Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 25, 2017 5:00pm-6:01pm GMT

5:00 pm
this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at five. former labour foreign secretary, david miliband, says the party is at its weakest point in half a century. as its deputy leader warns the party must do better. this is not the time for a leadership election, that was settled last year, but we have to do better, we cannot sustain this level of distance from our electorate. oxfam says it's preparing for a huge influx of civilians fleeing western mosul, as iraqi forces push further into territory held by the islamic state group. several news organisations, including the bbc, have been barred from entering an informal press briefing at the white house. suicide bombers have attacked two security compounds in syria's third city of homs, killing at least 30 people. also coming up... the national trust receives an unexpected gift. an island which inspired the organisation's foundation is given to the conservation charity after more than a century in private hands.
5:01 pm
scotla nd scotland break—out. and a spirited second—half performance at murrayfield earns scotland their first six nations win over wales in ten years. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. good afternoon. the former labour foreign secretary david miliband says the party is the furthest it's been from power in 50 years. he was responding to labour's by—election defeat in copeland in cumbria where the conservatives overturned a majority of more than two thousand to oust labour from a seat it had held for 80 years. jeremy corbyn has said he won't step down as leader. here's our political
5:02 pm
correspondent, matt cole. if these scenes in stoke, where labour held the seat, had been repeated in copeland, there would be fewer questions forjeremy corbyn. but it was theresa may's tories who celebrated an historic win in cumbria, turning this rock—solid red seat blue for the first time in 80 years. not for the first time, labour's former foreign secretary has spoken his mind. in a newspaper interview, david miliband said he feared labour is losing support in its core base and added he is obviously deeply concerned that labour is further from power than "at any stage in my lifetime." mr miliband is not the only one being critical of labour in print. in an article for the new statesman magazine, dave prentis, the leader of the union unison, says copeland was a disaster. and whilst not pinning the blame onjeremy corbyn, he does say that since his election as leader five months ago, labour has not risen much closer to setting up shop
5:03 pm
here in downing street. that said, for the most part the unions are still with jeremy corbyn. this is not about one person. it is about us reconnecting with our grassroots. it is about getting the working class vote back and by defeating ukip in stoke, we have successfully done that because we were told we could not. so, let us share our successes, work and get back into government where we should be. and labour's current deputy leader says he does not agree with mr miliband either. i do understand the point he is making. we are in very difficult times and we need to change tack in order to make sure that we can build a winning coalition for the next general election, whenever that may come. stoke central has tempered the potential for other attacks onjeremy corbyn, and noticeably his strongest mp critics have held off calling on him to quit following the vote, the copeland catastrophe, which is probably just as well as he is insisting he is going nowhere. iraqi forces have entered parts
5:04 pm
of western mosul in what is expected to be an arduous and dangerous battle to remove so called islamic state from iraq's second largest city. wyre davies reports from an advanced iraqi military base where american troops and advisers are proving to be a key part of the mosul offensive. the battle for mosul is in a critical phase. fierce clashes on the western edge of the city. fighters from so—called islamic state recede into narrow streets where government forces will have to follow. but they're not alone. from a field just to the south, these big american guns are why local commanders are confident they can finally drive is from its last major stronghold in iraq. this is an overwhelmingly iraqi military operation, but the role of american advisors and troops, so—called boots
5:05 pm
on the ground is also critical. us artillery pieces pounding targets in mosul. us commanders are reluctant to divulge the most sensitive details particularly about special forces at the frontline, but say american support can tip the balance. the fight in western mosul will be a tough fight for really any army in the world. so the iraqi army and iraqi federal police will face a tough fight. it will be a lot of house—to—house fighting. the enemy is cornered. they don't have any choice, but to fight. the iraqis will certainly defeat daesh and mosul. they will prevail. but in this brutal conflict, is fighters will use every tactic they can. this is video eulogises the use of commercially available drones to drop bombs and grenades. the effects are terrifying. this woman's leg was
5:06 pm
shattered in a drone attack. "i was lying on the ground. there were people pointing to the sky from where the bomb came", she told me. this is pretty new for this conflict. this method can be very effective and impacts on the population. really, really brutal. with 750,000 civilians currently trapped inside western mosul, aid agenies are are preparing for the worst. they're already calling it a humanitarian crisis. ina in a moment we join bbc one for a full round—up, but first, news organisations in the united states have been ruffled by fans were several of them, including the bbc have been barred from entering a press briefing. president trump's spokesman said the administration would "push back"
5:07 pm
