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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  March 6, 2017 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello. good morning. this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. a new chapter for british car—making — the french company which owns citroen and peugeot is expected to confirm that it's buying vauxhall. the deal raises questions over the future of 4,000 jobs at its ellesmere port and luton plants — and 30,000 more which depend on them. good morning. it's monday the 6th of march. also this morning speak out to save lives — police launch a new campaign urging people to report suspicious activity to combat terror attacks. north korea launches four missiles towards the sea of japan. tokyo calls it "a new stage of threat". this week the chancellor will unveil his last spring budget.
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all this week on breakfast we're looking at what it means for your generation. to we are focusing on the millennial is, those born in the 805 and 905. i have come here to aberdeen to see what these workers want for the economy. in sport, double gold for laura muir as she adds the 3000 metre title to her 1500 metre win at the european indoor athletics championships. pollution is not a joke is the message from students at this primary school. we are talking today about cars idling outside schools and the damage it does. and carol has the weather for us this morning. good morning. actually start, some have frost, but for many it will be sunshine with some showers. rain across the south, blustery here, and snow would hide. i will have more details of about 15
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minutes. good morning. first, our main story. there's uncertainty for thousands of british car workers as a deal that will see vauxhall sold to the french owners of peugeot and citroen, is expected to be announced within the next hour. the french car giant psa wants to buy general motors european operations, which includes vauxhall‘s plants in ellesmere port and luton, from where our reporter simon clemisonjoins us now. simon what can you tell us? good morning. in the last hour, or in the last few minutes, we have started to see people going into the plant here in luton. the 6am start has seen some nervousness from staff. what we are seeing today is the car industry map of europe being redrawn. we have known about the potential for this deal for a couple of weeks, but today we are expecting official combination —— confirmation
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that this could start to happen and that this could start to happen and that cars made by a car giant could change hands. in the car industry, where used to car brands been owned by the same company. but if the european arm of general motors makes this acquisition, it could be a huge move, making the french manufacturer the second biggest on the continent, after vw. but there are now fears forjobs that after vw. but there are now fears for jobs that the after vw. but there are now fears forjobs that the unions as they are fighting for. more than 1900 people produce the astra at ellesmere port. thousands more are employed in the supply chain. they're about 11100 workers at luton, making one of vauxhall‘s fans. if workers here eventually have new bosses in france, rather than in america, there are questions over how they may look to balance the books. commentators say they have the
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capacity to build more cars at the players they are ready control. the government has been speaking to the french group, psa. staff have been given reassurances. but there are concerns forjobs given reassurances. but there are concerns for jobs and given reassurances. but there are concerns forjobs and pensions once existing contracts start expiring 2020 one. —— existing contracts start expiring 2020 one. -- 2021. this is go to ba complexes and complex arrangement. aggression is what happens after that. what happens if peugeot does what lots of manufacturers do, with a van, and put a vauxhall badge on it? we don't know what will happen. it is all speculation at the moment. what we do know is that we will see some or we are hoping to see some kind of detail today. but this company is at the moment making a loss. so if they wa nt to the moment making a loss. so if they want to make a profit, they will have to do something. we are
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expecting some detail today, but these are details that many of the workers will want. thank you for joining us, simon. more on that throughout the morning. britain's most senior anti—terrorism officer has revealed that thirteen potential terror attacks have been prevented sincejune 2013. assistant commissioner mark rowley is launching a campaign, encouraging people to report suspicious activity. here's our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford. the moment caught on a security camera when this man visited a bag of fertiliser he was touring in 2004. he was planning to launch an al qaeda bombing campaign against targets like nightclubs and shopping centres. he was caught because women at the storage warehouse became suspicious and called police, potentially saving hundreds of lives. if you have a concern about suddenly you have seen or heard they could identify a terrorist threat, reported. a new police campaign
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focuses on the important contributions the public can make. it could be any you is unusual. detectives said the public is still playing an important part in one third of their current investigations. —— detectives say. senior detective said that supporters of so—called islamic state are not the only threat, and that these includes far right terrorists. new figures suggest that they have been 13 attacks thwarted since 2013. at any one time, the security services are running around 500 investigations. the threat level remains at severe, which means that the risk of an attack is assessed as highly likely. north korea has fired four missiles — three of which landed injapanese—controlled waters less than 200 miles from its north—west coast.
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they appear to have been launched from a remote military base close to china. we can speak to our correspondent, steve evans, whojoins us from south korea's capital, seoul. thank you forjoining us. what is going on? north korea is very annoyed at the moment that south korea and the united states are holding joint military exercises. north korea says it is practice for an invasion. so what it does in ms connor circumstance, with hide manga, is it looses off missiles. for them, this time, normally fewer than that. but experts will now be looking at whether these missiles are new, weather, for example, they could hit the continental united states. kim jong—un has said could hit the continental united states. kimjong—un has said his could hit the continental united states. kim jong—un has said his aim is to develop a nuclear arsenal and the missiles to put warheads on to hit cities like los angeles and washington. so people will look at this launch to work out if he is making progress towards that. thank you forjoining us.
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talks are beginning in belfast today aimed at forming a new power—sharing government. the two largest parties, the democratic unionists and sinn fein, are still divided over a botched green energy scheme that led to the collapse of their previous administration. sinn fein say the dup leader, arlene foster, can't be re—appointed as first minister while her role in the scheme is being investigated. a former british soldier has been shot dead on his ranch in kenya. tristan voorspuy ran lodges for visitors in the central rift valley region of laikipia. he'd served as an army officer in the 1970s and had spent nearly 30 years as a rancher and safari operator. a local official blamed rural herdsman. survivors, rescue workers and victims‘ relatives will gather today to mark the 30th anniversary of the zeebrugge ferry disaster. 193 passengers and crew died when the herald of free enterprise capsized shortly after leaving the belgian port,
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as duncan kennedy reports. the capsize the ca psize hold the capsize hold of one of britain was that worst peacetime shipping disasters. the herald of free enterprise, laying on its side near the entrance to the port of zeebrugge. the british ferry disaster of belgium... it was exactly 30 years ago to note that the vessel went down. there were 459 passengers on board, including british daytrippers. the first some new what was happening was when the plates started slipping off the tables. it took about 90 seconds for the 1300 ton vessel to turnover. the rescue operation help save many lives, but 193 passengers and crew died. the official enquiry found that the bow doors had been mistakenly that the bow doors had been
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m ista kenly left that the bow doors had been mistakenly left open she left port. an attempt to prosecute crew members on the company in court. a memorial service will take place today to allow people to mark the 30th anniversary of the disaster. the herald's bell will be at the service. this disaster continues to influence the lives of hundreds of ordinary people, the design of ships, and britain's millot at —— maritime history. and it about half are now we will speak to somebody who helps people on board escaped. we will talk to them later. so few of the survivors feel comfortable talking about what happened, don't they? fbi directorjames comey has rejected president donald trump's claim on saturday that his predecessor, ba rack 0bama, tapped his phone. mr comey reportedly asked the us justice department to reject
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the allegation mr 0bama ordered a wiretap during last year's election campaign. he is said to have asked for the correction because it —— he is said to have asked for the correction because it falsely insinuates that the fbi broke the law. south lakes zoo, where almost 500 animals died in the last four years, is expected to have a decision made on its application for a new license today. the zoo in cumbria was fined just under £300,000 following the death of a keeper who was mauled by a tiger in 2013. government inspectors have criticised the zoo for its overcrowding and lack of proper welfare for animals. labour has said it is "confident" thatjeremy corbyn has paid the correct amount of tax. the labour leader published his tax return as part of a call for transparency from politicians. it appeared to show his mp salary, plus pension payments, but not the money he is entitled to as leader of the opposition. however, the party said the allowance ofjust over £27,000
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was included and was taxed at source. we go to this poor with sarah. that lady behind you, laura muir, 5he doe5 lady behind you, laura muir, 5he does not need much sleep. given that when she was not allowed to do a victory lap on saturday? she did that for seven medals at the indoor championships, with laura muir adding to the 1500 title on saturday. —— there were seven medals for great britain on the final day of the european indoor championships with laura muir adding gold in the 3,000 metres to the fifteen hundred metre5 title she took on saturday. she stormed to victory in belgrade in a championship record time ahead of turkey's ya5emin can and compatriot eili5h mccolgan. england have secured the one day series against the west indies after a four wicket victory in the second match in antigua. tottenham are keeping up the pressure at the top of the premier league —
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they beat everton 3—2 with the help of two goals from harry kane. manchester city are third in the table after beating sunderland 2—0. and celtic came from behind to beat st mirren 4—1 in the last eight of the scottish cup. they'll now face old firm rivals rangers in the semi—finals. in the other tie, holders hibernian will play aberdeen we will have more on laura muir to come. did they try to stop her ain? here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. i cannot turn around. how is it going? a chilly start for some of us with some frost around. but for many, we will see ramos today. the forecast is one of suddenly spells, 01’ forecast is one of suddenly spells, or bright scales, and then scattered showers. —— spells. what we have the moment is a lot of low pressure
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around us. that has a lot of fronts attached to it, particularly in the south—west, where we have rain and also some hill snow, as well. but never way from that, drip into these, there are clearer skies. 0ne 01’ these, there are clearer skies. 0ne or two showers. that holds true, moving north, as well. although throughout northern england and it central scotland, there is a weak front, and that is producing some showers. showers continuing across shetland, and that towards the worse. we also have some showers. 0n the hills, there will be some snow. in northern ireland, a chilly start. a touch of frost here or there. the odd pocket of fog. for wales, dry and bright. temperatures a bit on the low side. aberdeenshire, where we have some frost at the moment. that is where it is continent. go through the morning, that rentals away. it will go across the island. it will be windy there. and then we are back into sunshine and showers. temperatures up to 12 celsius. later on in the day, you can see some more
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coming in across northern ireland and they are likely to have some snow on the hills as well. tonight, the wind arrows are going in every direction. we also have a view showers around and wintry in the hills. and scotland, where we have low temperatures and dance temperatures, there is the risk of highs on untreated surfaces. 0nce again, there will be frost around as well. but you cannot fail to mist what is happening in the atlantic by the end of the night. by tomorrow, that band of rain will swing in across ireland into south—west england, also through parts of wales, as well. the cloud will build out of it, so the driest and brightest conditions tomorrow will be out towards the east. but even here, through the day, the sunshine will turn the apa in nature. averages seven degrees to 11 degrees in the east and seven degrees to 10 degrees in the west. that system out in the west, i probably late afternoon, will be taking its friend with it over into eastern errors. you can see this weather front coming here. that will produce rain
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in the afternoon, and on thursday it will take another swipe at us from the south—west. here it is on wednesday, pushing down towards the south. a drier, prior to her sliced in the south of country coming but still some showers across the far north. temperatures by thursday up to 40 celsius. i hope your neck is better by then. so doi! i i hope your neck is better by then. so do i! iwant to i hope your neck is better by then. so do i! i want to see you but i cannot. let us look at the papers. sally is still with us. i have been rearranging my tie. the times. the chancellor bands a tax tax rise to fund budget giveaways. there is francois fillon and he is white, penelope. he says he will stick it
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out. —— his wife. penelope. he says he will stick it out. -- his wife. and the main story is abortions. the uk is the seventh—largest abortion provider. signing of abortions for women they have never met, according to the daily mail. and a diet to slash the risk of cancer by 7%. 0ily fish and other food like that will cut the risk of breast cancer. and adele broke the news that she is married. the guardian. a pretty emotional picture from a father and a daughter who fled islamic state control in mosul on saturday as iraqi forces are intensifying a push on to the city. and the budget is making the news. we will look at what will happen with that later. and alexis sanchez this summer. he was dropped
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to the bench on saturday at anfield against liverpool. and a strong piece about how this could actually be, not just alexis piece about how this could actually be, notjust alexis sanchez‘s and again, but the endgame of wenger. falling outs happen all the time, but arsene wenger is not handling it well. by dropping him to the bench, it is like sending an errant child to their room, but letting them have a burger and to their room, but letting them have a burgerand a to their room, but letting them have a burger and a big—screen tv while they are there. that is what it says. so don't drop him and then bring him on to make him unhappy and not performing at his best. the word is he could go to in the summer. not performing at his best. the word is he could go to in the summerlj don't know why he did not say that on the day he was getting so much grief for dropping his best player. and deciding to not say anything at all and complete denial. shall we talk about this? we are being asked
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if we can help scientists count penguins in case you are bored and need something to help you sleep at night? they have lots of pictures here. they want you to sort the penguins from the rocks. and pandas. the same scientists who sorted out why they have black and white colours to stop them getting bitten. a panda is white to helped hide in snowy environments and black to help them in the shade. and they love to kiss each other. and now for some other news. it's estimated 40,000 people in the uk are dying prematurely due to health problems linked with air pollution. the world health organization says more than nine out of ten of us across the globe are breathing polluted air.
