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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  February 24, 2017 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello. this is breakfast with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. an historic by—election win for the conservatives as they gain copeland from labour. harrison trudy lim, 13,748. in the first by—election win by a governing party for more than 30 years, trudy harrison takes the cumbrian constituancy with a majority of more than 2,000. in stoke, labour keep their seat. ukip leader paul nuttall coming a distant second. we're live in both constituencies this morning and we have the latest reaction from the parties involved. good morning. it's friday, the 24th of february. also this morning: shock as leicester city sack their premiership—winning manager. it's no happy ever after for
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the fairytale of leicester city or claudio ranieri, as the manager who masterminded the most unlikely of premier league titles is dropped by the club. good morning. after weeks of front page campaigns and political protest, the government has promised help for thousands of companies facing sharp increases in the amount they pay in business rates. storm doris brought us near misses like this, and disruption to roads, rail and air travel. as many people try to complete their journeys, nick has the details on what the weather's going to do next. yes, good morning. storm doris is gone. it is cold and calm this morning. many places will be dry. it will turn letter later. it is nowhere near as nasty as storm doris. i will be back with the full forecast. good morning.
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first, our main story. "a truly historic victory" — the words of new conservative mp trudy harrison after taking the labour seat of copeland in last nights by—election, the first gain by a governing party since 1982. in the night's other result labour did hold on to stoke central, with ukip leader paul nuttall finishing in second place. here's our political correspondent tom bateman. harrison, trudy. the conservative party candidate, 13700 and 48. voters chose a labour mp for the last 80 years. it all changed in a dramatic night as the conservatives w011 dramatic night as the conservatives won by 2000 votes. what has happened tonight is a truly historic event. you would have to go back more than a century to find an example of a governing party taking a seat from the opposition party in an election
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like this. labour said the vote was ona like this. labour said the vote was on a knife edge. in the aftermath of defeat the departing candidate tries not to face questions. this is a moment in history. the first time a conservative has represented the area since the 1930s. and for them tonight, jubilation. serious questions for labour underjeremy corbyn. it took place after the resignation of a labour mp critical ofjeremy corbyn‘s leadership. theresa may may be rare move of visiting a by—election seat vacated by an opposition mp. it was a ha rdfoug ht by an opposition mp. it was a hardfought campaign of the nuclear jobs and hospital services. the result leaves labour assessing its electoral prospects. but there was better news for labour in the by—election in stoke—on—trent, and other traditional seat for the party. they held on with a reduced majority. the people of
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stoke—on—trent when provided with a range of candidates have opted a labour candidate and me as a member of parliament. this campaign has been about many issues. while there might have been a slight decrease in oui’ might have been a slight decrease in our share of the vote, turnout was down on the last election, but i am happy with the result this evening. this by—election was a test for ukip ina this by—election was a test for ukip in a heavenly working—class area. it has increased its vote share. it was a bitter campaign during which the ukip leader attempted to fend off mounting personal criticism. ukip's time will come. this will happen. hang on. hang on. this seat was number 72 on hang on. hang on. this seat was number72 on our hang on. hang on. this seat was number 72 on our hit list. a lot more will happen. there is a lot more will happen. there is a lot more to come. we are not going anywhere. i am more to come. we are not going anywhere. iam not more to come. we are not going anywhere. i am not going anywhere. so we move on. there will be jubilation for theresa may at the resort in copland. jeremy corbyn
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promised he would reconnect with voters. he might have to try inspired offer the opposition for his own mps. so let's just take a closer look at those results for the copeland by—election. it was a conservative gain for trudy harrison with 13,748 votes. labour's gill troughton received 11,601. the liberal democrats' rebecca hanson got 2,252 votes. and ukip's fiona mills received 2,025 votes. we can now speak to our political correspondent tom bateman who is in whitehaven for us this morning. so, the conservatives have said it isa so, the conservatives have said it is a truly historic victory. how significant is it? i think it is an astonishing moment because you have to go so many years back to find a tory mp who represented this area. the last tory before trudy harrison was born in the 1870s. that gives you a sense ofjust how dominant
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labour has been in this area. and why, of course? we are talking about that. normally at a by—election we would be talking about the governing party given a pummelling by voters. that is how it normally goes. it is rare to have this turn of events when an opposition party is defending a seat it has vacated and to lose it. yet it has happened overnight. first of all i think there is going to be some happy faces in downing street this morning. theresa may will be jubilant. she visited in a rare move last week. and it raises questions forjeremy corbyn‘s leadership. we have heard him say since the result labour will reconnect with voters. the difficulty is he must do that knowing that many of his own mps will use this to continue to argue the case perhaps privately and increasingly in public again that they believe he is an electoral
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liability for the party. thank you very much. and just after 7am this morning we'll be speaking to the shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell about the results. leicester city has sacked manager claudio ranieri just nine months after he led the clubs to its first premier league title. the foxes are only one point above the relegation zone with 13 matches left. 0ur sports editor dan roan has more. he masterminded one of sport's greatest miracles, but less than a year after claudio ranieri's leicester city became the most unlikely premier league winners ever, the man who achieved the dream has been dismissed. leicester city are the premier league champions! last season's celebrations have turned to fears of relegation. having swept all before them, this season having swept all before them, this season of the euphoria evaporated. and with leicester languishing one point above the relegation zone the clu b
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point above the relegation zone the club decided to act. in a statement the chairman said... managerial loyalties are notoriously short in supply in the premier league but given what ranieri achieved many will be dismayed. former leicester star gary lineker described it as... ranieri's last game in charge was a 2—1 defeat against sevilla in the last 16 of the champions league. the managers seemingly unaware of his fate when he spoke after the match. we know, we know they are better than us, very high quality team, highly experienced team, everything, 0k. but we have a very big part, and a very big effort, we help each other. and i think we deserve this.
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very big effort, we help each other. and i think we deserve thism very big effort, we help each other. and i think we deserve this. it is le i ceste r‘s and i think we deserve this. it is leicester's poor performances in the premier league that could see them become only the second english champions in history to see a title defence and in relegation and it is that which ultimately cost ranieri hisjob. their memories of that which ultimately cost ranieri his job. their memories of what he achieved will always be cherished but the fairytale is now over. malaysian police say they have found the highly toxic nerve agent, vx, on the face of kim jong—nam, the murdered half brother of north korea's leader. vx is the most toxic of the chemical warfare agents, and just a drop on the skin can kill in minutes. cctv footage shows two women briefly holding something over kim jong nam's face while he was preparing to board a flight at kuala lumpur airport last week. donald trump has said he wants to expand america's nuclear arsenal. in his first comments on the issue since taking office, the president said america had, "fallen behind on nuclear weapon capacity," and must be,
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"top of the pack." police investigating the escape of a convicted murdererfrom custody have arrested two people on suspicion of assisting an offender. merseyside police detained a 27—year—old man and a 26—year—old woman in liverpool in connection with shaun walmsley‘s escape. walmsley, who is 28, went on the run when two men armed with a knife and a gun confronted prison officers guarding him at aintree university hospital on tuesday afternoon. the clear—up continues this morning after storm doris battered much of the uk leaving one woman dead after being hit by flying debris. winds of up to 94mph caused power cuts and travel chaos as flights were grounded and train services disrupted. drivers are being warned to be wary of ice on the roads in the north of the country. 0ur correspondent nick quraishi is at london euston where many services were cancelled. what's the latest? we are told things will get back to
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normal today. services were suspended for several hours yesterday. things started running around 5pm but obviously there was huge backlog. the station stayed open overnight to cater for many stranded passengers. people are being told they can use tickets which they didn't use yesterday this morning and tomorrow. similar situations down the road at king's cross and st pancras. there were wins of 94 mph, there were trees on the line and even a shed in nuneaton on the west coast main line. —— winds. with the strong winds, it brought the death of a 29—year—old woman in wolverhampton city centre. she was walking past starbucks and this masonry fell on her, something the size of a copy to help could be seen the size of a copy to help could be seen being taken away. west midlands police and wolverhampton city
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council investigated in. and a schoolgirl is in a life—threatening condition we understand after a ceiling at a sports hall in milton keynes fell on her. two other women we re keynes fell on her. two other women were injured, a woman in her 60s when a carport fell on her and a man in victoria station in london. 0n the roads, many drivers had a lucky escape. 0ne driving instructor, in fa ct, escape. 0ne driving instructor, in fact, a tree fell in front of him as he was driving. problems started in scotla nd he was driving. problems started in scotland on the m80 with snow and there was no escape for air travellers too. passengers on a flight travellers too. passengers on a flight in down to manchester had a bumpy landing. and heathrow and aer lingus cancelled flights. 24,000 homes in northern ireland were without power. 40,000 in east anglia. this morning, the problem is forice anglia. this morning, the problem is for ice in northern ireland, scotla nd for ice in northern ireland, scotland and north—west england. thank you very much. it turns out the bee's knees are even better than we thought — it's been discovered bumblebees can
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teach each other how to score goals with a tiny ball, displaying a learning ability never before seen in insects. they surprised scientists by working out how to obtain a food reward simply by watching their neighbours. in the experiment, the bees were placed on a platform and had to roll a yellow ball to a specific location in order to obtain a sugar solution. those that observed the success of other bees were better at learning the task than those that didn't. laughter. why? who cares? it is more like bee curling. especially with bumble bee 11, buzzy izzard, in the
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bumble bee 11, buzzy izzard, in the b top bumble bee 11, buzzy izzard, in the btop 11. bumble bee 11, buzzy izzard, in the b top 11. you have been a busy bee. buzzy izzard once played for leicester. and another thing that we can't explain, this fairytale, this match made in heaven. there is no happy ending for claudio ranieri. it seems so happy ending for claudio ranieri. it seems so harsh. especially the timing. they put in a good performance away in seville. even jamie vardy scored! and then he was gone the next day. you would have to think they have something lined up their sleeves. there's no room for sentiment in football — the harsh reality is that in 2017 leicester have the worst record of any of the 92 football league clubs. no goals scored, and they've fallen tojust one place and one point above the relegation zone,
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and so the miracle man, claudio ranieri, has paid the ultimate price with hisjob. as for who takes over, fellow italian and former man city boss roberto mancini is an early front runner. elsewhere, tottenham's wembley woes struck again as they went out of the europa league to gent — they'd had england star dele alli sent off by the time the belgian side made it 2—all on the night to seal their place in the last 16. 3—2 on aggregate. flankerjon barclay will captain the scotland side to face wales in the six nations at murrayfield tomorrow. barclay, who plays his rugby in wales, will lead the team in the absence of the injured greig laidlaw. nice car! world champion constructors mercedes have unveiled their new car for the upcoming formula one season. hamilton said the car felt incredible.