against what it sees as false reporting. 0ur washington correspondent laura bicker reports. president trump has stepped up his battle with the media. a few days ago i called the fake news the enemy of the people, and they are. they are the enemy of the people. because they have no sources, theyjust make ‘em up when there are none. he is angry at recent reports claiming his campaign aides had contacts with russian intelligence officials. the new york times used anonymous sources for their story. this should not be allowed, he said. they shouldn't be allowed to use sources unless they use somebody‘s name. let their name be put out there. this latest tirade during a speech to a conservative conference was 15 minutes long and just a few hours later things changed at the white house. this is the usual briefing by the white house press secretary, all accredited media can attend. instead a member of selected media groups were invited into sean spicer‘s office and others
5:08 pm
were barred, including the bbc. he was asked why. this ban saying cnn and others have been blocked from media briefings, are cnn and the new york times not in here right now because you are unhappy with their reporting? why are they not in here? because we had a pool and we expanded it and we added some folks to come and cover. it is my decision to expand the pool. the president said, "we are going to do something about it," in reference to the stories that he says are false by the new york times and cnn and others. what is he talking about? we are going to aggressively push back. we are notjust going to sit back and let false narratives, false stories, inaccurate facts, get out there. the white house correspondents' association says it is protesting strongly and is encouraging those who were allowed in to share material. the bbc is also asking for clarification as to why it was barred. good evening. labour's deputy leader tom watson
5:09 pm
has said the party must ‘do better‘ at winning over voters but now is "not the time" to change the leadership. is "not the time" to he was speaking at the scottish labour conference in perth where he acknowledged that the party's by—election loss in copeland two days ago had been hugely disappointing. jeremy corbyn has said he will stay on as leader. here's our political correspondent carole walker. jeremy corbyn has made it clear he has no intention of stepping down. he was in stoke yesterday, where labour saw off the challenge from ukip to win the by—election. where labour saw off the challenge but he is facing questions about the party's defeat in copland. the tories were jubilant after seizing the seat which had been in labour's hands since it was created. labour's deputy leader told the scottish conference he was hugely disappointed with the result. 0urjob at the next general election is to gain over 100 seats.
5:10 pm
keeping what we have is supposed to be the easy bit. this is not the time for a leadership election. that issue was settled last year. for a leadership election. but we have to do better. for a leadership election. we cannot sustain this level of distance from our electorate, from our national supporters. of distance from our electorate, so things do have to change. of distance from our electorate, even mr corbyn's most outspoken critics at westminster are not are not contemplating a leadership challenge. they fear he'd be a leadership challenge. re—elected and return in a stronger position. but many of his mps are deeply concerned that under his leadership there is little prospect of the party regaining support amongst the wider electorate. of the party regaining support david miliband, the former foreign secretary who now runs a charity based in new york, said he feared labour is losing support in its core base. said he feared labour is losing he said "i'm obviously deeply concerned that labour is further from power than at any stage in my lifetime". his supporters sayjeremy corbyn is not the problem. this isn't about one person,
5:11 pm
it's about as reconnecting the working class vote back. it's about as reconnecting and of course by defeating ukip instead we've successfully done that. ukip instead we've so let's share our successes, work, build upon it, and get back into government. work, build upon it, but in scotland where labour is struggling to recover, party members are concerned at the scale of the problems. can't help but thinkt leadership i can't help but think the leadership at the uk level is partly to blame for that. i thinkjeremy corbyn is our leader. he has the absolute support of the labour party, we've got to get on with it. of the labour party, jeremy corbyn has said he is proud to continue as labour. he's not given any indication he'll be changing his approach. in be changing his approach. order to rebuild support party. carole walker, bbc news. party. media groups have reacted angrily after several, including the bbc, were barred from a press briefing at the white house. the new york times said the move was an insult to democratic ideals. the bbc has asked the white house for clarification.
5:12 pm
president trump's spokesman, sean spicer, was challenged about the decision. sean spicer, was challenged reporter: are cnn and the new york times not in here because you're unhappy with their reporting? times not in here because you're why are they not in here? times not in here because you're because we had a pool and then we expanded it and we added some folks to come and cover it. we expanded it and we added some there we expanded it and we added some is enough roor it was my decision to expand the pool. reporter: the president said "we're going to do something about it" in reference to these stories that he is saying are false by the new york times, cnn and others. what is he talking about? cnn and others. i think we're going to aggressively push back. we're just not going to sit back and let false narratives, false stories, inaccurate facts get out there. iraqi forces have entered parts of western mosul in what is expected to be an arduous and dangerous battle to remove so called islamic state from iraq's second largest city. wyre davies reports from an advanced iraqi military base where american troops and advisers are proving to be a key part of the mosul offensive.
