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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  February 27, 2017 6:00am-8:30am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. confusion at the oscars as the best picture award is handed to the wrong film. la la land was initially named the winner. the producers started their a cce pta nce winner. the producers started their acceptance speeches but they were interrupted with an announcement that moonlight was in fact the best picture. it appears the warrant 80 and faye dunaway it were handed the wrong envelope, the most dramatic twist in the oscar's final scene. good morning, it's monday 27th february. also this morning: the independent inquiry into child sexual abuse finally holds its first public hearings more than two and a half years after it was first set up. sales of fairtade products hit
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£1.6bn last year but does the buying the brand still make a difference? i'll meet a farmer from malawi to find out. in sport, manchester united snatch victory from southampton in the efl cup final. the 3—2 win sanose mourinho become the first united manager to win a trophy in his first season with the club. and carol has the weather. good morning. a day of sunshine and showers and be showers will be a sundry with hail and possible sleet and snow. wherever you worry it will be windy. more details later in the programme. “— be windy. more details later in the programme. —— wherever you are. are. good morning. first, our main story. the oscars ceremony has ended in confusion, after the wrong film was declared best picture. in a farcical ending, la la land was announced as the winner, before the award eventually went to moonlight. we were here at work. extraordinary
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scenes as everybody tried to work it out. who's at the vanity fair after—show party which all the stars attend. there will be only one subject. what an extraordinary thing to mit.- mit— can you tell us what happenedand % happened? how it happened? what happened—flas’ award how it happened? what happahad—waa’ award ceremony a???” e1; a a???” trump especially s'fiif fizz: “oked at the start zzz: “oked at the start if f::: “oked at the start if he 2: host who joked at the start if he did not know if he would make a good job at hosting. we will come to that ina job at hosting. we will come to that in a moment because what happened at the end was that as they handed the best picture award to la la land, warren beatty and faye dunaway were opening the envelope. the name la la
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land was read out but then the producers came on stage, they began to make an acceptance speech. they we re to make an acceptance speech. they were quite a long way into them before it became apparent that there was a mistake. there was confusion and a kerfuffle on stage and eventually one of the producers snatch the envelope, held it up to the camera to reveal that moonlight was the winner. he handled it quite class lee. john floyd, just a few moments ago, even he was saying that when he won his oscar back in 1978 he could not have imagined what it would feel like if someone had taken a moment away from him. e a would feel like if someone had taken a momer moonlight, him. e a would feel like if someone had taken a momer moonlight, are i. e a would feel like if someone had taken a momer moonlight, are you e a would feel like if someone had taken a momer moonlight, are you guysfl would feel like if someone had taken a momer moonlight, are you guys won mistake. moonlight, are you guys won best picture. this is not a joke. i am afraid they read the wrong thing. this is not a joke. moonlight is a woi'i. this is not a joke. moonlight is a won. moonlight. best picture. server
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was the producer of la la land. he had made an acceptance speech and quite graciously said that he will hand over the oscar to the true winners. it was the most extraordinary moment. quite incredible and what had happened in the run—up to that was that la la land had done quite well. not sweeping the board as some had expected and it had done quite well. emma stone had won. the director had one as well. —— had won as well. hello, sir. this is the bbc. what did you think about the moment at the end? i thought it was an honest mistake. something that happens. it is live and so anything can go
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wrong. it is not the first time this has happened. i have probably been involved in something like this before. could you imagine, you would have won plenty of awards in your time. if you had won something of that calibre and it was taken from you at the last moment... the people we re very you at the last moment... the people were very gracious and they handled it quite well. what is your view about the whole aspect of racial diversity? that is what we would be talking about were it not for this last—minute kerfuffle. has there been an advance this year, do you think? something that we constantly need to work on. we constantly need to try to improve upon it. because it is the most stupid idea that man can have, to be prejudiced against each other of colour . belief. § human : human if: saw
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advert to win slag; uzlz 21313717532 a; ;;:'z. 2.2.2 baa—f.» '— actor, not supporting actor, marshela ali. not to mention viola davis for best supporting actress. it is not the first time a black person has won an oscar. it is ongoing. there is improvement but we are making progress. there is a lot of politics in this show. a lot of criticism, criticism of the policies of donald trump. was the appropriate? what did you feel? it is america. that is what this country is. you can say what this country is. you can say what you want to, that is what this is about. thank you very much. there is about. thank you very much. there is some reaction from the celebrities arriving here for the vanity fair party. i don't know how
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much you can hear. let's have a look at the line at the photographers down the yen, camera crews at this end. stars arriving with right and centre and as you rightly say, there is only one thing they will be discussing. huge congratulations to moonlight. we had the director here last week. it was beyond his wildest dreams. fantastic news for them. what else should we be talking about, if anything? when i wasjust talking about there i think is releva nt. talking about there i think is relevant. the first muslim actor, we believe, to win acting award at the oscars have got to be a significant moment. the koran was quoted one moment, invoking islam is a religion of peace. there was a victory for the white helmet and its producer. that is significant. a film about the civil war in syria and there were, at various points, please do
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not build walls between the united states and other countries and to remain united. one of the big question is, however that has only intensified as result of these oscars, i have to say was brilliantly hosted byjimmy kimmel, at least it was brilliantly hosted if you take a certain political persuasion. maybe you could support president trump and enjoyed as well that there will certainly be a significant slice of the united states of america who felt that mr kimmel was harsh on the president, effectively suggesting that he was a racist, among other things. i think thatis racist, among other things. i think that is a dilemma for producers of award shores. there is nowhere more liberal in the world than this, than hollywood. so to what extent of these people preach to the converted and to what extent is the other house of the united states simply turn off the television? thank you very much. we will return throughout the programme. we need more reaction
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on the people involved in that enormous mistake. the wrong envelope, that is all came down to. she initially read the nominations. if you look at the picture he actually has best actress in her leading role, which is emma stone, la la land. he gave it to faye dunaway because he thought was a mistake. they read the one and there you go. there were only two people in the room who knew the truth and they came up onto the stage. yes. the people come in under high security, nobody knows who has won because they are in suitcases, the winners, they go in separate routes. someone said that was the wrong envelope and... there you go. anyway, moonlight, best picture. let us anyway, moonlight, best picture. let us know what you think about that. we will be speaking about this later on in the morning as well. the independent inquiry into child sexual abuse will hold its first public hearings today, more than two and a half years
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after it was set up by the government. it'll begin by examining the mistreatment of british children in care orfrom poorfamilies, who were sent to australia in the years after the second world war. the inquiry will be told that the scale of abuse they suffered was much wider than previously thought. here's our home affairs correspondent tom symonds. newsreel: they arrive at fremantle from great britain with 931 new migrants for this country. new lives in the sunshine. that is what children in care, orfrom poor families were promised. but 70 years old, some like clifford walsh, are still affected by the beatings and sexual abuse they suffered instead. his catholic children's home near perth in australia has become notorious. for the next two weeks the televised public enquiry will consider new evidence about the
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extent of the abuse, claims that children were picked by paedophiles to travel aboard and allegations of a cover—up. to travel aboard and allegations of a cover-up. you want to know what happened, we want to know who did it and we want to know who covered it up and we want to know who covered it upforso and we want to know who covered it up for so long. of course we need to know about it. there were consequences for children today. we also need to look at why it has taken 30 years to bring about this enquiry into the horrific abuse of hundreds, if not thousands of young children. the enquiry rejects suggestions that it is reaching too far back in history. many of the migrants are still alive. getting to the bottom of what happened to them and why, it says, is still relevant. later on we will be speaking to somebody who was sent to australia asa somebody who was sent to australia as a young boy and is now a campaigner. the labour mp and former minister, sir gerald kaufman, has died at the age of 86.
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he was an mp in manchester for 47 years, and a shadow minister in 2015, as the longest; he became father of the house. the bbc has ordered an investigation into tv licence collectors following reports that they're deliberately targeting vulnerable people with aggressive tactics. the daily mail claims enforcement officers, who are employed by the private company capita, are ordered to catch 28 evaders every week and promised financial incentives for hitting targets. head teachers and school governors are calling on the chancellor to make schools a priority in the budget. the national association of head teachers and the national association of governors have written an open letter to philip hammond to say that they're being forced to make impossible choices to save money. here's our education correspondent, gillian hargreaves. more than a third of small businesses expect their rates to rise this april, according to the federation of small businesses.
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the federation says many face unsustainable and unaffordable increases, and are planning to cut the amount they invest in theirfirms. the government has promised help for those worst hit. the mobile phone company nokia is bringing back one of its most famous models, the 3310. the company has struggled to compete in the smartphone era, but it hopes there'll be a demand for a simple phone with a battery that lasts for weeks. the handset was first launched in the year 2000, with the classic mobile game snake. you loved that game. i still love it. i think i would it; heel: 5325515541223‘5‘232? as: a? a” ‘the on g: if not then . see on g: if not then they % on g: if not then they made % on g: if not then they made a % snake on it? if not then they made a hideous mistake. chefs from a town in russia have tried for the eleventh time to make the largest pancake in the country. despite it measuring three metres in diameter,
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it didn't get the award because it wasn't flipped properly, and it kept on breaking up. apparently it also tasted a bit too salty. it really was not slept properly. look at this. you don't cut a pancake like that, do you? everything about that is wrong. disappointing on so many different levels. sally's here now with all the sport. we will try to about other things on the programme apart from the oscars. 0h, the programme apart from the oscars. oh, really? do we have to. how about southampton... no, manchester, winning the cup. good morning, everybody. manchester united beat southampton 3—2 to win the efl cup at wembley. southampton will consider themselves unlucky after zlatan ibrahimovic ended their fight back by winning the match with less than five minutes to go. spurs go second in the premier league after they demolished stoke 4—0 at white hart lane.
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one goal from dele alli and three from harry kane did the damage — although spurs are still ten points behind chelsea. it's now 17 wins in a row for eddiejones‘ england side. on tha’final stag? 7a australia's caleb ewan beat him to win stage four, but cavendish had accumulated enough points to win the green jersey. things might be going wrong in the world, chaos everywhere, everyone making bad decisions and saying the wrong thing, but we are about to hand over to someone who has it all under control. you have built it up now! let's ring her in. what have
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you got for us, carol kirkwood.|j wondered if someone had walked in behind me. for many of us we will be seeing scenes like this lovely weather watcher's picture. it will be wet and cold. you can see the cold are coming in and the showers we are looking at will be as sleet and snow in some parts of the country, especially in the north. as the cold air filter south we will see some of that as well. some showers will be heavy but the very nature of showers means we won't all see one. across scotland, sunshine and showers but some of those will be sleet and snow, some will be heavy and have hail in them as well. for northern ireland, a similar story. you can expect some showers, fleet, snow, hail and thunder. as we come further south across england and wales there are a lot of showers, any wintry showers will be around south—west england, around the moors, for example. in between we will see brighter skies but there will be a lot of showers. it is
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windy at the moment, the peak of the winds around the northern isles and there is the risk of ice on cold, untreated surfaces which have also been damp. increasingly through the day we will see snow at lower levels. through scotland and northern england, we will also have some more showers coming in on the wind because it will be a windy day, across wales in south—west england, and again we will see a wintry flavour from them, and again we will see a wintry flavourfrom them, primarily and again we will see a wintry flavour from them, primarily on the hills. these are our maximum temperatures, nothing to be writing home about. as we head on through the evening and overnight it will be windy, gales for some of us. some snow coming out of the showers, and perhaps even more of the risk of ice on untreated surfaces this coming night. these are the temperatures you can expect in towns and cities. in rural areas it will be a lot lower than this, —6 in parts of scotland, —2 in parts of england and wales. as we go into tomorrow we start off on the cold note with the
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risk of ice. low pressure not to far away. this is the remnants of what was storm ewan at the weekend. it will be wintry on its south—western flank and as it does so it will drive him a lot of showers and some of those are likely to be wintry in nature. more dry weather than wet weather across much of the uk tomorrow, and temperatures between about seven and eight or nine. as we had from tuesday into wednesday we say goodbye to that system which moves off onto the near continent. a ridge of high pressure building in behind it, but the next set of front are not too far away. on wednesday a quieter day for most, and a dry day, with some bright spells and even some sunshine. we do have a set of front scooting across the south but here it is still mild, at 10 celsius, around six or seven as we push further north. thank you very much. we're all trying to get things especially right today. we guarantee it. and we can't do much worse. we
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are talking about the oscars, where there was a big mistake at the end of the night where la la land was announced as the winner of best picture, but actually it was moonlight. we will get to all of that in a minute. that show you some of the front pages. from moonlight to limelight, naomi harris in california nominated for best supporting actress for her role in moonlight. just that moment when you think you haven't won and then you have one. extraordinary for everybody. their main story is a curb on migrants. and the front page of the times, lots to talk about. manchester united winning the league cup against southampton and scots to demand a new referendum, number ten fears. we will get some more oscars reaction. the highest representatives we have in this industry, so you have to give them credit. that was colin paterson
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speaking to miles taylor about what happened. wejust speaking to miles taylor about what happened. we just missed speaking to miles taylor about what happened. wejust missed it, and we can speaka happened. wejust missed it, and we can speak a bit more about what happened. this is what most people will be talking about this morning. we are aware there is other news around but when something of this scale happens at such a huge global ceremony, warren beatty and faye dunaway were on stage to give away the best picture award and this is what happened. la la land! applause guys, iam applause guys, i am sorry. there is a mistake. moonlight, you guys won best picture. this is not a joke. i am afraid they read the wrong thing. this is not a joke. moonlight has won best picture. moonlight, best
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picture. so the way that all happened essentially is the guy who is explaining that moonlight one best picture is one of the producers of la la land, and he had to interrupt a co—producer, making a speech, thanking various members of his family.jimmy kimmel speech, thanking various members of his family. jimmy kimmel tries to sort it out, and warren beatty his family. jimmy kimmel tries to sort it ol envelope rren beatty his family. jimmy kimmel tries to sort it ol envelope which eatty his family. jimmy kimmel tries to sort it ol envelc last'hich eatty his family. jimmy kimmel tries to sor1 has envelc last'hici fiat; his family. jimmy kimmel tries to sor1 has beenlc last'hici fiat; his family. jimmy kimmel tries to sor1 has been doing 'hici fiat; his family. jimmy kimmel tries to sor1 has been doing a ct fiat; all do afterwards, conference they all do afterwards, and she says she is interested in how it all happened, because she was holding her card the entire time. so when you get your statue, you also get a card which has a winner on it, because you probably want to frame that. she says she had it all the time. there must be a second card.