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i will be back with leicester reaction later on. let's have a look at the weather. nick, a day yesterday. how does it look today? yesterday was completely horrible, todayis yesterday was completely horrible, today is a different story. this is a storm doris, well away from the uk now. it has been taking strong winds across germany into pollen but look how far away it is, how quickly it has moved. the uk this morning is finding itself in the gap between weather systems. it is colder this morning and there may be a risk of ice across parts of scotland and northern england but, more importantly, it is much calmer and many of us will see dry and sunny weather for a many of us will see dry and sunny weatherfor a time many of us will see dry and sunny weather for a time today here is the picture today. there may be a lot of cloud some patchy rain, sleet or snow across parts of scotland. we have a few early showers brushing the eastern coast of england. they will pull away to the north sea. 0ne 01’ will pull away to the north sea. 0ne or two on the breeze pushing through
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into the midlands. they will tend to die away but you concede a cloud this morning a lot of fine weather into southern england and notice, wherever you are um the strength of wind is down compared to yesterday. this is the picture through this morning. when you start with an early shower it will tend to fade. by early shower it will tend to fade. by midday nearly everyone is dry but there is another weather system coming into northern ireland, pushing and western ireland and this is going to bring not only wetter weather but freshening the wind again. nowhere near as messy as storm doris. temperatures around 5— 10 celsius. taking it through tonight there will be wet weather pushing through across the uk preceded by snow on the hills free time in scotland. gales develop again in north—west scotland. very little rain reaching southern england and it is a mild night to come because with this weather system coming in we have a flow of milder coming back into the uk. that is how we start the weekend and throughout the week and for most of us throughout the week and for most of us it will be on the mild side. it will be quite windy and there will
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be some rain around at times but not all the time. i will show you saturday now, so we can see what to expect, a windy start with outbreaks of rain spreading south eastwards. heavy as towards the hills of scotland, moving into cumbria. easing a little bit into the afternoon. brighter skies with a few showers. very little rain reaching south—east england. eastern areas generally not seeing as much rain as you would see further west. for part two of the weekend on sunday we see another weather system coming in taking outbreaks of rain south eastwards with the breeze as well. very little in the south—east england and notice that the temperatures for many of us are in two double figures. it will be calling to the start of next week. weather systems around this weekend, it will be unsettled but nothing like storm doris. that is how it looks. i think ithinka i think a lot of people will be pleased to hear that. it is 18 minutes past six o'clock. the main stories this morning— a shock defeat for labour — they lose their copeland seat stories this morning—
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seat for the first time in more than eighty years. the conservative victory is the biggest by a governing party for decades. in a separate election, labour hold onto their seat in stoke. ukip poll a distant second. warehouse people with us now for a look through the papers. letter look at the front pages first. main story on the front page of the daily mail, we we re on the front page of the daily mail, we were covering the story yesterday, the news that whirlpool, this is about tumble dryers in what the mail is calling the deathtrap tumble dryers. the information out from whirlpool is that they should not be used. if you have these particular tumble dryers, the fire risk now is so great that they should not be used recently. 0ver risk now is so great that they should not be used recently. over 15 months here at they have been saying that you could use them and keep an eye on them when they were in use. in the guardian this morning they pick up on the by—election results
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saying that labour saw off the challenge from ukip in stoke. the picture from yesterday, the storm yesterday which brought the worst weather of the winter. the met 0ffice referred to it as a weather bomb. from head to the daily mirror has the storm as well. cars crushed by trees and on the front page of the times as well. sean? many of the newspapers are covering john lewis cutting back on positions across the business. people in administration and customer restaurant, they will be consulted about their roles. a little bit of restructuring going on and we have heard a lot about that. a very nice picture in the telegraph of the royal mints, the new £1 coins. 12 sided, they will be. there isa coins. 12 sided, they will be. there is a nice pile of them. they are coming in in october. now, they will
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be steadily brought in and there will be a period where you can use both coins. after 0ctober, however, the new ones, the old ones will cease to be legal tender. the new ones, the old ones will cease to be legaltender. do the new ones, the old ones will cease to be legal tender. do you think they will have a secret thing on again so will be worth more? not at the moment, no. there is only 15 left. did you say 12 sided? what is that? dodecyl gone? sounds good. well, no surprise in the papers they are trying to make sense of why leicester have gotten rid of rainy area. the back page of the times blames the players. they forced him out, the special bond had gone and they had a meeting with the players in spain and it was the players that convinced the board that he should go. why do players never get the
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sack? they just get go. why do players never get the sack? theyjust get moved on. go. why do players never get the sack? theyjust get moved onm this a joke? sack? theyjust get moved onm this ajoke? no. they sack? theyjust get moved onm this a joke? no. they get moved on eventually but the manager pays the price first of all. the players are a collective, the manager is the one who got shot down. the other story is... there is a lot of anger about the players in the mail, saying the snakes, how could the snakes betray ranieri. the day the game lost its soul. it seems quite mean, does it? yes but in terms of form, there is only so much that fans can take full think very much. it is just coming up think very much. it is just coming up to 23 minutes past six. there are growing calls from patients, experts and nurses for better training and awareness of sickle cell disease. it's an inherited blood disorder that affects thousands of mostly african and caribbean people in the uk. during a so—called sickle cell crises or episode, red blood cells
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change shape, causing intense pain and organ damage. they can prove fatal. and as noel phillips reports, just having the condition can make other illnesses much worse. this boy was six when he died from organ failure, sepsis and sickle disease in 2015. hejust organ failure, sepsis and sickle disease in 2015. he just kept saying mum,i disease in 2015. he just kept saying mum, iwant disease in 2015. he just kept saying mum, i want to lie simone called emergency. 0ver mum, i want to lie simone called emergency. over the next hour his condition worsened. what happened on that day... i don't feel it was treated urgently enough when that person on the phone told me i would have to probably wait up to 45 minutes for an ambulance. in an ambulances and a rapid response unit we re ambulances and a rapid response unit were dispatched but then cancelled and sent to more urgent cases.
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shortly after paramedics arrived, the child went into cardiac arrest. i was the child went into cardiac arrest. iwasa the child went into cardiac arrest. i was a little bit panicked but i was not trying to show that i was panicked. but i was... it was serious then. lola is one of the country's most senior sickle cell nurses. you combine vomiting, diarrhoea, that the mother said the child had a fever. you can buy most things together with the fact that the child has sickle cell disease and that should be a trigger sufficient to say that that child needs attention. in a statement, the ambulance service apologise for the delay in getting to the child. the medical director added that over the last few years they had worked closely with the sickle cell society to improve care to patients. they regularly ordered the care they provide and sickle cell training is given to all ambulance crews.
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provide and sickle cell training is given to all ambulance crewsm provide and sickle cell training is given to all ambulance crews. it is like being stabbed while someone is pouring acid on you. this man is one of 15,000 people in britain living with sickle cell disease. it causes crippling pain but he claims he has had to wait hours in hospital for treatment. waiting in a cubicle for two plus hours. jo howard is a sickle cell consultant. in a recent report she says that staff shortages mean that patients are not getting the right care. patients should not be left in pain. patients should be treated within 30 minutes. i think thatis treated within 30 minutes. i think that is an absolutely reasonable thing that we should be doing for every patient. i think all trusts should be aiming to do that. every patient. i think all trusts should be aiming to do thatm every patient. i think all trusts should be aiming to do that. it is swelling up. i have had to teach the doctors about it. lavinia has been living with the disease for 30 yea rs. living with the disease for 30 years. the understanding and the korea is not there. nurses don't
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learn while they are training, they learn while they are training, they learn on thejob. learn while they are training, they learn on the job. the nhs as they are committed to providing patients with the high standards of treatment ca re with the high standards of treatment care and support. but she says the condition remains largely overlooked and likea condition remains largely overlooked and like a sickle cell sufferers will remain difficult. thank you to the families who took pa rt thank you to the families who took part in that report, reporting on the problems with sickle cell. we have reached 26 minutes past six. time for news, weather and travel. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. commuters are being warned they could face difficultjourneys into work this morning after storm doris caused serious disruption yesterday. at the height of the storm almost every route into london was hit by delays or cancellations because of fallen trees and problems with overhead wires. the fire brigade was called out to more than 150 incidents — in victoria a man was injured by falling debris outside the station.
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the overground the overg round is the overground is suspended between romford and upminster where a volu nta ry romford and upminster where a voluntary as brock, blocking the line. damaged were overhead lines at st albans is causing 30 minute delays as was causing disruption on to the midlands trains. disruption on other services including stanton expressing great at anglia. virgin trains east and west. let's have a quick look at the wall tunnel. this is normal rush—hour here. in vauxhall, kennington lane is closed. after a church roof collapsed yesterday. in chiswick, the road is still blocked between the a 316 and
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burlington lane. an exhibition of artwork from ladybird books is being launched in reading today. the archive at the university of reading has over 20,000 original illustrations. the pocket—sized books from the 20th century covered topics such as how magnets work and what to look for in winter. more recently the classic illustrations have been used for a new series aimed at grown—ups. someone had made an effort with it. it was not so... it was not a half effort it was the best artwork and the best writing, the nicest reproduction. they are special. let's have a check on the weather now. storm door as is now whipped off to eastern europe weakening all the while but she has left her mark on the capital. the highest recorded wind gust yesterday was 62 mph on yesterday afternoon. now today and altogether nicer day. a chilly start with temperatures hovering above freezing towards the west but good parts of sunshine around today. quite chilly times today. the top
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temperature only between eight and 10 celsius in central london. some good spells of sunshine and a much nicer day. 0vernight tonight it will stay dry at first, dry the evening rush hour and then gradually we see cloud increase from the north—western we gets outbreaks of rain. 0vernight lows between four and six celsius. tomorrow it will start to turn breezy again but not as windy as it was yesterday. you can see the ice above titan here. a south—westerly wind picking up and there will be outbreaks of rain on and off through the day. 0ut around as well. it will fill mild at the weekend with top temperatures on saturday at 211 degrees despite the lack of brightness. a little brighter possibly on sunday and a little bit dry but a few outbreaks of rain on the way at times as we head into the start of next week, these girls and showers. bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to steph and charlie. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast
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with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. it's 6:30am. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. after the author helen bailey was murdered by a man she met while grieving for her first husband, we'll speak to a charity for people whose partners have died, and ask if they can be particularly vulnerable when starting new relationships. after victory in stoke and defeat in cumbria, we'll ask the shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell what a mixed night for labour means for the party and jeremy corbyn's leadership. and they've been in decline for years, but we'll find out about a new plan to save the uk's last remaining red squirrels and how you can get involved. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. the conservatives have won the cumbrian seat of copeland which had been in labour's hands for more than 80 years. in the night's other result labour held on to stoke central, with ukip leader paul nuttall finishing in second place. this report from our political correspondent tom bateman contains flash photography. harrison, trudy lynn,
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the conservative party candidate, 13,748. voters here had chosen a labour mp for the last 80 years. but all that changed in a dramatic night as the conservatives took copeland by 2000 votes. what has happened tonight is a truly historic event. you would have to go back more than a century to find an example of a governing party taking a seat from the opposition party in an election like this. sack corbyn! labour said the vote was on a knife edge. in the aftermath of defeat, the departing candidate chose not to face questions. this is a moment in history. the first time a conservative has
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represented the area since the 1930s. and for them tonight, jubilation. but serious questions for labour underjeremy corbyn. theresa may made the rare move of visiting a by—election seat vacated by an opposition mp. it was a hardfought campaign of the nuclearjobs and hospital services. the result leaves labour assessing its electoral prospects. but there was better news for labour in the by—election in stoke—on—trent, another traditional seat for the party. they held on with a reduced majority. this by—election was a test for ukip for ukip in a working—class area. itjust managed second place, but did increase its vote share. ukip's time will come. this will happen. hang on. this seat was number 72 on our hit list. a lot more will happen. there is a lot more to come. we are not going anywhere. i am not going anywhere. so therefore, you know,
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we move on and our time will come. there will be jubilation for theresa may at the result in copeland. jeremy corbyn promised he would reconnect with voters. he might have to try inspired offer the opposition for his own mps. 0ur political correspondent alex forsyth joins us from stoke—on—trent. talk us through what happened last night. and the thirsting notice is the ukip campaign office behind you. this was where the campaign has been based over the last few weeks. the office is shut up. and when we have arrived, there is a red cross on the door, the significance is unclear, though some might say ukip is not welcome in stoke. this was a test for ukip. this was their leader standing ina for ukip. this was their leader standing in a seat where people supported brexit. and ukip after the eu referendum promised they would
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eat into the labour vote in the heartlands, in areas like this in stoke and they failed. ukip have played down the significance this morning and said they did eat into the majority. it leaves questions for the party about what they stand for the party about what they stand for post eu referendum and if they can't win in places like stoke, where can they win? talk through what happened in copeland and the scale of the conservative victory?|j don't think it could be underestimated. it was a very significant win in copeland, long held by labour, and labour have said there were local issues dominating his campaign. we know thatjeremy corbyn at the moment has some of the lowest ratings for a labour leader for sometime, so it will renew questions over his leadership. we are some way off a leadership challenge. this will lend
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credibility to his critics who say labour underjeremy corbyn isn't performing as it should. for the moment, thank you. malaysian police say they have found the highly toxic nerve agent, vx, on the face of kim jong—nam, the murdered half brother of north korea's leader. vx is the most toxic of the chemical warfare agents, and just a drop on the skin can kill in minutes. cctv footage shows two women briefly holding something over kim jong—nam's face while he was preparing to board a flight at kuala lumpur airport last week. donald trump says he wants to expand america's nuclear arsenal. in his first comments on the issue since taking office, mr trump said it would be "wonderful" if no nation had nuclear arms, but otherwise the us must be "top of the pack." the government is announcing plans for more universities to offer degree courses which last for just two years. the universities ministerjo johnson will say students want more flexible courses which enable them to get into work more quickly. in return, universities will be able to increase annual tuition fees
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to more than £13,000, although the overall cost of a degree will still be capped at £27,000. the clear—up continues this morning after storm doris battered much of the uk leaving one woman dead after being hit by flying debris. winds of up to 94mph caused power cuts and travel chaos as flights were grounded and train services disrupted. drivers are being warned to be wary of ice on the roads in scotland, northern ireland, and north—west england. and we've just got time to show you some amazing pictures of a modern day version of cat and mouse. but in this instance, the mouse was a drone and the cats, a group of large siberian tigers. the rare tigers in north—east china were chasing a bird before spotting the drone, which was filming them. it didn't take long before the electronic device became prey, the drone at least managing to capture some incredible pictures before being destroyed. it was down, yeah. wow. it is quite
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scary, isn't it, when you see them come scary, isn't it, when you see them co m e toward scary, isn't it, when you see them come toward you. now, where to start, with leicester and claudio ranieri. the dream, the fairytale, is over. you'd have to think the board saw something, a breakdown between the players and claudio ranieri, the special relationship. because a new manager coming in can't assign any players, so all he can't assign any players, so all he can do is try to motivate the set, so can do is try to motivate the set, so it has to be something they have seen. so it has to be something they have seen. already, people are asking about loyalty, where is loyalty in football? yes, because claudio ranieri in summer had the chance to go to italy, it was such a famous story, his stock rose to unprecedented heights, but he stayed at leicester, turning that down,
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because he thought the special thing they had going could continue. we can remind ourselves of the special times, only nine months ago when he was king claudio, defying the odds of 5000 to one, to do what many regarded as impossible, winning the premier league title. here he is, crowned by kasper schmeichel, but then they only really lost one main player to chelsea, so you would have thought they could have stayed in the top six, but form has been abysmal, it has got worse, and he really is looking rather concerned. no away wins in the premier league this season, no goals in the premier league this year, the worst record of 92 football league clubs in terms of 92 football league clubs in terms of form, although they offered hopes for fans of form, although they offered hopes forfans against of form, although they offered hopes for fans against seville in spain just two nights ago whenjamie vardy scored, but the border out there and
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according to some papers they spoke with players. and we have a statement, indeed. so, that is the harsh reality, that is what the board has set, but of course, you said there is no room for sentiment in football, and that isa for sentiment in football, and that is a feeling of hurt some up by a lot of the fans. gary lineker, former leicester city player tweeted: "after all that claudio ranieri has done for leicester city, to sack him now is inexplicable, unforgivable and gut—wrenchingly sad." former leicesterforward dion dublin was also shocked by the news, saying, "are you sure, leicester? sacking the manager that won you the premiere league title! that's just shocking." and manchester united's managerjose mourinho offered his condolences to mr ranieri: "sacked, that's the new football claudio. keep smiling amigo. nobody can delete
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the history you wrote." i suppose the straw poll of leicester fa ns i suppose the straw poll of leicester fans i spoke with overnight, two thirds of think it was too soon and harsh, but there are some fans, like chris in bristol, bristol—based leicester fan, it is right for survival, he said, ican fan, it is right for survival, he said, i can handle defeat but not the 92nd in form out of 92 clubs, and maybe roberto mancini is lined up and maybe roberto mancini is lined up already, we don't know, but the timing would suggest they have a plan in place. roberto mancini played for leicester, he had the premier league at all, but what is he like with relegation, in which leicester is certainly involved in now. and some other sports as well? 0h, now. and some other sports as well? oh, yes, we have. (laughter).. it was a busy night already.