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and this week on bbc breakfast, we're taking an in—depth look at what we can do about it. today, we're looking at the pollution caused by cars keeping their engines on when they're parked or waiting in bad traffic. john maguire is at a school in east london where they're trying to tackle the issue. good morning. good morning. we are ata good morning. good morning. we are at a school where the children have suddenly gone quiet. let us wake them up. good morning, children. good morning! they have been working on this post is about air pollution. some catchy logos that could go much further afield, letting us see what could happen if we breathe it in. there have been councils issued freedom of information requests about what happens with pollution. 0nly about what happens with pollution. only 50 out of 284 say they empower their staff to give fines for idling. 0nly five fines have been given. the stick is not doing much.
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what about the carrot? we have gone across the uk to find out what is being done. what are those dark patches? pollution. from schools in birmingham, to port talbot... we are looking at where we will plant trees to tackle air pollution. to sheffield. many people have issues because of the things they are breathing. there is a quiet revolution under way, and at times like this. engine turning off. in the name of science, will has said he will drive today to school. he will track pollution along his journey with his friends. and now we have a professor from the university of leeds, who is analysing the two trips. normally when you are stuck in traffic, that is when the levels
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can get quite high with pollution. it isa can get quite high with pollution. it is a quiet route. we have crossed some roads and seeing huge spikes, actually. they are a short duration. they have got a good route to school. they go down a backstreet. the levels are low there. at the school gates were all the cars are parking and dropping the children off, we can see lots of spikes at that end. and that exposure to pollution over the route is mainly focused around the school gates, actually. so, what can be done? basically we are asking people to turn off theirengine basically we are asking people to turn off their engine when they are stationary. 0k. turn off their engine when they are stationary. ok. i understand. we just want to educate people. stationary. ok. i understand. we just want to educate peoplem stationary. ok. i understand. we just want to educate people. it is yet another success for this anti—idling patrol. these people have been trained in what to say to
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people to get them to turn off and deal with inevitable excuses. the councils say this is about local people cleaning up local streets. councils say this is about local people cleaning up local streetsm is about this street in this area trying to reduce pollution levels for children at school. much difference can switching off your engine make? testing in one location saw that by stopping idling, pollution levels dropped by a third. the bigger message is that it helps people understand the impact of small actions on the larger problem ofair small actions on the larger problem of air quality. and there is always this approach. i am sorry to bother you, but your engine is running. you wouldn't turn it off, would you, i am just thinking of emissions. wouldn't turn it off, would you, i am just thinking of emissionsm the last six years as he went to work on his way to the theatre of london, nigel is a man on emission. they wonder who i am and have said some pretty choice things to me. but generally speaking, people are aware and said, oh, sorry, iam not aware of that. this is a drop in the
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ocean, admittedly, or a particle in the air, compared to the global problem of air pollution. but new research shows how switching off engines can make a difference in protecting our most precious resource. stop the pollution, it is the only solution, that is the message from one of the precious children at this school. we will talk to the head teacher. what are you holding? this isa teacher. what are you holding? this is a travel plan silver award which we got eight years ago. they came to look outside the school with the problems of idling and congestion at traffic lights. we want to encourage children to come to school by walking bulky scooting. —— or. children to come to school by walking bulky scooting. -- or. you are going for gold. what difference has it made? it has raised the profile of coming to school under your own steam. and perhaps even the pa rents your own steam. and perhaps even the pa re nts ca n your own steam. and perhaps even the
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parents can sort of suggest that they try more to use scooters and use bikes and walk and look to the future. because that is what we're doing with children, them for the future. so they can look back and say, well, we did something. we used to go by bus to the swimming pool and now we walk. 0k. thank you. we will chat to some of the children. good morning to you two. good morning. you have talked about air pollution. what have you learned? we have learned about idling. we learned that our school has 55.9, umm, n02 like particles. crikey, you know all the chemicals and everything. it is 15.9 over the limit. yes. we know that, don't we, sometimes over the european limiting. what things have fully done to persuade people to not idle
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out the school? we have sent letters to the mayor and year twos. we have also been making posters to persuade them. great. well done. that is fantastic. now, you had some notes written on the front of your hand, did you? it is a good trick. we decided to adopt it as well. what did you want is there? back to you, dan and louis. back to you guys in the studio. look at that! i like but she added our names! look at that. we will be talking more about pollution to the world health 0rganization at around 7:10. pollution to the world health organization at around 7:10. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning. ahead of the budget on wednesday, steph is looking at how the budget is working
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for young people. good morning. good morning. good morning, everybody. it is really busy this morning. this is a catering firm in aberdeen. they up repairing something like 1500 meals here. —— are preparing. it will head out to schools and nurseries and businesses in the area. it relies on the energy industry as well. they are sending out chefs and food to the oil rigs in the north sea. they are busy. we are here because this isa are busy. we are here because this is a firm that employs lots of young people. around a third of their staff are under 30. today is part of our road trip this week looking at how the budget will impact different generations. we are focusing on the millennial is, those born in the 80s and 90s. i will be here talking to them a little bit later on. —— millennials. but first, let us look at the news, travel, and weather, wherever you are this morning.
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good morning from bbc london news. iam i am alice salfield. a 40—year—old man has been charged with the murder of a pensioner on an allotment in north—west london. on tuesday 80—year—old lea adri—soejoko's body was found in a garage on the allotments in colindale where she was the secretary. rahim mohammadi, from hackney, is accused of her murder. the former boxer, michael watson, says he hung on "for dear life" as he was dragged several hundred metres along a road during a violent carjacking, and that last month's attack in chingford east, london. watson, who suffered a near—fatal brain injury in a 1991 fight with chris eubank, spoke to tonight's bbc‘s crimewatch programme. it was like a nightmare. i couldn't believe it, that it could actually happen. i was just believe it, that it could actually happen. i wasjust hanging on for dear life. they are evil, that is
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what they are. they are evil and senseless. you can see that interview in full on bbc one tonight at 9pm. a feminist film classification created to highlight the lack of women working in the movie industry is now being used at the barbican cinema. it's the latest venue to adopt the campaign, which uses the classification for any film that is directed or written by a woman or features significant women on screen in their own right. let's have a look at the travel situation now. starting with the tubes, a good service on all lines at the moment. 0nto the roads, in chiswick: there are temporary traffic lights on the a316 near the hogarth roundabout. it was causing long delays over the chiswick bridge at the weekend. and in bromley by bow: there's no right turn northbound on the a12 at lochnagar street as the traffic lights aren't working. time for a check on the weather. good morning. a dry and bright day
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in prospect compared to yesterday. bright spells this morning. may be some sunshine. a few showers likely to develop through the afternoon. the cloud is thin enough to let in some sunshine. showers blowing through on the north—westerly breeze, which will be quite chilly, actually. further west, the maximum temperature, 10 degrees. 0vernight, showers will continue for a time. gradually, they will become fewer between. clear spells that night. breezy with a north—westerly wind staying with us. 4— five degrees in town. the countryside, it may drop down a little further. a bright start tomorrow and a dry start. sunshine, but gradually. the cloud will move in from the west. the wind is fairly light still. nine, ten. that rain will not arrive until tomorrow evening. quite a wet night tuesday into wednesday that the outbreaks of rain for wednesday as well. you will notice that it is up
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in double figures. 12—13. a touch more mild. night—time temperatures well above zero as well. this week will be unsettled and rather cloudy. time to go back to the breakfast sofa. see you soon. hello this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. it's just gone 6:30am. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport injust a moment but also on breakfast this morning: how you can help to keep our streets safe. the country's lead anti—terror officer will tell us how he wants the general public to be involved in the fight against terrorism. also this morning, the exam season is fast approaching. we'll get expert advice on how to cope with the stresses and strains of the most testing part of the school year. and after 8:30am, from its heartland in the north of england to new frontiers in north america, the owner of rugby league's first trans—atlantic team will tell us how he hopes to take the sport by storm.
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all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. and its expected that the french car company, psa, will confirm this morning that it's buying vauxhall from the us firm, general motors. psa already owns peugeot and citroen. vauxhall employs 4,500 workers at ellesmere port in cheshire and luton in bedfordshire. security services have prevented 13 potential terror attacks since june 2013, the uk's most senior counter—terrorism police officer has revealed. assistant commissioner mark rowley also said there were 500 live counter—terror investigations at any time. he disclosed the figures as he launched an appeal that aims to get members of the public to report any suspicious behaviour. he will actually be here in this year later to give us more details.
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—— in the studio. north korea has fired four missiles, three of which landed less than 200 miles from the north—west coast of japan. the missiles appear to have been launched from a remote military base close to china. south korea's acting president has called it a serious provocation and a direct challenge to the globe. talks are beginning in belfast today aimed at forming a new power—sharing government. the two largest parties, the democratic unionists and sinn fein, are still divided over a botched green energy scheme that led to the collapse of their previous administration. sinn fein say the dup leader, arlene foster, can't be re—appointed as first minister while her role in the scheme is being investigated. a former british soldier has been shot dead on his ranch in kenya. tristan voorspuy ran lodges for visitors in the central rift valley region of laikipia. he'd served as an army officer in the 1970s and had spent nearly thirty years as a rancher and safari operator. a local official blamed rural herdsman. events are being held in belgium and britain today to mark the 30th anniversary of the zeebrugge ferry disaster, in which 193 people died.
