving an average of three months injail. that's something one animal rescue charity wants to change. battersea dog and cats home is calling for the maximum sentence in england and wales to be increased from six months to five years.
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we're joined now by its ceo, claire horton, who's brought along her dog, wilma, and by elaine chin, who's a volunteer with freshfields animal rescue in liverpool. good morning to all of you! i was going to say both of you but wilma is here as well. very well controlled. no hands, she's very good! why do you want to raise the maximum sentence? well, frankly the situation with sentencing in this country, particularly in england and wales, particularly for serious offences of animal cruelty is shocking. we are the lowest in europe at just shocking. we are the lowest in europe atjust six months, and other countries, including ireland and northern ireland, are up at five yea rs, northern ireland, are up at five years, which much more reflects the sort of punishment is expected for very serious and very horrific crimes against animals. tell us about wilma, she is a rescue dog,
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isn't she? wilma is from battersea dogs and cats home, i've had herfor about six years and when she came in i saw herfrom about six years and when she came in i saw her from the day she came about six years and when she came in i saw herfrom the day she came in, very poor state, very thin. she's14 now but she was nine when she came m, now but she was nine when she came in, just had puppies, they were nowhere to be found, very bad skin and ears and plenty of operations to get her right. completely neglected, horrendous state. she's very interested in yourjacket! what have you been seeing? when we talk about the abuse and cruelty towards animals? endless cases. it gets worse and worse and worse. we've had animals that have been brought in, a dog brought in who obviously had been owned by adults who were addicts and they used to put alcohol in his drinking bowl and forced him to inhale cannabis. when he came in he had had some corrosive substance thrown over him, acid or whatever, and he had dreadful scarring on him.
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we've got a dog at the moment in foster care who thankfully his hair owner has gone to prison —— her own. the nature of the abuse is too graphic to describe, even the police we re graphic to describe, even the police were horrified. dreadful abuse. this is an elderly dog, 11 years old, now needs a home, and that's all she's ever known in her life. what happens to the animals when they come in? they need a lot of care and let's to help them? this is the thing, i'm from freshfields animal rescue, a local charity in liverpool, i say at the door they must see the vet. as claire has described with wilma, sometimes we embarked on a long and intensive and expensive course of treatment to get the dog or the cat or whatever the animal is right. there's also an emotionaljourney to go on to restore the animal's faith and get trust again and help it to
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feel safe. i'm sure the vast majority of people watching will say it's disgusting and how deep could do that to an animal but i'm sure some people will be doing this this week and even today. how would a longer prison sentence deter those kinds of people from hurting animals ina certain kinds of people from hurting animals in a certain kind of way? there is something about, the punishment needs to reflect the crime, and we don't see that at the moment. birmingham did prison research, showing that increased prison sentences to deter the perpetrators of the most serious crimes. some of these animals are so badly hurt that they will either die at the hands of their owners or their abuses, or they will have to be euthanasia now found. and that happens way too often for that to be right. —— eutha nased. happens way too often for that to be
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right. —— euthanased. we take on lots of very nice animals from homes who can't take care of them, but some from homes where they have been starved or abused, we will take a lot of stray animals. a good third of the dog that came in, and cats that came in last year were strays, and many of them were extremely poorly looked after and had had very difficult start in life. you can see that. rspca in 2015 prosecuted and successfully prosecuted over 930 offenders who were punished, but none of those people, some even for the most serious crimes, received anything more than six months. and she is a beautifully behaved dog. she has been with you, six years or so? six years. how did you choose her? it was my second day at a busy andi her? it was my second day at a busy and i wanted to follow an animal through its journey, and and i wanted to follow an animal through itsjourney, and she has been with me in mind. you are watching
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breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: inajam. the uk has the worst congestion in europe, with drivers spending around 32 hours a year stuck in traffic. in an exclusive interview with the bbc, angelina jolie has spoken for the first time about her separation from brad pitt. thank you for your texts, tweets and m essa g es thank you for your texts, tweets and messages about that story. we will read some of those later in the programme. here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. it is exceptionally mild. u nfortu nately it is exceptionally mild. unfortunately that doesn't mean we have wall—to—wall blue skies. there isa have wall—to—wall blue skies. there is a lot of cloud around but to give you an idea of the current temperatures, in aberdeen at the moment is 13 celsius. at this time of day, at this time of year, it should be freezing. that is a big hike up. belfast, manchesterand norwich 11, cardiff and london ten.
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these temperatures would be good as maximum temperatures at this time of year. it is notjust today, even in some tomorrow, look at the amber colours coming from the atlantic ocean. the source of this is the caribbean, it is tangled up in the jet stream, so it is not dry. we have a lot of moisture, hence all the cloud that we currently have, the cloud that we currently have, the mist and murk and also the hill fog. for some of us we also have a weather front coming in across the north—west, producing thick cloud and some heavy rain. in the south—west it is a murky start. there is a lot of cloud around, there is hill fog. it is damp as well, drizzle coming out of the thickest cloud, but these temperatures, 11 and ten, not bad at all. for wales you have hill fog, northern england you have hill fog, northern ireland and scotland, the rain coming in the northern scotland will fringe in the northern ireland as we go through the course of the day and it is windy in scotland and northern ireland and will remain so throughout the day. it will be
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particularly windy through the north of england. if you are on the a1, bear that in of england. if you are on the a1, bearthat in mind, of england. if you are on the a1, bear that in mind, especially in a high sided vehicles. the rain will turn more patchy in nature as it moved south, bright and breezy behind it. still some showers piling on, and further south although there will be a lot of cloud around, parts of east and north—east wales, the south of england, where that sunshine breaks, the temperature could hit 17 celsius. 17 celsius in february happens once every five to seven yea rs. february happens once every five to seven years. now, as we move through the evening and overnight there is no weather front down in the south. it is going to rejuvenate and pivot back northwards. ahead of its clearer skies, cool in some of the mountains and scotland will see some snow. tomorrow that band of rain moves a little bit further north, not terribly far north. a lot of cloud associated with it. some brea ks cloud associated with it. some breaks in the cloud as we push further north but more rain piling in across the north—west, quite windy. like today, where we see some breaks, the temperature will be way