5:13 pm
to be a key part of this woman is a victim of islamic state's latest tactic in its desperate bid to avoid defeat in mosul. the 55—year—old mother of seven from the eastern part of the city was hit in a drone strike. from the eastern part of the city her leg shattered. from the eastern part of the city "i was lying on the ground and people were pointing to the sky from where the bomb came", she told me. one of dozens of drone attack victims they've treated at this hospital. attack victims they've this is pretty new for this conflict but also for conflicts all over the world. but also for conflicts these mortars can be very effective and the impact on the population really, really brutal. and the impact on the population this is video eulogises the use of commercially available drones to drop bombs and grenades. of commercially available drones an organisation which governs according to brutal feudal codes adapting modern technology to lethal effect. drones are yet another threat
5:14 pm
for government troops now pursuing fighters from so—called islamic state into the narrow streets of mosul. islamic state into the narrow after days of fierce clashes on the edge of the city. but from a field just to the south, big american guns are helping to sway the battle perhaps decisively in the government's favour. decisively in the this is an overwhelmingly iraqi military operation but the role of american advisers and troops, so—called boots on the ground, is also critical. so—called boots on the ground, us artillery pieces pounding targets in mosul. american commanders are reluctant to divulge too many sensitive details, but say us military support will be decisive. the fight in western mosul would be a tough fight for really any army in the world. a tough fight for really so the iraqi army, the iraqi federal police, again, will face a tough fight. federal police, again, it will be a lot of house—to—house fighting.
5:15 pm
the enemy is cornered. house—to—house fighting. they don't have any choice but to fight. a kurdish reporter, shifa gardi, was killed today covering the government advanced into mosul. was killed today covering a handful of refugees fled in the opposite direction but there are an estimated 750,000 civilians still trapped inside the besieged city. civilians still trapped wyre davies, bbc news, northern iraq. five teenagers from london have appeared at westminster magistrates' court today charged with terror—related offences. the boys, aged between 15 and i9, were arrested on tuesday, following a series of raids across the capital by the metropolitan police's counter—terrorism unit. three men have appeared in court on slavery charges after the discovery of a cannabis factory at a disused nuclear bunker in wiltshire. factory at a disused nuclear a police raid there on wednesday found plants with a street value of around a million pounds. found plants with a street value all three men were remanded in custody. a woman has been charged over the death of a three year old boy who was attacked by a dog last summer. dexter neal died at halstead
5:16 pm
in essex in august. jade dunne, who's 29 is accused of owning a dog dangerously out of control. is accused of owning a dog leicester city's former manager, claudio ranieri, has paid his last visit to the club's training ground. claudio ranieri, has paid his last he was sacked on thursday, just nine months after the team unexpectedly won the premier league title. leicester has been struggling this season. ranieri told reporters he wanted to say goodbye properly to the players. he wanted to say goodbye i don't speak with anybody, just to say thank you to the fans, they were fantastic, thank you. just to say thank you to the fans, claudio, how do you feel? just to say thank you to the fans, i feel good now. just to say thank you to the fans, you really... just to say thank you to the fans, you feel good? just to say thank you to the fans, yes, of course. just to say thank you to the fans, because what we achieved in leicester i hope could happen again, but it will be very difficult. leicester i hope could happen again, rugby now and in the six nations scotland have beaten wales for the first time in 10 years. scotland have beaten wales despite having five key players missing from their side scotland won 29 points to 13. missing from their side scotland our sports correspondent patrick geary was watching.
5:17 pm
you geary was watching. can lose yourself in edinburgh in you can lose yourself in edinburgh. in the city of at least it takes just one turn. so to the six nations. blown off course last week, scotla nd nations. blown off course last week, scotland in paris. wales in cardiff. scores! one further false move for either and their championship it's a dead end. so much hanging over this. for 20 minutes so little ground given. until wales set off on the open road. liam williams the fast leg. too quick to be stopped by any of scotland's barriers. so they try to catch them another way. finn russell kicked scotland closer. but leigh halfpenny can kick to the horizon. consider russell trumped. scotla nd horizon. consider russell trumped. scotland flew out after the break. tommy seymourfor scotland flew out after the break. tommy seymour for the line. in the city of trainspotting, try spotting. was it? it was, just. scotland
5:18 pm
ahead. they moved six points clear, then wales responded. this time rhys webb asked the question. before he reached the try line, you reached touch, the answer was no try. under the pump scotland have cracked in the pump scotland have cracked in the past. delirium, vern cotter style. a first scottish victory over wales in ten years. so, 29—13, and all of this show is scotland's rugby ‘s resurgence and all of this show is scotland's rugby vs resurgence and proves all of this show is scotland's rugby ‘s resurgence and proves that they are very real contenders for this year ‘s title. patrick geary, bbc news and murrayfield. there's more throughout the evening on the bbc news channel, we are back with the late news at a quarter past ten — now on bbc1 its time for the news where you are. hello this is bbc news. more on our lead story and those remarks by the former labour foreign
5:19 pm
secretary david miliband that the party is the furthest it has been from power in 50 years. let's hear from power in 50 years. let's hear from our political correspondent who says he does not think the comment will botherjeremy corbyn all that much. it's not the first time that he has been critical ofjeremy corbyn. the reason he is speaking now, that defeat in copeland is pretty historic, 80 years, since its inception, that was a labour seat. the swing of votes from labour to the conservatives took a majority for a labour, it the conservatives took a majority fora labour, it is the conservatives took a majority for a labour, it is about 6.7% swing and that were replicated across the
5:20 pm