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it was a dismal night for tottenham — out of the europa league after they could only draw 2—2 against gent of belgium at wembley, losing 3—2 on aggregate. dismal especially for two of their england stars — harry kane scoring at the wrong end. his own goal making it 1—1 on the night. then another of spurs' england players, dele alli, was sent—off for this horrendous tackle. tottenham out, leaving just manchester united as the sole british side in the last 16. england captain wayne rooney says he is staying at manchester united after being linked with a move to china. the 31—year—old striker said in a statement: "it's an exciting time at the club and i want to remain a part of it." rooney's agent had travelled to china to see if he could negotiate a deal, which could still happen in the summer. coach vern cotter has made five changes to scotland's side that will face wales in the six nations at murrayfield tomorrow. flankerjon barclay plays his rugby in wales with the scarlets, and will captain the team in the absence of the injured greig
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laidlaw. ali price will take over from laidlaw at scrum half. fly halfjohnny sexton returns to the ireland side for tomorrow's meeting with france in dublin. sexton missed ireland's first two games with a calf injury, but is back with paddy jackson dropping to the bench. catalans dragons beat hull fc16—14 to go top of rugby league's super league. luke walsh kicked six out of six in a scrappy game and his last penalty confirmed victory for catalans. they've now played two and won two. i love the feeling when you get the keys to your new car, and that was the feeling for lewis hamilton yesterday. world champion constructors mercedes have unveiled their new car for the upcoming formula one season. it will be going a lot faster than this when the season starts next month in australia. but for now lewis hamilton, who was joined by new team—mate valtteri bottas, took the car for a few laps around
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a very blustery silverstone. hamilton said the car felt incredible. that is a good sign, then. it is, yeah, he is happy. thank you. police in malaysia say a powerful nerve agent called vx appears to have been used in last week's killing of kimjong nam, the half brother of north korean dictator kim jong—un. in a statement, officials said traces of the agent, which is used in chemical warfare, were found on kim jong nam's face. 0ur correspondent rupert wingfield—hayes joins us now from kuala lumpur. this is a story which is quite baffling, really, and now this information about is highly toxic nerve agent, what more can you tell us? yeah, this story continues to get more extraordinary as the days
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go by. so, what the authorities are telling us is after kim jong—nam died at the airport, on the way to the hospital from the airport last week, they took him to the morgue and did an autopsy, during which they swapped his face, especially cheeks and eyes, and they tested the swa bs cheeks and eyes, and they tested the swabs and it has taken 11 days to come back with the results but they said they found traces of the vx nerve agents on those swabs, which is serious, because vx is considered the most toxic nerve agent invented, invented in britain in the 1950s. large quantities were produced in america and the soviet union in the cold war. it has subsequently been banned under un chemical convention, so banned under un chemical convention, so the fact it has been used in this killing makes this a whole new level on this killing. yeah, and also looking at what the malaysians have
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said, they don't blame the north korean state, but they say north korean state, but they say north korea was clearly behind it, so what's happening? well, it is very unclear, is the short answer. they are not at the moment accusing the north korean state of direct involvement. however, circumstantial evidence so far points to a plot based in north korea, or at least in the north korean and busy in kuala lumpur. there are women in custody thought to have been carrying out the killing, they are not north korean, but the other suspects named are north korean nationals, and one of them they want to talk to is a diplomat from the embassy here, but the north koreans are refusing to hand him over. what happens next? there is this other person they want to talk to. what happens next? well,
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we are locked in a stalemate. north korea will not back down or hand over people who are wanted. there is the potential for a over people who are wanted. there is the potentialfor a diplomatic over people who are wanted. there is the potential for a diplomatic rift. i have heard people say they will have to do something in retaliation, even kicking the north korean ambassador out of here. this is now very, very serious. and, as you say, a really extraordinary story. thank you very for your time. the table that the weather. things have calmed down? absolutely. a different story now. these is storm doris with very fast wind speeds, the whole system was moving very quickly so look where it is now. it has taken those stormy conditions through germany and into pollen. it is weakening and we find ourselves between weather systems as morning. a higher it pressure ridge and a
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cold flow of air. watch out few icy patches on untreated surfaces. a far more calm story this morning and a brighter story as well. some cloud around in scotland and a little bit of patchy light rain in a few spots are not amounting to very much. icy in places again. some showers coast to the eastern coast of england. 0ne or two filtering through parts of north wales in north—west england into the midlands. quite hit and miss. at eight o'clock in the morning a lot of dry and sunny weather and look at the wind speed here. they are much lower compared with yesterday. a fine day for many of us, even where you start with a shower roundabout midday the vast majority is to be dry with sunshine. another weather system is coming in and back this afternoon will bring rain across northern ireland and by the end of the day into western parts of scotland. nowhere near as nasty as storm doris. temperature is down compared to yesterday so maybe
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five to 10 degrees. we will take some wet weather, particularly across the northern half of the uk, preceded by snow urban ills in scotland. back to the rain, the wind freshening and our strengthening again cross north battling north—west scotland. lottery but milder with plenty of cloud around as we start of saturday morning. it ta kes as we start of saturday morning. it takes is on to the weekend and what can we expect? mild compared to today. it will be windy again, nothing like the storm, most of us will see rain at some stage but not all the time. it is quite a messy picture as we start off on saturday morning. windy wherever you are. dales for some of us, if this were close to the west and inner north—west scotland. rain heading south—east, not much down the eastern side of the uk and into saturday afternoon expected to turn will be brighter in scotland and northern ireland just a couple of showers around and temperatures for many back into double figures the whiz by blustery. 0n many back into double figures the whiz by blustery. on sunday we bring in another wet weather system so gets wet for a time. scotland into
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cumbria, quite wet throughout the weekend, pushing south —— south eastwards. the breeze nothing compared to storm doris and temperatures hitting double figures although will be turning colder the start of next week. the main message to the weekend, it is looking u nsettled to the weekend, it is looking unsettled and quite blustery at times but we put storm doris behind us. times but we put storm doris behind us. a lot of people will be pleased to hear that. thank you, nick. sean's here — and he's looking at business rates this morning it isa it is a fair thing to call this one an argument because it has been backbench mps of the conservative parties, many newspapers here, the mail the telegraph and the times last week to have let on this several times. it has has been a big talking point. well it was all about over the government's proposals to increase business rates that are due to come about in april. there are nearly 2 million
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businesses across the uk that will see rates come in at some point. this is all about the proposal of the government to see those rates increase next month. those properties in england and wales are liable for business rates. our tax is charged on properties like offices and factories. the amount is based on how much rain could be charged on those buildings that they are rain. if this are currently playing rates on property valuations from 2008. they have now been revalued in the raids recalculated with many winners and losers. according to the government, over1 million ratepayers will see no change. 0r, their bill will go down. but it is as loud half a million businesses will see them go up, and some of them significantly. we have had a lot of pressure we have heard this week that there may be some help announced in the budget in just under a couple weeks time. we can talk now to christian spencer was head of research and policy at the
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greater manchester chamber of commerce. christian, because it is so commerce. christian, because it is so closely linked to property prices is it just about the south—east and london think robbie prices go up and rates go up in the rest of the country benefiting? as a broad generalisation that is a reasonable assumption that the proper market across the uk is highly varied. we feel of fluctuation in manchester amongst the city and the outlying areas. at a high level, yes, but with the winners and losers appear in all sorts of odd places. people who expect changes to come in next month, you still hear from businesses that i talk to that they don't know the exact figure that they will be paying. as the government run this as smoothly as it could have done? there have been many challenges. this goes to the heart of some of the complexity and the system we have been working with government with over several years now. there are still some rates outstanding from the 2010 in grief. that gives a sense of how collocated
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things are. businesses have seen a d raft things are. businesses have seen a draft revaluations to 2017. businesses are looking at those many are already that these do not appear to be in line with where we would expect them to be and we can expect a large set of appeals. businesses who are your members will have known that these revaluations were coming in and they will have known how much the property price would have changed since 2008, 2010. is it fair to say that some businesses could have been more prepared for these changes? it is difficult because the process ca n changes? it is difficult because the process can take so long and bills can arrive close to the start of a new financial year. there is also a question about many businesses about how the valuations are arrived at themselves by the body who does it. even though once businesses know, of course, what the rent their pain is on the valuation of a property is, sometimes the weather ‘s calculation is are arrived at and give a very different number to what they actually pay. and there has been a little bitter criticism that big companies like amazon have big warehouses that around town, seen
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reductions on the business rates there while small shops on high street may see rises. you see that as well? absolutely. and it is the idea that people operating with his taxes similar to that of a land tax, business rates is not about land it is about the business itself, the building itself and even the kinds of machinery that sits within the business. that means you can get buried peculiar distortions. thank you for your time. we got there in the end. about 500,000 businesses will see a rate rise and that is where much of the talk is coming from. 0r where much of the talk is coming from. or in the budget in alljust over a week. 653 now. we've known for years that the red squirrel population is in decline, and conservationists have been working hard to try to save the native species. now animal lovers are getting a chance to do their bit, the wildlife trusts are uniting to recruit thousands of volunteers to help protect them. aisling mcveigh has been to mere sands wood nature reserve in lancashire to find out more.
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red squirrels were once a common sight across much of the uk. the introduction of their grey cousins 141 years ago spelt disaster for the red population. carrying a disease which killed reds, the greedy grey squirrel dominates our landscape more than a century on, with more than 2.5 million of them around. there arejust 140,000 reds in comparison. but in recent years efforts to protect reds have had some success and now for the first time the wildlife trusts are combining to recruit 5,000 volunteers to help with these conservation efforts. people will be asked to monitor and record data and, if they're willing, they'll be given training on how to cull grey squirrels humanely. they're hoping the red squirrels united project will not only maintain but maybe even increase numbers.