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above average for the time of year. but it will be down by a good four degrees in parts of scotland compared to what we are looking at today. so then moving from tuesday into wednesday we've got a weather front lines across central parts of england and wales, producing some rain. quitea england and wales, producing some rain. quite a lot of cloud around. behind it, although it is brighter, you can see how the temperature is slowly dropping back down to where it should be at this stage in february. quite mild, it has been very nice. it has been a lovely weekend, thanks, carol. sean is here now with some of this morning's business stories. baked morning's business stories. beans, whiskey, that i: we baked beans, whiskey, that is what we have got. breakfast of kings. good morning. it wasn't on for very long, but now the deal is off. on friday, the american food company kraft heinz said it wanted to buy the british—dutch company unilever, but last night it walked away from the deal. the takeover would have been worth £115 billion, one of the biggest in corporate
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history, combining dozens of household names, from unilever‘s ben &jerry‘s and marmite, to kraft heinz‘s baked beans and philadelphia cheese. online retail giant amazon has said it will create 5,000 new full—time jobs in the uk this year. the firm said it was looking for a range of staff, including software developers and warehouse staff. there will be jobs at amazon's head office in london, as well as in the edinburgh customer service centre, and in three new warehouses. the recruitment will take amazon's workforce in the uk to more than 24,000. single—malt scotch whisky topped £1 billion worth of exports for the first time last year, reflecting a return to growth for exports of scotch more widely, with nearly £4 billion of overseas sales in total. that follows a dip for two years because of falling demand from china, venezuela and brazil with serious economic difficulties. the return to growth for scotch whisky has been driven by the success of single—malts, appealing to luxury and prestige markets. there you go, it is very popular,
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isn't it? it is, especially at this time of the morning. all right, some! what is in your breakfast cup? we only have tea over here. he has been in thejob forjust over a month, but in a few short weeks, donald trump has managed to both delight his supporters and appal his detractors. today, mps will debate the president's upcoming state visit to the uk, after two million people signed a petition against it, and more than 300,000 signed one in favour. breakfast‘s graham satchell has been to an american comedy night in birmingham, where the audience shared their divided views on the new us president and his policies. and the thing is, living here as an american at the moment, i usually have to start my gigs byjust saying i'm sorry. we are in a cafe in birmingham. when people find out i'm an american now, the first thing they say to me is trump. trump, trump, trump, trump, trump, trump... american comedian eric mcilroy is playing to a split audience. some who admire donald trump,
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and some who loathe him. i think he's a racist, misogynistic, i think he's a sexist. donald trump is decisive. donald trump is his own man. i think he's a real threat to the values of freedom and equality. i'm living in this country as a muslim. i have no issues. i think he's a climate change denier, and i think he's pro—torture. why are people scared about him? his approaches are just archaic and shocking. do you think he's dangerous? very much so. very, very, very much so. england's the same. breaking the establishment and fixing the broken country. if they are going to call that dangerous, then i'm dangerous. that is what i want to do. and, in one word, he is an absolute bigot. so you like him then? i think we should let him come to the country, i think he should be greeted by sadiq khan, after waiting for an hour
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and a half in customs, because he would appreciate that, and he be taken out for a spicy chicken masala. almost 200,000 people have signed a petition to say he should be allowed to address parliament. the rights and wrongs will be discussed today, but again our audience is deeply divided. i'd love to see him here. i'd be happy to greet him personally, i'd like to see him having a drink on broad street, the same as bill clinton did. not in my name. he shouldn't come? no, not at all. if prime minister trudeau, liberal prime minister of canada, is prepared to reach out with an open hand, i think we should as well. we could be seeing a real division, not the unifying effect that state visits are supposed to have. whether we roll the red carpet out in all senses,
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some people might find that a bit much. but certainly we have to do the right thing, whatever that is. to be pragmatic? to be pragmatic, yes. i think so. given the almost vituperative disagreement within the room, it is no small mercy that our session begins and ends with laughter. and that was the first time i met boris johnson. .. you can watch mps debate donald trump's state visit to the uk on bbc parliament from 4:30pm this afternoon. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sonja jessup. david norris, who murdered the black teenager stephen lawrence in a racist attack in 1993, is suing the government. it is thought norris, who is serving a life sentence, is seeking thousands of pounds in compensation after he was allegedly attacked at belmarsh prison in south—east london. his lawyers claim he was put at risk by being moved to a part of belmarsh with black inmates. the former boxer michael watson and his carer have been injured
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during a suspected car jacking in east london. mr watson, who was left partially disabled after a fight in 1991, was dragged along the road in chingford as he tried to leave his car. sutton united will be aiming to pull off one of the biggest shocks in fa cup history tonight. having made it through to the fifth round for the first time ever, the non—league team will now welcome premier league giants arsenal to their tiny stadium at gander green lane. sutton's chairman says he can't wait to show off the club to tv audiences around the world. a huge media interest, worldwide. it's quite frightening, really, when you realise how many people are going to be watching this game live, all over the world. but it's such a unbelievable opportunity, for this very special football club. travel now. the tube is running well so far. no reported problems on any
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of those lines there, as you can see, at the moment. we have still only got one woolwich ferry running, because of mechanical problems. let's take a look at the a13, because we have already got queues heading into town from wennington. but we can end on some good news, at least. hammersmith bridge is open again. it was closed for the whole of last week of course for repairs. let's get the weather now, with kate kinsella. good morning. well, after a very mild weekend, we are in for a mild monday, but unfortunately that doesn't mean wall—to—wall sunshine. there is a lot of cloud around today, but yes, it is going to stay very mild. now, the chances are you may get a spot of rain first thing, but most places dry. the cloud quite thick, but through the afternoon the cloud could thin, and if you get a burst of sunshine the temperatures could rise that little higher. but widely, 15 or maybe 16 celsius as a maximum is pretty warm for february. now, tonight, of course, the fa cup fifth round, sutton united versus arsenal. it is looking dry at the moment, may get a spot of rain, but cloudy, and it is still going to stay mild. now, further through the night, spots of rain arriving,
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and also some light, patchy rain as we head through the early hours of tomorrow morning. that is likely to last through to tuesday. but the minimum temperature, it is staying mild. it is barely dropping, ten or 11 celsius. so another mild, if a little damp start to tuesday. now, the rain will gradually start to fizzle out as we head through the course of the day. it is going to stay rather cloudy, though. quite breezy, as well, as we head through tuesday afternoon. that mild air staying with us, between 13 and 15 celsius for tuesday. now, through the rest of the week, we are hanging on to the cloud. gradually, though, the temperature will start to get a little bit cooler. but in the meantime, we are still up double figures. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it is back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. the uk has the worst traffic congestion in europe, with some drivers spending a total of three days a year stuck in tailbacks during peak periods.