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the passenger ferry, herald of free enterprise, capsized 90 seconds after setting sail from the coast of belgium to the british port of dover. fbi directorjames comey has rejected president donald trump's claim on saturday that his predecessor, ba rack 0bama, tapped his phone, us media say. mr comey reportedly asked the us justice department to reject the allegation mr 0bama ordered a wiretap during last year's election campaign. 0ur washington correspondent nick bryant has more on this story. the white house is still not produced any evidence to back up the claim that barack 0bama or the white house ordered white —— whitecaps on trump tower. white house officials pointing people, reporters, towards some newspaper reports that they have read, which heightens the speculation that president trump's twitter tirade was not based on intelligence
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briefings that he had received, but rather, as strongly suspected, he was reading a right—wing news report on breitbart news. two new developments today. one is james clapper coming out and saying there were no wiretaps. and clapper is not only somebody who worked for barack 0bama, he also worked for george w bush and george herbert walker bush. he is seen as a trusted figure, a non—partisan figure. and another key development — the fbi director, james comey, it has been reported he approached the justice department, and asked thejustice department to come out publicly and say that president trump was wrong, that this was a false accusation, and that it needs to be rejected. that is a big slap down from the director of the fbi. it is 6:35am... is our phone go to? we have a massive phone. when anyone important brings, it is like good morning! were just happened? important brings, it is like good morning! werejust happened? i am
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not to explain it. you know when you're on a certain phone, it picks up you're on a certain phone, it picks up the voice recognition, one of us might have said they were that sounded like that, and it tried to translate next sentence. technology? we are all being listened to. good morning! i think we are alone? a grey weekend for grey britain. laura muir stormed to victory in belgrade had of yes ma'am cloud. laura muir became only the second briton to win two individual events at the games after adding gold in the 3,000 metres to the fifteen hundred metres title she took on saturday. she stormed to victory in belgrade in a championship record
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time ahead of turkey's ya5emin can and compatriot eilish mccolgan. muir's achievements matched those of colin jackson set in paris 23 years ago, before she was even born. idid i did know what my legs are going to do today. i tried to hang in there andi do today. i tried to hang in there and i am very tired. but i'm so glad i could do that today. what was the plan at the outset? she was a bit more of thejurors plan at the outset? she was a bit more of the jurors athlete, so try to hold onto her. and i managed to cross the line in first place. and after her efforts to complete a victory lap on saturday, she had a more relaxed time of it celebrating her 3000m success. no — i'll say the word — jobs—worth stewards around this time. what a weekend. she did a little bit ofa what a weekend. she did a little bit of a victory lap, but that was it. there she goes. congratulations to laura muir. asha philip also won gold yesterday, she pulled off a surprise, breaking the british record on her way to taking the 60 metres. it's her first individual medal at a major senior championships.
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i was so happy. i was not doubting myself, i knew i had it in me, and they think the confidence ran me through the race, but everytime i seem to get on that start line, a false start happened. i thought i did not have vibrant in the final. but it was all i had, and they said, you know what, i'm going to go out and do my best, and they did. i can he afford the w, and they did. i'm so happy with myself. —— and i did. —— i came here for b. and robbie grabarz understandably said he was "over the moon" with a silver medal in the high jump — just six weeks after having an emergency operation to remove his appendix. can you imagine having surgery on your stomach and managing to do that? incredible from them. meanwhile, england have clinched the one—day against the west indies were again to spare. the hosts chose to bat first but england bowled them out for 225,
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always likely to be below a competitive total. the west indies spin bowlers gave england some problems butjoe root saw them home with ten balls to spare. arsenal's alexis sanchez had a confrontation with team mates after leaving a training session early in the build—up to saturday's defeat at liverpool. that is why there was that terrible atmosphere between him, the manager, and his colleagues. he had angry words with other players in the changing rooms and one of them had to be held back. sanchez is arsenal's top scorer this season but was left out of the starting line up on saturday where his side lost 3—1. to liverpool. manager arsene wenger said it was a tactical decision to omit him. spurs have moved to within seven points of chelsea at the top of the premier league after a 3—2 victory over everton. it's their ninth consecutive home win in the league, a new club record. two goals from harry kane and one from delle ali was enough to secure the win.
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manchester city are one point behind spurs after winning 2—0 at bottom of the table sunderland. sergio aguero scored his 23rd goal of the season and leroy sane added a second. it's a fourth league win in a row for pep guardiola's side. there will be an old firm derby in the semi—finals of the scottish cup after celtic thrashed st mirren 4—1 in the last eight. scott sinclair scored the pick of celtic‘s goals to give them the lead as they came back from a goal down at home. aberdeen will face hibs after their 1—0 victory over partick thistle. and finally, the wife carrying championship has taken place in dorking. it's the tenth running of the event — and it looks like couples are getting good at tackling the 380—metre course. that does not look in any way co mforta ble. that does not look in any way comfortable. yes. i think it gets worse as the pictures go on. it goes worse. i don't like the way he
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dropped. that is all i can say. 0ver the line. that is spectacularly non—pc. i know we are not married, but we would make a formidable partnership. i think you are too tall. she would have a long way to fall. she can carry me! thank you very much, sally. plenty more from sally andy carroll would have the weather shortly. but we return to one of our main stories, this morning, and today marks the 30th anniversary of the zeebrugge disaster. it was the deadliest maritime incident involving it british ship in peacetime since 19 come in —— says 1919. british ship in peacetime since 19 come in -- says 1919. the herald of free enterprise capsized shortly after leaving the port. larry 0'brien was one of the people who
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help people get off the ferry. thank you forjoining us. i'm sure it is difficult even 30 years on to talk about the events of the day. but just take us through — i know you are one of the last people on the ferry. when did you know things were wrong? i had got upstairs. it was about 15 minutes when i got upstairs and went into the restaurant and sat down. and it heaved forward and back, and back to port again. it all only took seconds. it happened so quickly. it was unbelievable how quickly. it was unbelievable how quickly it happen. i suppose from the time i went on it was all over within 15 minutes. riot, it right. it basically turned onto its side. where were you when that happened? basically, i had been in shock and
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we nt basically, i had been in shock and went across to the restaurant and had sat down and ordered a meal. and i was sitting down. and that it started to hear. all i could do, my table was fixed to the ground, so i just held the table. it is unbelievable how quickly it all happened. it was all over with. when the ship went completely over on its side. it is hard to imagine for a person. the size of the ship to go completely on its side. but three quarters of the ship inside was full of water. clearly a terrifying situation to be in. you managed to find a way out, and then started helping other people, did you? look, idid not helping other people, did you? look, i did not have much time to think about it when i was looking around me. i had to decide... there was any one way out. i was used to be on
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ships. i was a ships twice a week going from and coming to. i was going from and coming to. i was going to europe direct from ireland, or go to england, and then on to france. i had plenty of experience being on board, so knew the only way out was. so i eventually got up and got onto the side of the ship. in a terrified state, i can tell you, because i did not know what was keeping it up or if it was courtesy call together. i would keeping it up or if it was courtesy call together. iwould not keeping it up or if it was courtesy call together. i would not be a good swimmer. iswim call together. i would not be a good swimmer. i swim very badly, actually. and ijust did not know if iti, it actually. and ijust did not know if it i, it was go to go to the bottom or white. idc found a rope and started taking people out through one of the porthole windows. —— i eventually found a rope. a5 one of the porthole windows. —— i eventually found a rope. as a two people out, some of them stopped and
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started to help to take more people out. and it went on from there. —— asi out. and it went on from there. —— as i took people out. i had about 30 people out and more people kept coming. i looked around, and the sense... the eerie feeling that there were 70 people on board that night, that nobody knew there would be, that so many people were on it. this in the newspaper had run a day trip to belgium for £1, and hence there were so many people on board. 194 lives were lost. the screens that night inside the ship... it was like a floating cough in. it was unbelievable. —— the screams will stop is a mere will never forget, 30 years later. but i was one of the lucky ones. i was one of those who survived. and an eu help lots of other people survive, as well. will you be thinking today and
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remembering people today? —— and you helped. of course. iwas lucky in one way. there was only one person one way. there was only one person on the boat who was irish that i knew. he was from co mead in ireland. idid knew. he was from co mead in ireland. i did not personally know him but he lost his life on board that night. 30 years later, i will be thinking about all the people that lost their lives. you know, that lost their lives. you know, that night inside the chip, there we re that night inside the chip, there were so that night inside the chip, there we re so many that night inside the chip, there were so many small children heading to belgium, and so many adults, all people out for the day, of course i will remember it. it was an awful thing to happen. thank you for talking to us today. thank you for talking to us today. thank you. as he said, so many people will remember that. are absolutely. i think you will enjoy
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this next part. normally we have to turn around. louise has a bad neck so we will look down the camera. good morning. bright spells in sunshine and also some showers. some rain in the forecast as well. the rain in the forecast as well. the rain is in south—west england. a weather front. this area rain is in south—west england. a weatherfront. this area of low pressure. we are surrounded by low pressures . pressure. we are surrounded by low pressures. this has taken wet and windy weather south. gusty winds of 80 miles per hour here. the forecast will start here at 8am. a lot of rain and also some snow on the moors. it starts to sink down towards the channel islands. in southern areas away from that rain, dry weather, sunshine, variable cloud. the cloud here and there is thick enough for the odd shower. northern england and eastern parts
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of scotland, a weather front producing showery outbreaks of rain. again, another in shetland. you will have that for a bit. more showers in the west. snowy for northern ireland. a dry and bright start. wales. a dry and bright start, and the odd shower in the south. frosty to start in the highlands. through the course of the day, the rain will pull away and go into the channel islands. it will be windy for a while here and then it will be a mixture of rights spells, sunshine, and highs of 12 degrees. more showers will pack in northern ireland with hill snow again. the rest of the afternoon and into the evening and overnight, starting to push over into western parts of mainland britain. showers in the east. 0ne mainland britain. showers in the east. one or two in the centre of the country. a lot of dry weather around. cold enough for some frost.
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damp surfaces bringing highs risks. by damp surfaces bringing highs risks. by the end of the night, we will see this system come in from the west across south—west england into wales and ireland and after that, sunshine. however, as the system continues to push across northern ireland and eventually getting into north—west england and north scotland, the cloud will build. the far east having the dark skies the longest. it will take until after dark probably until the rain makes the eastern areas. here comes the weather front. quite the eastern areas. here comes the weatherfront. quite blustery, as you can tell from the squeezing isobars. and then we have a second front. the tail end of that will come back in. to put detail on that, here comes the rain again. again, a lot of rain pushing towards the south. rain in the north as well. in between, brighter conditions. highs of 12 degrees. a blustery day.