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we can train people to help with the monitoring, using cameras and tubes, we also need people to record their sightings and report them to us and also help with grey squirrel control. it's a really great opportunity for people to get involved in a large—scale conservation project at a local level and really make a difference. most of us will never get this close to a baby squirrel. this map shows how many red squirrels were around. the campaign had to focus efforts of volunteers on the nine areas where there are already reads oral including the glens of northern ireland, anglesey in ways of wales and merseyside in england. the volunteer project of saving the red squirrels in scotland will also got under way. most of us will also got under way. most of us will never get this close to a baby ‘s —— most of us will never get this close to a baby squirrel. rachel is nursing this one back to health. but with this campaign there's
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a chance to make sure this native species survives and maybe even flourishes once again in the uk. we will talk more about how you can get involved in this project at around ten minutes to nine this morning. tynemouth at the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. commuters are being warned they could face difficultjourneys into work this morning after storm doris caused serious disruption yesterday. at the height of the storm almost every route into london was hit by delays or cancellations because of fallen trees and problems with overhead wires. the fire brigade was called out to more than 150 incidents — in victoria a man was injured by falling debris outside the station. the 0verground is suspended between romford and upminster— a fallen tree is blocking the line. other lines do appear to be running normally. damage to overhead lines at st albans is causing half an hour delays on thameslink between st pancras international and luton. as well as causing disruption
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to east midlands trains. we're also expecting disruption on many other services— including the stansted express and greater anglia, virgin trains east coast and virgin trains west coast. let's take a quick look at the blackwall tunnel there are the usual queues northbound there, normal rush hour problems. in vauxhall, kennington lane is closed between vauxhall street and tyers street after a church roof collapsed yesterday. and in chiswick, staveley road is still blocked between the a316 and burlington lane after a tree fell in the road. an exhibition of artwork from ladybird books is being launched in reading today. the archive at the university of reading has over 20,000 original illustrations. the pocket—sized books from the 20th century covered topics such as how magnets work and what to look for in winter. more recently the classic illustrations have been used for a new series aimed at grown—ups. someone had made an effort with it.
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it was not so... it was not a half effort it was the best artwork and the best writing, the nicest reproduction. they are special. let's have a check on the weather now. storm doris has now whipped off to eastern europe weakening all the while but she has left her mark on the capital. the highest recorded wind gust yesterday was 62 mph mph yesterday afternoon. now today an altogether nicer day. a chilly start with temperatures hovering above freezing towards the west but good spells of sunshine around today. quite chilly at times today. the top temperature only between eight and 10 celsius in central london. some good spells of sunshine and a much nicer day. 0vernight tonight it will stay dry at first, dry the evening rush hour and then gradually we see cloud increase from the north—western we gets outbreaks of rain. 0vernight lows between four and six celsius. tomorrow it will start to turn breezy again but not as windy as it was yesterday.
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you can see the ice above titan here. you can see the isobars tighten here. a south—westerly wind picking up and there will be outbreaks of rain on and off through the day. it will feel mild at the weekend with top temperatures on saturday at 11 degrees despite the lack of brightness. a little brighter possibly on sunday and a little bit dry but a few outbreaks of rain on the way at times as we head into the start of next week with sunny spells and showers. i'm back with the latest from bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to steph and charlie. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. an historic by—election win for the conservatives as they gain copeland from labour. harrison, trudy, the conservative
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party candidate, 13,748. in the first by—election gain by a governing party for more than 30 years, trudy harrison takes the cumbrian constituancy with a majority of more than 2,000. ukip keep their seat with paul nuttall. we have the latest reaction. good morning, it's friday, the 24th of february. also this morning: shock as leicester city sack their premier league winning manager. there's no happy ever after for the fairytale of leicester city or claudio ranieri as the manager who masterminded the most unlikely of premier league
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titles is dropped by the club. the royal bank of scotland which also owns natwest and ulster bank isjust about to publish its full year financial results. the bank which is 73% owned by the taxpayer is widely expected to report heavy losses. i'll bring you the full details when i get them. storm doris brought us disruption to roads, rail and air travel. as many people try to complete their broken journeys today, nick has the details on what the weather's going to do next. yes, good morning. some disruption may continue into today but storm doris has gone. we are in a calm, cold spell of weather as we start this friday morning. rain coming to northern ireland and western scotla nd northern ireland and western scotland later with freshening wind. i have the friday forecast and a look at the weekend of weather coming up. good morning. first, our main story. "a truly historic victory" — the words of new conservative mp trudy harrison after taking the labour seat of copeland in last nights by—election, the first gain by a governing party since 1982.
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in the night's other result labour did hold on to stoke central, with ukip leader paul nuttall finishing in second place. this report from our political correspondent tom bateman contains flash photography. harrison, trudy lynn, the conservative party candidate, 13,748. voters here had chosen a labour mp for the last 80 years. but all that changed in a dramatic night as the conservatives took copeland by 2,000 votes. what has happened here tonight is a truly historic event. you'd have to go back more than a century to find an example of a governing party taking a seat from the opposition party in an election like this. sack corbyn, sack corbyn! labour had said the vote was on a knife edge. in the aftermath of defeat,
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their departing candidate chose not to face questions. but this is a moment in history. the first time a conservative has represented the area since the 1930s. and, for them tonight, jubilation. but serious questions for labour underjeremy corbyn. theresa may made the rare move of visiting a by—election seat vacated by an opposition mp. it was a hardfought campaign over nuclear jobs and hospital services. the result leaves labour assessing its electoral prospects. but there was better news for labour in the by—election in stoke—on—trent, another traditional seat for the party. they held on with a reduced majority. this by—election was a test for ukip in a working—class area that voted hard for brexit. itjust managed second place, but did increase its vote share. ukip's time will come.
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this will happen. hang on. this seat was number 72 on our hit list. a lot more will happen. there is a lot more to come from us. we are not going anywhere. i am not going anywhere. so therefore, you know, we move on and our time will come. there will be jubilation for theresa may at the result in copeland. jeremy corbyn promised he would reconnect with voters. he may have to try in spite of futher opposition from his own mps. we can now speak to our political correspondent tom bateman who is in whitehaven for us this morning. a lovely scene behind you and one that the conservative party will be very pleased with today. absolutely. i think the calm waters and the gulls circling above are not reflective of the political tsunami which has taken place in this part of the world overnight. it is astonishing. normally these mornings we talk of the pummelling the governing party has taken. and yet
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here we are in copeland, it has been labourfor as long here we are in copeland, it has been labour for as long as anyone can remember, and we are talking about labour losing the seat to the conservatives. as for the candidate, trudy harrison, she was clear that this meant the tories were the party of the working people. that will cut to the heart of what labour mps are concerned about, that they believe jeremy colburn has failed to cut through to those labour heartlands, especially in working—class areas. labour say there are specific dynamics. it is aboutjobs in the nuclear industry. when you look at the victory in stoke it shows that they can win. however, at the end of this, we are looking at more political trouble forjeremy colburn from his own mps. thank you very much. it looks gorgeous. in a few minutes we'll be speaking to the shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell about the results. leicester city has sacked manager claudio ranieri just nine months after he led the clubs to its first premier league title. the foxes are only one point
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above the relegation zone with 13 matches left. 0ur sports editor dan roan has more. he masterminded one of sport's greatest miracles, but less than a year after claudio ranieri's leicester city became the most unlikely premier league winners ever, the man who achieved the dream has been dismissed. leicester city are the premier league champions! last season's celebrations have turned to fears of relegation. having swept all before them, this season the euphoria has evaporated. the champions losing their last five league matches. and with leicester languishing one point above the relegation zone the club decided to act. in a statement, the club's chairman said... managerial loyalties are notoriously short in supply
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in the premier league but, given what ranieri achieved, many will be dismayed. former leicester star gary lineker described it as... ranieri's last game in charge was this 2—1 defeat against sevilla in the last 16 of the champions league. the manager seemingly unaware of his fate when he spoke after the match. we know, we know they are better than us, very high quality team, highly experienced team, everything, 0k. but we have a very big heart, and a very big effort, we help each other. and i think we deserve this. but it is leicester's poor performances in the premier league that could see them become only the second english champions in history to see a title defence and in relegation champions in history to see a title defence end in relegation and it is that which ultimately cost ranieri hisjob. their memories of what he achieved
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will always be cherished but the fairytale is now over. well, we just have news well, wejust have news in well, we just have news in from well, wejust have news in from rbs, sean is here, another year of losses, i mean, nine years of annual losses. and it is a lot bigger than last year as well, so last year it was £2 billion, but today we have seen was £2 billion, but today we have seen £7 billion the royal bank of scotla nd seen £7 billion the royal bank of scotland lost in 2016, a lot of it to do with what they call one off costs, but when you're talking about nine years of not making a profit, it seems to happen on a regular basis. so, litigation costs in the us, ppi compensation, that is still in as well, they are trying to get rid of a lot of their branches, williams unclean branches, which they had to sell, and they have to try to get rid of, which didn't work, it has cost £1 billion as well
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—— glynn. it is important for two reasons. the taxpayer owns three quarters of the bank. any losses that banks make, three quarters is effectively taxpayers. it is important that banks do well. they need to lend to small businesses and be able to give customers confidence. when you think £7 billion is being lost over the year, that money could be used in much better ways. and is interesting because we have lloyd's results and that was a bank that we pumped money into in the financial crisis and thatis into in the financial crisis and that is a different story completely. completely the opposite. lloyds didn't have the legacy issues from the financial crisis which rbs has had and that is why rbs said, these are legacy problems, fundamentally, the bank is doing 0k but they don't expect to make a profit until 2018. thank you very much. i know that you will talk about it more a little later on. malaysian police say the highly toxic nerve agent, vx, has been found
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on the face of kim jong—nam, the murdered half brother of north korea's leader. vx is an extremely toxic chemical warfare agent and just a drop on the skin can kill in minutes. cctv footage showed two women briefly holding something over kim jong—nam's face while he was preparing to board a flight at kuala lumpur airport last week. more on one of the main stories this morning, reaction to the by—elections last night. lets get some reaction from the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell, whojoins us now from westminster. thank you for your time this morning. we want to talk about your labour success in stoke. what reflections can you draw on that victory? well, i think it is a significant victory. i don't think just for the labour party, a significant victory for politics in this country overall. remember, what was predicted by a lot of the media
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was predicted by a lot of the media was ukip would win the seat, it would be the start of them destroying the labour party in the north, and what the people stoke done for all of us is they have rejected the politics of division and dishonesty, so i think the people of stoke have done this country real service. i am pleased that we won the seat. 0bviously country real service. i am pleased that we won the seat. obviously it was a hard campaign. and i am pleased we turned back ukip. they threw everything at it. the people of state have done us a service. do you think paul nuttall is finished? well, that is for ukip and him, but, i tell you, on the streets of stoke, when i was up there, people were very angry about, well, the dishonesty of the ukip campaign, and the way in which they try to divide the way in which they try to divide the community. what the people of stoke said last night is that we will not be divided, and they
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concentrated on the issues which concern them, and it was the same, well, jobs, the nhs and the future public services. so, i am well, jobs, the nhs and the future public services. so, iam pleased well, jobs, the nhs and the future public services. so, i am pleased we won last night. their more work to do in stoke, developing the economy, supporting the community, and we will work in that community to develop local plans, work with local people, with a terrific local mp. people might detect there isn't celebration in your time this morning, and they will know of course it will be linked with what happened in copeland. now, to put this in perspective, effectively, not in living memory has a conservative being an mp in that area. to what do you attribute what happened? well, just to comment on what you said, i don't think in stoke, for example, we should be triumphant, in any way. it was a ha rdfoug ht triumphant, in any way. it was a hardfought campaign. i am so please we defeated ukip and turn them back andi we defeated ukip and turn them back and i think stoke has done us all,