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that's according to research from the travel information company, inrix, which found that congestion followed by manchester and then aberdeen. the department for transport says it's investing record amounts to keep the country moving. we'll hear from two traffic experts atjust after 8am this morning on what they think should be done to ease congestion on our roads. thanks for all your suggestions, we'll get to those a little later as well. council tax rises are planned by most local authorities in england in the coming year to help meet the increasing cost of social care. the government says extra money is being put into social care and councils will soon be able to keep all the money they raise from council tax and business rates. but the local government association who represent councils say deep cuts will still have to be made to other services as the cost of care for the elderly and disabled will account for all of the extra money raised.
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nearly all local authorities have taken the opportunity to raise the aduu taken the opportunity to raise the adult social care precept and raise council tax. it does not surprise me, there's been a united voice of local government to say they need to have more funding into social care and that the crisis in social care is immediate now. the funding for local government needs to be resolved immediately. the house of lords will get its first chance to debate the so—called brexit bill later, the legislation which kicks off the formal process for britain leaving the eu. the bill passed through the commons unamended, but it's thought opposition peers will seek guarantees about the rights of eu citizens in britain and the role of parliament in scrutinising brexit. the nhs is at breaking point as the number of overnight hospital beds continue to decline, that's the warning from the british medical association. its research, based
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on official statistics, said the number of beds in england fell by a fifth between 2006 and 2016. but department of health officials have disputed some of the report's key findings, insisting changes in the way data is recorded means historic and current figures cannot be compared. iraqi government forces have resumed their offensive to regain the last major stronghold of so—called islamic state in iraq. thousands of troops are involved in the assault on western mosul, which is now in its second day. last month, the iraqi government forces secured the eastern part of the city after weeks of fighting. some important bee news for you this morning. researchers have discovered that the insects make a ridiculously cute noise when they bump into each other. let's have a listen. excuse me, excuse me, coming
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through! it sounds a bit like ducks quacking. it is a high-pitched little crack. —— quack. this sound, identified by scientists at nottingham trent university, is made when bees accidentally collide with other bees in the hive. it's made when they vibrate their wing muscles and it can't be heard by human ears, only with a special microphone. that's why we can hear it now. it's interesting, i want to know the noise a wasp makes when he stings you. we know the sound we make! have some of that! ouch! coming up on the programme, carol will be here later. i don't think wasps speak when they do it! you've been watching too many cartoons! do it! you've been watching too many cartoons! i think i do it! you've been watching too many cartoons! i think! probably do it! you've been watching too many cartoons! i think i probably have! i'll be talking about the fa cup. i'm not sure that was the right word for the bee noise. it was apologetic, wasn't it? they will be
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cheering hopefully, lincoln city, they know who they have in the next round of the fa cup. non—league sutton united take centre stage in the fa cup when they take on arsenal tonight for the last remaining place in the fa cup quarter—finals. it will be on an artificial pitch. i know you're going to that game, dan! and whoever wins tonight will play the big winners from this weekend, lincoln city for a place in the semi—finals. while tottenham hotspur and manchester united came through yesterday. united had to come from behind to beat championship side blackburn rovers 2—1 with zlatan ibrahimovic scoring the winner. united now go to manager jose mourinho's former club chelsea in the quarterfinals. they had brilliant attitude and if we didn't have this professional attitude with everybody playing with focus and responsibility, we would be in real trouble. he does say focus there in case
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you're wondering! harry kane scored a hat—trick against fulham yesterday. the england striker says the win will also help them later this week when spurs attempt to come back from 1—0 down in the europa league against belgian side gent. winning games, it gives you confidence so we go into thursday now, coming off this result, and we'll buzzing to go out at wembley. we're looking forward to it. you know, it is never easy in the fa cup as you see yesterday, with some of the results. we had to make sure we come here and done ourjob and we did that. aberdeen have strengthened their grip on second place in the scottish premiership after a late comeback against kilmarnock. aberdeen were a goal behind going into the last ten minutes before substitutes jayden stockley and peter pawlett scored to seal the victory. the result cuts celtic‘s lead at the top but they're still 24 points clear. dundee picked up theirfirst home league win over rangers for 25 years. goals from mark o'hara and kevin holt put them 2—0 up at half—time. rangers got a goal back but they were unable to find an equaliser.
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wigan have won the world club challenge series for a record fourth time. the series is between the best in the northern and southern hemispheres. a hat—trick from winger joe burgess helped wigan beat australian champions cronulla sharks 22—6. pleased with that. we've got widnes on friday, and i wanted us to perform really well. so i'm proud of the blokes. it's not the stuff, it's not the coaching stuff — the players have so much desire and shown such guts and determination to get these wins. this win is all for them. there was a surprise result in rugby union's premiership yesterday as leaders wasps lost to tenth place sale sharks. denny solomona scored a hat—trick for the sharks who inflicted wasps' third league defeat of the season. wasps remain six points clear at the top. elsewhere, newcastle beat northampton. late last night stuart bingham won the welsh open. he beatjudd trump 9—8 in the final frame to win the tournament
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for the first time. bingham had led 4—0 in the early stages before trump battled back to lead 8—7 in the evening session. but bingham held his nerve to take the final two frames, sealing his first welsh open win with a break of 55. i alluded to this in the last hour! at those world biathlon championship they had one of those anthem issues. this time it was for the russian national anthem. anthem starts. they all look a little bit confused. one of the tv commentators comes rushing in and says to stop and tells them to start singing. sing there were huge apologies. is one of those when you get handed a microphone and are made to sing in
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front of the public. not fun! terrible that they got the wrong anthem. it's happened a few times around the world at various different events. you should take your own cd i think! not a bad idea just in case. and learn the words to the national anthem, it's that second verse! very awkward. thank you very much. sepsis kills around 44,000 people in the uk every year, more than bowel, breast and prostate cancer combined. today, the uk sepsis trust will present a report to the director of nhs england calling for more to be done to save lives and money. we're joined now by doctor ron daniel from the charity, and by stephaniejennings who first developed the condition two years ago. lovely you see u—boats, thank you for coming on. whenever talk about sepsis, it's important we reiterate what it is —— you both. people are still a bit confused. so doctor,
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what is it? alouettes the way the body responds to infection, it is infection, it is triggered by an infection. it could be a cut or a bike but the immune system going into overdrive damages the body's organs —— cut or a bike. it can be life—threatening. organs —— cut or a bike. it can be life-threatening. stephanie. you had pneumonia and then you started feeling increasingly ill? -- bite. i contracted pneumonia in january, 2015. it felt like a normal cold but then i got the feeling something was seriously wrong. it got to the point where i felt i was dying and this was it, then i got it again in the middle of february because the pneumonia didn't clear completely. four months later, because of all the antibodies i had to clear the sepsis, it ravaged my bowl, they took the: away in may, 2015 which