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friday, rain swinging in from the south—west. quite a lot of dry weather further east with temperatures especially in the south coming down, now on the up. thank you. good to hear. we like a bit of rain. the rain was coming down very solidly. on wednesday, the chancellor, philip hammond, will unveil his economic plans for the country in his spring budget. here on breakfast this week, we'll be looking at the impact it might have on different generations. this morning, we're focusing on millennials, those born between 1981 and 2000. steph has taken to the road, and is just outside aberdeen for us with a catering business and its young workforce. you have a massive spoon! it is my paddle. good morning, everybody. i wish it did smell this. it is a
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gorgeous stew being made here. i am ata gorgeous stew being made here. i am at a catering factory in aberdeen. i am talking about what the economy will do for young people. the budget is coming out soon. i am travelling the country to work out what it means for different generations. this firm employs nearly 100,000 people. they have 1500 meals they need to make today. that food will go to the offices in the area. they also work with the energy industry. we will talk with 16—year—old nicole. you left school and came straight here. doing well. i left the academy after i won a competition and went through to the final. it is all going well for you? you are earning while learning. and
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you are saving for a car?|j you are earning while learning. and you are saving for a car? i have a driving test coming up. good luck with that. i also want you to meet tyler, one of the apprentices here doing accountancy. a little bit older. 19. tell us a little bit about your life and what used band your money on. most of my money goes on my car. “— your money on. most of my money goes on my car. —— what you spend your money on. what would make your life easier with money? is fuel came down a little bit and car insurance quite a little bit and car insurance quite a lot. —— if. it is extortionate on young children. you live at home at the moment. what is your plan?|j wa nt to the moment. what is your plan?” want to save as much as i can to get out by 24. you would like to buy your own house? yeah. wendy you that happening? 24- 25. -- when do you. does it feel different to university? i definitely have the
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advantage of having finished my course by the time they get out of university. good luck to you. lovely to talk to you. we are talking to many people about this. jane mccubbin, one of the breakfast reporters, went to see some people in london to see what they are worried about. let us introduce the millennials. hi, my name is abby. i am 24, and i ama hi, my name is abby. i am 24, and i am a freelance as. i live in totte n ha m , am a freelance as. i live in tottenham, north london, with my pa rents tottenham, north london, with my parents and my brother and younger sister. i am 24. parents and my brother and younger sister. iam 24. i live parents and my brother and younger sister. i am 24. i live at home with my mum and sister. i live in surrey andi my mum and sister. i live in surrey and i am renting and lived four other people. all this week, we will be getting a grip on what this generation wants from the budget. be getting a grip on what this generation wants from the budgetm you are a millennial, you were born
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between 1981 and 2000. you are finishing education and making a start to your career. you have been most affected by the falling pay of recent yea rs most affected by the falling pay of recent years and are struggling to get onto the housing ladder and are suffering high rents as a result. so it is with our millennials. me and my sister share a room, which we have done all our lives. i am 24. 24! it is a bit like, 0k, it have done all our lives. i am 24. 24! it is a bit like, ok, it is time to go. we cannot afford it. it is just not going to happen. how does your mother feel about this? until i am kicked out, i your mother feel about this? until i am kicked out, lam your mother feel about this? until i am kicked out, i am going to have to stay there. none of their salaries can come remotely close to the 6—figure sums to just rent here. to be managed to move out of home, but only by moving out of the city. —— toby. the am for you is to own your own home? yes. somewhere. like many of the children my age, i could get a deposit, though it will take a
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while. ijust a deposit, though it will take a while. i just want economic stability. economic stability. that is the big thing for to be especially with brexit. i want the government to reassure me with something coming out now. what do they want from the budget on wednesday exactly? housebuilding, economic security, and brexit. this is what i want, affordable housing, and how are they going to pay for it? go after tax dodgers.” and how are they going to pay for it? go after tax dodgers. i want the government to support young people so government to support young people so they don't have to move out of the city to make a living. make housing affordable. so, philip hammond, if you are watching, millennials want housing, housing, and housing. and a new focus on a generation that largely feels left out. jane mccubbin, bbc news. with me now is adam who is from shelter scotland. 0bviously, your charity looked at a lot of the issues with people trying to get housing. we were hearing about young
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people worried about thatjust housing. we were hearing about young people worried about that just then. what could we hear that would help young people getting on the ladder? we need to build more homes, and more affordable homes, and in particular, homes available for social rent. the stories heard today and you will hear if you are anywhere across the country today is that we just do not have enough supply of good quality affordable homes. that is having a tangible knock—on effect on young people. i saw a report last year that in scotland, nearly a million people aged between 18 and 45 were putting off major life milestones because of the impact of housing. that is impacting children, getting married, and retirement, at the other. the cost of housing is having a huge effect. -- the other end. to get in touch if you have anything to tell us touch if you have anything to tell us about that. but for now, here is
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the news, travel, and weather, wherever you are this morning. good morning from bbc london news. i am alice salfield. a 40—year—old man has been charged with the murder of a pensioner on an allotment in north—west london. on tuesday 80—year—old lea adri—soejoko's body was found in a garage on the allotments in colindale where she was the secretary. rahim mohammadi, from hackney, is accused of her murder. the former boxer, michael watson, says he hung on "for dear life" as he was dragged several hundred metres along a road during a violent carjacking, and that last month's attack in chingford east, london. watson, who suffered a near—fatal brain injury in a 1991 fight with chris eubank, spoke to tonight's bbc‘s crimewatch programme. it came like a nightmare. i couldn't believe it, that it could actually happen. my skin was peeling off. i was just hanging on for dear life. evil thugs, that's what they are.
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they are evil and senseless. and you can see that interview in full on bbc one tonight at 9pm. non—emergency patients in london could soon be transferred to and from hospital in uber vehicles. a deal between barts health nhs trust and social care company cera will see patients able to use the cab hire service for hospital appointments and generally getting out—and—about, using the uberassist disabled access cars. now for the travel. starting with the tubes. a good service on all lines at the moment. 0nto the roads. blackfriars road is closed northbound between st georges circus and southwark tube station because of a building fire. and in chiswick. there are temporary traffic lights on the a316 near the hogarth roundabout. time for a check on the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. a much drier and brighter day in prospect compared to yesterday.
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bright spells this morning. maybe some sunshine. still a few showers likely to develop as we head through the afternoon. the cloud is thin enough to let in some sunshine. showers blowing through on the north—westerly breeze, which will be quite chilly, actually. the further west, the drier the picture. a maximum temperature of 10 degrees. 0vernight, showers will continue for a time. gradually, they will become fewer between. clearer spells that night. breezy with a north—westerly wind staying with us. 4—5 degrees in towns is the minimum. the countryside, it may drop down a little further. a bright start tomorrow and a dry start. some sunshine, but gradually, the cloud will move in from the west. the wind is fairly light still. nine, ten. that rain will not arrive until tomorrow evening. quite a wet night tuesday into wednesday that the outbreaks of rain for wednesday as well.
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but you will notice that it is up in double figures. 12—13 degrees celcius. a touch more mild. night—time temperatures well above zero as well. this week will be unsettled and rather cloudy. time to go back to the breakfast sofa. see you soon. hello this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. a new chapter for british car—making — the french company which owns citroen and peugeot seals a deal to buy vauxhall. the 2 billion euro deal raises questions over the future of 4,000 jobs at its ellesmere port and luton plants — and 30,000 more which depend on them. good morning. it's monday the 6th of march. also this morning: speak out to save lives — police launch a new campaign urging
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people to report suspicious activity to combat terror attacks. north korea launches four missiles towards the sea of japan — tokyo calls it "a new stage of threat". on wednesday, the chancellor will unveil his last spring budget. all this week on breakfast we're looking at what it means for each generation. this morning we're talking about the millennial is, so those born in the 80s and 90s. this factory here in aberdeen employs a lot of them. i look to find out what they want from the economy. what a weekend its been for britains laura muir. she claimed the 3000 metre title to add to her 1500 metre win at the european indoor athletics championships. talk to friends or family. they are the ones who want the best for you... advice for students from students —
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as exam season approaches, we'll find out about a new project to help students share their stress—busting tips. that is such a good idea. and carol has the weather. it is actually suffer some of us with some frost around. but for some of us, bright spells and showers. some heavy rain across parts of south—west england depositing some snow in the moors, but that will clear, and then you, too will have sunshine and showers. good morning. first, our main story. there's uncertainty for thousands of british car workers as a deal that will see vauxhall sold to the french owners of peugeot and citroen has been announced. the french car giant psa has agreed to buy general motors european operations for £1.9 billion pounds. the deal includes vauxhall‘s plants in ellesmere port and luton, from where our reporter simon clemisonjoins us now. simon what can you tell us? good morning to you. i have been
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speaking to one or two people here as the shares have changed over in luton this morning. and there is concern that this deal, which as you say has been confirmed in the last hour. we were expected over the last few weeks, but what it essentially means is that the car industry map of europe could be redrawn. in the car industry, we're used to car brands been owned by the same parent company. but if the european arm of general motors, which makes vauxhall, or 0pel in germany, to the company that makes peugeot and citroen goes ahead, it would be a huge move, making the french manufacturer the second biggest on the continent, after volkswagen. but there are now fears for jobs, which the unite union says they are fighting for. more than 1900 people produce the astra at ellesmere port, with 120,000 vehicles rolling off the production line each year. thousands more are employed in the supply chain. there are about 1400 workers at luton, making one of vauxhall‘s vans. general motors has been losing
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money on these sides of the business for years. if workers here eventually have new bosses in france, rather than in america, there are questions over how they may look to balance the books. commentators say they have capacity to build more cars at the plants they already control. the government has been speaking to the french group, psa. staff have been given reassurances. but there are concerns forjobs and pensions once existing contracts start to expire in 2021. now we know that because it does not make much sense, if you think about it, to move production until a model comes to the end of the line. that is because it is very complex and costly. everything is that apa. so does not make much as they say. but it is have even. but what if perce
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use one of its fans as a basis for a vauxhall model. if it has a facility elsewhere in europe, we could be outside in europe at that point. there are so many questions to remember. as i said, the arm of the company at the moment is not making profit, it is making a loss. so they wa nt to profit, it is making a loss. so they want to make a profit, they could adapt to do something. we are expecting more details in the next hour, details that the workers want. britain's most senior anti—terrorism officer has revealed that thirteen potential terror attacks have been prevented sincejune 2013. assistant commissioner mark rowley is launching a campaign, encouraging people to report suspicious activity. here's our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford. the moment, caught on a security camera, when 0mar khyam visited a bag of fertiliser he was storing in 2004. he was plotting to launch an al qaeda bombing campaign against targets like nightclubs and shopping centres. he was caught because a woman working at the storage warehouse became suspicious and called the
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police, potentially saving hundreds of lives. voiceover: if you have a concern about suddenly you have seen or heard they could identify a terrorist threat, report it. a new police campaign focuses on the important contributions the public can make. voiceover: it could be anything that strikes you as unusual. detectives say the public is still playing an important part in one third of their current investigations. senior detectives are warning that supporters of so—called islamic state are not the only threat. al qaeda remains a danger, too, as does far—right terrorism. new officialfigures show that the number of attacks in britain thought to have been thwarted sincejune 2013 has risen to 13, one higher than the figure given six months ago. at any one time, the security services are running around 500 investigations. the threat level remains at severe, which means that the risk of an attack is assessed as "highly likely". and we'll be talking little more
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about that later, and about 40 minutes time. —— in about 40 minutes' time. north korea has fired four missiles, — three of which landed in japanese—controlled waters less than 200 miles from its north—west coast. they appear to have been launched from a remote military base close to china. we can speak to our correspondent, steve evans, whojoins us from south korea's capital, seoul. what more can you tell us about this? how serious is it? it is this the very serious sa power like north korea, which is about to turn washington into a sea of flames, and is working on nuclear weapons, unleashes for missiles. what would make it really serious is if these launches show that it is making progress, that it is making better missiles. it let off a whole host of
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missiles. it let off a whole host of missiles last year and many were duds. these were not. experts will now look to see if north korea is making progress towards an intercontinental ballistic missile. and if that happens, then the us get seriously worried. —— the us gets seriously. labour has said it is "confident" thatjeremy corbyn has paid the correct amount of tax. it's after the labour leader published his tax return as part of a call for transparency from politicians. the return did not appear to include the money he is entitled to as leader of the opposition. let's get the latest from our political correspondent iain watson who joins us from westminster. just take us through what exactly has been published and what questions they might be.” has been published and what questions they might be. i think whatjeremy corbyn is finding out is that there is an unintended consequence to publishing his tax return. the intended consequence was to put his political opponents on the back foot, to say they are not being transparent. philip hammond, the chancellor, as you know, said he would not make his tax affairs