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politics in general and his country, a real service, but yes, it was mixed fortunes, and i am disappointed about copeland. if you we re disappointed about copeland. if you were to choose two constituencies which would be the most difficult to fight at the moment, one would be stoke, with the ukip threat, and remember, that was the largest brexit vote in the whole of the country, when we were campaigning to remain, which would have been difficult, and copeland was the other one, with unique circumstances, the labour vote has eroded over a number of elections now, but this issue around the future of the nuclear industry clearly dominated election campaigns. not that we campaign very ha rd campaigns. not that we campaign very hard on the nhs, and although we gave the community assurances on the future of nuclear in the area, a lot of the disinformation, misinformation from the conservatives really meant we couldn't convince people about that. so, yes, i'm disappointed, but it is not unexpected given the unique circumstances in copeland itself. not unexpected given the unique circumstances in copeland itselfm that really the best you have got,
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blaming the defeat on misinformation and disinformation? not at all, we are in the most difficult circumstances as a party for a series of reasons. for the last, what, 20 months sincejeremy corbyn was elected, we have been through two leadership elections. it has been a major distraction. we are coming out of the brexit vote, which we lost, we campaigned to remain and the country voted to brexit. difficult circumstances. and it says clearly as well that people will not vote for a divided party. we have looked divided over the last 20 months with the leadership challenges. the lesson is, we have to unite. in copeland, there were special circumstances over the nuclear issue and we could link up through. one of the circumstances is not very special, is it, the nhs, and the issue your party campaigned over, specifically, a maternity unit
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in that area. this is one of your co re in that area. this is one of your core subjects, in an area you campaigned hard on, jeremy corbyn in the house of commons talked about it directly. now, if you can't get some kind of leverage under those circumstances, people were thinking, well, when? well, it is interesting, because campaigning on the nhs has been near the top of people's concerns in opinion after opinion poll, so we are having a breakthrough on the nhs as an issue itself, but in copeland, u nfortu nately, itself, but in copeland, unfortunately, the nuclear industry and the future ofjobs, especially theissue and the future ofjobs, especially the issue about the moorside development which was in jeopardy, people concentrated on the issue of jobs. i think the nhs was a matter of concern in copeland and i am hoping the government does not take his victory in copeland as a green light to close the maternity services and attack the accident and emergency services, and we will continue to campaign to protect the
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nhs against the conservative cuts.|j have to ask whether you spoke with jeremy corbyn directly, and the other question for you, as a friend of his, a colleague and a friend, are you prepared to have that conversation one day, which is, do you know what, as your friend, conversation one day, which is, do you know what, as yourfriend, and as your colleague, soomin lee get about the labour party, maybe, just maybe, now is the time to think about stepping down? this isn't about stepping down? this isn't aboutjeremy about stepping down? this isn't about jeremy corbyn, this about stepping down? this isn't aboutjeremy corbyn, this is about the position of the labour party for the position of the labour party for the future. we have had a difficult period over the last 20 months with the leadership talent is, because of divisions which have been sown within the party. the vast majority of members, the vast, vast majority, wa nt of members, the vast, vast majority, want us to unite and campaign and hold the government to account, and thatis hold the government to account, and that is what we will do. these by—elections were difficult ones. we knew that. we have lost copeland. we will learn lessons from that. but we have won in stoke and we have
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defeated i think something which was really dangerous politics in this country. we have turned back the politics of dishonesty and division and, as! politics of dishonesty and division and, as i say, the people of stoke, by supporting labour, have done us all a service in this. john mcdonnell, thank you for your time this morning. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. to storm to the doris continues this morning. flights grounded, trains disrupted. let's find out the forecast in a couple of minutes but first let's talk to our correspondent outside euston station. it was a dramatic day yesterday with many trains cancelled and delayed. what is it like there today? we are told that things will get back to normal today. late yesterday morning the station effectively ground to a halt
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because there were no services operating. people were told not to trouble. things started to return at about five in the afternoon that you will understand there is a backlog of travellers and, in fact, the station remained open through the night to cater for stranded passengers. people who could not travel yesterday, are allowed to use their tickets this morning and tomorrow morning. 0ther their tickets this morning and tomorrow morning. other problems on the roads which i will come to an and it, with the wind there was a fatality, a woman in her 20s, a 29—year—old woman died in wolverhampton city centre after masonry fell on her. a number of other people were injured including a 13—year—old schoolgirl when a ceiling fell on her at a sports hall. 0n the road is a driver instructor in spalding had a lucky escape when a tree fell in front of him. problems at the airport is and power was out to thousands of homes in northern ireland in east anglia. most of those have now been
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restored. thank you very much. an important part of all of this is what is happening with the weather today. let's find out. good morning. we heard there about the wind gust of 94 mph yesterday. if you wonder about some of the wind speaking eu here are a selection of the thunderstorm. as fast as these winds we re thunderstorm. as fast as these winds were blowing, storm doris was moving quickly across the uk. it is now actually long gone. this is where doris is at the moment, taking no stormy conditions through germany and poland and we have a look reach of high pressure built across the uk. it is far calmer this morning. and relaxed. it is also cold out there this morning. a touch of frost across parts the northern half of uk. watch out through few patches of ice on untreated services. scotland, northern ireland and northern england this morning. a bitter sunshine to come for many of us as we go through this morning. here is a picture from nine a.m.. afair
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amount of cloud around and had to light rain in a couple of spots. not amounting to very much. early showers across the eastern parts of england. pulling away into the north sea so it is becoming dry and sunny. we have one or two showers scattered about parts of north—west england and wales and the midlands. these will fade away and become very few and far between during the day. it is the wind arrows as we go round the uk. a colder direction but the numbers at lower and it is far calmer this morning. a lot of dry weather was sunny stuff to come today. just an isolated shower. you will notice the northern ireland you have rain coming back in this afternoon. they will push into western scotland by the end of the afternoon. a freshening wind again although nothing on the scale of storm doris. temperatures down compared with yesterday. most of us will not get that high. we would ta ke wet will not get that high. we would take wet weather across the northern half of the uk tonight. ren preceded by snow and the scottish hills but turning back to rain. when
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strengthening across the uk the gales into the north—west scotland and those to temperatures are higher tonight compared with last night where we're switching the wind around with a cold north—westerly to around with a cold north—westerly to a milder south—westerly. that mild weather will stay with us into the weekend. it will be a blustery weekend. it will be a blustery weekend to come and there will be some outbreaks of rain around at times. the picture for saturday, taking rain south eastwards across the uk. not much down the eastern side. heavy births in the hills of western scotland and cumbria. —— heavy gusts in the hills. iraqi government forces have begun their attack on the western part of the city of mosul. yesterday they managed to recapture mosul airport as part of the government's offensive to drive so—called islamic state from iraq's second city. 0ur correspondent quentin somerville is the only foreignjournalist with the iraqi troops. he captured the intense fighting as it took place, as we can see from this footage. heavy gunfire sounds
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mosul airport may be in ruins but more importantly it is back in government hands. the iraqi flag is flying here again. a landmark moment. the iraqi forces now have the islamic state group on the run. right now here in iraq we are witnessing the final days of the caliphate. joining us now in the studio is dr afshin shahi, senior lecturer in international relations & middle east politics at the university of bradford. looking at that piece there are,
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there are clearly dramatic scenes. what are your thoughts on these developments? the operation deliberate mosul started last 0ctober. it took them two about january two only liberate the eastern side. but when you think about it, over the last 2.5 years, isis has dedicated most of its defence preparation to the western side. so if, basically liberating the eastern side proved to be that difficult, the western side is probably going to be even more complex and probably will take some very long time. quentin tweeted last night as he was covering the ongoing situation that the next step was going to be the hardest. why some scale of difference. what is the significance of mosul to isis?m scale of difference. what is the significance of mosul to isis? it is the largest urban centre controlled at the moment. 0ver the largest urban centre controlled at the moment. over the last 15
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months they have lost 60% of the territory that they controlled in 2014 in iraq. and a lot of their territory in syria. they have lost a lot of important urban centres in the country and mosul is the last one. as we speak, most 700,000 people are living there. it has a lot of strategic and symbolic significance for the organisation. if they lose it, it will be a game changer. that does not mean they will be irrelevant. even if they lose territory the conditions, the factors that are part of the cause of the structure that made the emergence of possible four years ago are still in place. even if they lose territory, unfortunately they are still going to cause a major threat to the security of the country and nation as a whole. looking at the military hardware they are, how about the civilian population that is still within the areas held by islamic state? as i
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mentioned, we do not know how many people are living there but assuming that up to seven thousand people are living in the city. as isis has proved over the last two or three yea rs proved over the last two or three years they are absolutely capable of using a kind of human shelter. this is the main complexity because the majority of people are still living in the western side. the western side is very difficult to operate in and over the last two years they have dedicated most of the defence preparation to this specific part of the city. 0bviously preparation to this specific part of the city. obviously the implications for the civilian life is going to be very profound and problematic. what does this mean for the strength of isis at the moment? isis, if you are talking about their financial position, they are under a great deal of pressure. in their peak, in about 2014, they are having an annual income of $1.9 million a year. —— $1.9 billion a year. that
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has dropped to about 800 million. financially they are not as strong as what they used to be in 2014. nonetheless they are still the richest terrorist organisation in the world. you have to remember that some of the atrocities that they conducted in your blood the attack in paris, they did not require that much money. it did not cost them much. so the very fact that they are financially under pressure in the fa ct financially under pressure in the fact that they are losing territory is not going to make them irrelevant. i think as they lose more and more territory they may resort to more problematic tactics and methods that are paid has been using. potentially they can constitute a greater security threat not only to the middle east but to europe as well. thank you very much for your time this morning. time now to find out what is happening with news, travel and weather where you are this morning. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup.
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commuters are being warned they could face difficultjourneys into work this morning after storm doris caused serious disruption yesterday. at the height of the storm almost every route into london was hit by delays or cancellations because of fallen trees and problems with overhead wires. the fire brigade was called out to more than 150 incidents — in victoria a man was injured by falling debris outside the station. the jindalee line thejindalee line is suspended at the moment. the good news is that the moment. the good news is that the overground the moment. the good news is that the overg round has the moment. the good news is that the overground has reopened. a fallen tree had blocked the line this morning. —— thejubilee line. damage to overhead lines at st albans is causing half an hour delays on thameslink between st pancras international and luton. as well as causing disruption to east midlands trains. we're also expecting disruption on many other services— including the stansted express and greater anglia, virgin trains east coast and virgin trains west coast. let's take a quick look
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at the blackwall tunnel this is the age 13, slow heading into london but that is the normal rush—hour. in vauxhall, kennington lane is closed between vauxhall street and tyers street after a church roof collapsed yesterday. and in chiswick, staveley road is still blocked between the a316 and burlington lane after a tree fell in the road. iam sure i am sure many people will remember the classic ladybird books from their childhood. an exhibition of artwork from ladybird books is being launched in reading today. the pocket—sized books from the 20th century covered topics such as how magnets work and what to look for in winter. more recently the classic illustrations have been used for a new series aimed at grown—ups. someone had made an effort with it. it was not sort of... it was not a half effort it was the best artwork and the best writing, the nicest reproduction. they are special. let's have a check on the weather now. storm doris has now whipped off to eastern europe weakening all the while but she has left her mark on the capital.