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left me with a colostomy bag. —— the colon. you really went through it! when did they say it was sepsis? they didn't tell me for a long time in hospital, they were almost frightened to because of how ill i was. you can see the pictures, you we re was. you can see the pictures, you were extremely ill. absolutely. it was touch and go and i was told if i hadn't gone to the hospital the night i did i wouldn't be here. is that a problem many doctors find, it is hard to know the symptoms because it manifests itself in different ways, sepsis? it does, and we need to firstly heighten public awa reness, to firstly heighten public awareness, which we're doing today, but we need health officials to be thinking sepsis, it's a complicated condition to diagnose and health officials need to be on the lookout to get this right. officials need to be on the lookout to get this right. what should people and health officials be looking for? you said you felt like you were going to die, that's one of the things, when you feel that ill,
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that's on the list. absolutely, it is one of the six key symptoms. the context is, you've got an infection, you know what that feels like and you know what that feels like and you feel worse. you start to think sepsis, slurred speech, confusion, pain in the muscles and joints, not passing any hearing, a sense you're going to die and your skin changing colour and you're going to die. —— urinal. you talk about diagnosis and treatment, how do they tell? is it a simple blood test, how do they you've got it? it's a clinical diagnosis and that means we need a clinical expert assessing the patient, looking at a multitude of things, some will be blood tests and ordering a picture. if they get early treatment like you did it can make a difference to recovery? absolutely. we know there is a burden of survival if we get this wrong, people have psychological and physical problems, something
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relatively difficult to measure, like fatigue problems and that kind of thing. and this is included in the report, there's a huge economic cost as well as the human cost of sepsis because people can't go back to work quickly if we get it wrong. how long were you off work for?|j didn't go back to work for ten months, i retrained to do something else because i wasn't well enough physically and mentally, i couldn't get out of bed and the shock of being in intensive care was very harrowing. that cost, it's worth mentioning the figures, how much is it going to potentially cost the nhs? potentially to our economy it could be £16 billion a year and these estimates are conservative, it is at least £1 billion to £2 billion just for the nhs due to bed days in hospital. just for the nhs due to bed days in hospital. how are you now? i'm really well. thank you very much for coming in. carol has been talking
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about how my old things are, good morning. it is mild, these are the current temperatures. rhyl, edinburgh, belfast, birmingham, london, cardiff. these temperatures would be pretty good at maximum temperature time at this time of year, but for minimum, aberdeen at the moment is 13. the average at this time in february is freezing at this time of day. through the course of the day, the average temperatures again between round about nine and 12 celsius. but today we're looking at widely between 12 and 14, and locally we could see 16 or 17. tomorrow for some it will still be mild as you can see with the amber colours coming up. we're importing ourairat the colours coming up. we're importing our air at the moment, it's moist but not necessarily sunny from the caribbean which is why we're seeing the higher temperatures, tempered by the higher temperatures, tempered by the atlantic. a lot of cloud across our shores this morning and we have thicker cloud in the north—west,
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producing heavy rain in north—west scotla nd producing heavy rain in north—west scotland and that will go into northern ireland and as it continues its descent south—east across northern england and eventually northern england and eventually north wales, it will weaken. a windy start in the northern half of the country and for a time this morning particularly in the pennines and generally northern england. as we come south, although it's a cloudy, murky start to the day, it will remain fairly cloudy but some will see some breaks, more notably in parts of the south—east and where the sun comes out for any length of time, we could in parts of the south—east hit 16 or 17, as we could in parts of east or north—east wales away from the band of rain. rain clears northern ireland and scotland leaving clearer skies, some sunshine and showers but still a blustery day. across northern england we still have the rain sinking steadily south, as it will do through the night, getting in through much of wales and in through parts of the south—east but the heaviest rain
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will always be in the west. that's a weather front that will flip round and move north through the night. still mild in southern areas, cold in the north and we'll see snow above around 500 metres in the scottish mountains. tomorrow we start off with all this rain in wales, the midlands and the south—eastern corner. a lot of cloud around it as well, some hill fog but there will be some brighter breaks and then more rain in the north and west and gets into northern ireland. here it will be breezy. tomorrow in scotland, some temperatures will come down around four degrees compared to today but we still hang on to milder conditions in the south. then it does turn colder, or more like it should be for all of us as we head towards the middle and the end of this week. as we head towards the middle and the end of this weeklj as we head towards the middle and the end of this week. i rather enjoyed the mildness, though. 16% of working disabled people identify as being their own boss. that is slightly higher than in the non—disabled population. is this difference due to the flexibility that going it alone offers disabled people, or are disabled people pushed in to it through lack of opportunity?
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sean is finding out. it is all part of the disability works week across bbc news. look at the hashtag online or go to our to see more. just under half of working—age disabled people have a job, compared to more than 80% for those without a disability. self—employment is a particularly popular way for people living with a disability to get into the workforce. there are seven million people of working age in the uk who have a disability or a health condition, of which 500,000 are their own boss. is that a personal choice, or because too many businesses aren't supportive of those living with a disability? graeme whippy is an accessibility manager at open inclusion, and selina mills is from leonard cheshire disability. you work with employers to try and improve access to the workplace. think of us as the barrier removal
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people. we try to provide better customer service for disabled customers. we have seen quite a decent growth in that area of self—employment for people living with a disability. what do you think has been driving it? with a disability. what do you think has been driving it?|j with a disability. what do you think has been driving it? i think in the general population more people are starting their own companies anyway, so there is a general thing. but what is interesting is it is not that disabled people want to be entrepreneurs, it is that disability itself, and the barriers in the working world, have forced people to look at their own abilities. so problem—solving, resilience, flexibility, are great things if you are an entrepreneur. the two work well together so for some people, and it does depend on your character, it is a really good place to go and work for yourself. that sort of makes you think that businesses are missing out if... with so much talent there, that people are thinking it might be better to go their own way sometimes. absolutely, why on earth
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would you want to turn away as part of 20% of the working population when you are looking for someone to work for and you would need to spend thousands of pounds replacing that person, for people who become disabled. if you are a very small business and you hear the argument of how much cost it takes to make a place more suitable, it must be something you hear quite a bit. absolutely, but the truth is that employing a disabled person can often have no additional cost, or it can be very low cost. things like additional flexibility for working hours, it is not ramps and power doors and expensive stuff. often just very low adaptations to the workplace, and flexibility. is flexibility the strongest reason for people with disabilities to go down the self—employment route? people with disabilities to go down the self-employment route? no, absolutely not. if you have a great passion and idea you want to go after that idea whether you are disabled or not. people are people.