country you could see the tories getting back on in a general election with our majority of 100 and defines its. clearly he is very concerned for the party. i think jeremy corbyn's people say he would say that. they point to the fact that they won in stoke on trent and it proves they can still win. mr corbyn said he is not looking at his position, where to the union stand on this? well, they play an important role. they have offered support to jeremy corbyn throughout and one thing we do want to watch, there is obviously an election going on for the position of the leader of the unite union. len mccluskey was leading it and he is now being challenged. the contention there is that len mccluskey, one of the big
5:21 pm
backers ofjeremy corbyn, is too close to westminster politics, the challenger says we want to move from that and if that changes and it len mccluskey was to lose, that could change the relationship between labour, jeremy corbyn and the unions but for now, i think broadly speaking, we are seeing unions mostly backing jeremy corbyn albeit the friendly criticism that he needs to do better because copeland was a disaster. we will be hearing from the scottish labour party on the second day of their conference. indeed. we have heard from tom watson, the deputy leader of the national party who has been reflecting on the by—election defeats and saying we should not be pleased about holding onto our worrying about losing seats that have always been hours, seven years into ourtime in have always been hours, seven years into our time in opposition. he says that they need to do better and he has made clear that he does not think it is the time for leadership elections. some breaking news that
5:22 pm
is coming in via the associated press. it has been reported in germany that a man apparently drove a car into a group of pedestrians in the square in heidelberg. three people were injured and then the man fled the location and he was tracked down by police and was shot. it is believed that he had been carrying a knife and then got out of his rental carand ran off. knife and then got out of his rental car and ran off. police tracked him down, we understand it was a short stand—off and he has been taken to hospital after being shot by police. no immediate word on his possible motives. more news as we get it. iraqi forces have entered parts of western mosul in what is expected to be an arduous and dangerous battle to re m ove be an arduous and dangerous battle to remove so—called islamic state from the second largest city in iraq. to get more on the story i am joined by save the debbie terry ——
5:23 pm
deputy director. bring us up to date on the situation. thank you for having me. we have seen families, women and children in particular, fleeing the city. for safety. sorry, we understand also, in terms of the effect it is going to have on civilians, take us through what is expected. what we are hearing, we are hearing from the women and children who are on the run from the city, there are women and children being shot by snipers from behind and really they are talking about families being separated. they are talking about a horrible situation. how easy is it to do that, to get them to safety? the moment they
5:24 pm
leave their houses, that is the most dangerous part, where they are being shot from behind and really, some of them are making it, some of them are either injured or killed. where are they going? they are going through they going? they are going through the safe routes towards the identified displacement camps where teams are on stand—by with other agencies to provide water, food and bla nkets agencies to provide water, food and blankets and what ever they need for today. finally, do we know how long or have you been given any indication as to how long this offensive will take in mosul? u nfortu nately, offensive will take in mosul? unfortunately, it is hard to predict. 0k. unfortunately, it is hard to predict. ok. we are going to leave it there for now. thank you very much. thank you. just to remind you of our breaking news this afternoon ona of our breaking news this afternoon on a bbc news, it has been reported
5:25 pm
via a pea that a man drove a car into pedestrians in the german city of heidelberg, three people have been injured and the man himself has been injured and the man himself has been shot by police and taken to hospital. time to catch up with the weather. scotland and northern ireland have managed to see sunshine this afternoon, but for england and wales, we have a lot of cloud and a fair bit of rain. that rain moves from west to east and by the end of the night it should be mostly gone leaving behind cloud, some breaks in the north—east, a touch of frost in the north—east, a touch of frost in the north—east, a touch of frost in the north—east of scotland but not so the north—east of scotland but not so elsewhere with a southerly breeze, relatively mild. the next system coming in from the west, wet and windy weather spreading quickly through scotland, pushing through northern ireland as well and it will get into the west of england as well where the winds pick up, could get gusts of up to 50 or 60 mph. that rain never really gets towards east anglia and the south—east. temperatures in double figures, but it is turning colder from the north and the colder air spreads across
5:26 pm
many parts of the uk as we look towards the start of the new week. quite blustery, showers around, some of the shires will be heavy, hail, thunder and even a bit of wintry weather over higher ground. this is bbc news. your headlines at 5:30pm. labour's deputy leader tom watson says now is not the time for a leadership contest, but once the party must do better at winning over voters. iraqi forces have now entered parts of western mosul in what is expected to be a dangerous battle to remove so—called islamic state from iraq's second largest city. several large news organisations have been excluded from a briefing by president trump's spokesman at the white house. the bbc, cnn and the new york times were among those told they were not invited. suicide bombers have attacks two security installations
5:27 pm
in homs killing at least 30 people. it is the biggest weekend in the music industry with the musical expected to dominate tamara's 0scars. it is expected to become an arena for political discontent. keith adams reports. it is 0scars weekend and the red carpet has been rolled out to signal the start of the 89th academy awards. millions of people around the world will tune in to see if la la land sweeps the board. the musical about two la dreamers is nominated in 1a categories and is expected to come away with a raft of major prizes. but politics is expected to loom large this year. on friday, a demonstration took place in support of immigrant rights, where the crowd was addressed by the actors michaelj fox and jodie foster. there are people giving up everything.