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what is interesting about the clip is how you see warren beatty basically passed the buck to faye dunaway. he opens it, and clearly he is looking at it, and he sees emma stone, la la land, we think. he is confused why her name is on that, passes it over and leaves her to make the announcement.” passes it over and leaves her to make the announcement. i felt sorry for faye dunaway in that moment, it was what else was she going to do except to read what was on the wrong card? the wonderful thing is that immediately, we have made a mistake, let's handed over. moonlight, congratulations. yes, eventually. we will have to be careful we don't make a mistake today! as the independent inquiry into child sexual abuse finally gets under way, the first case to be investigated is the story of the so—called "lost children" who were sent to australia. thousands of youngsters were sent down—under after the second world war. many went on to be beaten and sexually abused
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in homes or institutions. our home affairs correspondent tom symonds reports. margaret humphreys uncovered the scandal of britain's lost children, sent abroad without parents in the yea rs sent abroad without parents in the years following the second world war for what they were promised would be a better life. they are now elderly. but finally, a public enquiry is about to start considering the damage it has done to their lives, in particular the impact of sexual abuse. we want to know what happened, we want to know who did it, and we want to know who covered up it, and we want to know who covered upforso it, and we want to know who covered up for so long. of course we need to know about it. there are consequences for children today. we also need to look at why it has taken 30 years to bring about this enquiry into what is the horrific abuse of hundreds if not thousands of young children. newsreel: the liner asturias arrives at fremantle from great britain with 931 new migrants for this country. i've lived for 60—odd years with this hate.
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they sent us to a place that was a living hell. we did nothing wrong. all we did was do as we were told, and suffered immensely for it. clifford walsh was nine when he arrived here at fremantle, near perth, in australia. he ended up at bindoon, run by the catholic christian brothers, where barefoot children built their own accommodation and were beaten and sexually abused. we were 60 miles from perth. we had no parents. we had no relatives. there was nowhere we could go. these brothers, these paedophiles, must have thought they were in hog heaven. the public enquiry will hold new hearings, into claims that children we re hearings, into claims that children were picked by paedophiles to go abroad, and allegations of a
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cover—up. david hill left tilbury docks, near london, for australia 58 yea rs docks, near london, for australia 58 years ago, and grew up at the fairbridge farm school north of sydney. he has written a book on what went on, and estimates 60% of the children were sexually abused. he will be a key witness at what has been a much criticised enquiry. what can best achieve? from my point of view, only good can come of it. because the truth will be known. it seems to me that the greater the evil, the stronger the conspiracy to keep it a secret and keep it covered up. so, if this inquiry is capable of opening some of that truth, then that's a good thing. it takes painstaking work to link children sent abroad with the families they always had in britain. that work happens here at the child migrants trust in nottingham, and this is the result. thousands of long—awaited reunion is. the
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government's scheme which pays for these reunions pays for elderly child migrants to visit britain is about to finish. the trust is demanding it continues. at the end of their lives, it says, it is the least the country of their birth can do. tom symonds, bbc news. and a little bit later on bbc brea kfast we and a little bit later on bbc breakfast we will be talking to a man who as a young boy, aged 12, was sent to australia. he will talk to us sent to australia. he will talk to us about his experiences, and his giving evidence as well. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. coming up in the next half—hour, we will be getting reaction to the oscars. james cook is at the vanity fair after—show party. where everyone is all a flutter about the last minutes of the oscars, which were astonishingly dramatic. the oscar was handed to la la land. the best picture oscar, the
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last of the night, the crowning glory of the 89th academy awards, or so it seemed. withinjust glory of the 89th academy awards, or so it seemed. within just a few minutes, after the producers had come onto the stage and were making their speeches, it became clear that their speeches, it became clear that the wrong envelope had been handed over, and that in fact the winner of best picture was the coming—of—age drama moonlight, directed by barry jenkins. there was astonishment in the room, i can tell was here as well. people astonishment here as well. people we re astonishment here as well. people were standing watching the telecast with their mouths agape and the stars coming down this red carpet have been astonished by what happened. we will have a lot more on that as the morning goes on. first the news, travel and weather where you are this morning. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. a man is fighting for his life this morning after being mowed down by a car in south—east london yesterday morning. he is one of five people hurt after a mercedes mounted the pavement near catford bus garage. police have arrested the driver, but have confirmed the crash is not terror—related.
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actors keira knightley and dominic west were in trafalgar square yesterday, and not at the oscars, as theyjoined thousands of people for the uk premiere of the oscar—nominated iranian film the salesman. its director, asghar farhadi, was boycotting the awards in protest at the travel ban initiated by president trump. the mayor of london was in the square, too, and then hours later the film itself won the award for best foreign language film. a little—known victorian chapel in east london could be lost because it has been damaged by leaking rainwater. the chapel is hidden inside the roof of oxford house, in bethnal green, which is well over 100 years old. it provides programmes for the community, but needs a lot of work. the roof needs to be replaced. we need to do lots of major repairs to
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the windows. the lift that services where the chapel is, upon the third floor, is broken. we can't afford to fix it. it is going to be a really challenging time. at its worst we might have to sell the building. i hope we won't have to do that. it is too important a placejust hope we won't have to do that. it is too important a place just to hope we won't have to do that. it is too important a placejust to be turned housing. let's have a look at the travel situation now. central line has severe delays due to an earlier track fault at north acton. there is no service from white city to ealing broadway and west ruislip. and on the london overground, trains are running again on the gospel oak to barking line for the first time since september, after a series of issues. on the roads, in maida hill, harrow road remains closed because of an unsafe building, following a fire that broke out on friday. in south—east london, it is busy northbound to the blackwall tunnel. let's have a check on the weather now, with kate kinsella. good morning. it is quite mild start the day. i have the last of the
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really mild start this week. anyway, it is going to get much colder. today, also quite unsettled. we are going to get some frequent showers. now, some brighter spells may be adverse but these showers blowing through quite quickly. we could get some hail mixed in there as well, a company by this quite fresh south—westerly breeze. thunder and lightning potentially as well. the maximum temperatures in celsius, so gradually getting a bit cooler by the end of the afternoon. now, these showers are going to continue overnight as well and it is going to be quite cold. much colder night and last night. the breeze stays with us again, potentially the showers could fall wintry. the minimum between three and seven celsius. as we move into tomorrow we will get some showers first thing but we will get some brighter spells between them tomorrow, maybe even see a little sunshine. so slightly improved, still going to see some showers, the maximum temperature at nine celsius. now, it stays rather unsettled this week. we will get some showers around. temperature, though, gradually starting to heat up a little bit as we move towards the
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end of the week. va nessa vanessa feltz will have more on the oscars and what is going on. goodbye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, a dramatic and farcical ending to the oscars. la la land was announced as the winner before the award eventually went to moonlight. to explain this, we crossed to los angeles and james cook who was at the after show party. there will be all sorts of madness going on behind you. can you explain to us what happened? we are expecting to talk this morning about diversity and some of the things thatjimmy kimmel was saying, but there is only one awkward thing to discuss. we will
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probably address some of those other things as well but there is only one headline and that is the unbelievable drama in the final minutes of the oscars. a plot twist that no—one could have predicted. surely one of the most extraordinary fa rces in surely one of the most extraordinary farces in the history of the academy awards. this was the 89th academy award. let's have a look at how the moment unfolded. come on. la la land. i'm sorry, no. there has been a mistake. moonlight, you guys won best picture. this is not a joke. i am afraid they read the wrong thing. this is not a joke. moonlight has won best picture. moonlight. best picture. i believe i should keep it
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anyway. no, sorry. guys... this is very unfortunate what happened. personally i blame steve harvey for this. i would like - to i will be proud to oscar anyway. i will be proud to hand this to my friends from moonlight. so that was stored in horror bits and jimmy kimmel trying to explain what happened there. do we know more about what went on? was it just we know more about what went on? was itjust a we know more about what went on? was it just a case we know more about what went on? was itjust a case of we know more about what went on? was it just a case of the we know more about what went on? was itjust a case of the wrong envelope? i think it was the wrong envelope? i think it was the wrong envelope and i think the suggestion is that it may have been the envelope that contained the award that had just been handed to best actress, that is that emma stone, one of the stars of la la land. i have reaction just here one of the stars of la la land. i have reactionjust here in one of the stars of la la land. i have reaction just here in the past few minutes from the director of
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moonlight. he says that it was extraordinary, the moment that happened there. he said that he had never before seen anything like that happen. he said the last 20 minutes of his life have been insane. he really wa nted of his life have been insane. he really wanted to see the card for himself and why and 80 showed it to himself and why and 80 showed it to him and then he felt better about what had happened. he said that the people involved with la la land had been so generous, that he could not imagine being in their position and having to do that. of course, you know, it was an amazing thing to hear la la land. ithink we know, it was an amazing thing to hear la la land. i think we would have loved to have one best picture. but we are so excited for moonlight. it is one of the best films of all time sol it is one of the best films of all time so i was beside myself. i was also holding my best actress in a leading role card that entire time. sol leading role card that entire time. so i don't mean to start stuff but
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whatever story that was... i had that card. i don't know what happened. i wanted to talk to you guys first. well, that was emma stone. what a moment. what drama and we will hear a lot more about that and some of the other issues that featured in the ceremony which included some attacks on criticism of president trump and his policies and also increased diversity after two years and also increased diversity after two yea rs in and also increased diversity after two years in which only white actors we re two years in which only white actors were nominated. he glossed over some of the other main awards of the night. it has, hasn't it. best director, damian for la la land. best act ever casey affleck. we will remind you, of course, and tell you who won at what the quite an extraordinary story. there is other news as well, however. yes. and it is quite right, and important. the independent inquiry into child sexual abuse will hold its first public hearings today,
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more than two and a half years after it was set up by the government. it'll begin by examining the mistreatment of british children in care orfrom poorfamilies, who were sent to australia in the years after the second world war. the inquiry will be told that the scale of abuse they suffered was much wider than previously thought. the labour mp and former minister, sir gerald kaufman, has died at the age of 86. he was an mp in manchester for 47 years, and a shadow minister during the eighties and nineties. in 2015, as the longest continuously serving mp, he became father of the house. downing street has dismissed discussion that theresa may will end free movement of eu migrants. the report is that it could be the 15th of march,. anyone arriving in the uk after that point will no longer have
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the automatic right to stay permanently. downing street has said that node decision has been taken. let's have a break, shall we? sally. i'm pretty sure that southampton fa ns i'm pretty sure that southampton fans wished that had happened to them yesterday. i think we are talking about ibrahimovic. jose mourinho has become the first manchester united manager to win a trophy in his first season at the club after guiding his side to a 3—2 win over southampton in the efl cup. saints fans will consider their side to have been unlucky as manolo gabbiadini saw a goal contentiously ruled out. united then went two nil up through zlatan ibrahimovic and jesse lingard. gabbiadini struck either side of the interval to bring southampton level. but ibrahimovic snatched victory with just a few minutes left to secure the first domestic silverware of the season. they gave us a beautiful final. a
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beautiful football match. so they gave us a beautiful final. a beautifulfootball match. so i they gave us a beautiful final. a beautiful football match. so i want to have these words for them. i feel happy with our victory and very happy with our victory and very happy with our victory and very happy with the fact that i did it four times, the same as the biggest one, the same as mr clough. harry kane scored his third hat—trick in nine games as tottenham thrashed stoke 4—0 at white hart lane. all the goals came in the first half, with delle alli scoring spurs' fourth goal. it's kane's third hat—trick in nine games. spurs go second in the premier league — but they're still ten points behind chelsea. ten points is a big gap to be