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public. but now it isjeremy corbyn's own tax affairs that are in the spotlight. because at first base, it looked like he had not declared extra income is leader of the opposition. some newspapers reported that. additionally, his office could not come up with asus factory expedition. i can tell you, though, that the riddle has been solved. it is difficult to read the small print, but it turns out that that extra salad extra salary is listed as a benefit, broken down into the stuart kennedy greek public office. it appears thatjeremy corbyn has coughed up the right amount of tax. but what his opponents are saying inside, never mind outside, the labour party is that there might not be tax evasion or avoidance, but this issue is about confidence. he should have been a silly crystal clear about his own tax affairs before he went on the attack and try to take his vertical opponents out in the week of the budget. thank you forjoining us. “—
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of the budget. thank you forjoining us. —— take his political opponents out. this week bbc news are looking at air pollution — the world health organisation estimates 9 out of 10 people across the world are breathing polluted air. and its estimated in the uk the lives of around 40,000 people a year are shortened due to illnesses linked to air pollution. we'rejoined now by dr maria neira from the world health 0rganisation. really good to talk to. how have the who come to this figure of 1.7 million deaths from children under five each year? this is an estimation that we do and the purpose of that was to alert and to raise awareness about how this problem is getting really dramatic. years ago, we had an alert saying that 6.5 million premature deaths are recorded every year because of the exposure to add pollution. both indoor and outdoor air pollution. today, our call is for giving people the figures that represent the cost
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of polluted air we breathe. and this time, we focused on children, because we think the figure is even more dramatic. so 1.7 million deaths in children under the age of five caused by exposure to different environmental risk factors, i think that deserves some action and alert in the —— and immediate interventions. other countries that are worse than others? definitely developing country. the population is more vulnerable. the government have not taken the actions and solutions that may be in richer countries we have put in place. but it is wrong to think that this is only affecting developing countries. this is affecting all of us. this is affecting, as well, people living in very industrialise places, the rich places, where you cannot choose the airyou places, where you cannot choose the air you breathe. you are exposed and you have two breathe, no matter where you are. in different cities
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around the world, you are exposed. we are looking particularly at air pollution this morning. but the purpose of your figures, you have considered clean water, add pollution and so on. the thing that can be confusing to lump all of those together when they are all distinct problems? yes. in the of air—pollution, this is one of the biggest environmental risks that we are on. as i said, there are 6.5 million deaths around the globe caused by exposure to air—pollution. the message is different if you are living a rich country or a developing country. but still this isa developing country. but still this is a problem that we all need to put measures in place to fight for. and the bbc, this week, we're looking at a sort of series about pollution. today, that eagerly, we're looking at the problem of idling. people are sitting with their car engines on. they can cause issues, can't it? sure. it might only be a small part
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of the solutions we need to put in place, but it is an important one. because first it desensitises children, and create education. and it promotes as well a safer and more sustainable way of transport. ideally, we should go for a public transport system, that would be more cost—effective and reduce pollution. we need to invest in better systems for sustainable transport, public transport, but in the meantime, obviously all of those measures are extremely important and can contribute to the solution. a lot of those things to government action. but on an individual and family bases, what sort of things could or should we be doing?” bases, what sort of things could or should we be doing? i think that is a good measure. if you can safely walk or ride a bike, that would be fantastic as well. and creating that culture at home to your children, as well. recycling. the conscious of the way we use energy. we need to be
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very efficient in the way we use energy. particularly if our energy or electricity is produced by coal fired power plants, which are very much in committing to the pollution. and we all need to get very well—informed. because the more we know about how our pollution is impacting our health, how it is having a terrible negative impact on our cardiovascular systems and so on, the more pressure we put on our politicians for them to take more measures. 0ur mayor ‘s, those who have solutions that are a bit more institutional at a government level. but we'll need to contribute. from what you are saying, there is no quick fix. there are some quick fixes. if you change the sources of where you produce energy, and move to renewable energy and. coal power parklands, for instance. —— mayors.
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that will have an immediate return. but if you go on sustainable power, there are people trained to do that. —— coal powered power plants. bbc news are looking at air pollution all this week, and john maguire is at a school in east london where they're trying to tackle a particular aspect of the issue. the main stories this morning. the french car giant, psa, will buy the european arm of general motors for £1.9 million. and the most senior antiterrorism officer reveals 13 terror attacks have been boiled on home soil. —— foiled. he will be with us later. we were saying that john maguire is out and about talking about pollution caused by ca rs talking about pollution caused by
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cars keeping their engines on while they are waiting. good morning. john maguire is at a school in east london where they're trying to tackle the problem. good morning. they have a clear message for us this morning. stop idling! there you go. these are the wonderful posters they have been working on. idling is an issue here just like it is across the uk. just behind the children is where they sit with their engines running. it is an even larger problem in the winter, of course. 0ne is an even larger problem in the winter, of course. one of the things the school has done has applied for a grant to plant some trees to negate the effects of idling. it is an issue here and right across uk in schools. what do you think those dark patches are? pollution. that's right. from schools in birmingham, to port talbot... we are looking at where we will plant trees in the school to help tackle air pollution.
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..to sheffield. many people have issues because of the things they are breathing. there is a quiet revolution under way, and at times like this. engine turning off. in the name of science, will has said he will take this tool on the drive to school today. using highly sophisticated tech, we can analyse the pollution. he will track pollution along his journey with his friends. and now we have a professor from the university of leeds who is analysing the two trips. normally when you are stuck in traffic, that is when the levels can get quite high with pollution. it is a quiet route. we have crossed some roads and seeing huge spikes, actually. they are a short duration. they have got a good route to school. they go down a backstreet. the levels are low there. at the school gates is where all
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the cars are parking and dropping the children off and idling, we can see lots of spikes at that end. and that exposure to pollution over the route is mainly focused around the school gates, actually. so, what can be done? so, basically we are asking people to turn off their engine when they are stationary. i'm about to pick up my son. i understand. we just want to educate people. thanks for switching off. it is yet another success for this anti—idling patrol. these volunteers in islington have been trained in what to say to people to get them to turn off and deal with inevitable excuses. the councils say this is about local people cleaning up local streets. today it is about this street in this area trying to reduce pollution levels for pupils at school. so, just how much difference can switching off your engine make? testing in one location saw that by stopping idling, pollution levels dropped by a third.
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the bigger message is that it helps people understand the impact of small actions on the kind of larger problem of air quality. and there's always this approach. i'm sorry to bother you, but your engine is running. it is. you wouldn't turn it off, would you? i am just thinking of emissions. in the last six years as he went to work on his way to the theatre of london, actor nigel havers is a man on a mission. they wonder who i am and have said some pretty choice things to me. but generally speaking, people are aware and said, oh, sorry, i am not aware of that. this is a drop in the ocean, admittedly, or a particle in the air, if you liked, when compared to the global problem of air pollution. but new research shows how changing habits and switching off engines can make a difference in protecting our most precious resource. and who could say no to nigel and
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these posters? look at this one. make the earth cleaner. less pollution. i like this one. stop pollution, it's the only solution. you can wait, but switch off the engine. that is talk to ralph from nice. i'll be doing enough? we have put freedom of information request to councils. 0nly put freedom of information request to councils. only 50 said they and give staff the right to issues fines. the guides were using say it isa fines. the guides were using say it is a good thing. children and elderly are particularly vulnerable. at the age of 14, they are at a stage of development, and pollution can harm the development of their lungs. we want to do something about this. and fines is one of the
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guidelines recommended. do we expect them to be successful and taken up? we see all sorts of signs outside school about slowing down and not parking on the lines and that sort of thing. should this be at every school? it depends on the setting. look at where we are. many high buildings surrounding us. that causes a barrier that trapped polluta nts causes a barrier that trapped pollutants inside. you have problems in places like this. in other places with better insulation, there are a number of diesel vehicles not passing through, and it is not so much a problem. we know from measurements that this is one of the three worst polluted schools in london. it is of particular concern here. the children. good morning. tell me what you have been doing at school. at school we have been doing many things towards idling. for example, we have been learning how it can affect people. yeah. and
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mainly children. some people with asthma and maybe lung disease. it can asthma and maybe lung disease. it ca n affect asthma and maybe lung disease. it can affect them negatively. absolutely. what will you do, joseph? tell me about your white sheet. we put white sheets everywhere. when we collect them back in, the one in the car park that we put up was very black. right. so was the one in the playground. though not as bad the point that is worrying, because then you know that is what is happening inside your lungs as well. shall we have a back to the studio? back to the studio, dan and louise. back to the studio, dan and louise. back to the studio, dan and louise. back to the studio, dan and louise. excellent work. thank you! thank you for remembering our names.” excellent work. thank you! thank you for remembering our names. i could get used to that. now for the weather with carol! the best introduction ever. the weather has a
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role to play in air pollution.” introduction ever. the weather has a role to play in air pollution. i am no expert on the subject, but when the rush—hour was, generally speaking, we do not have so many problems. —— there are showers,. that is because the air is rising. but with high pressure, that acts as a lid, keeping pollutants in we have sunny spells and scattered showers in the forecast. some have persistent rain. especially in south—west england. low not far away. and some fronts producing this rain. we arejust away. and some fronts producing this rain. we are just off the peninsula where we have had a gust of wind at 109 miles per hour recently. nothing like that here. this morning in south—west england, rain. snow in the moors. that will continue to pulls out. that is around the channel islands. southern counties.
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sunny spells and bright spells. with the cloud, certainly big enough for the cloud, certainly big enough for the odd shower. that extends into central england as well. the same for scotland. another front in shetland producing rain. aberdeenshire, frost. more showers and hill snow in the west. a nippy start in northern ireland. some sunshine for you. it will not last all day. wales, sunshine around. and all day. wales, sunshine around. and a nippy start. through the day, you can see how it will remain. it will improve in south—west england with sunshine and showers. most of the sunshine and showers. most of the sunshine will be in the east. a lot of dry weather. but later in the day, some more rain will show its hand across northern ireland. some else do with that as well. through the evening and overnight that will tra nsfer the evening and overnight that will transfer into the mainland parts of england and wales and scotland. showers in the east still. the wind
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direction, coming from all directions. cold enough forfrost in sheltered areas tonight. where there are damp surfaces, the risk of ice on untreated surfaces. tomorrow, dry and bright and much of the uk. more rain in the south—west and in wales and northern ireland. ahead of that, cloud building. windy as well. slowly progressing to the east. eastern areas hanging onto the driest conditions until after dark. there goes that front, moving east. then another one sinking south, just in time for wednesday. then, on wednesday, we are looking at a pretty wet day in southern and central areas. rain in the north. but in between, brighter and brighter conditions. thank you very much for that. we will see you later in the programme. this is bbc news. 0n in the programme. this is bbc news. on wednesday, the chancellor will
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unveil this budget. we arejust outside aberdeen looking at what it means for young people, who have been very busy this morning. what are they cooking up? good morning. good morning. a fancy rhubarb dish we are making this morning with nicole, one of the people employed by this catering firm in aberdeen. around one third of their staff are under 30 here. i around one third of their staff are under30 here. iam here around one third of their staff are under 30 here. iam here talking around one third of their staff are under 30 here. i am here talking to them about what they would like to hear from the budget. them about what they would like to hearfrom the budget. we them about what they would like to hear from the budget. we will them about what they would like to hearfrom the budget. we will do this all week, from different generations the previous week is the millennials, those born in the 80s and 90s. they are prepping 1500 meals a day. that will go to businesses in the area and schools and nurseries. in aberdeen they deal and nurseries. in aberdeen they deal a lot with the energy industry as well. i will tell you all about that. but first, let us get the news, travel, and weather, wherever you are morning. good morning from bbc london news.