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the highest recorded wind gust yesterday was 62 mph yesterday afternoon. now today an altogether nicer day. a chilly start with temperatures hovering above freezing towards the west but good spells of sunshine around today. quite chilly at times today. the top temperature only between eight and 10 celsius in central london. some good spells of sunshine and a much nicer day. 0vernight tonight it will stay dry at first, dry for the evening rush hour and then gradually we see cloud increase from the north—west and we get outbreaks of rain. 0vernight lows between four and six celsius. tomorrow it will start to turn breezy again but not as windy as it was yesterday. you can see the isobars tighten here. a south—westerly wind picking up and there will be outbreaks of rain on and off through the day. 0ut around as well. it will feel mild at the weekend with top temperatures on saturday at 11 degrees despite the lack of brightness. a little brighter possibly on sunday
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and a little bit dry but a few outbreaks of rain on the way at times as we head into the start of next week with sunny spells and showers. i'm back with the latest from bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it's back to steph and charlie. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. the time now is 7:30am. the conservatives have won the cumbrian seat of copeland which had been in labour's hands for more than 80 years. in the night's other result, labour held on to stoke central, with ukip leader paul nuttall finishing in second place. and in the last few minutes we spoke with the shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell about the by—elections. these by—elections were difficult ones, we knew that. we lost copeland and we will learn lessons from that. but we won in stoke and we have defeated i think something which was
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really dangerous for politics in this country. we have turned back the politics of dishonesty and division. and, as i say, the people stoke, by supporting labour, have done us all a service in that. 0ur political correspondent alex forsyth joins us from stoke—on—trent. morning to you. you may have heard john mcdonnell speaking about ukip, and that is the story from stoke, isn't it, labour holding onto the seat and where it leaves ukip. undoubtedly, that is the story, there will be labour relief from john mcdonald, that they saw off the challenge from ukip, but it has raised questions for ukip now, and thatis raised questions for ukip now, and that is because after the eu referendum and the victory for ukip and what it stood for, there were questions about where the party goes from there. ukip said it wanted to eat into the labour vote in the midlands and in the north of england as well. this was a big test for
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ukip. here in stoke, 70% of people backed brexit, this is exactly the seat ukip wanted to target. they even put their leader, paul nuttall, up even put their leader, paul nuttall, up to stand, so the fact they didn't win will pose questions for what the party represents and where it will go from here. and the story in copeland is conservatives have an empty, effectively, for the first time in that area in living memory, what does that say about where labour is and about the conservative party? well, the significance of the result shouldn't be underestimated, because it is incredibly rare for a governing party, the conservatives in this case, to take a seat from the opposition, labour in this case, especially when it has been such a strong labour seat for such a long time. labour said there were local issues in play, in that copeland
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by—election, but undoubtedly it will leave questions forjeremy corbyn and his party, and fuel critics who say he is not the man for the moment. thank you. let's have a look at some of the other stories this morning. the royal bank of scotland reported a loss of £7 billion, that is its ninth consecutive year in the red. the figure represents a hefty increase on the £2 billion pound loss the bank reported last year and is one of the group's biggest since its government bailout in 2008. malaysian police say they have found the highly toxic nerve agent, vx, on the face of kim jong—nam, the murdered half brother of north korea's leader. vx is the most toxic of the chemical warfare agents, and just a drop on the skin can kill in minutes. cctv footage shows two women briefly holding something over kim jong—nam's face while he was preparing to board a flight at kuala lumpur airport last week. traces of this vx nerve agent on
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those swabs, that is a very, very serious thing to have found out, because vx is considered the most toxic nerve agent ever invented, it was actually invented in britain in the 1950s, large quantities produced in america and the soviet union in the cold war, but it has subsequently been banned under un chemical convention, and so the fact that it has been used here in this killing makes this just a whole new level on this killing. donald trump says he wants to expand america's nuclear arsenal. in his first comments on the issue since taking office, mr trump said it would be "wonderful" if no nation had nuclear arms, but otherwise the us must be "top of the pack." the government is announcing plans for more universities to offer degree courses which last for just two years. in return, universities will be able to increase annual tuition fees to more than £13,000, although the overall cost of a degree will still be capped at £27,000. the clear—up continues this morning after storm doris battered much
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of the uk leaving one woman dead after being hit by flying debris. winds of up to 94mph caused power cuts and travel chaos as flights were grounded and train services disrupted. drivers are being warned to be wary of ice on the roads in scotland, northern ireland, and north—west england. those are the main stories this morning. and are you ready with bumblebee football? thank you to the brea kfast bumblebee football? thank you to the breakfast audience, we have some excellent suggestions. it turns out that the bees knees were better than we thought. it's been discovered bumblebees can teach each other how to score goals with a tiny ball, displaying a learning ability never before seen in insects. you have to see this to believe it. they surprised scientists by working out how to obtain a food reward simply by watching their neighbours.
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in the experiment, the bees were placed on a platform and had to roll a yellow ball to a specific location in order to obtain a sugar solution. those that observed the success of other bees were better at learning the task than those that didn't. that would make for some legwork. that would make for some legworkm reminds me of golf or curling, a hole on the putting green. the bumblebee 11. the manager has to be max busby, hive allen and gordon mcqueen bee. not bad. let's talk about claudio ranieri. for the people who follow football, a lovely thing that happened, the players delivering for the manager, wonderful moment, and now he is
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gone. the way to explain it, it is like a fairytale with a dream marriage, the fairy princess and the prince of meat and go to the top and have a wonderful honeymoon, they d efy have a wonderful honeymoon, they defy the odds, they defeat the dragons, if you want to continue the metaphor, and then when it gets to the nitty—gritty, when things go wrong, it all falls apart, and there is no happy ever after in this fairy tale. it is so mean. well, it is mean, and the board would say that you have to look at the facts, the clu b you have to look at the facts, the club form has been the worst of any 92 football clu bs. it's such a contrast to the euphoria of nine months ago, but however harsh it may seem, the leicester owners felt they had to act now, with relegation for the champions a real danger. claudio ranieri has cut an increasingly isolated figure, and has not been able to lift his players to stop the slide. it's not just the fact that the club are one place and one point above the relegation zone, but they haven't won away in the league all season, and haven't even scored in the premier league this year.
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it's the worst form of any of the 92 football league clubs. the leicester board have released a statement explaining this move, saying... "domestic results in the current campaign have placed the club's premier league status under threat, and the board reluctantly feels that a change of leadership, while admittedly painful, is necessary in the club's greatest interest. " joining us now from leicester city's stadium is bbc football commentator ian stringer. ian, good morning. so, well, the rest of the football world may be full of shock, may be fuelled by sentiment, but what do the diehard fans think, is it a surprise for them, given the woeful form? i hosted a radio show last
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night from 8:30pm until 10pm and we we re night from 8:30pm until 10pm and we were struggling for people to come and confirm they thought it was a good idea. this time yesterday i was in seville with hundreds, thousands of fans, talking about the jamie vardy goal being a lifeline here in the king power stadium in march, that they could overturn the deficit and the italian could see them into the quarter—finals of the champions league. i looked into claudio ranieri's eyes after the game, he had no idea, he thought it was a good result. clearly he has fallen on his sword. people on air were gutted, very emotional people. he gave this club the best years in 133. so, you were in spain, and the board was also, and you saw no evidence of this supposedly down in the bond between the players and claudio ranieri. it has to be to blame. whoever comes in can only work with the same players?
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absolutely right, there is no tra nsfer absolutely right, there is no transfer window until the summer, you would expect craig shakespeare to ta ke you would expect craig shakespeare to take over on monday, what an enormous game. the manager is going to walk in and take charge of a champions league last 16 second leg, which in itself defies belief and a 1-0 which in itself defies belief and a 1—0 win and they are through, the away goal will count and they are through to the quarter—final. the relationship with the players has been spoken about. they looked like they were together in sir bill earlier on wednesday night but i am led to believe his fate was probably sealed before the game after the m illwa ll sealed before the game after the millwall defeat. he was given the bad news after landing from the trip yesterday afternoon, and he will be packing his bags, saying his goodbyes, and the king is dead, long live the king. yes, indeed. do you think the timing, it was improved in
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spain, we saw the spirit, jamie vardy scored, would it suggest the board have a plan up their sleeve and a certain roberto mancini? roberto mancini was a legend here, i say legend, he was on loan for a short period. 100 yards behind, i watched him as a young boy play online for leicester city, the crowd loved him. would he come to a relegation threat and leicester city in the premier league? i don't know. i follow this club for nine years, their been times when they have been burnt getting rid of managers without a replacement, thinking of venue and ericsson, nigel pearson, it took them a while to appoint claudio ranieri. to sack him after a good defeat in sevilla smacks of the possibility of a replacement lined up. maybe not having been spoken to, but there might be at a replacement
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relatively soon. thank you very much indeed, fascinating to hear about that last night, it seems a lot of emotion was poured out because it is such a bizarre state of affairs. and even as he was celebrating. remember how loyal he was when he stopped, he was offered the italian national, his country's job, but he stayed at leicester. plenty of other sport news as well. it was a dismal night for tottenham — out of the europa league after they could only draw 2—2 against gent of belgium at wembley, losing 3—2 on aggregate. dismal especially for two of their england stars — harry kane scoring at the wrong end. his own goal making it 1—1 on the night. then another of spurs' england players, dele alli, was sent—off for this horrendous tackle. tottenham out, leaving just manchester united as the sole british side in the last 16. england captain wayne rooney says he is staying at manchester united after being linked with a move to china. the 31—year—old striker said
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in a statement: "it's an exciting time at the club and i want to remain a part of it." rooney's agent had travelled to china to see if he could negotiate a deal, which could still happen in the summer. coach vern cotter has made five changes to scotland's side that will face wales in the six nations at murrayfield tomorrow. flankerjon barclay plays his rugby in wales with the scarlets, and will captain the team in the absence of the injured greig laidlaw. ali price will take over from laidlaw at scrum half. fly halfjohnny sexton returns to the ireland side for tomorrow's meeting with france in dublin. sexton missed ireland's first two games with a calf injury, but is back with paddy jackson dropping to the bench. i love the feeling when you get the keys to your new car, and that was the feeling for lewis hamilton yesterday. world champion constructors mercedes have unveiled their new car for the upcoming formula one season. it will be going a lot faster than this when the season starts next month in australia.
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but for now lewis hamilton, who was joined by new team—mate valtteri bottas, took the car for a few laps around a very blustery silverstone. hamilton said the car felt incredible. so, more reaction from a former leicester player at 8:30am and from the tweets, it is what ian has said, two thirds has said it is a mistake, and gary lineker says it is inexplicable. and you have a sense of the passion locally, it will be fascinating to see what is happening next. thank you. it isjust coming up next. thank you. it isjust coming up to 7:45am. it is fair to say it was a bit of a crazy day yesterday. bye for now. the calm after the storm with the
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sum up in devon. a horrible day yesterday that such a contrast this morning. calder, mind you, but it is much calmer. doris is long gone. the area of low pressure losing the make moving so quickly it has moved into pollen and towards russia where as we are in between weather systems, a little bridge of high pressure. although there is some disruption continuing today there are many things to clear up, the weather todayis things to clear up, the weather today is not making any of that any worse. i must say, watch out for ice patches this morning. scotland, northern ireland and northern ireland. indications of how temperatures have dropped after storm doris but there is plenty of dry and, for many of us, sunny weather to come to day. this view are nine o'clock this morning. no frost, widespread into scotland. areas of cloud producing patchy rain and snow. early showers are pulled away from most of northern england at this stage. the couple were
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scattered about throughout wales and internet england. hit and miss and if you are keeping an eye on the wind arrows here, far lighter winds compared to yesterday. for many of us, sunshine. although there is a chance to catch an odd shower here and there look at the picture. at midday, mostly dry with sunny spells. we will see another wet weather system bringing rain into northern ireland this afternoon. double reached a western scotland by the end of the day. a freshening wind with that. nothing on the scale of storm doris. a call today for many of us. the temperatures drop back to single figures. we will take rain away from northern ireland and pushed across scotland this evening. some hill snow for a time becoming rain. 0utbreaks some hill snow for a time becoming rain. outbreaks of rain in wales and the midlands. not much at all into the midlands. not much at all into the south of england. all areas overnight the wind is picking up, gales developing again in north—west scotland. 0vernight the temperatures will not be as low as they were last night. taking a look at the where the menu for the weekend. mild compared with two today. windy, not on the scale of storm doris. there
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will be wet weather around at times. here saturday. 0utbrea ks will be wet weather around at times. here saturday. outbreaks of rain spinning south eastwards. not a lot down the eastern side of the uk, heavy and the winds of western scotland. brightening into scotland and northern ireland. the leader in the day. double—figure temperatures, four to the weekend on sunday brings another weather system south eastwards, not much at all in the south—east england until much a later in the day. unsettled this weekend but storm doris is not on that scale. that is how it looks. thank very much and we will see you later. let's return to our lead story now. the conservative victory in the copland by—election has been hailed as historic. we speak now to sir patrick mclaughlan. good morning. how important is this to the conservative party? it looks calm there but i imagine it has been a night of celebration? it is a very important game. by—elections come and go but this is truly historic. to have won a by—election of the
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major opposition party two years into government is really unprecedented. i would like to congratulate trudie harrison on the fantastic campaign she waged. the campaign she fought is also an endorsement on the work that the prime minister is doing. do you think, however, that this is not about how well the conservatives are doing but more about how badly eve ryo ne doing but more about how badly everyone else is doing? well, no. if we had not have won the seat it would not be the question you would be putting to me. the truth is that this is about the campaign that we fought. we fought at positive campaign and in trudie harrison we gotan campaign and in trudie harrison we got an exceptional candidate whom fought the campaign from local issues and also on the wider national front as well. yes, there we re national front as well. yes, there were problems as far as the labour campaign were concerned. but i would like to come this morning, and congratulate trudie on her remarkable victory and also