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behind. but we need to keep going. i believe that is important. we need to put pressure on trade be there. —— and try to be there. england made it seventeen wins in a row after beating italy 36— 15 in their six nations match at twickenham. england weren't at their best and had to come from behind to claim the bonus point victory as italy led by five points at half time, but five second—half tries, including this from elliot daly, ’"":| e775?szttzfi.eiezi-ee§%3\;lw17:3?” ., . 7 fl 7”, w it was not rugby, let's face facts. you must have an offside line to play the game. italy was smart and congratulations to their coaching staff and their players, they executed their plan brilliantly but it was not brilliantly. if i were the bbc i would be asking for my money back because we have no rugby game. we need to go outside and train now so we get some proper
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by. wasps extended their lead at the top of the english premiership with a win at home to gloucester. at the other end of the table, gavin henson kicked all the points for bottom club bristol as they beat local rivals bath 12—11. bristol stay bottom, two points behind worcester, but it's a win that gives them great hope of staying up. and move above munster in the table. great britain's mark cavendish has won the green jersey at the tour of abu dhabi, afterfinishing second on an unusual final stage. after 27 laps around the yas marina grand prix circuit to hang on to the green jersey. portugal's rui costa won the overall race. that eddiejones that eddie jones clip that eddiejones clip there, i know he is known for saying what he thinks but it is unusual for him to
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have such a jab at the opposition. obviously, i do not have the paper with me, there is a brilliant bit in the paper, a brilliant photo of him in the back of the times where they ca ptu red in the back of the times where they captured that moment where he is watching the game unfold and you can see him thinking "what on earth?! " that is it. what on earth is going on here. can we see his face there. look at that eyebrow. he is trying to work out... it is reckless rugby and he does not quite know how to respond to it. that is exactly what the players were thinking as well. they did a good job at half—time to get their heads together but he was really not happy. but, italy, they did not break the rules. exactly. you can go change in the tournament, can we? certainly not at this point. if you are just waking up this morning it really is a storyline worthy of an oscar itself. chaos at
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the academy awards last night in the last few hours after the wrong film was announced as best picture. in a moment we will speak to james cook but this is the moment that everyone will be talking about this morning. warrant 80 and faye dunaway are on stage to give out the final award of the night, a big moment. best picture. the actual winner was moonlight but this is what went wrong. la la land. i'm sorry. no. - has been a mistake. moonlight, you won best picture. this is not a joke. this is not a joke. i am afraid they read the wrong thing. this is not a joke. moonlight has won best picture. moonlight. this picture. and there
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isa moonlight. this picture. and there is a close—up just —— to prove. just to prove that moonlight won, not la la land. quite extraordinary scenes. there is only one place to go to talk about it, the after party at vanity fair where i can imagine there is little talk of anything else. our correspondent is there for us. extraordinarily awkward. good morning. everything else... yes, everything else. i mean, have you everything else. i mean, have you ever seen anything like that? i don't think anyone in the room had ever seen anything like that and they have been to a few of these things over the years. that leaves many of the actors and actresses in that room had been to many of these events and no—one can remember seeing a moment like this. i must say, the producers of la la land, who were well into their speeches before it became apparent that they had not in fact won the crowning
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prize of the night, they handled it ware... as tit... gal-”l l!—,,—,-- l._.uaal n, considerable classy. over 55 off i , you know, their the stage and... , you know, their moment was over. they had had their moment, it is not as if anyone watching would have suspected anything because it is hardly a surprise. la la land had been tipped to win best picture. sure people we re to win best picture. sure people were saying it was a tight race with moonlight but la la land was the favourite. one of the stars here at the vanity fair awards, what do they make of it? i spoke tojon voigt. you put it well. i had not thought of that. if it had been me, i got halfway up the stairs and he says excuse me, there was a mistake. 0h, my god. it would break me into.
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would you have kept going? no. but, you know... you can imagine the emotions that wherein it. when la la land was announced the kids, they would have felt so much emotion and thenit would have felt so much emotion and then it was taken away and given to moonlight. they did handle with class, didn't they? la la land is a wonderful team of people. i have known a few of them. they are to refit people. as known a few of them. they are to refit people. a5 are all of these people. and moonlight is a spectacular piece. and so they get a little more attention butjust because of this. that is good. the john the making the age—old point that all publicity is good publicity ——john that all publicity is good publicity —— john voigt. that all publicity is good publicity
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-- john voigt. everything very noisy down there. film criticjames king is with us now. it is the takeaway moment, this extraordinary thing when they announced the wrong film. i have never seen anything like it. i have never seen anything like it. i have been watching the oscars are long time and i have never seen anything like this. it started at 1:30am uk time and i tweeted at 1:35am saying thatjustin timberlake has opened the show and it will not get any better, this is the highlight. little get any better, this is the highlight. little did i get any better, this is the highlight. little did i know that there would be something that everybody would be talking about. there would be something that everybody would be talking aboutm isa everybody would be talking aboutm is a standout moment but elsewhere in the awards, la la land was up for many. it won seven at one point, but 6.5! was up to 14, a record number of nominations, and i don't think anybody expected it to win everything because that is highly unlikely. emma stone had won, they had won an award for cinematography, and it looked like it would all be la la land. forgetting the mistake,
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evenif la la land. forgetting the mistake, even if the envelope had been right from the start, and moonlight had won, that would have been a surprise because moonlight was not expected to win. wonderful news for moonlight, we spoke to the director last week and they made it for $1.5 million. i can't even remember if it was dollars or pounds, but a tiny budget. tiny budget, no major stars, small—scale, intimate drama, not the kind of thing you would think would eat the bigger movies. it was a surprise anyway to see it win but the way in which it won was obviously an even bigger surprise. and best actor went to casey affleck for manchester by the c, and we may see him in some far more prominent roles. —— sea. see him in some far more prominent roles. -- sea. idon't see him in some far more prominent roles. -- sea. i don't think we as film fans have entirely known what to do with casey affleck. he has beenin to do with casey affleck. he has been in lots of different styles of
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movies, and perhaps hasn't found his niche, but in manchester by the sea, another very serious drama, he has shown he can do in tents and small very well. it is a small—scale, su btle very well. it is a small—scale, subtle performance, up against denzel washington who is very weak and loud in his movie. casey affleck is much more small—scale, and it is great to see him win. best supporting actor, moonlight. great to see him win. best supporting actor, moonlightm great to see him win. best supporting actor, moonlight. it was doing very well anyway, and really the night was already between la la land and moonlight. i am the night was already between la la land and moonlight. iam happy the night was already between la la land and moonlight. i am happy with either winning, but it depends if you want song and dance and something frothy, or do you want a more intimate drama? you can't really compare the two. in recent yea rs, really compare the two. in recent years, oscars so white has been a
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talking point. if this hadn't happened at the very end we would be talking about diversity because of the winners of the supporting actor roles. it certainly felt like a more inclusive ceremony, aside from movies like hidden figures and lion, and things like that, and how art can unite people. so the whole event actually felt... i know we expected it to be quite angry and vitriolic but it felt quite optimistic and hopeful, the whole ceremony. and this wonderful peaceful handover of one oscar... maybe it works with the mood of the night, about being kind to people and understanding one another. that was the theme of the evening, so in a way, it kind of works. although warren beatty did throw faye dunaway under the bus a little bit. i thought he was playing
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the time, a bit of dramatic or comedy fracture, which was why they we re comedy fracture, which was why they were not announcing it immediately, but for him it didn't look right on the cards. he saw emma stone, la la land, the card for the previous award. although emma stone says she had that previous award. maybe they we re had that previous award. maybe they were two cards, we don't know. here is the weather with matt taylor. hold on a minute, it is carol kirkwood! thanks, charlie. you will find a cold start for many parts, exceptin find a cold start for many parts, except in the south, turning colder as we go through the day. we have the combination of heavy showers and some will have hail and thunder and snow embedded in them as well. the cold air filters further south as we go through the course of the day. really it is the far south of england that hangs on to the milder conditions. for scotland this morning it is cold. we have the showers, some of them falling as sleet and snow and a lot of dry
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weather, some sunshine. for northern ireland, watch out for ice on untreated surfaces. there are showers coming your way, if you don't already have them. for england and wales, frequent showers. some of those heavy and thundery. there will be some wintry mess, but the moors of south—west england as well, and as we go through the day and the cold air cuts as we go through the day and the cold aircuts in, as we go through the day and the cold air cuts in, we will see more snow showers heading further south. watch out for ice on untreated surfaces. drying up through the course of the day across northern scotland. the peak of the winds across the northern isles and it will be quite a blustery day wherever you are, more showers being driven in on that wind through the day. in between, drierand brighter spells but as is the way with showers, not all of us will see them. more wintry sleet and snow coming out at lower levels but they will be fairly sporadic. for southern scotland and northern england we will see more heavy snow across these areas. again, even at
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lower levels. through the evening and overnight, the wind remains strong in the south and also the north—west. there will be a lot of dry weather, a greater risk of ice on untreated surfaces through the course of the coming night and these temperatures you can see are indicative of towns and cities. in rural areas they are more likely to be in scotland and northern ireland between —4 and —6, and in england and wales between —2 and freezing. bear that in and wales between —2 and freezing. bearthat in mind, and wales between —2 and freezing. bear that in mind, a cold start to the day. what will happen tomorrow is storm ewan, named by the irish met service on saturday, is going to come back again. it will still be windy around it and we will still see some wintry temperatures, quite cold for some parts of the country but for many of us it is actually going to be dry. some rain across the southern counties and quite a bit of sunshine, temperatures seven to about eight celsius. as we move from tuesday into wednesday, off
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goes the low pressure onto the near continent. a region of high pressure builds in behind it and we have another set of fronts coming our way so on wednesday itself, a lot of dry weather. one or two showers, except in the south where we have a band of wintry weather coming. sales of fairtrade products rose to £1.6 billion last year, but could more of us be supporting the charity's efforts? ben has been taking a look. exactly. you may know, or buy already products, with the fairtrade mark. it has been going for more than 20 years. originally associated with things like coffee and tea, the mark can be seen on a whole range of products from developing countries. products with the mark are guaranteed to have been produced with internationally agreed standards on things like pay and working conditions. charles chavi is a sugar cane grower from malawi. tell us a bit about the poverty in malawi before fairtrade. talk me through the difference. what
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is it like working with fairtrade? what difference does it make for you asa what difference does it make for you as a farmer, day—to—day? what difference does it make for you as a farmer, day-to-day? fairtrade has the power to transform lives, making a huge difference in the lives of families. we have done quite a number of projects through fairtrade, and these projects have transformed the lives of our farmers and the communities. for example, we brought electricity to the villagers. for fairtrade, farmers never had access to electricity but now most households have been connected to electricity. we built a school, and over 900 children can go to this school. before this school was built, children had to walk a distance of eight to ten kilometres to the nearest school. but because of this school, children can attend school at a tender age. we have also
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invested quite a lot in clean water, constructed many boars, we built taps, we built a clinic, we have also invested pa rt taps, we built a clinic, we have also invested part of the premium backin also invested part of the premium back in the business, just to postproduction —— bores. back in the business, just to postproduction -- bores. and i think we can see some pictures of the school built with the proceeds as well. while we have a look at those let's talk about the farmers themselves. those are the ones who, by getting a fair price for their products, with a bananas, or sugar, or those sorts of things, they make a difference day to day to farmers. like i said, before fairtrade it wasn't easy for farmers to provide for theirfamilies. they wasn't easy for farmers to provide for their families. they could wasn't easy for farmers to provide for theirfamilies. they could not be able to afford basic needs. but fairtrade has enabled them to earn more and as a result of that they are able to assist their families, they are able to provide for their families. they are able to buy food, school fees for their children, have access to electricity, at a minimum.