5:28 pm
they have lost everything they have and are struggling to keep their families alive and to keep food in their mouths and keep diseases from their bodies, and taking tremendous risks to get here, to get to this country, and then we... we say no? it is our time to tell our elected officials to do theirjob. we will not tolerate chaos, ineptitude and warmongering. there is also expected to be a political mist to be a political mood surrounding the event, with many anticipating acceptance speeches with an anti—trump message. one of the nominated films, the white helmets, has been dragged into the political frame. the documentary is about rescuers on the journey through training to the syrian front line. its cameraman, khaled khatib,
5:29 pm
has been barred from travelling to los angeles for the ceremony. officials say they have found what they called "derogatory information" about him. sunday's ceremony is sure to have the glitz and glamour you would expect, but this year look out for more political digs than usual. keith adams, bbc news. an island which inspired the foundation of the national trust has been gifted to the charity after more than a century in private hands. sitting in the lake district, grasmere island was left to the trust by its former owner in her will. dave guest has been for a visit. it is small but beautifully formed.
5:30 pm
grasmere island lies at the heart of the lake district. wordsworth is said to have picnicked here frequently. but back in 1893 the island was put up for sale and the thought of this idyllic spot becoming private property outraged a local clergyman hardwicke rwa nsley. canon hardwicke rawnsley had a deep passion that everybody needed access to nature and natural beauty. the journey to grasmere island is an idyllic experience in itself. back in 1893 the new owner decided to make a few additions which did not go down too well with the locals. mr bell erected a flagpole, he planted some shrubbery, which caused a lot of indignation. a respectful letter was written asking him to reconsider some of these changes. the reply was blunt. "if you and your friends felt so strongly about what happens "to the island, you were perfectly competent to turn up to the sale "as i did, and purchase it." i suppose really that is exactly the issue that rawnsley was concerned about, that bits of the lake district were being sold off to the highest bidder and they could do whatever
5:31 pm
they wanted with it. absolutely. he was passionate that ordinary people had access to natural beauty in nature. the loss of this island for public use proved the catalyst that inspired rawnsley to become a founding father of the national trust. the national trust. but it is only now that the trust has been able to take control of the island. the last owner bequeathed it to them. so now this island belongs to the national trust, will it be overrun with hundreds of people? i don't think so. whilst we would never stop people from coming, the physical access to the island is difficult, which makes it a little refuge for nature. and as a conservation charity, that is important to us. this is quite an oak tree, isn't it? it is wonderful. a veteran oak tree. heaven knows how many hundreds of years old it is. canon rawnsley spent his final years at allan bank on the shore of grasmere. from here he could view the island that inspired him to help create the national trust.
5:32 pm
now, at last, that island is part of the trust's portfolio, to be preserved and enjoyed by everyone for ever. dave guest, bbc news, grasmere. time for the sport. we will cross over and speak to catherine. good evening. we will start with by good evening. we will start with rugby union and the first win for scotla nd rugby union and the first win for scotland over wales in a decade. they won the first of this weekend's six nations fixtures 29—13 in front ofan six nations fixtures 29—13 in front of an ecstatic home crowd. whales lead at half—time, 13—9 up, liam williams rounded off a slick move for wales's only tried but scotland we re for wales's only tried but scotland were dominated —— dominant thereafter with seymour and this is not crossing the line and russell kicking 19 points. the scots's success ended wales's run of four
5:33 pm
consecutive wins in murrayfield. we started the jabbing chip well at home against ireland and were disappointed in france but we believe we can do something with this group and we are notjust saying that. we have come today from a poor first half to saying that. we have come today from a poorfirst half to build saying that. we have come today from a poor first half to build a saying that. we have come today from a poorfirst half to build a nice score and be a good welsh side. we beat ireland, good team, wales, a very good team as well, so england for the next game, and we are a group of we work hard, we genuinely believe we can win games. there was definitely a momentum shift at the end of the first half. they took the opportunity. we wanted to keep possession in the second half and they took the opportunity to capitalise on the possession they had. if the rhys webb try had been allowed would that be a turning point? we cannot focus on that, it was disallowed, we should have capitalised more in the game. it is easy to say with hindsight but we
5:34 pm
fell short in the second—half. elsewhere ireland are currently playing france in dublin, ireland have a good record at home in the six nations, nine matches without defeat, but france got the first points on the board courtesy of lopes who has converted two penalties, but murray responded with a try for ireland just a short while ago, soa a try for ireland just a short while ago, so a slender lead for them, 7—6 approaching half—time at the aviva stadium. england are top of the women's six nations table tonight after beating italy 29—15. the english pack were too strong for their opponents, hooker vicky fleetwood scoring a hat—trick of almost identical tries for england. they now have four point lead at the top of the table as they look to win their first top of the table as they look to win theirfirst six top of the table as they look to win their first six nations since 2012. ireland play france tomorrow. the business of the premiership goes on of course and saracens moved to within two points of leaders wasps within two points of leaders wasps with a win against sale sharks. elsewhere, exeter beat newcastle
5:35 pm