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but the thing that is really interesting is it gives you a sense of ownership. so you can really own your own project, and if you are lucky and it works and takes off, and some businesses don't, it is definitely a risk, you really have this chance to fulfil something you are passionate about and have financial independence. i wouldn't say it is just flexibility. financial independence. i wouldn't say it isjust flexibility. and it is not a general panacea. absolutely. if you have an intellectual disability, your chances of being employed are reduced to one in seven. we need to reduced to one in seven. we need to reduce the barriers that are stopping those people from getting full—time employment. stopping those people from getting full-time employment. what is the biggest barrier? if you are a business out there and listening to this, and! business out there and listening to this, and i am going to come out of it with one thing. firstly, i am missing a trick. doesn't matter if you are a small business owner or a big company, there is value in employing disabled people because they bring different kinds of ideas,
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just like people from any other different perspective. and if people can not have low expectations, not make assumptions, see the person, not the disability. and you can follow it all week on the hashtag disability works. could the uk soon boldly be going where it has never been before? detailed plans to create the country's first spaceports, which are like airports, but for rockets, are being unveiled today. they could see commercial satellites being launched within three years, and even lead to the start of space tourism. ministers want to grab a share of an industry that is potentially worth billions of pounds, and john maguire is in cornwall for us, at a site they are hoping will become mission control. from glasgow prestwick airport, destinations include barcelona, malta and rome. but soon there will be another one — space. the number one target is to see the first launch from the uk by 2020. for a burgeoning and already very successful space industry,
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worth £250 million, this is a crucial piece in the jigsaw, and could be in place soon. to start with, it will actually be rockets flying under an aircraft, for the first few years, so it won't be that different from watching an ordinary aircraft take off. but obviously, in the fullness of time, we would expect that to be a proper rocket taking off, and with wings that can be deployed and able to land again. to be classified as a spaceport, sites will need to be licensed. they won't need to undergo major works, but will have to be able to refuel rockets. the vast majority of takeoffs will be horizontal, rather than vertical. the carrier aircraft will climb to around 40,000 feet, so above the weather, above traditional air traffic... inside the rocket will be small satellites. for the businesses involved, this is the chance of a lifetime. we find ourselves with this fantastic opportunity.
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nobody in the us is doing this, nobody in europe is doing it, nobody around the world is doing it, and the uk can capture this enormous economic potential, and get way ahead of the market. and lift—off of the falcon 9 to the space station. once the exclusive playground of the superpowers, space is more accessible than ever, and the government wants the uk to take a bigger slice of the pie. now, the economic benefits of hosting a spaceport are very enticing. at the aerospace park over there, they already employ about 3,000 people, and it is believed that they could take on another 2,000 in this area if a spaceport comes to prestwick. the benefits uk—wide of housing this next generation of aerospace travel, well, they are even more significant. and, here at oxfordshire, they are developing the next generation of aerospace engines, capable of flying at five times the speed of sound in the atmosphere, and of spaceflight. the air—breathing sabre rocket engines would revolutionise travel. london to the stars in hours.
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it could really transform aerospace. there has been a significant gap since the last big development and this one. but this is potentially the closest we are going to get to the whittle jet engine moment in our lifetime. but first, the commercial spaceport will launch satellites, and could bring zero—gravity flights to the uk. then, ultimately, even space tourism. the opportunities are huge, and not even the sky is the limit. john is in cornwall for us now at a site which hopes to be mission control. so many questions. when are
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you going into space? when am i going into space? good question. it could be much safer down here, no one can hear you scream, could be much safer down here, no one can hear you scream, is the good thing about space. these antennas will hopefully become mission control, as you say, and they will be able to track the spacecraft. we have talked about business and we will talk about the science. we have natasha stevens and tim parry. what is the big benefit of us launching satellites from the uk rather than what we do now, which is go to other missions around the world? what we do now, which is go to other missions around the world7m what we do now, which is go to other missions around the world? it is important to remember that those big international missions will still exist as collaborations because we're not about rockets and orbital missions from a vertical launch. it is the small—scale satellite which will be going up. it will be at a faster pace, which is important for the british industry. we will see technological and engineering developments being able to be tested a lot quicker because they will not have to piggyback on those big missions, a launch window of the ring much larger. it is quite an
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important thing to keep going forward with the developments —— something much larger. and what excites you about the potential? the idea of using these microsatellites as test technology for missions in my field, in astrophysics, to get above the atmosphere, the wavelengths we can't see from the ground and get rid of the turbulent atmosphere which spoils our observations from the ground and do them in space, it will be an opportunity for uk science. to talk to both of you, and a lot of the time we talk about these things, and they seem like far—flung dreams. in terms of the amount of time involved, this will become a reality if all goes according to plan and just a few years' time. are you going to go? i am ready to broaden my horizons. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news.
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i'm sonja jessup. sutton united will be aiming to pull off one of the biggest shocks in fa cup history tonight. having made it through to the fifth round for the first time ever, the non—league team will now welcome premier league giants arsenal to their tiny stadium at gander green lane. sutton's chairman says he can't wait to show off the club to tv audiences around the world. a huge media interest, worldwide. it's quite frightening, really, when you realise how many people are going to be watching this game live, all over the world. but it's such a unbelievable opportunity, for this very special football club. david norris, who murdered the black teenager stephen lawrence in a racist attack in 1993, is suing the government. it is thought norris, who is serving a life sentence, is seeking thousands of pounds in compensation after he was allegedly attacked at belmarsh prison in south—east london.
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his lawyers claim he was put at risk by being moved to a part of belmarsh with black inmates. the former boxer michael watson and his carer have been injured during a suspected car jacking in east london. mr watson, who was left partially disabled after a fight in 1991, was dragged along the road in chingford as he tried to leave his car. travel now. the tube is running well so far. no reported problems on any of those lines there, as you can see, at the moment. we have still only got one woolwich ferry running, because of mechanical problems. this is how the m4 is looking. it is slow heading into town as you come up tojunction 2 for brentford. but we can end on some good news, at least. hammersmith bridge is open again. it was closed for the whole of last week of course for repairs. let's get the weather now, with kate kinsella. good morning. well, after a very mild weekend, we are in for a mild monday, but unfortunately that doesn't mean wall—to—wall sunshine. there is a lot of cloud around today, but yes, it is going to stay very mild.