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talk me through how the process works. if somebody is buying with this logo on it what does that mean to you day—to—day? it means you will get a to you day—to—day? it means you will getafair to you day—to—day? it means you will get a fair price for what you pay, but standards of production as well. sure, the fairtrade mark in my opinion is a widely respected mark. it guarantees the fact that a farmer receives a fair dealfor it guarantees the fact that a farmer receives a fair deal for what they grow. what was life like before that? before the fairtrade mark on your product, what did that mean? farmers were not being paid fairly for their product, but with fairtrade, they do have more income. they do have supplementary income as a result of fairtrade. before we become fairtrade accredited, it was so hard for a farmer, like i say, to afford basic needs. it is good to talk to you, and thank you for explaining that. time is tight, but you are right, it proves what a
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difference it makes. thank you for joining us, and i will have more after 7a m joining us, and i will have more after 7am about energy. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. a man is fighting for his life this morning after being mowed down by a car in south—east london yesterday morning. he is one of five people hurt after a mercedes mounted the pavement near catford bus garage. police have arrested the driver, but have confirmed the crash is not terror—related. actors keira knightley and dominic west were in trafalgar square yesterday, and not at the oscars, as theyjoined thousands of people for the uk premiere of the oscar—nominated iranian film the salesman. its director, asghar farhadi, was boycotting the awards in protest at the travel ban initiated by president trump. the mayor of london was in the square, too, and then hours later the film itself won the award for best foreign language film. a little—known victorian chapel
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in east london could be lost, because it has been damaged by leaking rainwater. the chapel is hidden inside the roof of oxford house, in bethnal green, which is well over 100 years old. it provides programmes for the community, but needs a lot of work. the roof needs to be replaced. we need to do lots of major repairs to the windows. the lift that services where the chapel is, up on the third floor, is broken. we can't afford to fix it. it's going to be a really challenging time. at its worst, we might have to sell the building. i hope we never have to do that. it's too important a place to just be turned into housing. let's have a look at the travel situation now. central line has severe delays due to an earlier track fault at north acton. there is no service from white city to ealing broadway and west ruislip. and on the london overground,
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trains are running again on the gospel oak to barking line for the first time since september, after a series of issues. on the roads, in maida vale, harrow road remains closed because of an unsafe building, following a fire that broke out on friday. in hammersmith, the a4 in to town has delays because of flooding at gliddon road, where one lane is closed. let's have a check on the weather now, with kate kinsella. good morning. it is quite a mild start to the day, perhaps the last of the really mild starts this week. anyway, as it is going to get much colder. today, also quite unsettled. we are going to get some frequent showers. now, some brighter spells, maybe, at first, but these showers blowing through quite quickly. we could get some hail mixed in there as well, accompanied by this quite fresh south—westerly breeze. thunder and lightning, potentially, as well. the maximum temperature seven celsius, so gradually getting a bit cooler by the end of the afternoon. now, these showers are going to continue overnight, as well, and it is going to be quite cold, much colder night
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and last night. the breeze stays with us again. potentially the showers could fall wintry. the minimum between three and seven celsius. as we move into tomorrow, we will get some showers first thing, but we will get some brighter spells between them tomorrow, maybe even see a little sunshine, so slightly improved. still going to see some showers, the maximum temperature at nine celsius. now, it stays rather unsettled this week. we will get some showers around. temperature, though, gradually starting to heat up a little bit as we move towards the end of the week. film criticjason film critic jason solomons film criticjason solomons is speaking to vanessa feltz about all thatis speaking to vanessa feltz about all that is happening at the oscars in la. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. confusion at the oscars as the best picture award is handed by mistake to the wrong film. la la land was initially named the winner. the producers started their acceptance speeches. but they were interrupted with an announcement that moonlight was in fact the best picture. moonlight, you guys won best picture.
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this is not a joke. moonlight has won best picture. moonlight. best picture. it appears that warrant 80 and faye dunaway had been handed the wrong envelope in one of the most dramatic plot twists in oscars history. good morning, it's monday 27th february. also this morning: the independent inquiry into child sexual abuse finally holds its first public hearings as it looks at the treatment of british children who were sent to australia. the number of us switching energy suppliers has hit a six year high as they raise their prices. i'm looking at why it's still worth shopping around for cheaper deals on gas and electricity. in sport, manchester united beat
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southampton in the efl cup final. the 3—2 win sanose mourinho become the first united manager to win a trophy in his first season with the club. red and yellow, green and blue. is this rainbow of bins and box is the best way to get us campaigning? is it the best way —— to get as recycling. heavy showers with thunder and pale. it will be windy and feel colder. more details on 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. the oscars ceremony has ended in confusion, after the wrong film was declared best picture. in a dramatic and farcical ending, la la land was announced as the winner, before the award eventually went to moonlight. let's cross to our los angeles correspondent james cook, who's at the vanity fair after—show
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party which all the stars attend. there's only one topic they will discuss tonight. what did happen? yes. there is only one thing on the minds of people as they arrived and thatis minds of people as they arrived and that is the extraordinary plot twisted the end of the night, the moment when the best picture was awarded to the wrong film. it was dramatic and left people astonished. to begin with a lot of people did not know whether it was a joke will not know whether it was a joke will not be but it became clear quickly that it was not a joke. let us look at what happened. and the academy awards... for best
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picture... come on. la la land. i'm sorry, no. there has been a mistake. moonlight, you guys won best picture. this is not a joke. i am afraid they read the wrong thing. this is not a joke. moonlight has won best picture. moonlight. best picture. not a joke. congratulations to moonlight and it was an extraordinary thing to happen. what have people been saying about it? up until that point it had been going
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well if not brilliantly for moonlight. they had won best director, emma stone had won best actress. they won in some of the below the line categories as well. it really was stunning and we will hear a little later on about the reaction in detailfrom some hear a little later on about the reaction in detail from some of the people involved. i'm just having a look around to see who is on the red carpet at the moment. people are flooding in right now. i don't think there is anyone right now we need to speak to. it was incredible. the director of moonlight, barry jenkins, said afterwards that he thought that la la land and the producers who were most of the way through their speeches before this happened, that they handled the situation with considerable grace. mahershala ali, who won best
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supporting actor, the first muslim, incidentally, to won and acting category we believe that the academy awards has also been reacting. he has been saying that la la land has done so well and resonated with so many people. when the name was read he was not surprised that he was happy for them. and then he got worried when security came and said. people are concerned in these tense times about what was happening. but mahershala ali said that when he heard that they had won he did not wa nt to heard that they had won he did not want to go up there and take something from somebody. he said it was hard to take joy from a moment like that. i think that has probably passed now for the cast and crew of moonlight. i think they will be enjoying their success now. we will be with you throughout the morning. we will come back you a little later. a difficult gig, trying to look both ways at the same time. but as mentioned there, the of emma stone. and after she had been on
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stage, they came off and she spoke about her own award because she won best actress for her role in la la land. she spoke about the mixup. of course, you know, it was an amazing thing to hear la la land. i think we would have loved to have won best picture. but we are so excited for moonlight. it is one of the best films of all time so i was beside myself. i was also holding my best actress in a leading role card that entire time. so i don't mean to start stuff but whatever story that was... i had that card. i don't know what happened. i wanted to talk to you guys first. well... as it developed, there is more information coming out, there are apparently two cards, a producer on either side of the stage and they have identical cards. what happened, what they think happened anyway was that the previous award was given
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out by leonardo dicaprio, came off one side of the stage and then warren beatty and faye dunaway came on the other side of stage and instead being handed the card for best picture they were handed a duplicate card for best actress and that seems to be root of the problem. it is does, every time you see it is still awkward. any people are talking about it. jane fonda describing it as a jawdropping mistake. jimmy kimmel blamed it on steve harvey, a reference to miss universe a few years ago when he was the host and he wrongly gave the wrong contestant the award of miss universe and then had to correct himself. another actress has tweeted that she feels bad that for the la la land produces. add a reference to barryjenkins. he tweeted a picture of the card saying still speechless. we spoke to him last week on bbc
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brea kfast. we spoke to him last week on bbc breakfast. and now his dream is coming true. we have more in oscars and what did happen and the late r. there is plenty of other news around this morning as well. the independent inquiry into child sexual abuse will hold its first public hearings today, more than two and a half years after it was set up by the government. it'll begin by examining the mistreatment of british children who were in care orfrom poor families, who were sent to australia in the years after the second world war. the inquiry will be told that the scale of abuse they suffered was much wider than previously thought. here's our home affairs correspondent tom symonds. newsreel: they arrive at fremantle from great britain with 931 new migrants for this country. new lives in the sunshine. that is what children in care, orfrom poor families were promised. but 70 years on some, like clifford walsh, are still affected by the beatings and sexual abuse they suffered instead. his catholic children's home, bindoon, near perth in australia has become notorious.
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for the next two weeks the televised public enquiry will consider new evidence about the extent of the abuse, claims that children were picked by paedophiles to travel aboard and allegations of a cover—up. we want to know what happened, we want to know who did it and we want to know who covered it up for so long. of course we need to know about it. there were consequences for children today. we also need to look at why it has taken 30 years to bring about this enquiry into the horrific abuse of hundreds, if not thousands of young children. the enquiry rejects suggestions that it is reaching too far back in history. many of the migrants are still alive. getting to the bottom of what happened to them and why, it says, is still relevant. we will speak to somebody in a few
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minutes it was sent to australia when he was 12 to ask his thoughts. the bbc has thoughts. —— the bbc ordered an investigation into tv licence collectors following reports that they're deliberately targeting vulnerable people with aggressive tactics. the daily mail claims enforcement officers, who are employed by the private company capita, are ordered to catch 28 evaders every week and promised financial incentives for hitting targets. head teachers and school governors are calling on the chancellor to make schools a priority in the budget. the national association of head teachers and the national association of governors have written an open letter to philip hammond to say that they're being forced to make impossible choices to save money. they have warned that lessons will need to be cut and class sizes reduced. more than a third of small businesses expect their rates to rise this april, according to the federation of small businesses. the federation says many face unsustainable and unaffordable increases, and are planning to cut the amount they invest in theirfirms.