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acknowledge the work that has been done by the prime minister in ensuring that this was a victory which was possible. looking at what trudie harrison said in her campaign, she made a commitment during the campaign to keep the maternity services in west cumbria open, this was not something that the prime minister, theresa may, could commit to where she came to the area. what would you say to the people of copland had now about these services? will trudie harrison be able to keep her word? trudie made a very clear promise that she was going to make the case and fight the campaign for the retention of the campaign for the retention of the services in the hospital. there isa the services in the hospital. there is a consultation that has closed. we have yet to see the results about. the issue that is being looked at is how do you service the hospital in the best possible way? that is obviously a very important local issue which trudie will be campaigning hard on. we spoke to the shadow chancellor earlier in the programme. he accused yourselves of
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misinformation and disinformation during the campaign. what do you say to that? i would say that i was rubbish. if that is the best excuse he can come up with then my estimation of him is going down by the second. the truth of the matter is that if i looked at some of the literature in the light of the make that the labour party were putting out this campaign, it was outrageous. the governing party to ta ke outrageous. the governing party to take a seat off the main opposition party in nine years into parliament is just unbelievable. and party in nine years into parliament isjust unbelievable. and if party in nine years into parliament is just unbelievable. and if he and this party cannot actually hold seats like this now then they are going to be in serious trouble over the coming years. i would like to focus on a very positive campaign which was fought by the conservative candidate. a campaign which was not so candidate. a campaign which was not so positive, however, was the by—election in stoke—on—trent where the conservatives came third. is it fairto the conservatives came third. is it fair to say that there are still many people it can not connect with the conservative party? well, there
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are two very different constituencies. in stoke there was a lower turnout. in copland we had a high turnout for by—elections, a 51% turnout which is a higher turnout than we had in recent by—election. in stoke was far lower. we increased our share of the vote in stoke—on—trent. we have a very good candidate they are. the issues were different. it came third but, you know, it he was 100 votes behind ukip. the labour party, overall... sorry? sorry, i interrupted you. please finish a sentence. sorry, i was saying that the share of the vote for the labour party went down. if you are trying to say somehow that it was a bad result for us in stoke, no, we improved our share of the vote. i congratulate our candidate on what he did in that
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campaign. thank you very much for your time. you got there in the end. we have figures from the rbs and the reason tom shone, that we care about these figures is that we still own three quarters of it? good morning. the bank that us taxpayers own almost three quarters of has just reported its full year financial results. they don't make pretty reading. a loss of last year of £7 billion, because of litigation costs in america, the failure to spin off its business in england and wales. it is the ninth year in a row it's made a lost. and it's announced £ 2 billion of cost cutting over the next four years. frances coppola is an independent banking analyst and she's in our london newsroom. good morning. i don't know where to
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start. let's begin with a £7 billion loss. we were expecting that? yes. i think it had been widely singled in advance that there would be a loss and we were at expecting that. possibly a little bit more than we thought but it is in the ballpark. why does it matter? we talk about companies making profit and losses or the time but as the royal bank of scotla nd or the time but as the royal bank of scotland particularly important to us? it is important for us because we own most of it. when there is a loss like this it means that our lives as our ownership of it, how equity is reduced because, you know, when companies make losses it is the shareholders of those companies that ta kes a shareholders of those companies that takes a hit. as the royal bank of scotland, that is us, mostly. and when you look at cost—cutting as well for workers at the royal bank of scotland... they said £2 billion. we hear from the of scotland... they said £2 billion. we hearfrom the bank this morning, they use the terms back—office and middle office of the bank. where it cuts going to be, do you think? back
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office and middle office basically means what we might call the plumbing, the bits that go on behind the scenes in banks that makes the system work. the people who we do not see in the branches but who work in call centres and in processing centres who basically keep the whole system running. that is where the cuts will fall. it may be that they will be expected to work harder and also that there will be some streamlining of efficiencies in the actual processes themselves both in the way people work and in the it systems. when i spoke to the bangalore earlier they were at pains to stress that these were legacy issues from the financial crisis. underneath it all, there is a bank thatis underneath it all, there is a bank that is doing well. how does that argument a hold—up? that is doing well. how does that argument a hold-up? you can see we are doing getting thin but looking
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at the figures i would have to agree with them. underneath it, there is a solid performance being turned in, particularly in the retail bank which is really good news for everybody and, particularly also in what is left of rbs's investment bank. the profits have gone up by 16%. thank you very much for your time, francis. percy marks there over some people's jobs there time, francis. percy marks there over some people'sjobs there in those £2 billion worth of cuts, never mind the losses that it has already announced this morning. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. commuters are being warned they could face difficultjourneys into work this morning after storm doris caused serious disruption yesterday. at the height of the storm almost every route into london was hit by delays or cancellations because of fallen trees and problems with overhead wires. the fire brigade was called out to more than 150 incidents —
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in victoria a man was injured by falling debris outside the station. thejubilee line is suspended at the moment. 0ther other lines appear to be running normally. there are half—hour delays for the thameslink. as well as causing disruption to east midlands trains. we're also expecting disruption on many other services— including the stansted express and greater anglia, virgin trains east coast and virgin trains west coast. there is a queue on the m25 that stretches seven miles. there has been an accident there. finally, in vauxhall, kennington lane is closed. that is after a church roof collapsed yesterday. 15 people believed to be from iraq have been found hiding inside pallets of fruit on the back of a
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lorry at a market in late on. the police say they included a family of five were being taken to hospital. the driver has been arrested. i am sure many people will remember the classic ladybird books from their childhood. an exhibition of artwork from ladybird books is being launched in reading today. more recently the classic illustrations have been used for a new series aimed at grown—ups. someone had made an effort with it. it was not sort of... it was not a half effort it was the best artwork and the best writing, the nicest reproduction. they are special. let's have a check on the weather now. storm doris has now whipped off to eastern europe weakening all the while but she has left her mark on the capital. the highest recorded wind gust yesterday was 62 mph yesterday afternoon. now today an altogether nicer day. a chilly start with temperatures hovering above freezing towards the west but good spells of sunshine around today. quite chilly at times today. the top temperature only between eight and 10 celsius in central london. some good spells of sunshine and a much nicer day.
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0vernight tonight it will stay dry at first, dry for the evening rush hour and then gradually we see cloud increase from the north—west and we get outbreaks of rain. 0vernight lows between four and six celsius. tomorrow it will start to turn breezy again but not as windy as it was yesterday. you can see the isobars tighten here. a south—westerly wind picking up and there will be outbreaks of rain on and off through the day. cloud around as well. it will feel mild at the weekend with top temperatures on saturday at 11 degrees despite the lack of brightness. a little brighter possibly on sunday and a little bit dry but a few outbreaks of rain on the way at times as we head into the start of next week with sunny spells and showers. i'm back with the latest from bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to steph and charlie. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with
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charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. an historic by—election win for the conservatives as they gain copeland from labour. harrison, trudy lynn, the conservative party candidate, 30700 and 48. in the first by—election gain by a governing party for more than 30 years — trudy harrison takes the cumbrian constituency with a majority of more than 2,000. in stoke — labour keep their seat — ukip leader paul nuttall coming second. we're live in both constituencies this morning and we have the latest reaction from the parties involved. good morning, it's
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friday 24th february. also this morning, a big loss for royal bank of scotland. £7 billion in lost last year. the ninth year in a row without a profit. i will have more on those figures in a couple of minutes. in sport there is no happy ever after in the fairy tale of claudio ranieri. it is the calm after the storm doris. we will see some sunny
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weather later. i have the friday forecast and the whole weekend of whether coming up. good morning. first, our main story. "a truly historic victory" — the words of new conservative mp trudy harrison after taking the labour seat of copeland in last night's by—election, the first gain by a governing party since 1982. in the night's other result labour did hold on to stoke central, with ukip leader paul nuttall finishing in second place. this report from our political correspondent tom bateman contains flash photography. harrison, trudy lynne, the conservative party candidate, 13,748. voters here had chosen a labour mp for the last 80 years. but all that changed in a dramatic night as the conservatives took copeland by 2,000 votes. what has happened here tonight is a truly historic event. you'd have to go back more than a century to find an example of a governing party taking a seat
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from the opposition party in an election like this. sack corbyn, sack corbyn! labour had said the vote was on a knife edge. in the aftermath of defeat, their departing candidate chose not to face questions. but this is a moment in history. the first time a conservative has represented the area since the 1930s. and, for them tonight, jubilation. but serious questions for labour underjeremy corbyn. theresa may made the rare move of visiting a by—election seat vacated by an opposition mp. it was a hard—fought campaign over nuclearjobs and hospital services. the result leaves labour assessing its electoral prospects. but there was better news for labour in the by—election in stoke—on—trent, another traditional seat for the party. they held on with a reduced majority. this by—election was a test for ukip in a working—class area that voted heavily for brexit.
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itjust managed second place, but did increase its vote share. ukip's time will come. this will happen. hang on. this seat was, what, number 72 on our hit list. a lot more will happen. there is a lot more to come from us. we are not going anywhere. i am not going anywhere. so therefore, you know, we move on and our time will come. there will be jubilation for theresa may at the result in copeland. jeremy corbyn promised he would reconnect with voters. he may have to try in spite of futher opposition from his own mps. we can now speak to our political correspondent iain watson, who is in whitehaven for us this morning. it looks absolutely lovely there behind you. tell me a little about those words, political history in the making. always a little bit wary when people say that but in relation
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to copeland, put it in perspective for us. ok, very happy to do so. it is lovely here. the calm after the storm. a tightly fought by—election campaign. this seat was formed in 1983. it has always been labour but in whitehaven it has been labour since the 1930s. it is historic for that reason that labour have lost a seat, but also historic that a governing party has gained a seat from the opposition. that has not happened since 1982. so historic for both those reasons. labour so there are indeed reasons for the defeat. they say there is a campaign on the future of the nuclear industry which contain sellafield. they also say in this particular seat, with the labour majority would go down year after yea r. labour majority would go down year after year. that is true butjeremy corbyn's opponents inside his own
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party say these are excuses and not reasons and his leadership came up on the doorstep here in whitehaven and the surrounding areas and that to some extent this was a verdict on his leadership of the labour party. from labour's point of view, what they will be delighted to see is the success in stoke, holding not that seat and seeing off ukip. there will be questions asked aboutjeremy corbyn's leadership but there will also be questions about paul nuttall‘s. i don't expect either man to throw in the towel but there will be questions from their parties. thank you. royal bank of scotland has reported an annual loss of £7 billion, its ninth consecutive year in the red. sean has the details. we were sitting here last year talking about £2 billion and that was a big figure, this year, 2016, £7 billion. a lot of that is because of one—off costs that the bank talks
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about but after nine years of losses that argument might start to wear thin. that is to do with litigation charges in the united states, part of the financial problems to deal with mortgage products it sold around the world. here in the uk there is still the remnants of the ppi compensation it is paying out people. businesses in england and wales needed to spin that. all of these things amounting to big problems for the bank, even though they say things are ticking along 0k. the they say things are ticking along ok. the reason why we care is because as taxpayers, we have a big sta ke because as taxpayers, we have a big stake in the royal bank of scotland? three quarters of it is owned by taxpayers and these losses will hit shareholders and we are one of the biggest shareholders. we need banks to do well to lend to businesses to be able to give us decent customer services and rates. cost cutting comes in somewhere. we have been
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hearing about £2 billion of cost cutting and that could well hitjobs across the business. thank you. leicester city has sacked manager claudio ranieri just nine months after he led the clubs to its first premier league title. the foxes are only one place above the relegation zone with 13 matches left. 0ur sports editor dan roan has more. he masterminded one of sport's greatest miracles, but less than a year after claudio ranieri's leicester city became the most unlikely premier league winners ever, the man who achieved the dream has been dismissed. leicester city are the premier league champions! last season's celebrations have turned to fears of relegation. having swept all before them, this season the euphoria has evaporated. the champions losing their last five league matches. and with leicester languishing one point above the relegation zone the club decided to act. in a statement, the club's chairman said... managerial loyalties
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are notoriously short in supply in the premier league but, given what ranieri achieved, many will be dismayed. former leicester star gary lineker describing the dismissal as... ranieri's last game in charge was this 2—1 defeat against sevilla in the last 16 of the champions league. the manager seemingly unaware of his fate when he spoke after the match. we know, we know they are better than us, very high quality team, highly experienced team, everything, 0k. but we have a very big heart, and a very big effort, we help each other. and i think we deserve this. but it is leicester's poor performances in the premier league that could see them become only
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the second english champions in history to see a title defence end in relegation and it is that which ultimately cost ranieri hisjob. their memories of what he achieved will always be cherished but the fairytale is now over. malaysian police say the highly toxic nerve agent, vx, has been found on the face of kimjong nam — the murdered half brother of north korea's leader. vx is an extremely toxic chemical warfare substance and just a drop on the skin can kill in minutes. cctv footage showed two women briefly holding something over kim jong nam's face while he was preparing to board a flight at kuala lumpur airport last week. donald trump says he wants to expand america's nuclear arsenal. in his first comments on the issue since taking office, mr trump said it would be "wonderful" if no nation had nuclear arms, but otherwise the us must be "top of the pack". more universities in england will be
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soon be able to offer degree courses which last for just two years under new plans. in return they will be able to increase annual tuition fees to more than £13,000 — although the overall cost of a degree will still be capped at £27,000. those are the main stories this morning. let's go back to the by—election results. early this morning ukip's hopes of gaining another mp morning ukip's hopes of gaining anothermp in morning ukip's hopes of gaining another mp in parliament were thwarted as labour's gareth snell won the by—election. we can speak now to the director of ukip peter whittle. you had a real chance of beating labour here but you did not, what went wrong? hello. can you hear us?