36-14 elsewhere, exeter beat newcastle 36—14 and second from bottom worcester were well beaten by northampton. 0n worcester were well beaten by northampton. on two premier league football, and leaders chelsea are now 11 points clear at the top of the table, beating swansea 3—1, fabregas scoring first and llorente drawing swansea level, but a late flurry of two goals from pedro and costa won it for chelsea. we showed great character to start the second half, create the chances, and then we scored a repeat. i think we did a lot to win the game, now it is important to win this way. we need over 29 points to be champions. it is important to know this for me and my players and the fans. we have to continue with great focus and concentration. there was a big win
5:36 pm
for crystal palace as well, hoisting themselves and of the relegation zone by beating middlesbrough1—0. new signing van aanholt with the goal, pulling palace level with middlesbrough on points now. goal, pulling palace level with middlesbrough on points nowm goal, pulling palace level with middlesbrough on points now. it is a great victory and hopefully we can move on from there. i think the two week break had a big influence on players because we could get a lot of work into the players in all aspects of their game, and i think today they made a lot of really good decisions and coped with the pressure very well. bournemouth's poor form in 2017 continues. they're still without a league win this year after losing 2—1 to west brom at the hawthorns (00v) josh king early penalty put bournemouth ahead after just 5 minutes. craig dawson equalised for west brom and gareth mcauley scored the winner. it's a fourth league defeat in a row for bournemouth. most teams when they are not winning games it is not one person, it is different players, and that's why we
5:37 pm
have to take collective responsibility to make sure we put those right and come back. if we do come out of this, which i am sure we will, we will be a better team for it. everton are unbeaten in nine games now, beating bottom side sunderland 2—0. gay scored his first goalfor everton then sunderland 2—0. gay scored his first goal for everton then the cargo scored his 60th, equalling the club record. another clean sheet, really pleased by the first 45 minutes. not really ha p py pleased by the first 45 minutes. not really happy about the second a5. pleased by the first 45 minutes. not really happy about the second as. i think we dropped the tempo. we played more backbone than forward, and one lucky moment —— more back then than forward. i think it was defoe. a lucky moment and we did it ourselves because once again we drop the tempo in the second—half. ourselves because once again we drop the tempo in the second-half. hull city miss the chance to pull themselves out of the bottom three drawing 1—1 with burnley, a late
5:38 pm
penalty by tom huddlestone giving them the lead but michael keane scored for burnleyjust four minutes later. burnley have still not on the game away from home this season. so here's confirmation of all those premier league results for you — the late kick off sees watford take on west ham — that's got underway that's got underway at half past and it's1—0 to watford — troy deeney with a penalty. celtic have maintained their 2a point lead at the top of the premiership with a 2—0 win over hamilton, dembele scoring both to give celtic their 21st league win in a row. aberdeen nine points clear in the race for second with a win over ross county, adam rooney with the goal there. dundee one away at motherwell, partick thistle beating ten man hearts at firhill and kilmarnock got their first win away since october at saintjohnstone. leicester city play liverpool on monday but after today's premier
5:39 pm
league results, last year's champions have fallen into the relegation zone. sacked manager claudio ranieri has been at the training ground this morning to say his goodbyes to the staff. the club's owners flew in after he'd left. adam wilde reports. the thoughts of many leicester fans didn't need spelling out. but outside the training ground today here they were. the players arriving for a final goodbye to claudio ranieri, the man who guided them to one ranieri, the man who guided them to or the game's history, but also now in the game's history, but also now crucially into a battle for premier league survival. we achieved the impossible together and i have nothing but the utmost respect for him. for everything he has achieved at this club. he came in and said his piece to the players, thanked us for our efforts and for last season, and said goodbye. it is a shame it has come to this. i wouldn't say there were tears but you could see
5:40 pm
that it hurt him and it hurts the players that we haven't performed well enough to make this carry on. meeting that lasted around a0 minutes, bailly time, it seems, to reminisce on all his team achieved. i had to say thank you for the fans, they are fantastic. how do you feel? do you feel good? yes, of course, because what we achieved in leicester, i hope will happen again but it will be very different. was it emotional with the players in there? no, it was normal. do you feel stabbed in the back? normal or not, this was the end of the story that was anything but. the owners, who made the decision to sack ranieri, arrived shortly after by helicopter. it is a decision that has left many asking questions of the game, or should that be, the business? they will take it from a pragmatic business sense, and
5:41 pm
despite everyone's discontent with the decision and the passion that has been shown, the passion ranieri showed, looking in a cold—hearted way, they made a decision and leicester have two move on. moving on for the moment means preparing for monday's game at liverpool. leicester are still in the champions league of course but also now in a perilous fight to remain in the premier league. replacing the man who achieved the impossible mayjust be an impossible task. adam wilde, bbc news. history has been made in rugby league's challenge cup. the toronto wolfpack have become the first canadian side to make it through to the fourth round. the full time pros of the wolfpack, recruited from three continents, were playing their first competitive match against the west yorkshire amateur club siddal. and the sport's first transatlantic professional team did a professional job against spirited opposition — adam sidlow, who was playing for bradford bulls last season, going into the record books with the final try as toronto won 1a—6.