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the government has promised help for those worst hit. in about ten minutes time will have the latest from los angeles where the latest from los angeles where the oscars ceremonies ended in confusion with the wrong film being given the award for best picture. moonlight eventually won la la land for they had received their seventh of the night. an extraordinary story. painfully and wonderfully awkward. one of those moments you will see for many years to come. it is 12 minutes past seven and there is 12 minutes past seven and there is plenty of other news around as well. in the years following the second world war thousands of british children in care orfrom poorfamilies were sent to start new lives in australia. many went on to be beaten and abused in homes or institutions. their stories will be told today at the first public hearings of the independent inquiry into child sexual abuse. one of those children was david hill and he's in our london newsroom. thank you forjoining us. can you
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ta ke thank you forjoining us. can you take us back, you were 12 when you we re take us back, you were 12 when you were sent to australia with two of your brothers. and you are part of the decision. tell us why you went. we went because we, like most migrants, were extremely poor. mum was a single parent and struggling and there was no way she could keep us and there was no way she could keep us at school and a society, one of the child migrant scams promised us opportunity and education in australia that we had no hope of getting here. persuaded us to sign up getting here. persuaded us to sign up and that is how we went. i was 12 with a twin brother and a 14—year—old brother. we were luckier than most child migrants because later my mother was able to follow us later my mother was able to follow us out and we got back together as a family. we reunited as a family where as most of these are the kids, some as young as four never saw their parents again and spend an entire loveless childhood and they we re entire loveless childhood and they were the ones who were the most,
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least protected, most vulnerable and it turns out the most severely abused, sexually and physically.” know you have been working on this for many years and you have been speaking to others who have been abused. what kind of scale was it on? what can you tell us? well, that is the frightening part. as a result of all of the interviews i have done with kids who went to favourite with me and others and other research that i have made available eye, for this enquiry, has estimated that as high as 60% of the children were sexually abused in the institution. which isjust a devastating sexually abused in the institution. which is just a devastating fact that you talk about. this happened from 1938 until 1974. thousands of pa rents from 1938 until 1974. thousands of parents effectively signing over their children. i must say, incidentally, if you need to feel for the parents. my mother was a
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case in point. you know, they were told that if you really love your children you will make this great sacrifice for them and a lot of parents in innocence and in good faith signed their children over to these schemes which were widely flawed. there has been a landmark settlement, hasn't there, against fairbridge. you again were part of that. what else do you think needs to be done? i think the case we won after years of struggle in sydney la st after years of struggle in sydney last year, what came with it, which was so important and comforting for the kids, well, the former kids, was an acknowledgement of the terrible wrong that had been done to them. but frankly there is not... yukonite unto the great wrong. you cannot give back a childhood that has been crushed. —— you can't undo the great
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wrong but you can have some recompense. i hope that will happen far the child migrants as a result of this enquiry. you will give written evidence to this enquiry. what would you like to say? there we re what would you like to say? there were a series of things but the abuse was far more widespread than has been accepted today and the other thing of great significance is that the authorities, including the british government, knew that these schemes were flawed at the time and did nothing to correct it. in 2010 the prime minister apologised to children who had been shipped overseas. is that enough, in your view? oh, no, there is much more. the british government condemned and blacklisted a number of institutions including fairbridge and then, as a result of political pressure,
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quietly tore up the blacklist and allowed hundreds more children to be sent, including me, to institutions that they had condemned. it has been kept secret and covered up for over 40 yea rs. kept secret and covered up for over 40 years. i am sure that this enquiry is going to be very helpful in uncovering all of that. and that is what you would like to see? evidence that that happened? i want to see the evidence out there and i have been research and, you point out, for many years and i have given all that material to the enquiry already. we appreciate your time. it is an incredible story. let's find out what is happening with the weather. carol has it this morning. it certainly has. this morning you will notice a cold start to the day and generally colder feel which will puts —— push south through the day. we are looking at heavy showers, a combination of rain, hail, sleet,
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thunder, lightning and snow. watch out for ice on untreated surfaces and the callback their cuts in further south as we go through the afternoon and into the evening time. this morning across scotland it is a mixture of bright spells, sunshine and showers, some of the showers wintry with sleet and snow at low levels. the same for northern ireland, a lot of dry weather but the showers are not far away and there is the risk of ice across northern england. for england and wales we are looking at plentiful showers as we go through the course of the day. not all of us catching them, that is the nature of showers, and this morning any wintry feel is going to be across high ground in the south—west of england. windy across the northern isles, so winds are now peaking. this the remnants of storm ewan, and gusty winds across the south and south—east. as we go through the day, the showers will be heavy, some with thunder and some with sleet and snow but a
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period of heavy snow across south—eastern scotland and northern england. if you are travelling, they are all that in mind. as we head on through the evening and overnight, gusty winds, particularly in the south. also north—west scotland, in between a lot of dry weather. where we have showers and overnight temperatures dipping there is the risk of ice, more widespread than the nightjust gone. temperatures in scotla nd the nightjust gone. temperatures in scotland falling easily to between —4 and minus six. then as we move through tomorrow, this is what is left of storm ewan. a weakening area of low pressure, and you can see it is quite windy around its southern flank and with the accompanying weather front we will see some rain coming out of it and some snow, particularly across higher ground across parts of england and wales. a lot of dry weather to be had as well. wall am moving across the south taking showery rain as it goes. for tuesday into wednesday, there goes that system moving away
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into the south. you can see the isobars close together for a while, meaning it will be windy for a while, and then they broaden out. we are looking at a more settled day on wednesday, a quieter day except in the south, where we have a cluster of weather fronts rolling across us bringing wet and windy weather. temperatures between about eight and 10 celsius. in summary, for the early pa rt 10 celsius. in summary, for the early part of the week is going to feel cold. there will be some wintry showers around but as we head towards the latter part of the week, the beginning of march, milder but we will also see some rain. thank you very much, pretty chilly for some people. the weather has been the outstanding story of the last few days, but move over, whether! it is the storyline worthy of an oscar itself. chaos at the academy awards, after the wrong film was announced as best picture. this is the dramatic moment at the end of the night where it all went wrong. there was a sort of activity behind
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the stage, you are thinking what is going on? carnage. they have announced the wrong film. warren beatty and faye dunaway were on stage and this is what happened. and the academy award... for best picture... come on. la la land. i'm sorry, no. there's a mistake. moonlight, you guys won best picture. this is not a joke. this is not a joke, i'm afraid they read the wrong thing.
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this is not a joke. moonlight has won best picture. moonlight, best picture. that is jordan that isjordan horovitz, one of the producers, taking control on the stage. there is only one place to go, the vanity fair after—show party, where we can talk to our los angeles correspondent james cook. normally at this point in an oscars ceremony we are talking about the winners of all the awards and which film did particularly well, what the british success was but at the moment there is only one story, and it is unfortunately the awkward one. that's right. it was awkward, it was a difficult moment. i think some people for a very brief moment were concerned about the security when they saw people coming on from the side of the stage and they wondered what was happening. in fact it is... in fact, it was a moment when it turned out that it was just the
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wrong announcement that had been made, that the wrong envelope had been handed over. we have been getting plenty of reaction, we will getting plenty of reaction, we will get more in a minute, but let's first of all hear from jackie chan. it was great drama, great night, i think tomorrow all of the world will talk about it. i think it is drama, good! it is a good thing? no one is perfect. the whole world, everybody... it was a great night. thank you, chaps, thank you. well, that was the reaction there from jackie chan, standing alongside chris tucker. a few seconds ago we heard from some —— salma hayek.” think it was fantastic. he got a
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moment to shine, he was so gracious towards the other winner because they are all winners, and it was a fantastic moment for him.” they are all winners, and it was a fantastic moment for him. i know you are trying to grab people as they go past, so feel free to grab people as they go by. what are the headlines from the evening? la la land 16 oscars from its nominations, but where else are the headlines? you are right, i do need eyes in the back of my head —— la la land won six. the best supporting categories both went to black actors, viyella —— viola davies, and mahershala ali.
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plenty more on that oscars debacle throughout the programme. if you've missed it, don't worry, we will play at again. trying to cover what has happened overnight while everyone is shouting at you. once upon a time when the idea of taking pictures on your phone seemed laughable and social media wasn't a thing, the nokia 3310 ruled the world. when smartphones took over it fell out of fashion but it is making a comeback and you can still play snaked on it. barcelona, and as the mobile phone industry arrives for its annualjamboree, there is nostalgia in the air. singing the nokia tune. nokia, a name that used to rule the mobile world, is making a comeback.
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this was its first chance to make a big splash. and, with a range of new smartphones, it unveiled something very retro, last on sale in 2005. let me reintroduce the nokia 3310. you cannot do much with this phone except make calls and play a game of snake, but the battery lasts forever. well, almost. we asked consumers what is the most iconic device that you have ever seen from nokia? we thought, let us have some fun and be creative with this device. this may be fun, but let us face it, it is a gimmick. if nokia wants to be a major force in the world again, it will not be because of the 3310, but a new range of android smartphones. this is already selling well in china. but competition in a market where smartphones all look the same is tough. so perhaps it was smart to look
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backwards as well as forward. by bringing out this truly iconic device with bags of nostalgia, for many people it was their first mobile phone. it captures their attention, and let them know that nokia is back. will it appeal to the public? maybe with my parents‘ generation, but not something i'd be interested in. i would switch my phone. even if it had no internet? yes. i would change my mind. here is another phone making a comeback. this is the blackberry 31, launched by a chinese firm. two big names making an unlikely bet they could be big again in the future. rory cellan—jones, bbc news, barcelona. more on the oscars shortly.
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good morning, i'm asad ahmad. a man is fighting for his life this morning after being mowed down by a car in south—east london yesterday morning. he is one of five people hurt after a mercedes mounted the pavement near catford bus garage. police have arrested the driver, but have confirmed the crash is not terror—related. actors keira knightley and dominic west were in trafalgar square yesterday, and not at the oscars, as theyjoined thousands of people for the uk premiere of the oscar—nominated iranian film the salesman. its director, asghar farhadi, was boycotting the awards in protest at the travel ban initiated by president trump. the mayor of london was in the square, too, and then hours later the film itself won the award for best foreign language film. a little—known victorian chapel in east london could be lost, because it has been damaged by leaking rainwater. the chapel is hidden inside the roof of oxford house, in bethnal green, which is well over 100 years old. it provides programmes for the community, but needs a lot of work.
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the roof needs to be replaced. we need to do lots of major repairs to the windows. the lift that services where the chapel is, up on the third floor, is broken. we can't afford to fix it. it's going to be a really challenging time. at its worst, we might have to sell the building. i hope we never have to do that. it's too important a place to just be turned into housing. let's have a look at the travel situation now. central line has minor delays due to an earlier track fault at north acton. there is no service from white city to ealing broadway and west ruislip. and, on the london overground, trains are running again on the gospel oak to barking line for the first time since september, after a series of issues. on the roads, in hammersmith, the a4 into town has delays because of flooding at gliddon road, where one lane is closed. the harrow road remains closed because of an unsafe building, following a fire that broke out on friday.
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let's have a check on the weather now, with kate kinsella. good morning. it is quite a mild start to the day, perhaps the last of the really mild starts for this week, anyway, as it is going to get much colder. today, also quite unsettled. we are going to get some frequent showers. now, some brighter spells, maybe, at first, but these showers blowing through quite quickly. we could get some hail mixed in there as well, accompanied by this quite fresh south—westerly breeze. thunder and lightning, potentially, as well. the maximum temperature seven celsius, so gradually getting a little bit cooler by the end of the afternoon. now, these showers are going to continue overnight, as well, and it is going to be quite cold, much colder night and last night. the breeze stays with us again. potentially these showers could fall wintry. the minimum between three and seven celsius. as we head into tomorrow, we will get some showers first thing, but we will get some brighter spells between them tomorrow, may even see a little sunshine. so slightly improved, still going to see some showers, the maximum temperature at nine celsius. now, it stays rather unsettled this week. we will get some showers around.
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temperature, though, gradually starting to pick up a little bit as we head towards the end of the week. va nessa vanessa feltz is on bbc radio london, talking about the new £1 coin which comes into circulation soon, and the oscars of course. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. the oscars ceremony has ended in confusion, after the wrong film was declared best picture. in a dramatic and farcical ending, la la land was announced as the winner, before the award eventually went to moonlight. let's cross to our los angeles correspondent james cook, who's at the vanity fair after—show party. and the academy award... for best
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picture... la la land. i'm sorry, no. there has been a mistake. moonlight, you guys won best picture. this is not a joke. i am afraid they read the wrong thing. this is not a joke. moonlight has won best picture. moonlight. best picture. i believe i should keep it anyway.