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now, the chances are you may get a spot of rain first thing, but most places dry. the cloud quite thick, but through the afternoon the cloud could thin, and if you get a burst of sunshine the temperature could rise that little higher. but widely, 15 or maybe 16 celsius as a maximum is pretty warm for february. now, tonight, of course, the fa cup fifth round, sutton united versus arsenal. it is looking dry at the moment, may get a spot of rain, but cloudy, and it is still going to stay mild. now, further through the night, spots of rain arriving, and also some light, patchy rain as we head through the early hours of tomorrow morning. that is likely to last through to tuesday. but the minimum temperature, it is staying mild. it is barely dropping, ten or 11 celsius. so another mild, if a little damp start to tuesday. now, the rain will gradually start to fizzle out as we head through the course of the day. it is going to stay rather cloudy, though. quite breezy, as well, as we head through tuesday afternoon. that mild air staying with us, between 13 and 15 celsius for tuesday. now, through the rest of the week, we are hanging onto the cloud. gradually, though, the temperature will start to get
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a little bit cooler. but in the meantime, we are still up double figures. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. she is hello. this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. gridlocked. a report finds the uk's roads are the most congested in western europe. researchers say some drivers are spending more than three days a year stuck in traffic, as they warn of a significant cost to the economy.
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good morning. it's monday 20th february. also this morning. almost every council in england is planning to put up taxes to help meet the cost of social care. angelina jolie talks exclusively to us about her new film set in cambodia, and for the first time, about her separation from brad pitt. it was a very difficult time, and... and we are a family, and we will always be a family. and we will get through this time, and hopefully be a stronger family for it. online retailer amazon has said it will create 5,000 new full—time jobs in britain this year. i'll have more on that in 15 minutes.
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can another non—league club make it to the quarterfinals of the fa cup? sutton united take on arsenal later. the winner will play lincoln. the holders manchester united will face chelsea next, after coming from behind to beat blackburn rovers yesterday. plans for the first uk commercial spaceport are progressing, the government wants flights by 2020. we are in goonhilly in cornwall where they will monitor the spacecraft. and we'll be joined by tv royalty. joanna lumley and jennifer saunders will be on the sofa as they celebrate 25 years of ab fab. and carol has the weather. good morning, the weather this week is topsy—turvy, a very mild day—to—day, cloudy with hill fog and some wet and windy conditions in the
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north. tomorrow is similar, then by the end of the week we will see some snow, thenit of the week we will see some snow, then it is milder by the weekend. more details in 15 minutes. good morning. let's set you up for the day by talking about traffic! the uk has the worst congestion in western europe, with some drivers spending an average of three days a year stuck in tailbacks during peak periods. this is according to the travel information company inrix. congestion is the most severe in london, followed by manchester, and then aberdeen. the department for transport says it's investing record amounts to keep the country moving, as jane—frances kelly reports. drivers across the uk who face the daily misery of trafficjams are losing notjust their patience but also time and money. unsurprisingly, london is the most congested city in the uk, with drivers spending more than three days every year stuck in traffic during rush—hour. manchester is the second worst, with motorists wasting 39 hours gridlocked during peak times. aberdeen is third, and perhaps
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surprisingly beats london as the hardest city to drive in and out of during rush—hour. research suggests businesses in cardiff suffer the most from congestion, based on the amount of tailbacks during the daytime. outside of london, part of the a1 southbound in belfast was found to be the most congested route in the uk. other than drivers getting frustrated behind the wheel, why is all this a problem? experts calculated that hold—ups cost the economy £31 billion last year, that's an average of nearly £1,000 per driver on things like fuel, being late for work and childcare. there's also more traffic on the roads because of a growth in online shopping. the department for transport said it's making the most extensive improvements to roads since the 1970s, investing a record £23 billion. but money may not be the only solution. researchers say, to stop us standing still, we need better traffic management, more flexible working
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and to consider the wider use of congestion charges. jane—frances kelly, bbc news. we'll hear from two traffic experts later this morning on what they think should be done to ease congestion on our roads. council tax rises are planned by nearly all of england's local authorities in the coming year. but the organisation that represents them is warning that deep cuts to services will still be needed. the local government association says social care services for the elderly and disabled are at breaking point, and will swallow up any extra money raised. here's our social affairs correspondent alison holt. this is social care in action. after several falls, maureen edwards is getting support to regain some independence and rebuild her confidence. she needs help each day, which allows her and her husband, mick, to cope in their own home. i'm very grateful for all that they've done for me,
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i really am and... without them, i don't know what i would have done. so, yeah, it's good, really good. councils fund most social care, and today's survey shows the majority of them struggling to meet growing costs. there are 151 local authorities in england. 147 plan to raise council tax specifically to help pay for social care. but councils warn that won't plug the funding gap, and that could mean cuts to other council services. there has been a united voice of local government to say that they need to have more funding into social care, and that the crisis in social care is immediate now. the funding for local government needs to be resolved immediately. the government says extra money is being put into social care and authorities will soon be able to keep all the money they raise from council tax and business rates. alison holt, bbc news.
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and you can see how much social care costs where you live by visiting the bbc news website. you can type in your postcode and discover how much it costs on average where you are. the house of lords gets its first chance to debate the so—called brexit bill later, the legislation which kicks off the formal process for britain leaving the eu. the bill passed through the commons unamended, but it's thought opposition peers will seek guarantees about the rights of eu citizens in britain, and the role of parliament in scrutinising brexit. our political correspondent tom bateman is in westminster. good morning, it's likely to get quite a lot of scrutiny. it will be a busy time in the house of lords. more than 190 is due to speak, a record numberfor any debate in that gives you a sense of the
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desired they have to scrutinise and talk about the brexit process and the bill that passed to them from the bill that passed to them from the house of commons. they will not try to stop it but me tried to change the bill, add amendments about eu citizens's rights, now, what about the government? they have urged them not to meddle with the bill, to get it through parliament as quickly as possible. when mr having said beasley peers should do that picture at its duty and respect the will of the people. —— the prime minister having said that peers should do its parliamentary duty. the nhs is at breaking point, as the number of overnight hospital beds continue to decline. that's the warning from the british medical association. its research, based on official statistics, said the number of beds in england fell by a fifth
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between 2006 and 2016. but department of health officials have disputed some of the report's key findings, insisting changes in the way data is recorded means historic and current figures cannot be compared two senior ukip officials have resigned in protest at their leader's handling of the hillsborough controversy. paul nuttall has been embroiled in a row after his website incorrectly claimed he'd lost close friends in the tragedy. in a statement, the chair of ukip's merseyside branch condemned mr nuttall‘s "unprofessional approach and crass insensitivity", and suggested there could be more resignations on the way. donald trump has been back on twitter. this time to clear up comments he made at a rally over the weekend. speaking to supporters in florida about immigration, he appeared to suggest there had been some sort of terror attack in sweden on friday, but left many people confused because no attack had taken place. you look at what's happening last night in sweden — sweden!