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yes, ican. went wrong? hello. can you hear us? yes, i can. you had a real chance of beating labour, what went wrong?|j think beating labour, what went wrong?” think the thing is that obviously, we are disappointed, disappointed that we didn't get paul across the line this time. but in terms of what we can win in ukip, in terms of our if you like win ability of seats, stoke was quite away down the list. it would have been fantastic if we had done it this time. this is the first of many by—elections we will be coming up to now in 2020 and we are already getting ready now for the next fight which will be in leeds. we are in pretty good spirits. 0bviously, leeds. we are in pretty good spirits. obviously, it is no doubt it was a disappointing night. you say it was far down the list in priority of winning it but it was not long ago that nigel farage told ukip's conference the victory in stoke was fundamental to the party's
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future, so what now? it is not right at all. i think people, whether it is the media or in this case nigel, or always tending to put huge amounts of significance on things which are obviously very significant that at the same time, this is not some life or death situation. the fa ct some life or death situation. the fact is that ukip regrouped and became united last year when paul was elected leader and it stayed that way. that was after an extraordinary year last year of ups and downs. but we are going forward now ina and downs. but we are going forward now in a way we have not been before, very united, and indeed, in the polls nationally, we were 15%, we had gone up by 2%. that is the sign ofa we had gone up by 2%. that is the sign of a party which has lost its way, the public support for the party is huge. but if you cannot win in stoke if you have your party
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leader standing and labour it is fairto leader standing and labour it is fair to say leader standing and labour it is fairto say on leader standing and labour it is fair to say on the ropes, where are you going to win? well, there are many different places we are going to be standing in. many different places. give us some examples of where you might win. stoke was obviously a very big brexit constituency, there is no question about that. not everything obviously is about brexit, but i think what happened in this particular case is because we as a party obviously posed a considerable threat to labour, very much the attack was put onto paul personally as leader, quite personal. in fact, in some ways it was a bit of a new low in what was actually done in this campaign. so obviously, that made things very difficult. but we are notaiming to things very difficult. but we are not aiming to whinge about that, thatis not aiming to whinge about that, that is what happened. we are very much looking to the future and we
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are going to go on and we will gather strength and be fighting by—elections this year going up to the general election in three years' time. you mentioned paul nuttall's leadership there, he said he's not going anywhere but as you rightly said there has been a lot of controversy around this campaign, about where he lives, his comments on hillsborough, don't you want a less controversial leader?” on hillsborough, don't you want a less controversial leader? i am finding it difficult to hear you but i think the gist of your question really is yes of course, things were brought up very personally about paul. he dealt with them very clearly but there is no question about it, this was a pretty orchestrated smear campaign against paul. a lot of people want to see us disappear, wherever they are from, and the fact is therefore they will particularly hold us to a particularly hold us to a particularly high standard. in the case of what happened with paul, he
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certainly apologised for errors, ie not reading his website, he made that very clear. but of course, that was followed by other things and all the rest of it that we know. i think this was definitely very much not a policy thing, it was a kind of personal attack on him and obviously, it was difficult for him, but at the same time, ukip remains united around him. when he came back from the count yesterday, a huge cheer went up for him, so paul is absolutely here to stay and we will be united around him. thank you for your time. it is 8:15am exactly. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning... a bruising by—election defeat for labour as they lose their copeland seat for the first time in more than 80 years. the conservative victory is the first by a governing party for 30 years. royal bank of scotland has reported
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an annual loss of £7 billion, its ninth consecutive year in the red. after a very stormy day yesterday, how is it looking today? good morning. we have heard there is still disruption following storm doris, but the weather is in a com pletely doris, but the weather is in a completely different mood today. this is one view from one of our early rising weather watchers in cumbria this morning. doesn't it look lovely? it is cold. storm doris has moved away very quickly, taken those strong winds through germany and poland, heading through eastern europe. we are in a gap between weather systems and a breach of high pressure. at the moment we can relax. quite a bit of dry and sunny weather to come today. a widespread frost in scotland, some icy patches in northern ireland and northern
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england. we've had a few early showers down the eastern side of england. they've just about pulled away into the north sea. 0ne england. they've just about pulled away into the north sea. one or two coming into north—west england and north wales and filtering into midlands but very hit and miss, the exception to the rule. if you are looking at the wind speeds these are much lower compared with yesterday. a completely different picture out there. as you can see as we go on through the morning and to the middle of the day, a lot of dry u nfa i rly middle of the day, a lot of dry unfairly sunny weather. in northern ireland, a change coming back this afternoon with rain coming in. that will reach western scotland and the breeze will freshen again, not on the scale of storm doris. the temperatures are stuck in single figures for many of us, just ten across parts of southern england. this evening rain in southern scotla nd this evening rain in southern scotland preceded by hill snow. drying up for a time in northern ireland. not much rain at all in southern england overnight. turning windy across all parts, gail is
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developing in north—west scotland. but a change of wind direction, south—westerly, milder air coming into the uk, so we will notice that over the weekend. temperatures back up over the weekend. temperatures back up again. a blustery weekend but not stormy and there will be some rain around, clearly, as you can start saturday morning. thoroughly wet in the hills of western scotland and cumbria as well. the rain pushing south—eastwards. not much down the eastern side of the uk. northern ireland and scotland brightening up in the afternoon, a few showers following and the temperature is widely back into double figures. pa rt widely back into double figures. part two of the weekend, on sunday another weather system coming in, taking outbreaks of rain southeast, not reaching east anglia or southeast england until after dark. fairly blustery again. for many of us fairly blustery again. for many of us those temperatures in double figures. it will turn colder into the start of next week. that's how it's looking this weekend, unsettled but not stormy. thanks very much. just coming up to
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8:20am. police in malaysia say a powerful nerve agent called vx appears to have been used in last week's killing of kim jong—nam, the half brother of north korean's dictator kim jong—un. in a statement, officials said traces of the agent, which is used in chemical warfare, were found on kim jong—nam's face. earlier our correspondent rupert wingfield—hayes has been following the story from kuala lumpur. this story continues to get more and more extraordinary as the days go by. what the authorities are telling us now by. what the authorities are telling us now is that after kim jong—nam died at the airport or on the way to the hospital from the airport last week, they took him to the morgue and did an autopsy, during which they swapped his face, particularly his cheeks and eyes and then they tested those swabs and it's telling them about 11 days to come back with these results but they say they have found traces of this vx nerve agent
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on those swabs. that's a very serious thing to have found out because vx is considered to be the most toxic nerve agent ever invented. it was invented in britain in the 1950s. large quantities were produced in america and the soviet union during the cold war but it has subsequently been banned under un chemical convention, and so the fact it's been used here in this killing makes it a whole new level on this killing. studio: also, looking at what malaysia are saying about this, they are not blaming the north korean state for his death, but saying north koreans were clearly behind it. what's happening here? well, it's very unclear, is the short answer. they are not at the moment accusing the north korean state of direct involvement however although circumstantial evidence so far points towards a plot, based in
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north korea or at least based on the north korea or at least based on the north korean embassy here in kuala lumpur. there are two people in custody, while women, thought to have carried out the actual killing. they are not north korean but all the other suspects named are north korean national scum and one of them they want to talk to is a north korean diplomat from the embassy here, all the north koreans are refusing to hand over. these two women and that other person they wa nt to women and that other person they want to speak to, what happens next? diplomatically we are locked in a bit of a stalemate. the north koreans are refusing to back down or hand over these people wanted. there is potential now for a diplomatic rift. i've heard people here today say they will have to do something in retaliation, even as high as perhaps kicking the north korean ambassador out of here. no confirmation that will actually happen but this is now very, very serious. it is a 21 am. there are growing calls from patients, experts and nurses
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for better training and awareness of sickle cell disease. it's an inherited blood disorder that affects thousands of mostly african and caribbean people in the uk. during a so—called sickle cell crises or episode, red blood cells change shape, causing intense pain and organ damage. they can prove fatal. and as noel phillips reports, just having the condition can make other illnesses much worse. this boy was six when he died from organ failure, sepsis and sickle cell disease in 2015. he just kept saying "mum, i want to lie down." simonne called emergency. she told operators her son was vomiting and had a temperature. over the next hour his condition worsened. what happened on that day... i don't feel it was treated urgently enough, when that person on the phone told me i would have to probably wait up to 45 minutes for an ambulance.
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two ambulances and a rapid response unit were dispatched but then cancelled and sent to more urgent cases. but shortly after paramedics arrived, the child went into cardiac arrest. i was a little bit panicked, but i was not trying to show that i was panicked. but i was... it was serious then. lola is one of the country's most senior sickle cell nurses. you combine vomiting, diarrhoea, that the mother said the child had a fever. you combine those things together with the fact that the child has sickle cell disease and that should be a trigger sufficient to say that that child needs attention. in a statement, the ambulance service apologised for the delay in getting to the child. the medical director added that over the last few years they had worked closely with the sickle cell society to improve care to patients.
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it is like being stabbed while someone is pouring acid on you. this man is one of 15,000 people in britain living with sickle cell disease. it causes crippling pain, but he claims he has had to wait hours in hospitalfor treatment. waiting in a cubicle for two plus hours. jo howard is a sickle cell consultant. in a recent report she says that staff shortages mean that patients are not getting the right care. patients should not be left in pain. patients should be treated within 30 minutes. i think that is an absolutely reasonable thing that we should be doing for every patient. i think all trusts should be aiming to do that. i have had to teach
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the doctors about it. davinia has been living with the disease for 30 years. the understanding and the care is not there. nurses don't learn while they are training, they learn on the job. nhs england say they are committed to providing patients with the high standards of treatment care and support. but davinia says the condition remains largely overlooked and, like sickle cell sufferers, will remain difficult. that was no phillips there with that report. coming up in a moment on the bbc news channel is business live. here on breakfast... he's gone from lifting the premier league trophy to collecting his p45 injust nine months. we'll get reaction from a former leicester player to the club's sacking of claudio ranieri. there is already lots of reaction
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coming in from fans and other people as well. it's one of those stories, evenif as well. it's one of those stories, even if you are not interested in football, the story, the rise and fall of leicester city is quite interesting to a lot of people. comments here, one saying, let's be honest, leicester over achieved last season. did they really expect they'd be able to repeat it? it's not claudio ranieri's fault. and another viewer said, players to blame. they think they've arrived, performances have dropped, not staying hungry. and another viewer said instead of sacking managers, why not sack the players? catherine says the same, nobody ever blames the overpaid players, they should hang their heads in shame. they have let down claudio lots of comments coming in, thank you for those. we will be talking about them with mike shortly. time now for the
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news travel and weather where you in the wake of storm doris we will now see some sunshine. the storm has been zooming across europe. a short lived ridge of high pressure will be settling the weather down this morning. there are some showers to watch for. many areas having some morning sunshine. into the afternoon we are looking at some changes in the weather. a weather system coming off the atlantic will bring rain to west scotland, preceded by some hill snow, most of the snow above 200 metres elevation. the wind is nowhere near a strung as they were yesterday. for england and wales, keeping a lot of dry weather, tending to cloud over by western areas later in the day. much of eastern england will hold onto the sunshine all day. 0vernight we will see the wet weather push across
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scotland. the snow becomes less of an issue, even in the higher mountains. wet weather from an issue, even in the higher mountains. wet weatherfrom northern ireland. some dribbles of rain or northern england. a much lighter nights in last night. the weekend is looking unsettled. these strong south—westerly wind will target heavy rain into south—west scotland and cumbria. we could get around 60 millimetres of rain falling here today, enough to cause localised flooding. the rain will try to brighten up later on. for sunday, brighten up later on. for sunday, bright enough towards south—eastern parts of the uk but more rain is on the way for the north—west of the uk. staying mild, highs of 12 degrees. this is business live from bbc news with aaron heslehurst and rachel horne. "made by american hands". trump pledges to bring millions of factoryjobs back to the us. but who really took them? mexicans, or machines? live from london, that's our top story on friday 24th february.
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five million us factoryjobs have been lost since the turn of the millennium, but what's to blame? we'll ask an expert later in the show. also in the programme — knock off — get outta here, go home early, it's premium friday! japanese firms bring in a 3.00 pm finish — once a month, starting today. question is, can it really change a culture that has a word
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