5:42 pm
elsewhere, wins for whitehaven, haydock and keighley cougars. workington town are winning away at newcastle under, that kicked off just over half an hour ago. lizzie yarnold has won bronze at the skeleton world championships in germany. before the weekend they 0lympic germany. before the weekend they olympic champion had an indifferent season since returning after a year out. she began the day's two heats in fourth place and moved up the table to take bronze in the end. this is what the whole two years has been about, coming back, and this major stepping stone of top three. i am feeling really strange at the moment, on the verge of crying, but it means more than i can ever explain. gb men's four didn't fare quite as well though — they crashed out in their second run.
5:43 pm
that's bradley hall, joel fearon, bruce tasker and gregory cackett bumping their way down the run at konigssee in germany — they were unable to correct it and ended up going head first into the wall and finishing on their side. they were all ok. that's all the sport for now. keep up—to—date with all the stories including the live sport, the six nations going on of course at the moment at the aviva stadium. half time between france and ireland. keep up—to—date on the bbc sport website. we will have much more in sportsday at 6:30pm. next on bbc news, it's time for meet the author. we have an all today which has dealt with 0ne an all today which has dealt with one of our greatest contemporary problems, the feeling of loss, maybe hopelessness among young people who feel the opportunity —— the future they have been brought up to believe in is an illusion. she was an art
5:44 pm
student in ireland and the story is told by the narrator struggles with mental illness and sees little hope. it isa mental illness and sees little hope. it is a dark story but a compelling the theme of this story, sarah, is a problem i suppose. 0ne the theme of this story, sarah, is a problem i suppose. one which is familiarand problem i suppose. one which is familiar and troubling to many people at this moment, isn't it? yes. we live in an age where we grow up yes. we live in an age where we grow up much slower. definitely my generation. i think it is funny, i think about this quite often now, my pa rents were think about this quite often now, my parents were married and having kids at my age, but whereas it is a cce pta ble at my age, but whereas it is acceptable in your early 30s, i am doing what i did as a child only i would like to think more sophisticated, and i have had some
5:45 pm
wonderful responses from parents. that's interesting. yes, saying they will give this book to their kids, presumably kids in their 20s. how do you think it might help? is to know they are not the only person to fit —— who feels like this. frankie, the narrator, feels very lost and disillusioned, in the normal way, because society is setup to make us feel that our lives are incomplete and this is a problem. to what extent is there an autobiographical element in the novel? to a great extent. it started with a nonfiction essay i wrote at college, and it was structured around photographs of dead animals i was taking, the idea being that this character is stranded in the irish countryside, feels lost and alone and as if everything is dying and nature
5:46 pm
becomes a metaphor for that. everything is dying and nature becomes a metaphorfor that. she notices, it is like, when you are pregnant, not that i've never been pregnant, not that i've never been pregnant, you keep seeing women who are pregnant, she keeps finding these dead animals because she notices them, i suppose, and that becomes, that builds the landscape around her. you are an art student, and the visual arts are important to you. you see the world in a sense through that artistic lens. it is interesting that you use at work as a framework for the story. did that just come naturally? it did, because i suppose it came out of the character's own mind. she is a former art student struggling to be an artist, and she is concerned that now she has finished formal education she will not learn anything any more, those years testing herself on the artwork she knows and at the same time trying to find meaningful life in the only way
5:47 pm
she knows how, through examining artworks. it is a weird idea, really, isn't it, that learning stops when formal education ends, because it should be the other way round, and we should all know that and understand it and look forward to it, learning through life. yes. that is mostjobs, they result in an ending of that. or it seemed... i am very coloured by... i graduated pretty much during the irish session andi pretty much during the irish session and i think this is still a problem in irish society and many developed societies, we are all very qualified but there are few opportunities so we end up in dead—end jobs and learning ends. the narrator in the novel has all kinds of problems, and you touch on something which i think is on many people's minds, the prevalence of mental illness of various kinds, for which there is no immediate help, not much prospect of escape. i think we are more aware of
5:48 pm
that now than we were a generation ago, aren't we? i suppose we are. i think, again, like we were talking about earlier, we grow up slower and when we are lost and disillusioned there is no medication for that, which is the easiest way. the novel isn't a polemic and i do not stand injudgment over isn't a polemic and i do not stand in judgment over people who take medication... that is very deliberate, isn't it marciello frankie is very resistant, then the book draws a conclusion and it is up to the reader to decide whether she was right to be resistant or not, i suppose. what you think of frankie? it's funny, rewriting this book recently, it grew from this essay i wrote when i was 25, 26, the age of frankie and novel, then rewriting it recently, there were so many things that frustrated and infuriated me about her, which i was tempted to cut because i wouldn't think like that any more, than i realised this was my 25—year—old self, but frankie