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no, sorry. guys... this is very unfortunate what happened. personally i blame steve harvey for this. i would like to see you have an oscar anyway. i will be proud to hand this to my friends from moonlight. to explain what you are seeing there,jimmy kimmel to explain what you are seeing there, jimmy kimmel was the hottest. jordan was the guy holding up the piece of paper that he took took away from warren basey. it seems that they had been handed the wrong envelope. there are two identical suitcases on either side of the stage and the award before that was emma stone for la la land for best actress in a leading role. it seems that warren basey and faye dunaway picked up an envelope, got the same envelope in duplicate. when he
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opened it it's said emma stone, la la land and you saw him make a face, is this the right one? presume your belly she just saw la la land and thatis belly she just saw la la land and that is what she said. we cut it short. two speeches had already been made, thanking family members, what a great night it had been a leather and then eventually someone took control. moonlight came up on stage, gave their speeches and it was spectacularly awkward. and congratulations to moonlight. we spoke to the director last week. we will have more on that later. the independent inquiry into child sexual abuse will hold its first public hearings today, more than two and a half years after it was set up by the government. it'll begin by examining the mistreatment of british children in care orfrom poorfamilies, who were sent to australia in the years after the second world war. the inquiry will be told that the scale of abuse they suffered was much wider than previously thought. downing street has dismissed
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suggestions that theresa may will announce that the end of free movement for new eu migrants will come into force next month. the daily telegraph is reporting that the cut—off date could be the 15th of march, once the government's article 50 bill has gone through parliament. anyone arriving in the uk after that point would no longer have the automatic right to stay in the uk permanently. downing street has said that no decision has been taken. more than a third of small businesses expect their rates to rise this april, according to the federation of small businesses. the federation says many face unsustainable and unaffordable increases, and are planning to cut the amount they invest in theirfirms. the government has promised help for those worst hit. we have an oscar winner now. james
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cook is with colleen atwood. good morning. good morning and thank you very much. we have an oscar winner, our first of the morning. thank you so much forjoining us. you won your award for costume design. please show it to us. how does it feel to hold it? it feels great. there was a total surprise to me but i am thrilled to be here and holding this lovely statue. you won it for that the adaptation of the jk lovely statue. you won it for that the adaptation of thejk rawling novel, fantastic beasts and we do find them. i think this is the only oscar for anything adapted from jk rawling. that is true. i was quite shocked but that is the case. i'm happy to be the first hopefully the first of many. what is it like, walking up the steps when your name is called. what is it like? because lama is called. what is it like? because i am a behind the camera person it is quite scary. you got up there,
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you got the award. who presented it to you? um, i can't remember either. ryan... ryan bathie. —— murphy. anyway, you have it. it's fine. you are only live on bbc. do not worry about it. what did you think of the end of the show was to mark i was as shocked as anybody else and i felt bad for everybody, the people up there, to find that you don't have it after that moment of terror with your heart in your throat. and i felt for the people who... you know, imean, it felt for the people who... you know, i mean, it isjust awkward. i think they handled it beautifully in both cases. they were classy, won't they? yes. quite classy. it was a great opportunity for a movie where people we re opportunity for a movie where people were tied to say thank you to
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everyone and then for the next round it was awesome to see them up there, hugging each other and it was great. and, finally, if there are any young costu me and, finally, if there are any young costume designers watching they will now look up to you for a long time. what would you say to them? i would say to keep working hard, you know? do not be afraid to be yourself and don't be afraid of the magic. thank you so much and congratulations. coueen you so much and congratulations. colleen atwood has won an oscar, as you can see there in her hand, for fantastic beasts and where to find them. we will try to find some other oscar winners to speak to live on the programme. in the end, la la land won six. do you think they will put that on the advert? won six but thought they won seven? let's get some cup winners on now. good morning, everybody. jose mourinho has become the first manchester united manager to win
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a trophy in his first season at the club after guiding his side to a 3—2 win over southampton in the efl cup. saints fans will consider their side to have been unlucky as manolo gabbiadini saw a goal contentiously ruled out. united then went two nil up through zlatan ibrahimovic and jesse lingard. gabbiadini struck either side of the interval to bring southampton level. but ibrahimovic snatched victory with just a few minutes left to secure the first domestic silverware of the season. they gave us a beautiful final. a beautiful football match. so i want to have these words for them. i feel happy with our victory and very happy with the fact that i did it four times, the same as the biggest one, the same as mr clough. harry kane scored his third hat—trick in nine games as tottenham thrashed stoke 4—0
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at white hart lane. all the goals came in the first half, with delle alli scoring spurs' fourth goal. it's kane's third hat—trick in nine games. spurs go second in the premier league — but they're still ten points behind chelsea. england made it seventeen wins in a row after beating italy 36— 15 in their six nations match at twickenham. england weren't at their best and had to come from behind to claim the bonus point victory as italy led by five points at half time, but five second—half tries, including this from elliot daly, ensured england top the six nations table but coach eddiejones was critical of italy's unusual breakdown tactic. it was not rugby, let's face facts. you must have an offside line to play the game. italy was smart and congratulations to their coaching staff and their players, they executed their plan brilliantly but it was not rugby.
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if i were the bbc i would be asking for my money back because we have no rugby game. we need to go outside and train now so we get some proper by. he was decidedly unhappy. the referee was expecting the tactic. italy had had a word with the referee prior to the game, a tactic of rockliff rugby. england, in the first half, did not know what to do about it. surely you do whatever you can to overcome your opponent. yes, and that is what italy was doing. whether that was in the spirit of the game, i am uncertain. switching energy suppliers is at a six—year high according to the energy watchdog ofgem. you would think that more people would switch but the vast majority of people tend to stay with the same provider.
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yes we all know we should be switching energy suppliers to get a better deal and according to the latest figures more of us are doing it. the energy regulator ofgem has just published its figures for consumer switching over the last year. it says that customers swapped their energy providers nearly eight million times last year that's a rise of nearly three million over the previous year. and almost 30% up on 2015. so customers are voting with their feet. but what impact is it having? three of the big six energy firms havejust announced price rises for millions of customers. rachel fletcher is from ofgem. rachel, good morning to you. the question that i post there, doesn't make any difference? on one hand these figures are great and it's just that more of us are voting with our feet, taking ourselves just that more of us are voting with ourfeet, taking ourselves elsewhere but does not stock prices going up. i think, obviously, but does not stock prices going up. ithink, obviously, this but does not stock prices going up. i think, obviously, this is a very good news story and we are seeing things move in the right direction in terms of putting pressure on suppliers. but you are right. we see
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intense competition for people who switch regularly. with good prices in the market. we see much less that two thirds of loyal customers who stay with their supplier. what we're hoping is that the more switching that there is, the more that that pressure is felt including for the standard variable tariffs that are at 65% of people are paying. the vast majority of people are still on the standard variable tariffs. they tend to be the most expensive and therefore it penalises people for apathy. if you stick with the status quo, you pay the price for doing so. evenif quo, you pay the price for doing so. even if you do not want to change supplier you can usually find a better deal with your current supplier is you are on a standard variable tariffs. i would encourage customers in that situation to look at their bills which will include information about how much they could save from switching to a
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better deal, even with their own supplier. but, you know, switching between suppliers is far easier and faster than it has ever been. most switches between suppliers are taken around 21 days and that includes two weeks cooling off period if you want to change your mind. so the message it really is, you know, get online, have a look for good deals and vote with your feet. you say it has never been easierfor with your feet. you say it has never been easier for customers to do this but if it was so easy i think we would see the figures for the number of switches rise even more because as you said, the vast majority are still on the most expensive tariff. we just still on the most expensive tariff. wejust don't think still on the most expensive tariff. we just don't think it is worth the hassle to move. and then if we do move there is nothing to stop the provider putting up the prices that was just move to. provider putting up the prices that wasjust move to. most of the good deals on the market are fixed deals. so not only are you switching to a lower price but you are also switching to a price guarantee for 12 months or in some cases even
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further. so there is a really strong incentive to shop around and, in oh, we will continue to do everything we can to make the switching process smooth and reliable and we will continue to do everything we can to give people the information they need to make a good choice about their energy provider. and making a good choices about making compensation work in the market. people will move in that means that the business should, in theory react. but is it not yourjob, as a regulator, to make competition were, not just rely regulator, to make competition were, notjust rely on consumers do the ha rd notjust rely on consumers do the hard work was to mark as i said, we are working hard to make it as easy as possible to shop around. we are making it as easy as possible as well for new suppliers to come in with good offers and innovative offers that are attracting consumers. we have, also, recently announced a price cap for the 4 million households that are on
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prepaid meters and are not getting access to good deals in the market. there is protection available there for those who are thusly served and in the meantime many people should be shopping around and voting with their feet if they are unhappy with their feet if they are unhappy with the price they are paying. their feet if they are unhappy with the price they are payingm their feet if they are unhappy with the price they are paying. it is good to talk to you. so you have heard the advice, shop around if you are unhappy. have you guys switched it? my wife mentioned it, yesterday. why haven't we switched yet? glad she listens to what we talk about in the studios. i also listen to carol, who has very interesting details about the weather. thank you, good morning. we're looking at a cold start to the day for many of us and heavy not just this start to the day for many of us and heavy notjust this morning but through the course of the day. some of those will be thundery, with hail, and some will have some heat pa nts hail, and some will have some heat pants no embedded in them. it is
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very windy across the northern isles, but this will move away. this isx isles, but this will move away. this is x storm ewan. and if you look at the isobars, here through the course of the day it is going to be very lonely. ahonen all dollar that we are pulling in cold air, so increasingly we have got wintry showers in scotland and northern ireland, but as the cold air cut them across parts of england and wales, we'll see some wintry showers but not everyone will see them as we have through the course of the afternoon. this morning we have the risk of ice first thing on untreated surfaces. there is quite a bit of dry weather in between the showers, we are looking at some sunshine, but wintry flavour across scotland and northern ireland. it will dry and brighten up in scotland. for england and wales we are looking a lot of showers increasingly turning wintry. the north of scotland will brighten up the north of scotland will brighten up this afternoon, the south, south—east and northern england we are looking at a spell of heavy snow. for northern ireland, sunshine, bright spells and showers for you and for wales and south—west
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england we are likely to see some wintry conditions this afternoon, even at lower levels, but it shouldn't be problematic. for the rest of england and wales we are looking at rain showers, some of those heavy and thundery with some hail. through the evening and overnight we hang on to some of those wintry showers. still windy in the south and north—west but there will be a lot of dry weather and where we have damp surfaces and low temperatures there is the risk of ice. more widespread than this morning. we are looking at temperatures in rural areas in scotla nd temperatures in rural areas in scotland down as low as possibly —4 minus six. similar in northern ireland, england and wales —2 to around about freezing. a cold start to the day on wednesday morning. there goes our first front in the next lot coming in, this is storm ewan. still quite windy around its south—western flank and as it comes in the showers will be driven in by that wind. a lot of them will be rain showers but there will be some
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wintry conditions on higher ground. we also have another system scooting across the south of england, bringing some wet and windy conditions, but in between dry and bright, our temperature range between six and about nine. thank you very much, see you later.“ between six and about nine. thank you very much, see you later. if you are waking up this morning, the big story is the oscars and you would expect us to be talking about diversity and the winners, but the big moment is right at the end. the final moment of the night, best picture, la la land was expected to win, but moonlight was also in contention. warren beatty looked deeply confused and in the middle of it thought it looked so confusing that he decided to put faye dunaway
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under the bus. and the academy award... for best picture... come on. la la land. i'm sorry, no. there's a mistake. moonlight, you guys won best picture. this is not a joke. this is not a joke, i'm afraid they read the wrong thing. this is not a joke. moonlight has won best picture. moonlight, best picture.