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who would believe this? sweden! they took in large numbers and they are having problems like they never thought possible. he tweeted the following day, saying, it was "in reference to a story that was broadcast on fox news concerning immigrants and sweden". the swedish embassy responded saying they look forward to advising mr trump's administration about swedish immigration and integration policies. angelina jolie has spoken for the first time about her separation from brad pitt, in an exclusive interview with the bbc. the actor and director has been filming in cambodia, the country where she adopted her son maddox in 2002. she's been speaking to our reporter yalda hakim. i'm here because 17 years ago i came to this country and fell in love with its people and learned about its history and in doing so realised how little i actually knew in my early 20s about the world so this country for me has been...
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was my awakening and my son changed my life. do you think that in many ways you have come full circle? you know, your humanitarian work started here, you became a mother here, that perhaps this is some sort of crossroads for you and it's come back here? yeah. i will always... i will always be very grateful to this country and i hope... i hope i have given back as much as it has given me. i don't think i ever could give back as much as this country has given me. i understand this is a very sensitive issue. we know that an incident occurred which led to your separation, we also know you have not said anything about this but would you like to say something? uh... only that...
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i don't want to say very much about that except to say it was a very difficult time and... and we are a family and we will always be a family and we will get through this time and hopefully be a stronger family for it. you can see the full interview with angelina jolie on the bbc news website. thank you for being with us on this monday morning. trafficjams are the source of misery for millions of motorists. and, as more of us take to the roads, there's an increased need for new ways to cut congestion. as we've been hearing, the uk is the worst country in europe for tailbacks. but we're also at the forefront of trialling solutions like smart motorways which use the hard shoulder as an extra lane. let's have a look at the kind of congestion we're talking about. this is the m4 near
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brentford right now. just look at that slow—moving traffic. we're joined now by motoring campaigner quentin willson, and colin bamford, professor of transport and logistics at huddersfield university. good morning. lots of people who are going out today will not be surprised by these figures. colin, why is it we have such bad traffic? the bottom line is we have basically too many cars and too many people using their cars, often unnecessarily. that is in order to make short trips when, in fact, they could either walk, cycle or use other modes of transport. it is interesting this week with it being the school half—time the degree of congestion in many places will be considerably less than it would otherwise be during school term
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time. let us talk about solutions, what should be done? the reason we have this congestion in europe, we are 27th in the road network league of the world which is shocking, is because we have historically under invested in roads. a report is published on wednesday in front of the all— party parliamentary group saying £55 billion on a railway that goes nowhere when we should be spending this on roads is an act of folly. if you want to know the reasons for congestion, we have not spent enough on roads over a long period. government would argue there is money being spent on roads, and smart motorways make a difference. they do, but the money apportioned in the autumn statement is too small. if we carry on, we will be looking ata if we carry on, we will be looking at a cost to uk society of £307
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billion in terms of congestion in the next 15 years, reducing productivity, competitiveness, add quality, the cost to the nhs from pollution will be seismic. we need a joined up strategy. you cannot say, give up cars. 83% of all journeys on our roads are by cars. what is the alternative? if we went on public transport tomorrow morning, it would be broken by the afternoon. a department for transport spokesman said, we are making extensive improvement is to roads since the 19705, £23 improvement is to roads since the 1970s, £23 billion. the crux seems to be how to keep the traffic flowing. the 20 years we have had an anti—car rhetoric, roads being narrowed, more traffic lights. it is not difficult to understand how to make roads slow and takeaway pinch points. spending
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£55 billion minimum on a row away when you should be opening up the roads so we don't get congestion is, to me, the way ahead —— on a railway. iaman railway. i am an economist and in my view, what is required is a radical overhaul of the way in which we charge motorists and other road users are using the network. congestion charges? how would you make them pay? various ways. the most extensive scheme is one in singapore whereby it is pay—as—you—go. in london, the congestion charge is seen as a way of reducing the volume of congestion. in singapore there was a lot of support for that cause. i think in manchester they threw the opportunity of the congestion charge and 85% of the people said no
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thanks. we're in a situation where we need a radical re—think about the way in which we tackle the congestion problems. the report that you referred to in the news bulletin also talked about homeworking and there maybe a way in which employers... you need connectivity of broadband across the country and we don't have that either. we don't pay vehicle ex—excise duty and consumers will not buy road charging unless it is like the continental model where we invest it in roads. if you look at the netherlands they're very if you look at the netherlands they‘ re very close to if you look at the netherlands they're very close to introducing they're very close to introducing the national system of road users charging. the problem with the way in which we pay to use roads is that the prices are all to pot. where someone the prices are all to pot. where someone is using the road in a peak period in effect they're not paying
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what is seen as adequate to use that road. on trains you pay more for travelling at a peak period. that's right. lots of you making the point. lorraine says, "public transport woeful and expensive unless you live in london." stewart says there is nothing to public information. allow drivers to turn left on red traffic lights and mike says maybe more flexible working times, car sharing and road works could be done more efficiently. the only thing i want to say is good luck on yourjourneys today. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. this picture was taken in cheshire. durham 13 celsius, belfast 12
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celsius, london 11 celsius and cardiff ten celsius. is this mild weather going to last? well, it will last today and tomorrow, but look how the day changes. as we go through the middle of the week and towards the end of the week the blues replace the milder yellows, but it is only temporarily, but when we see the blues some of us will see snow. by the time we get into the weekend, mild air starts to come across our shores. there is some rain across scotland which is heavy. if you're travelling there will be excess spray around. it will continue into northern england and northern ireland. it is windy. windy across northern ireland and scotland and fora time across northern ireland and scotland and for a time this morning across the north of england. we could have gusts of 50mph. further south, we're starting off on quite a grey note. a lot of cloud around. hill fog, misty and murky conditions. into the afternoon, we hang on to a lot of
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cloud, but here and there, we will see brighter breaks and somewhere in the south—east this afternoon, could hit 16 celsius, possibly 17 celsius. here is our weather front across wales and northern england, moving out of northern ireland. so some cooler conditions following, but good temperatures for the time of year. sunshine and the same for scotland. brighter skies, a wee bit cooler and windy and still showers. through the evening and overnight, our band of rain sinks further south into the midlands, also through wales, towards the south—west, weakening as it does so. so we won't see a lot initially in the south east, but it pivots and it starts to reverse and go north again and that will mean it will be rejuvenate. behind it, colder. cold enough for wintry showers above 500 meters, we will see snow in the scottish mountains. tomorrow, here is our band of rain across england and wales. a lot of cloud around, breezy, some breaks in the cloud. still mild. further north, we have got hill fog, but there will be