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i am alice salfield. a 40—year—old man has been charged with the murder of a pensioner on an allotment in north—west london. on tuesday 80—year—old lea adri—soejoko's body was found in a garage on the allotments in colindale where she was the secretary. rahim mohammadi, from hackney, is accused of her murder. the former boxer, michael watson, says he hung on "for dear life" as he was dragged several hundred metres along a road during a violent carjacking, and that last month's attack in chingford east, london. watson, who suffered a near—fatal brain injury in a 1991 fight with chris eubank, spoke to tonight's bbc‘s crimewatch programme. it came like a nightmare. i couldn't believe it, that it could actually happen. you could feel like my skin was peeling off. i was just hanging on for dear life. evil thugs, that's what they are. they are evil and senseless. and you can see that interview in full on bbc one tonight at 9pm.
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a feminist film classification created to highlight the lack of women working in the movie industry is now being used at the barbican cinema. it's the latest venue to adopt the campaign, which uses the classification for any film that is directed or written by a woman or features significant women on screen in their own right. let's have a look at the travel situation now. starting with the tubes, a good service on all lines at the moment. 0nly woolwich ferry due to mechanical problems. 0nto the roads, in chiswick: there are temporary traffic lights on the a316 near the hogarth roundabout. time for a check on the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. a much drier and brighter day in prospect compared to yesterday. bright spells this morning.
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maybe some sunshine. still a few showers likely to develop as we head through the afternoon. the cloud is thin enough to let in some sunshine. showers blowing through on the north—westerly breeze, which will be quite chilly, actually. the further west, the drier the picture. a maximum temperature of 10 degrees. 0vernight, showers will continue for a time. gradually, they will become fewer between. clearer spells that night. breezy with a north—westerly wind staying with us. 4—5 degrees in towns is the minimum. the countryside, it may drop down a little further. a bright start tomorrow and a dry start. some sunshine, but gradually, the cloud will move in from the west. the wind is fairly light still. nine, ten as the maximum temperature. that rain will not arrive until tomorrow evening. quite a wet night tuesday into wednesday that the outbreaks of rain for wednesday as well. but you will notice that it is up in double figures. 12—13 degrees celcius. a touch more mild. night—time temperatures well above zero as well. this week will be unsettled and rather cloudy. time to go back to the breakfast sofa. see you soon.
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i will be back in half an hour. until then, there is plenty more on our website. hello and welcome back. that's bring you up—to—date with all the latest news and sport. in the last hour the french car giant, psa, has confirmed that it's buying the european arm of general motors for £1.9 billion pounds. the deal includes the vauxhall plants at ellesmere port and luton which employ 4,500 workers. psa already owns peugeot and citroen. we will have more out throughout the programme this morning. security services have prevented 13 potential terror attacks since june 2013, the uk's most senior counter—terrorism police officer has revealed. assistant commissioner mark rowley also said there were 500 live counter—terror investigations at any time.
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he disclosed the figures as he launched an appeal that aims to get members of the public to report any suspicious behaviour. we will be speaking to me a little later this morning. —— to him. north korea has fired four missiles, three of which landed less than two hundred miles from the coast of japan. the missiles appear to have been launched from a remote military base close to china. south korea's acting president has called it a serious provocation and a direct challenge to the globe. talks are beginning in belfast today aimed at forming a new power—sharing government. the two largest parties, the democratic unionists and sinn fein, are still divided over a botched green energy scheme that led to the collapse of their previous administration. sinn fein say the dup leader, arlene foster, can't be re—appointed as first minister while her role in the scheme is being investigated.
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a former british soldier, has been shot dead on his ranch in kenya. —— soldier has been. tristan voorspuy ran lodges for visitors in the central rift valley region of laikipia. he'd served as an army officer in the 1970s and had spent nearly thirty years as a rancher and safari operator. a local official blamed rural herdsman. events are being held in belgium and britain today to mark the 30th anniversary of the zeebrugge ferry disaster, in which 193 people died. the passenger ferry, herald of free enterprise, capsized 90 seconds after setting sail from the coast of belgium to the british port of dover. fbi directorjames comey has rejected president donald trump's claim on saturday that his predecessor, ba rack 0bama, tapped his phone, us media say. mr comey reportedly asked the us justice department to reject the allegation mr 0bama ordered a wiretap during last year's election campaign. 0ur washington correspondent nick bryant has more on this story.
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the white house still hasn't produced any evidence to back up the claim that barack 0bama or the white house ordered wiretaps on trump tower. white house officials pointing people, reporters, towards some newspaper reports that they have read, which heightens the speculation that president trump's twitter tirade was not based on intelligence briefings that he had received, but rather, as strongly suspected, he was reading a right—wing news report on breitbart news. two new developments today. one is james clapper coming out and saying there were no wiretaps. and clapper is not only somebody who worked for barack 0bama, he also worked for george w bush and george herbert walker bush. he is seen as a trusted figure, a non—partisan figure. and another key development — the fbi director, james comey, it has been reported he approached the justice department, and asked thejustice department to come out publicly and say that president trump was wrong, that this was a false accusation, and that it needs to be rejected.
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that is a big slap down from the director of the fbi. coming up on shortly carol will have the weather. but now, sally is here with the sport. laura muir is certainly an athlete we'll be hearing a lot more of in the coming years. she had the most prodigiously brilliant weekend. we will be hearing a lot about this girl, believe you me. she stormed to victory in belgrade in a championship record time ahead of turkey's yasemin can and compatriot eilish mccolgan. muir's achievements matched those of colinjackson set in paris 23 years ago, before she was even born. i did know what my legs were going to do today. i tried to hang in there and i am very tired. but i'm so glad i
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could do that today. what was the plan at the outset? did go according to plan?” did go according to plan? ijust tried to tag onto yasemin can. and managed to cross the line in first place. and after her efforts to complete a victory lap on saturday, she had a more relaxed time of it celebrating her 3000m success. she confessed she was shattered. nobody stopping that little bit of a victory lap, they are. she did a bit more running around in postal voters. 0bviously delighted with the result, there, last night. asha philip is also celebrating gold, she pulled off a surprise, breaking the british record on her way to taking the 60 metres. it's her first individual medal at a major senior championships. i was so happy. i was — i was not doubting myself... i knew i had it in me,
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and they think the confidence ran me through the race, but everytime i seem to get on that start line, a false start happened. i thought a pickup in eagle. but they didn't. and they said i was going to go out and do my best. and they did. they came out here for the w, and they did. —— i thought i picked up a niggle. and robbie grabarz understandably said he was "over the moon" with a silver medal in the high jump — just six weeks after having an emergency operation to remove his appendix. england's cricketers are enjoying their caribbean adventure at the moment. they've won twice in antigua and now they are going to barbados with a series win already secured. the hosts chose to bat first but england bowled them out for 225, always likely to be below a competitive total. the west indies spin bowlers gave england some problems butjoe root saw them home with ten balls to spare. if you wanted to leave yourjob, you could do worse than following the example of arsenal's alexis sanchez.
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he walked out of training, arguing with his teammates — and almost got in a fight with one of them. that never happens, here. he is arsenal's top goalscorer — he was left out of the starting line—up against liverpool at the weekend by his manager arsene wenger. he said it was a tactical decision instead of saying his striker was playing up. elsewhere in north london, tottenham have a very happy striker. harry kane scored two more goals in their win over everton. it's their ninth consecutive home win in the league, a new club record. two goals from harry kane and one from delle ali was enough to secure a 3—2 victory. it is true that we are playing very well. always, it is very good to play for ourfans. well. always, it is very good to play for our fans. the atmosphere is great. weekend deal that. and yes,
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so far, we are in a very good position, here. we feel confident and we hope that we can go in the same way. “— and we hope that we can go in the same way. —— we can feel that. manchester city are one point behind spurs after winning 2—0 at bottom—of—the—table sunderland. sergio aguero scored his 23rd goal of the season and leroy sane added a second. it's a fourth league win in a row for pep guardiola's side. there will be an old firm derby in the semi—finals of the scottish cup after celtic thrashed st mirren 4—1 in the last eight. scott sinclair scored the pick of celtic‘s goals to give them the lead as they came back from a goal down at home. aberdeen will face hibs after their 1—0 victory over partick thistle. and finally, the wife—carrying championship has taken place in dorking. lots of people taking part. there is
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one kind of hole that is very popular. it is thought of upsidedown and over the shoulder. 0ver popular. it is thought of upsidedown and over the shoulder. over the hay bales. and the winners were in fact jack and kirsty from north wales. we will see the end of the course is actually upheld. that is very challenging. there is a brogue kick who just got challenging. there is a brogue kick whojust got his challenging. there is a brogue kick who just got his wife. —— there is a blokey. and there you have —— and there you have jack and kirsty. thank you for clearing all that up. lots of you will know this feeling. getting ready to sit exams can be a stressful time. with the summer term fast approaching the bbc is launching a new way of helping pupils cope with the pressure. called the mind set, it offers tips and tricks from 12 student coaches who have
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recently been there. we'll speak to three of them in a moment but here's a look at what's on offer. talk to your friends or parents. they will want what is best to you. tell them your concerns or talk to friends and get advice from them. because they properly went through the same thing and might have come through it. when i realised that my worrying are stressing was getting out of hand, realise they needed to confide in somebody. so immediately we nt confide in somebody. so immediately went to my parents because they knew i could talk to them. so every night, even if it was what i thought was a series worry or something small, about it, and it is surprising how much better you would feel after speaking to some of it. —— silly. to know that your friends can connect to a certain situation
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during this period is quite comforting. the maths teacher was quite good because i have been dire at mass since i was no edge. she helped me by saying that all they needed to do was passed. and i could get it over with. -- bad at maths. it isa get it over with. -- bad at maths. it is a stressful time. i know a lot of people will be going through it, and have gone through it. joining us in the studio now are dr radha modgil and student coaches beattie, max and safiya. let's's talk about it in a general way. we will go to some specifics in a moment, but let's talk about general things. exams have always been stressful, have a? they have. a rise in anxiety and expectation, as well as competition is new. we are just catching up in terms of teaching people how to deal with pressure. i think we need to do a lot more about that. that is why this campaign is so fantastic. and you and you have all come through exams yourself. what was it likely
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you? how stressful did you find the whole process of revising and entered in the exams? it was very stressful. there is a lot of emphasis on what you don't know what you need to learn, and what i found was helpful was focusing on what you do know, because it is a time in your life where you are taking so much information. and all the gcse stu d e nts much information. and all the gcse students should all be proud about. and that will help you with stress. and that will help you with stress. and you say you are stressed. your stress. how did that affect... poor you! how did it affect you and what help to? i struggled a lot with self—doubt is confidence. so i think that just are that self—doubt is confidence. so i think thatjust are that i was doing well and doing 0k and reminding myself that it was myjourney not comparing myself to others. so it is for me and my gcses. there is so much chatter. you can do the exam and asked how people dead. what did you do about that? after exams, i would
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not say because you need to stay with a small stress as possible. citing not talking to others about it and stressing is about more is the best thing to do. because after exams, there is a view can do, there is nothing good about talk about it. 0nce is nothing good about talk about it. once you have done it, you just let it out. that is what i used to do. people start asking questions about what you did, and your confidence is shot. are there any other techniques that you advise, now, being people have gone through a? some people might be worried about an hour with them coming up. i was great about it now, as i started revising december. i think that is the best advice can give. start early so you are not stressed at the end so there is not loads of the last point. is yourself into it, not all at once. it can feel overwhelming, the sheer scale of it all. so how do you advise people to deal with that sort of
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sense? i think the main thing to do is to tell somebody haler feeling. and for those parents and teachers to listen and to make sure that they are taking seriously. we'll know what it feels like when pressure become stress. so talk about it, work out practical ways, as well, to deal with revision timetables, things like that. also they are looking at exercise and well—being, having brakes, listening to music. all of these tips and tricks are really important to keep you happy. because it is a long road on the way to exam. you start preparing very early. you need to keep their reserve in the tech. it is a balance between getting the pressure right. 0n the one hand, it isjust a piece of paper, but at the centre, it feels very important. and if you validate, it can cause issues. is that they sort of stress process you feel yourself dealing with? definitely. i was under a lot of pressure. i was considered the
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student who is going to do really well. were you the head girl as well? i was. even well. were you the head girl as well? iwas. even when well. were you the head girl as well? i was. even when people were very lovely and helpful, i put a lot of pressure on myself. and wherever the pressure is coming from, the most important thing is to tap into why you want to do well. and if that is not something which has a relationship with what you're doing, it not that pressure. just focus on the pressure that comes from you and use that to drive you. what about taking breaks? that was important because you find a balance between work and social life. don't isolate yourself and your friends because they are important. and they are going through the same thing. did you take breaks?” are going through the same thing. did you take breaks? i did. i was able to go hang out with my friends foran able to go hang out with my friends for an hour. are used that to motivate me to study hard. spread it
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out. ——i used. motivate me to study hard. spread it out. --i used. something strikes me about always being attached to mobile phones and incoming messages on social media. what did you do with that? i turned my phone off. i knew i would get distracted. put it in the cupboard. really what about you? i would have a cheeky look. you have to have your own approach. every time i sat the exam, the first hour, i would just organise my desk. do you do that? put all your pens in line. good advice. thank you very much indeed. if you want to find out more about how to keep calm during the exam period, go to bbc. com/mindset. the exam period, go to bbc.com/mindset. good advice. and now for the weather. good morning.