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i believe i should keep it anyway! they made three acceptance speeches, the producers of la la land, and he very graciously tries to put it all straight, and he does. moonlight was the winner. and we will have more after eighta.m.. grey bins, green bins, blue boxes, and red boxes. if you are confused about where to put your recycling, then you are probably not alone. keep britain tidy claims that complicated bin collections are putting us off from sorting our rubbish. and, as a result recycling targets are being missed, as dianne oxberry reports. bin collections in england are so desperate and complicated they are being blamed for a drop in recycling rates. keep britain tidy said there are more than 300 different systems
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for collecting household waste and people are confused about what they can and cannot recycle. the pressure group on the government to impose a blueprint for recycling to make the situation simplerfor blueprint for recycling to make the situation simpler for householders. it is very difficult to actually have a national conversation about what we should recycle and what should be recycled and everybody is doing something different. every local authority in the uk has been given the target of recycling 50% of its waste by 2020 to meet eu guidelines, but the figures obtained by bbc inside out north—west found some councils are recycling as little as 15% of their waste. london boroughs are amongst the worst offenders, with none of the councils in the capital currently hitting the 50% mark they will have to reach within the next few years. keep britain tidy believes we can learn from wales, which has a 60% recycling rate. the devolved government has set ambitious targets, and every household has
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food waste collected. that is incredibly important as we waste 7 million tons of food in the uk every year. richard mcilwain from the campaign group keep britain tidy joins us now. good morning to you. so so many different systems. shall we talk about what is going right? we mentioned that wales seemed to be really mailing list. how is that different? first of all, wales have set a target of 7% by 2025, an ambitious target when england is currently recycling 40%. each of the authorities will work to deliver greater consistency in the way they collect the waste, which ultimately could be having the same coloured bins, and also the welsh government support local authorities with funding where they have hard to reach areas with low recycling rates. so it is a complete package, and that is what we are looking at
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now, saying are voluntary measures enough or do we need to look at places like wales and learn from what they are doing? we are getting better, you go back to 2002 and we we re better, you go back to 2002 and we were recycling 10% of household waste, a lot better than what we were. yes, local authorities have done a greatjob, we have increased from 10% to 44% over the last few yea rs. from 10% to 44% over the last few years. over the last four to five yea rs years. over the last four to five years it has flat lined, so we have struggled to get above that. we are looking at another step change and pa rt looking at another step change and part of that is to say let's have a much more consistent service. we do an awful lot of work with people on the doorstep, to talk to people about the issues around recycling. we know that people find it confusing. if we could have a once only national message about what you recycle, the same waste types, consistent services, the same coloured bins, it would be very much easier and overall it would save money. richard in leicester makes
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the point that the house next door can't recycle what they can, why isn't there a single country—wide system ? vera isn't there a single country—wide system? vera says we can't recycle yoghurt pots or some things like that, so there are so many different things going on and changes being made. exactly, and if you want people to do the right thing, make it easy for them, that is the classic mantra in policy—making. we are saying let's try to unpick what has been a very effective system up until now and take a step back and say what do we need to do next? we would welcome a conversation with government and local authorities and business. there is already work going on and a blueprint in england, we just need to see some pace behind it and some targeting. if we set ourselves timescales for 2025 to 2030, it gives everybody confidence that we can move towards them. loads of people getting in contact on that
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one. the department for environment, food and rural affairs insisted some councils had excellent recycling rates, but admitted more could be done to meet eu targets. viewers in the north—west of england can see more on this story on inside out tonight on bbc one at 7:30pm. if you are in another part of the country, it will be available on the bbc iplayer. and bins in liverpool are purple because they cannot be blue and red, so they combine them and make them purple. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. a man is fighting for his life this morning after being mowed down by a car in south—east london yesterday morning. he is one of five people hurt after a mercedes mounted the pavement near catford bus garage. police have arrested the driver, but have confirmed the crash is not terror—related. actors keira knightley and dominic west were in trafalgar square yesterday, and not at the oscars, as theyjoined thousands
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of people for the uk premiere of the oscar—nominated iranian film the salesman. its director, asghar farhadi, was boycotting the awards in protest at the travel ban initiated by president trump. the mayor of london was in the square, too, and then hours later the film itself won the award for best foreign language film. a little—known victorian chapel in east london could be lost, because it is been damaged by leaking rainwater. the chapel is hidden inside the roof of oxford house, in bethnal green, which is well over 100 years old. it provides programmes for the community, but needs a lot of work. the roof needs to be replaced. we need to do lots of major repairs to the windows. the lift that services where the chapel is, up on the third floor, is broken. we can't afford to fix it. it's going to be a really challenging time. at its worst, we might have to sell the building. i hope we never have to do that. it's too important a place to just be turned into housing.
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let's have a look at the travel situation now. central line has minor delays due to an earlier track fault at north acton. there is no service from white city to ealing broadway and west ruislip. and, on the london overground, trains are running again on the gospel oak to barking line for the first time since september, after a series of issues. on the roads, the strand underpass is closed for repairs. there are queues northbound over waterloo bridge. in hammersmith, the a4 into town has delays because of flooding at gliddon road, where one lane is closed. let's have a check on the weather now, with kate kinsella. good morning. it is quite a mild start to the day, perhaps the last of the really mild starts for this week, anyway, as it is going to get much colder. today, also quite unsettled. we are going to get some frequent showers. now, some brighter spells, maybe, at first, but these showers blowing through quite quickly. we could get some hail mixed in there as well,
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accompanied by this quite fresh south—westerly breeze. thunder and lightning, potentially, as well. the maximum temperature seven celsius, so gradually getting a little bit cooler by the end of the afternoon. now, these showers are going to continue overnight, as well, and it is still going to be quite cold, a much colder night than last night. the breeze stays with us again. potentially these showers could fall wintry. the minimum between three and four celsius. as we head into tomorrow, we will get some showers first thing, but we will get some brighter spells between them tomorrow, may even see a little bit of sunshine. so slightly improved, still going to see some showers, the maximum temperature at nine celsius. now, it stays rather unsettled this week. we will get some showers around. temperature, though, gradually starting to pick up a little bit as we head towards the end of the week. smoking bans on hospital grounds and the oscars is all being discussed by va nessa the oscars is all being discussed by vanessa feltz in the next half—hour. for hello.
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this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. confusion at the oscars as the best picture award is handed by mistake to the wrong film. la la land was initially named the winner. the producers started their acceptance speeches. but they were interrupted with an announcement that moonlight was in fact the best picture. this is not a joke. moonlight has won best picture. moonlight, best picture. it was one of the most dramatic plot twists in the history of the academy awards and we will be getting lots of reaction throughout the programme. good morning. it's monday 27th february. more on the oscars shortly. also this morning: the independent inquiry into child sexual abuse finally holds its first public hearings as it looks
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at the treatment of british children who were sent to australia. the number of us switching energy suppliers has hit a six year high as big firms raise their prices. i'm looking at why it's still worth shopping around for cheaper deals on gas and electricity. in sport manchester united beat southampton in the efl cup final. the 3—2 win sanose mourinho become the first united manager to win a trophy in his first season with the club. and carol has the weather. good morning. it is a cold day today but one of bright spells, sunshine and showers. some of the showers will be heavy and boundary with pale, but some of them will also be wintery. —— heavy and thundery with hailstones. the oscars ceremony has ended in farce after the wrong film was named as best picture. it doesn't matter how many times you
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see this clip, it gets more awkward every time! the team behind la la land had begun their acceptance speeches when they were interrupted by a producer who said the award should have gone to moonlight. let's cross to our los angeles correspondent james cook, who's at the vanity fair after—show party. iimagine i imagine that is top of everything they are disgusting. how did it happen and do we even know yet? good morning. good morning. the stars are pouring in here. we havejust seen eltonjohn, matt pouring in here. we havejust seen elton john, matt damon pouring in here. we havejust seen eltonjohn, matt damon and scarlet johannson. loads of stars pouring in here and not many willing to talk about that moment. what we think happened is that the wrong envelope was handed to faye dunaway and warren beatty, and the envelope contained the winning name of emma stone, who had just won best actress for la la land, and that was read out. and that is why the producers of la la land came up onto the stage
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to a cce pt of la la land came up onto the stage to accept the award. a brief moment of glory for this dazzling musical. escapism personified here in hollywood. but in fact it was a much more serious work, moonlight, which actually won the oscar. dave willis reports. warren beatty was about to announce the award for best picture but he seemed confused. best picture... in the end faye dunaway made the announcement. la la land! and the producers were midway through the a cce pta nce producers were midway through the acceptance speeches when in came the man in the headphones frantically trying to clear the stage. it turned out that la la land had not won the oscar after all and it belonged instead to the producers of
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moonlight, the low budget underdog. this is not a joke. moonlight has won best picture. moonlight. moonlight, best picture. la la land producerjordan horowitz moonlight, best picture. la la land producer jordan horowitz galla ntly handed the oscar over as the audience looked on aghast. it was left to an embarrassed warren beatty to try and explain the producers' mistake. i will tell you what happened. i opened the envelope and it said emma stone, la la land. that is why i took such a long look at faye and at you. i wasn't trying to be funny. moonlight, the drama of a 93v be funny. moonlight, the drama of a gay black man growing up in miami was dwarfed by la la land in terms of nominations but it ended triumphant in the most extraordinary of circumstances. even in my dreams this could not be true but too well
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with dreams. i'm done with it because this is true. oh, my goodness. academy award organisers are still trying to work out exactly what went wrong on a night like no other at the oscars. i blame myself for this. david willetts, bbc news, hollywood. a night like no other. you can say that again. i am joined now by davis. good morning. it is strange to say that because you are just starting to party. what on earth did you make of the end of that? i simply... i don't know what happened. what is so weird, jimmy kimmel had been roasting matt damon all night. so the guy who came on with the correct envelope looked a bit like matt damon and i thought it was part of the bit, until it clearly wasn't. what a tough way for la la land to find out they lost and
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what a tough way for moonlight to find out that they won. they couldn't enjoy the moment as well as they might. la la land was so classy about it. what did you think of moonlight as a winner. we should be talking about that as a deserving best picture. nobody is going to forget who won best picture at the 2017 academy awards. for a film made for $1.5 million, a film about a marginalised group, and made by a film—maker who hadn't made a film for 12 years, it is a cinderella story really. naomi harrisjust walking past. we are going to get her to join walking past. we are going to get her tojoin us... she said she walking past. we are going to get her to join us... she said she will be back. sorry. moonlight, what is your view about representation of race and other diversity and whether it has broadened out over the past year? this is a very good showing, not only in front of the camera but behind the camera as well. we have
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cinematographers of colour, producers, editors, but they are still lacking any area of female directors, which is pretty egregious. in terms of hispanic and asian representation, that is still thin on the ground. it is a great year but there is still work to be done. it isjust one year. we have seen towards the viola davis, but two years with no nominees of colour at all. the thing to be wary of is apathy, to think we can be complacent because we have had a good year. we have had good years in the past. everybody is looking for the past. everybody is looking for the kind of consistency where we don't need to have this diversity and inclusion, sage and again and again because movies should reflect the world we actually live in. —— inclusion conversation. la la land doesn't reflect the world we live in. what would you like to say about that movie? the less i say about that, the better! i thought it was a
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truly unique film this season. i loved it. i loved ryan gosling and emma stone and congratulations to herfor emma stone and congratulations to her for winning emma stone and congratulations to herfor winning the emma stone and congratulations to her for winning the academy award. i think wejust need her for winning the academy award. i think we just need variation. even though it was tragic way it played out to have moonlight and la la land on the same stage tonight was great. naomi! sorry. they are saying that she is getting away. we will run and try to get her. so sorry to keep interrupting. that is terribly rude. one more question i was going to ask you which is about the politics. a lot of politics tonight, quite a lot from the hose, jimmy kimmel. he was funny but how do you think that goes down with all of united states? people in the uk may not feel quite how divided and politically charged the atmosphere is right now. i actually thought it was a mild ceremony considering what is going on in america right now. i think he
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did it in a humorous way that did not feel too heavy—handed. did it in a humorous way that did not feel too heavy-handed. thank you so much and lovely talking to you, david. we appreciate you coming back to speak to us. let's hear a bit more reaction to what has been going on tonight. a little bit broken but it was one of those things that get thrown at you and you can choose to lea n thrown at you and you can choose to lean into ed or push away from it. it was a real honour to be able to give it to them. everybody is talking about the same thing here tonight. it has been a remarkable evening. we arejust tonight. it has been a remarkable evening. we are just chasing naomi harris down the carpet. let me see ifi harris down the carpet. let me see if i can figure out what she is doing because we would be keen to get to come and speak to us. naomi, the bbc. live on the bbc. would you come and talk to us? possibly not. she is queueing for her photograph.