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brea ks got hill fog, but there will be breaks as well. then we've got rain coming into the north—west. a merger taking place here, but not quite. as we head on into wednesday, we still have our rain ensconced across parts of england and wales. another band coming in from the north, but note the difference in temperatures, dan and lou. we normally talk about mergers in the business news, but there you go, carol! tonight, arsenal take on non—league side sutton united in the 5th round of the fa cup, which means the gunners will be up against the lowest—ranked team left in the competition. let's see how the two compare. sutton are 17th in the national league. arsenal sit fourth in the premier league. that means there's 105 places between them. arsenal are no strangers to fa cup glory. they've won the trophy 12 times. sutton have never won the tournament, but this is the furthest they've ever got in the competition. the game is on sutton's plastic pitch at gander green lane, their ground which can
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fit 5,000 people. that's compared to arsenal's 60,000 capacity emirates stadium. sutton will have to watch out for alexis sanchez if he's picked for the arsenal line—up. he's their highest scorer with 20 goals this season. sutton's highest goal scorer is team captain jamie collins, who has racked up seven. he's also a part—time builder. we're joined by sutton's chairman bruce elliot and the town's mp paul scully. good morning to you gentlemen. we can see the plastic pitch behind you there. it is lovely to have you on there. it is lovely to have you on the programme. bruce, i know you've spent weeks being interviewed talking about this wonderful run that the team have been on. how are you feeling about tonight? this is arsenal who in their last game played bayern munich and here they come to beganeder green lane to take on sutton united? good morning, dan. it is surreal. we have had three
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weeks of build—up and personally i'm relieved that the day has now come! we're looking forward to hopefully what will be a very special evening for sutton united football club tonight. paul, how have the town been preparing? we were there for football focus before the leeds game and the wimbledon match as well and imean, you and the wimbledon match as well and i mean, you often say well, there is anticipation, but sutton have been there on numerous occasions already this season? 0h, absolutely. there is this season? 0h, absolutely. there isa this season? 0h, absolutely. there is a real big atmosphere. the council have got the sutton flag flying. the town has got the posters and flags. there is a buzz for the big match atmosphere. in terms of your dreams this season, bruce, when your dreams this season, bruce, when you were planning out the season, what did you estimate for the fa cup? well, our ambition each year is to reach the first round proper of the fa cup. that's the target. so the
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fa ct fa cup. that's the target. so the fact that we've managed to get as far as the fifth round is something very special and obviously it is the first time for this football club that we got that far and we're delighted that lincoln got through against burnley and two non—league clu bs against burnley and two non—league clubs at this stage of the fa cup and if by any chance we could get through tonight, and those two non—league sides will be playing each other for non—league sides will be playing each otherfor a non—league sides will be playing each other for a place non—league sides will be playing each otherfor a place in the semifinals. that's the state i'm in, you see, three weeks of complete mayhem, i don't know what round it will be if we got through. so i think we'll worry about that after tonight! i was going to ask you about the draw. i know you have got to get past arsenal. were you happy with the draw which means if you're there, there will be a non—league side in the semis, or would you have preferred a side like manchester united or chelsea ? preferred a side like manchester united or chelsea? if i'm being honest, it don't like the draw being before you know whether you got
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through. i prefer to know whether you're going to be playing in the next round, but yeah, i mean, look, i think linkoning, they are probably hoping that arsenal win so they can go to the emirates. my preference would have been chelsea or manchester united away, but i think we've got a lot to worry about tonight before we dreaming anymore. paul, you have been a fan for a long time. those who know their history will remember sutton's name being involved in this competition for many years, the win over coventry city in the 80s, but if it goes your way, that would eclipse even that moment, wouldn't it? oh, it certainly would. i wasn't at the ground, iwas certainly would. i wasn't at the ground, i was on the train outside the ground listening to the cheers as matt hanlon scored his goal and the final whistle went in 1989. this is the biggest day in the club's history and it couldn't happen to a nicer bunch of guys. they do so much
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for the community and bruce and so many of the others are volunteers, but they really work with the kids and with wider community groups and that's why all of those people are behind the club here today. well, it is great to talk to you, have a fantastic evening and i will see you later. i have got my tickets. we look forward to seeing you later. we've got the giraffe ready for you! for those of you who don't know what that's about, the giraffe is a mascot. they have got a full sized giraffe, notan mascot. they have got a full sized giraffe, not an actual giraffe! it's a stuffed giraffe. that's the mascot of sutton united. good morning. it wasn't on for very long, but now the deal is off. the american food company kraft heinz wanted to buy the british—dutch company unilever, but not anymore. the take—over would have been worth £115 billion combining familiar brands from unilever‘s ben and jerry's and marmite, to kraft heinz‘s baked beans
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and philadelphia cheese. online retail giant amazon has said it will create 5,000 new full—time jobs in the uk this year. it said it was looking for a range of staff from software developers to warehouse workers. the recruitment will take amazon's workforce in the uk to more than 24,000. single malt scotch whisky has topped £1 billion worth of exports for the first time last year, reflecting a return to growth for exports of scotch more widely including blends. that's it for now. it's time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. a mild start to the week across all parts of the british isles but at a price. the mild airfrom the atla ntic price. the mild airfrom the atlantic bringing all of this cloud. sunshine is a premium product in the
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first half of monday. a cloud sitting very low over the welsh hills, the south—west and south—east. murky for a time before that moves away to the channel. further north, thicker cloud again across northern ireland and the far north of england. scotland as well. the eastern side of scotland not so much in the way of cloud. but watch out for the winds, over the pennines, 50 miles an hour. until the rain moves further south, brighter skies to finish off the afternoon. very mild in the south, into the teens. keeping mild overnight across these southern areas as that frontal system continues to bring all of that moisture from the atlantic. a lot of cloud, is south—westerly breeze keeping temperatures up. further north, the skies were clear which means teachers could get close to
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zero. into tuesday, still that by the front bringing the threat of rain across the midlands, western england and wales. further north, a new area of cloud, rain and strong winds moving back in. a fresher feel. temperature is not as high as monday. but still good for the time of year. tuesday and wednesday, very wet and windy across the northern pa rt wet and windy across the northern part of scotland, guts of 70 miles an hour. further south, staying mild, wetand an hour. further south, staying mild, wet and windy. this is business live from bbc news, with ben bland and sally bundock. hands across the water. america's vice president meets european leaders in brussels, as the future of trade relations remains shrouded in uncertainty. live from london, that's our top story on monday the 20th of february. the us and europe are the world's biggest trade blocs.
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but tensions between the two sides have been rising. we'll assess what's at stake. also in the programme. the world's biggest potential takeover gets canned. us food giant kraft heinz now says it won't buy its rival unilever.
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