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good morning. a mixture this morning of sunshine, bright spells, and showers. also some rain in the forecast. that is because of an area of low pressure coming in from south—west england bringing rain, but also strong wind. the placement is important because it has gone south. the root of the storm is affecting france. in fact, off the coast of brittany, we had a gust of 90 miles an hour. it is a fast—moving storm. later today, 90 miles an hour. it is a fast—moving storm. latertoday, it would be down here. 80 miles an hour here. back on our shores, what we're looking at today a mixture of bright spells, sunshine, and showers. the rain in the south continuing to push southwards. wet in the channel islands this morning. windy. it will give way to show later on eventually. lots of showers later on, especially in the east. through the afternoon, they will
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conglomerated in northern ireland with hill snow to boot. hill snows year. most of the showers in the east. hit and miss. a weatherfront still plaguing this area. northern england and the north—west, seeing the brightest skies. prone to showers here in the pennines. heading to the midlands and east anglia and kent. not all of us will catch showers. some will stay dry. bright weather in southern counties. in the south—west, compared to the rain this morning, a much improved picture. wales as well will have a mostly dry afternoon with just a few showers here and there. through the evening and overnight, hanging on our lot of showers. lots of dry weather as well. —— on to. where it is cold enough, we could have some ice on untreated surfaces. also some frost as well. wind coming from every direction. tomorrow we start
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off with a chilly note. again, when we lose the showers in the east, dry and bright weather. some fine china. the next weather fronts coming in from the atlantic will introduce rain initially to south—west england, wales, and northern ireland. ahead of that system, the cloud will build. not until after dark that we will see the rain in the far east. eastern areas hanging onto the sunken for the longest time. another weather front going south just in time. another weather front going southjust in time time. another weather front going south just in time for wednesday. so, when today's picture is looking quite messy. a fair bit of rain around at times. —— wednesday's. the tale of that weather front still affecting scotland. breezy. high as 14. thank you. wednesday is messy. and what about for the chancellor? on wednesday, the chancellor
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will unveil his financial plan for the country in his spring budget. this week on breakfast we're looking at what it could mean for different generations. today's focus is on millennials, those born between the early 1980s up to the 2000s. steph is at a catering firm just outside aberdeen. good morning. they are making her work. good morning. that is not me. that is the expert hands of nicole. something mesmerising about watching things being chopped up, well, fruit and veg and things like that. this isa and veg and things like that. this is a big catering firm. they employ a lot of people. around one third of their staff are under the age of 30. they supplied the area. they will talk about how they feel about the economy and the budget on wednesday. they are prepping 1500 meals here. so many businesses in the area are being served by them. it is certainly a busy business. i can
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talk to shane, one of the apprentice is. tell us what you have done here. i have been on a chef apprenticeships for three years. i am training us. you are only 19. tell us about the things you are doing with money. i use it on my car or my pet. insurance is going up every year. it is a struggle. you fork out a lot on your car. and you wa nt to fork out a lot on your car. and you want tojoin fork out a lot on your car. and you want to join the housing ladder is it is really expensive to buy a house to buy it this is an area that did well off the oil industry, but you feel it will be a while. it is really ha rd to you feel it will be a while. it is really hard to buy a house. good luck with the rest of your career. housing is a big issue for shane, but many people around the country as well. we went to meet some people in london to hear their thoughts on
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it. let us introduce the millennials. hi, my name's abby. i am 24, and i am a freelancer. i live in tottenham, north london, with my parents and my brother and younger sister. i'm 24. lam 24. i live at home with my mum and sister. i live in surrey and i am renting and lived with four other people. all this week, we will be getting a grip on what this generation wants generation wants from the budget. if you are a millennial, you were born between 1981 and 2000. you are finishing education and making a start to your career. you have been most affected by the falling pay of recent years and are struggling to get onto the housing ladder and are suffering high rents as a result. so it is with our millennials. me and my sister share a room, which we have done all our lives. iam 24. 24! it is a bit like, 0k,
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it is time to go. we cannot afford it. it isjust not going to happen. how does your mother feel about this? until i am kicked out, i am going to have to stay there. none of their salaries can come remotely close to the six—figure sums to just rent here. toby managed to move out of home, but only by moving out of the city. the aim for you is to own your own home? yes. somewhere. like many of the people my age, i could get a deposit, though it will take a while. i think i could do it. i just am concerned about economic stability. economic stability. that is the big thing for to be especially with brexit. i want the government to reassure me with something coming out now. what do they want from the budget on wednesday exactly? housebuilding, economic security, and brexit. so, this is what i want, affordable housing, and how are they going to pay for it?
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go after tax dodgers. i want the government to support young people so they don't have to move out of the city to make a living. make housing affordable. so, philip hammond, if you are watching, millennials want housing, housing, and housing. and a new focus on a generation that largely feels left out. jane mccubbin, bbc news. so, some thoughts there from some young people that we met. so more people to talk to. the founder of young money blog. and one of the economists at natwest. we heard some thoughts. cars with shane and housing too. it is interesting that he talked about car insurance. many of the workers here have told us about the pressures they face. many have had to get on their bike to get
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work. the equivalent is to get in the car. how can you do that when car insurance is into the thousands each year. perhaps we need to rethink changes to the car insurance premium. and the rate which means people get more money if they are in a car accident and claim compensation but we have to pay more in insurance premiums. we have to address that the bite and wages as well. absolutely. the national living wage at the moment, there is only a legal requirement to give that you over 35s. perhaps we should rethink that and give the under 25s. they need help with wages to bite absolutely. 0f they need help with wages to bite absolutely. of we talk about the pressure on young people, but what about the pressure on the chance of it? he is under pressure. but we have good news. the economy will grow faster than it was 4—5 months ago. that means there will be more
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need to spend money. but as a country, we want the government to spend more money on public services than we paid with tax is. —— taxes. he will have to bring the deficit down. more tax and less spending. interesting to see what happens in the next two days. you will stay with us to talk later on. first, the news, travel, and weather, where you are that morning. —— this morning. good morning from bbc london news. i am alice salfield. a 40—year—old man has been charged with the murder of a pensioner on an allotment in north—west london. on tuesday 80—year—old lea adri—soejoko's body was found in a garage on the allotments in colindale where she was the secretary.
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rahim mohammadi, from hackney, is accused of her murder. the former boxer, michael watson, says he hung on "for dear life" as he was dragged several hundred metres along a road during a violent carjacking, and that last month's attack in chingford east, london. watson, who suffered a near—fatal brain injury in a 1991 fight with chris eubank, spoke to tonight's bbc‘s crimewatch programme. it came like a nightmare. i couldn't believe it, that it could actually happen. you could feel like my skin was peeling off. i was just hanging on for dear life. evil thugs, that's what they are. they are evil and senseless. it came like a nightmare. i couldn't believe it, that it could actually happen. you could feel like my skin was peeling off. i was just hanging on for dear life. evil thugs, that's what they are. they are evil and senseless. and you can see that interview in full on bbc one tonight at 9pm. a feminist film classification created to highlight the lack of women working in the movie industry is now being used at the barbican cinema.
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it's the latest venue to adopt the campaign, which uses the classification for any film that is directed or written by a woman or features significant women on screen in their own right. let's have a look at the travel situation now. starting with the tubes, a good service on all lines at the moment. southwest and southern have a half an hour delay. time for a check on the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. a much drier and brighter day in prospect compared to yesterday. bright spells this morning. maybe some sunshine. still a few showers likely to develop as we head through the afternoon. the cloud is thin enough to let in some sunshine. showers blowing through on the north—westerly breeze, which will be quite chilly, actually. the further west, the drier the picture. a maximum temperature of 10 degrees. 0vernight, showers will continue for a time. gradually, they will become fewer between. clearer spells that night. breezy with a north—westerly wind staying with us. 4—5 degrees in towns is the minimum. the countryside, it may drop
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down a little further. a bright start tomorrow and a dry start. some sunshine, but gradually, the cloud will move in from the west. the wind is fairly light still. nine, ten as the maximum temperature. that rain will not arrive until tomorrow evening. quite a wet night tuesday into wednesday that the outbreaks of rain for wednesday as well. but you will notice that it is up in double figures. 12—13 degrees celcius. a touch more mild. night—time temperatures well above zero as well. this week will be unsettled and rather cloudy. time to go back to the breakfast sofa. see you soon. hello. this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. a new chapter for british car—making
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— the french company which owns citroen and peugeot seals a deal to buy vauxhall. the 2 billion euro deal raises questions over the future of 4,000 jobs at its ellesmere port and luton plants and 30,000 more, which depend on them. good morning. it's monday, 6th march. also this morning... speak out to save lives. police launch a new campaign urging people to report suspicious activity to combat terror attacks. north korea launches four missiles towards the sea of japan. tokyo calls it "a new stage of threat." on wednesday, the chancellor will unveil his last spring budget. all this week on breakfast, we're looking at what it means for each generation. today we are talking about
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millennial is, those born in the 80s and 90s was the i am at 0bama in aberdeen that they employ a lot of them define that what they think about the economy. what a weekend it's been for britains laura muir! she claimed the 3000 metre title to add to her 1500 metre win at the european indoor athletics championships. and this time she was allowed a victory lap. we are at a primary school which suffers from air pollution. the children have a clear message for drivers who do not switch off their engines. news on that and the rest of the weather from carol. a chilly start all some of us with frost. for most of us it would be a day of writes about, sunshine and showers. more details in 15 minutes. ——
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bright spells. good morning. first, our main story. there's uncertainty for thousands of british car workers as a deal that will see vauxhall sold to the french owners of peugeot and citroen has been announced. the french car giant psa has agreed to buy general motors european operations for £1.9 billion. the deal includes vauxhall‘s plants in ellesmere port and luton, from where our reporter, simon clemison, joins us now. simon, what can you tell us? good morning. there have dean shifts changing over this morning i have been speaking to some of the workers. they are concerned about this deal that has been confirmed this deal that has been confirmed this morning but we have been expecting it for a couple of weeks. what this means is that car industry map of europe, which includes luton and elsewhere port, could now be rewritten. -- else may port.