5:49 pm
isn't me now and wouldn't make those decisions. you have to let her be herself. precisely, she became a character and not me. she needs to make her own mistakes without you intervening. yes, and people need to decide for themselves. what did it tell you about your 25 old self writing this, at the end?” tell you about your 25 old self writing this, at the end? i was very self absorbed, and i think that is againa sign self absorbed, and i think that is again a sign of the times. it is a different perspective, it is curious, the book deals a lot with the death of a grandmother which at the death of a grandmother which at the time i was interested in tackling. i am still interested about it because we hear a lot about the death of a spouse and grief from that point of view and not so much about grandparents, but in the last year my father has died, and that was a huge dislocation. they say you don't really grow up into one of your parents dies and i think that is absolutely true. i made a big shift during that time period myself, and frankie seems very self absorbed and her world is very
5:50 pm
small, and the ego, ve ego, the ego, which you need a certain amount of i think if you are going to pursue the arts. you think people are more alone now, they have to be more self—reliant if they are going to make their way? yes. i tend to write about lonely characters. that is what interests me. it has made me realise that it is an endless subject in a way, there many types of loneliness. the narrator in my first book was an older man and this isa first book was an older man and this is a book more about the loneliness of failure or having perceived that you have failed and your life has hardly begun. would you like people when they put the book down to feel more optimistic about life, or do you suspect they might feel a wee bit gloomy? i hope the artworks will... lift them? in a way, or get people to look more closely at the
5:51 pm
smaller details. is that where you find your solace? it is. nature, as well, is a big thing in both books. this isn't a new way, the whole mindfulness thing, slowing down and looking at things more closely. again, agnes merton said, i have a very quiet mind, i worked hard for that. i think generally in today's society there is a lot to be said about a quiet mind and frankie's minds certainly isn't. perhaps if people think more about their own jumping thoughts and try to fix them on things... i don't know, you don't think about that when you are writing. i know what i learned. let's hear it for a quiet mind. yes! sara baume, thank you very much. thank you very much. good evening. there certainly was a lot of clout in the sky to start the
5:52 pm
day today. some of us have brightened but many of us stay pretty grey, this is a view of the afternoon in north wales. we saw sunshine today in northern ireland and scotland, but still with showers, certainly in those pictures. the satellite shows a cloudy start for all to brighten up in northern ireland and scotland but cloud in england and wales and a fair bit of rain. i south—westerly wind as well, driving our weather at the moment. that rain will push south and east over the next few hours, and through the small hours of the morning it becomes light and patchy before fizzling out. it leaves behind cloud with breaks in the north—east, particularly the north—east of scotland with frost possible. not so in the north of west —— and west because the next batch of wind and rain is coming in saw wet start in scotland with snow over higher ground, rain moving west to east fairly swiftly, pushing through northern ireland quickly in the morning, by 9am mostly dry, but
5:53 pm
showers developing already. eastern england starting on a promising note, dry and bright, broken cloud, sunshine getting through but mild with the south—westerly breeze, nine or10 with the south—westerly breeze, nine or 10 degrees at 9am. further west there is thicker cloud with the rain setting into wales at this stage and the wind picking up. the rain will become heavier in wales through the morning and into the afternoon, the wind picking up. fora morning and into the afternoon, the wind picking up. for a time west wales could see gusts up to 50 or 60 miles an hourso wales could see gusts up to 50 or 60 miles an hour so bear that in mind. dry in northern scotland at times, still showers around, but it will be cold, five or six in stornoway. dry in the east midlands, east anglia and the south—east but mild and cloudy. round ten or 11 at twickenham with a lot of cloud and little rain to speak of if any, and strong wind as well, to bear in mind. awindy strong wind as well, to bear in mind. a windy day again on monday, with rain moving west— east through the morning, eventually clearing towards the near continent than sunny spells and showers behind, the
5:54 pm
showers quite heavy with and thunder but temperatures coming down, single digits for many of us on monday, and cold air through tuesday and wednesday as well. unsettled through the early part of the coming week but with some showers, some quite heavy. this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at six. former labour foreign secretary, david miliband, says the party is at its weakest point in half a century —— as its deputy leader warns the party must do better. if this is not the time for a leadership election, that was settled last year, but we have to do better, we cannot sustain this level of distance from our electorate. the battle for mosul. iraqi forces enter parts of the west of the city as they continue their offensive to remove so called islamic state. media organisations react angrily after several, including the bbc, are barred from a press briefing at the white house. three people have been entered in
5:55 pm
the german city of heidelberg after a man drives a car into a pedestrian area.
5:56 pm
5:57 pm
5:58 pm
5:59 pm
6:00 pm

23 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on