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we can't quite get down there. we will see if we can get naomi to come back. i'm sure she just didn't hear you. she's not ignoring you! she is having her hair ruffled by somebody. she has spoken to us repeatedly throughout the oscar season and she has been very charming so i hope we will get her back. it would be wonderful to speak to her and she was in moonlight. three days work. amazing. we will come back to james later. we will try to tidy it up for you later but that is the magic and the madness of the after show party. james trying to hold it all together and talk you through what happened overnight, while various a list celebrities are walking past. he has done a greatjob. it is aged 10am and now time for some other news. ——
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it is 8:10am. the independent inquiry into child sexual abuse will hold its first public hearings today, more than two and a half years after it was set up by the government. it'll begin by examining the mistreatment of british children who were in care orfrom poor families, who were sent to australia in the years after the second world war. the inquiry will be told that the scale of abuse they suffered was much wider than previously thought. here's our home affairs correspondent tom symonds. newsreel: they arrive at fremantle from great britain with 931 new migrants for this country. new lives in the sunshine. that is what children in care orfrom poorfamilies were promised. but 70 years on some, like clifford walsh, are still affected by the beatings and sexual abuse they suffered instead. his catholic children's home, bindoon, near perth in australia has become notorious. for the next two weeks the televised public enquiry will consider new evidence of the extent of the abuse, claims that children were picked by paedophiles to travel aboard and allegations
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of a cover—up. we want to know what happened, we want to know who did it and we want to know who covered it up for so long. of course we need to know about it. there are consequences for children today. we also need to look at why it has taken 30 years to bring about this enquiry into the horrific abuse of hundreds if not thousands of young children. the enquiry rejects suggestions that it is reaching too far back in history. many of the migrants are still alive. getting to the bottom of what happened to them and why, it says, is still relevant. tom symons, bbc news. the labour mp and former minister sir gerald kaufman has died at the age of 86. he was an mp in manchester for 47 years, and a shadow minister during the 80s and 90s. in 2015, as the longest continuously serving mp, he became father of the house. the bbc has ordered an investigation
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into tv licence collectors following reports that they're deliberately targeting vulnerable people with aggressive tactics. the daily mail claims enforcement officers, who are employed by the private company capita, are ordered to catch 28 evaders every week and promised financial incentives for hitting targets. more than a third of small businesses expect their rates to rise this april, according to the federation of small businesses. the federation says many face unsustainable and unaffordable increases, and are planning to cut the amount they invest in theirfirms. the government has promised help for those worst hit. let's go straight back to vanity fair where james is speaking to naomi harris. good morning! she is a lovely, lovely lady and i told you she would come back and she has come back to speak to us. naomi harris of moonlight. a wonderful performance,
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it really was. it was most enjoyable, if that is the right word. it was slightly grim as well. what about the end of those oscars? it isa what about the end of those oscars? it is a moment i am never going to forget. i don't think it has ever happened in history of the oscars. it was quite extraordinary and i have to say a little awkward. more than a little awkward, actually. i went up on stage with a gormless expression because i didn't know what was happening when they finally said moonlight. i was stunned and shocked and shaking even. a very strange moment. and poor la la land. yes. i hadn't even thought of that. i was only thinking of it from our perspective but poor la la land. but they won best director. what was wonderful was that most of the movies got recognition in some form.
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there were some nice surprises and it wasn't like one movie swept the board. it was diverse in terms of number of films and representation. yes, and! number of films and representation. yes, and i think that is really wonderful. that is what people like. it gets a little boring when it is just one movie. tell me why your piece of work won best picture? because it is an honest, authentic story. the writer wrote the piece because his mother died and he was trying to recount his past and make sense of it. in that personal journey he his past and make sense of it. in that personaljourney he penned it isa that personaljourney he penned it is a universal story that appeals to so many people whasmt really connects with people is because it is about this yearning for connection and we are all yearning for connection. what's next for naomi harris, now with an oscar winning film? next to something different. i'm doing rampage with
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dwayne johnson different. i'm doing rampage with dwaynejohnson in atlanta, but i'm taking a break first. hopefully you'll have more than three day to say film this one? i've got two months. a real luxury. i won't know what to do with myself. what are you going to be doing tonight to celebrate? i'm here tonight with my mum and my friend peter and my amazing manager and publicist so we're going to celebrate here. thank you very much. i'll let you go and speak to 5 live. naomi, thank you. it is, it is a wonderful performance. she plays a mother who is really struggling and failing to hold it together as a result of drug addiction in the film moonlight which is a coming of age drama. so it's which is a coming of age drama. so its best picture as well. believe its best picture as well. believe it or not, some people didn't. james you said she was lovely and you are 100% right. i wanted to see what
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happened between us saying goodbye to james and speaking to david and running off and trying to get naomi harris to come back and speak to us. wonderful. shall we have a break from the oscars? yes. let's have the weather. good morning. i have a picture for you and it's of lying snowment there are heavy showers around today. not all will be wint ary. some will have hailand —— all will be wint ary. some will have hail and —— wintry. all will be wint ary. some will have hailand —— wintry. some all will be wint ary. some will have hail and —— wintry. some will have hail. it will be windy in the south of the country, but also in the north. at the moment we have very gusty winds, but they will come down through the day across the northern isles. this is what's left of ex—storm ewan and through tomorrow it will come back across our shores. but today, it will increasingly turn colder. it's cold already across scotla nd colder. it's cold already across scotland and northern ireland and northern england. through the day
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that cold front digs in behind the yellow warmer conditions that we have across southern england and south wales. so to put pictures on that, watch out for ice this morning. there will be a lot of dry weather, but a lot of showers. across parts of scotland and northern ireland, they‘ re across parts of scotland and northern ireland, they're going to be wintry. at lower levels you could see sleet or snow. as the cold air cuts in later, we will see more of that across england and wales, but not everywhere. by then the north of scotla nd not everywhere. by then the north of scotland will be dying up, but south—eastern scotland and northern england will see a period of heavy snow. for northern ireland, you've got a mixture of bright spells, sunshine and showers. some wint ariness and for wales and south—west england, you could see a little bit of sleet and snow at lower levels, but we don't expect it to be problematic. for the rest of england, it is a mixture of bright spells and heavy showers as well. with showers, not all of, of course, will catch them. still the risk of wintriness in the showers tonight. a
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lot of dry weather and where we've got the damp surfaces and the low temperatures there is a risk of ice this coming night. themps tures are indicative of towns and cities. in scotla nd indicative of towns and cities. in scotland we are looking at minus six celsius. the same for northern ireland. england and wales minus two to freezing, but that's in rural areas. tuesday and into wednesday, there goes our runner taking showers with it. here comes what's left of ex—storm ewan. as it pushes across us, you will notice the squeeze in the isobars. it will turn windy. the wind driving in showers. we have what's left of our runner across the south producing showers. but in between, there will be a lot of dry weather and some of us will see sunshine. a blustery feel to the today with temperatures between seven and nine celsius. from tuesday and into wednesday, there goes one system, a ridge of high pressure builds in behind it, but then we've got a plethora of weather fronts
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coming in from the atlantic. to put that on charts, a lot of dry weather, one or two showers and then we've got wet and windier conditions moving across the south of england and south wales, but with it turns that little bit milder, dan and lou. thank you very much, carol. it's 8.20am. from wednesday, the penalty for drivers caught using their mobile phone will double, to a fine of £200 and six penalty points. but for some this doesn't go far enough. one of those is meg williamson, whose partner gavin roberts was killed last year by a driver who lost control of his car while he was on his phone. just last week she met the man responsible, lewis stratford. we'll talk to her in a moment, but first take a look at how that meeting went. has it affected your family? they've obviously had to go into work and know their son was a sort of a, some
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sort of murderer someone at my step mum's workplace said, "your son killed someone. he should be put in prison for life." are you angry at me? a—little bit, but then so many people do it. so many people. me? a—little bit, but then so many people do it. so many peoplem me? a—little bit, but then so many people do it. so many people. it was a stupid mistake. i don't want to hate you forever. i'm not that type of person. eventually i'll probably be able to forgive you. oh, meg williamson thank you for coming in. what a brave and extraordinary thing to do to go and meet the person responsible for gavin's death. tell us what happened ? responsible for gavin's death. tell us what happened? gavin was heading
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to work. he was heading up to oxfordshire to work that evening and ijust got a oxfordshire to work that evening and i just got a phone oxfordshire to work that evening and ijust got a phone call the next morning to say that he had not made it to work. so, i went straight to the hospital. went to see how he was and then four or five days later, we had to say goodbye. just watching that film of you meeting the man who caused that crash. what was that like preparing for that when you first knew that you were going to get that opportunity to sit down with this man, who had, you know, changed your life forever? when the accident originally happened i wanted to meet him straightaway. i had anger and i wa nted him straightaway. i had anger and i wanted to blame him and over time i still continued to want to meet him, but then it became more of a determination for me to have this as a deterrent so it prevents people from using their phones behind the wheel. yes, i was anxious and i was very nervous, but i guess he was as well. he certainly appeared so. lewis was driving at the time and
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was having some argument. did he explain to you what was going on? he said he was having an argument on the phone. he doesn't remember very much. so again this was something that i wanted to highlight with people that if you are distracted, emotionally by the physical use of the mobile phone then it's going to have an impact. notjust on you, but on other drivers as well. so why do you feel the changes which we're going to see in a few days of a £200 fine and six penalty points, why isn't that enough? to me, i am emotionally charged by this, but i think £200 to some people is not a lot of money and if they can afford to drive a car, and they can afford to drive a car, and they can afford to have their mobile phone then £200 isn't very much. so i think using it asa isn't very much. so i think using it as a deterrent and using it as an impact for people just to make them aware, just like we do with drink—driving or drugs behind the wheel, then i think this is something that needs to be highlighted. essentially, it is a phone conversation that had a devastating impact on many people.
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yeah, not just an devastating impact on many people. yeah, notjust an impact on my life and gavin'sle family and friends. on lewis' side, he suffered and his family suffered and society does it. everybody picks up their phone behind the wheel and now is the time, i think, behind the wheel and now is the time, ithink, to behind the wheel and now is the time, i think, to raise that awareness. there is a lot of comments coming on this morning. lots of support what you're saying. lois, a penalty should be automatic imprisonment especially if someone is kill. simon burn says plan a no nonsense response with no offer of a driver awareness course. another one says it will make no difference because the chance of getting caught is so low. they say they see it every day. doreen says take the car and the fond and ban them driving forever. i travel from kent through da rtford forever. i travel from kent through dartford and kent and blackwall. one timei dartford and kent and blackwall. one time i counted five of the first 12 we re time i counted five of the first 12 were using their phones. it is a widespread problem. it is very widespread problem. it is very widespread and i agree in some
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respects that we can't find everybody who is on their phone. people know it's illegal and so thinking about it now, do we implement it within schools and we teach drugs, sex education and alcoholism, can we bring in the driving awareness of using the mobile phones and starting from the younger generations. it is illegal to touch a mobile phone with a hands—free set since 2003 that includes using a mobile phone to follow a map and check social media and the law applies even if you're stopped at traffic lights and your engine is running. what do you do? for example, with your mobile phone? do you not have it in the car? it's in the bootment it is in my bag. it's locked away. people hear sounds and they have to pick up that phone to see who is it that's messaged? my message to people, a phone will still be there at the end of your journey. allow the journey to continue and if you're going to make
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it to the end of the journey without touching the phone you've saved your life and other people's as well. what do you think lewis thinks about this now? what was his thoughts at the end of the meeting? he said it helped him. he accepted the penalty and what will happen to him and he said he didn't want the cam passion, but as human beings you realise that he isa but as human beings you realise that he is a person and he made that stupid mistake just as o he is a person and he made that stupid mistakejust as o many he is a person and he made that stupid mistake just as o many other people have done and probably will do until this law is properly enforced. thank you so much for coming to talk to us. i always think such an incredibly brave thing to do to go and talk to him as well. thank you. viewers in the south of england can see more on this story on inside out tonight on bbc one at 7.30pm. if you're in another part of the country, it will be available on the bbc iplayer. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. a very good morning to you. we have got a mixed day on the way today, with a bit of everything on the
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weather front. sander and hailstones, maybe not all the time, but for some of us. that big weather system, rem na nts but for some of us. that big weather system, remnants of the storm that swept system, remnants of the storm that swe pt a cross system, remnants of the storm that swept across parts of ireland and the northern parts of uk in the last 24 hours. we are dealing with lots of showers and cold air coming in with this weather system, so today there is a combination of cold air stronger sunshine building. hailstones, thunder, showers, wintry showers, whatever you want to call it, it is all on offer today. maybe not so bad in northern scotland. and because it is gusty it will feel quite chilly. the showers continue this evening and overnight. they tend to fade away as we get into the overnight hours and also a chance of icy patches. temperatures dipping away close to freezing in city
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centres and in rural spots it could be5 centres and in rural spots it could be 5 degrees lower than that. on tuesday we have got a few areas of low pressure spinning around, circling the uk, and it will be quite breezy with quite a few isobars out there. gusty with showers on tuesday. but i think tuesday will bring fewer showers. but it doesn't mean that the risk of rain will be any less overall. on wednesday, starting off dry across many areas at least in the morning and then in the afternoon we see thickening cloud and rein in southern and south—western areas by the afternoon. by the end of the week, hopefully things turn milder but still unsettled. this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and ben bland. hopes of a european mega exchange between london and frankfurt are fading fast. the london stock exchange says the regulatory hurdles are too high.
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live from london, that's our top story on monday 27th february. doubts about the $30 billion merger plan come as a top german banker tells the bbc that leaving the european union is not the reason for penalising the city of london. also in the programme: ringing afamiliartune.
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