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in the car industry, we're used to car brands been owned by the same parent company. but if the european arm of general motors, which makes vauxhall, or 0pel in germany, to the company that makes peugeot and citroen goes ahead, it would be a huge move, making the french manufacturer the second biggest on the continent, after volkswagen. but there are now fears for jobs, which the unite union says they are fighting for. more than 1900 people produce the astra at ellesmere port, with 120,000 vehicles rolling off the production line each year. thousands more are employed in the supply chain. there are about 1400 workers at luton, making one of vauxhall‘s vans. general motors has been losing money on these sides of the business for years. if workers here eventually have new bosses in france, rather than in america, there are questions over how they may look to balance the books. commentators say they have capacity to build more cars at the plants they already control. the government has been speaking to the french group, psa. staff have been given reassurances. but there are concerns forjobs and pensions once existing contracts start to expire in 2021.
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as we know, it does not make much sense to move production until the models come to the end of the run. it is costly and complex will do everything here is set up for it. it is what happens after that that is the big concern. what if peugeot word to say, we have a van, let essentially put the vauxhall badge on it. they are talking this morning about seeing through the turnaround plans would they want to make a profit, they may have to do something. more detail is what we are expecting in the next hour in a news conference. more detail is what many of these workers will want to see. plenty more on that on the rest of the programme and throughout the day on the bbc news channel. 13 potential terror attacks have
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been prevented sincejune 2013. assista nt been prevented sincejune 2013. assistant commissioner mark rowley is launching a campaign to encourage more people to report this activity. there was a plotted al-qaeda bombing campaign against targets like nig htclu bs campaign against targets like nightclubs and shopping centres. well —— a woman working at the storage warehouse became suspicious and reported it to the police, potentially saving hundreds of lives. if you see something suspicious, report it. a new police campaign focuses on the important contribution the public can make. campaign focuses on the important contribution the public can makem can be any thing that strikes you as unusual. detectives say the public
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is still playing an important part in one third of their current investigations. senior detectives are warning that supporters of so—called islamic state are not the only threat. al qaeda remains a danger, too, as does far—right terrorism. new officialfigures show that the number of attacks in britain thought to have been thwarted sincejune 2013 has risen to 13, one higher than the figure given six months ago. at any one time, the security services are running around 500 investigations. the threat level remains at severe, which means that the risk of an attack is assessed as "highly likely". 0n breakfast in the next few minutes, we'll be speaking to the assista nt minutes, we'll be speaking to the assistant commissioner. that is innate few minutes. -- that is in a few minutes. north korea has fired four missiles — three of which landed injapanese—controlled waters less than 200 miles from its north—west coast.
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they appear to have been launched from a remote military base close to china. we can speak to our correspondent, steve evans, whojoins us from south korea's capital, seoul. iimagine i imagine they are taking this seriously. what more can you talus? a lot of talk of tightening sanctions and something must be done. every year, south korea and the us have big military exercises. north korea gets very angry about this and often looses off missiles. we do not know if this is different in that they are better missiles. north korea is improving its technology. last year, it launched a whole string of missiles, many of them doubts. three of them appear to have gone a distance. it may be getting better but, is it getting better with better, different missiles, making progress towards having a nuclear strike capability
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on the us, or is it getting better with the same missiles it has used for a while? thank you very much. labour has said it is "confident" thatjeremy corbyn has paid the correct amount of tax. the labour leader published his tax return as part of a call for transparency from politicians. it appeared to show his mp salary, plus pension payments, but not the money he is entitled to as leader of the opposition. however, the party said the allowance ofjust over £27,000 was included and was taxed at source. survivors, rescue workers and victims relatives will gather today to mark the 30th anniversary of the zeebrugge ferry disaster. 193 passengers and crew died when the herald of free enterprise capsized shortly after leaving the belgian port. 0ur europe reporter gavin leejoins us. the capsized hulk of one britain's worst shipping disasters. the herald
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of free enterprise lying on its side at the entrance to the port of zeebrugge. the british ferry disaster of belgian... it took around 90 seconds for the vessel to turnover. it helped to save many lives. 193 passengers and crew died. the official enquiry found that the bow doors were mistakenly found that the bow doors were m ista kenly left found that the bow doors were mistakenly left open as she left port. an attempt to prosecute crewmembers and the company collapsed in court. in dover today, memorial service will take place to allow the victims families to mark
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the 30th anniversary. the bell will be presented at the service. three decades on, this disaster continues to influence the lives of hundreds of ordinary people, the design of ships, and britain's maritime history. fbi directorjames comey has rejected president donald trump's claim on saturday that his predecessor, barack 0bama, tapped his phone. this is according to us media. mr comey reportedly asked the us justice department to reject the allegation mr 0bama ordered a wiretap during last year's election campaign. 0ur washington correspondent has more on the story. the white house has not produced any evidence for this. white house officials pointing people, reporters, toward some newspaper reports they have read which heightens the speculation at president trump's twitter thai red
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was not based on intelligence briefings but on suspicions he was reading a right—wing news report. two key development. one is the former director of national intelligence coming out and saying there were no wiretaps. he is not only someone who worked for barack 0bama he also worked for george w bush. he is seen as a nonpartisan and trusted figure. the fbi director james komi, it has been reported, has asked thejustice barman to say that president trump was wrong. this was a full is activation needs to be corrected. —— thejustice department. that is a big slap down from the director of the fbi. members of the public have made significant contributions to a third of the 100 most high risk ongoing terrorism investigations. that's according to britain's most senior counter—terrorism officer, who says the public are key to keeping our streets safe.
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and assistant commissioner mark rowleyjoins us now. good morning. thank you for talking to us today. so much to talk about. let's start with the nature of the threat you'd think we are facing these days. it is broader than it has ever been before. when you look at the attacks on the continent, in brussels and paris, these were big, sophisticated attacks causing major loss of life. through to some of the attacks which have been foiled or conducted on the continent where you have one individual radicalised who has a knife and wants to kill one or two people. we have to deal with all of those. while we are succeeding at the moment with 13 plots disrupted over the last four years, we need more information. what sort of information are you getting what are
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you looking for? how has it helped to thwart recent plots? the best place to start from is our work is like doing a jigsaw without all the pieces. surveillance is not perfect. people use encrypted applications and it is a challenge. sometimes a member of the public gives information which will start an investigation. 0ther information which will start an investigation. other times we already have an investigation under way and a give another piece to help. it may be someone in the cumin tea or who says someone's personality has changed and they are showing signs of radicalisation. all the way through to somebody you do not know, maybe where you work or go shopping and you see someone, in an area you know, where instinctively you'd think that is not quite right. that is what we want. even know we are getting a lot of the public have are getting a lot of the public have a job to help us but they say they do not know how and not competent to
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do not know how and not competent to do it. this appeal by pod and website information, all of that is about giving the public more information to ensure them about how we will treat the information. one concern you picked up on is that people are concerned they are wasting your time. it is a bit odd but i will not trouble anybody. we'll try to build up confidence. if your instinct says it is wrong, please call us. even if it is not right, no one is going to throw away the key on a call. sometimes got that call gives us the starting point for an operation about targets we do not know about. the idea you're working on 500 investigations and still requesting this information, those that mean that strategy is not working and you are not stopping radicalisation?m strategy is not working and you are not stopping radicalisation? in the last year or two, 150 people have
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shown signs of radicalisation, ambitions to travel to syria and preventative work done by police, local authorities, the channel programme, they have been steered back onto a more sensible view of the world and have not travelled. some of that information, if you spot someone early on on a path of radicalisation, it might be a young person who at a vulnerable point in their life is having their heads turned, the more it can be preventative rather than someone planning to do something awful being imprisoned for a long time, which is sad. can you give us any figures? 150 people who have been looking to travel to syria will be one part of it. we're, every month we're closing between about 50 and 70 cases where concern has been raised about an individual and police, local authorities and voluntary agencies have worked to try and steer them back on to a sensible course. that's fantastic results. you talked about the different levels of threat from
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a paris—style attack to individuals. let's deal with that sort of, the attack that happened at the bataclan. are you ready if that sort of thing was to happen here? are officers ready for that sort of thing? we have done an immense amount to strengthen our ability to respond. you will see have lots of announcements. after that, we looked at that and worked with government and they gave us extra money and we're trying firearms officers and that's the firearms officers who are on 24/7 and some of our more high grade specialists who can deal with the most difficult situations.” know you talked about this before, if that sort of thing were to happen, you talked about members of the public, you know, it is a very terrifying situation... completely. what's your advice? on our website, there is information. it is run, hide, tell. we have seen information in the past where people might, where i am and then some someone in
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authority will tell me what to do. run, get as far as away as possible and to the point where you can hide yourself safely and call the authorities, call the police. it is simple advice that's designed to be simple. we know it would work and it is based on analysing attacks across the world. good to speak to you. thank you very much indeed for your time this morning. it's 8. .17am. let's find out what's happening with the weather. it has been raining steadily across the south—west of england. that is moving quite quickly across france and towards the mediterranean and italy, but we have had a gust of wind recorded off the coast of brittany at 119mph. nothing like
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that in south—west england, but it is blustery and you can see all the rain associated with it. extending down into the channel islands where at the moment it is pretty wet. now, it will remain so in the channel islands for a wee while yet and that rain will turn more showery and it will brighten up. that's certainly the case across south—west england. a lot of dry weather, but a fair few showers, more especially in eastern area, but later in northern ireland, we will start to see the showers line up and some of them will merge. producing some rain at lower levels and snow with height. for scotland, and snow with height. for scotland, a lot of dry weather. a fair bit of sunshine, but there are a scattering of showers around. wintry on the hills and still an old weather front playing the northern isles. north—east england seeing a few more showers and again the showers hit and miss wherever you are, but through parts of the midlands and into east anglia, essex and into kent, but in between them, it will be dry or bright and sunny skies. variable amounts of cloud and
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sunshine and this morning's rain giving way to some showers, but still quite blustery. for wales this afternoon, a beautiful afternoon with just a few showers. through the evening and overnight, the showery outbreaks of rain will push across into western areas. we will have some in the east, but in between, there is a lot of dry weather. the wind coming at us from every direction, but not particularly strong and of course, where we've got damp surfaces and low temperatures there is the risk of ice on untreated surfaces and frost. now, we've got the next system waiting in the wings for tomorrow and it's coming our way. so after a dry and bright start with sunshine here comes into the rain into south—west england, wales and northern ireland. the cloud will build so it is eastern areas that will hang on to the sunshine and probably we won't see the rain until after dark. in the sunshine highs of 11 celsius will feel pleasant. nothing special. if you're in the rain it's nothing special. if you're in the rain its seven celsius. so that system, you can see the two fronts
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continue to drift away, but we've got another one that's heading south—east wards and the tail end of it by the time we get to thursday will take another swipe at the south—west. let's deal with wednesday first. we have got a weather front sinking south taking the rain with itment more rain and windier conditions in the north. in between, drier and brighter. windier conditions in the north. in between, drierand brighter. a blustery day, but look at that, 14 celsius in london. ten celsius in glass gosmt that's more like it, lou and dan. isn't it, indeed? thank you carol. it is 30 years since britain's worst ferry disaster. gavin lee is there for us this morning. good morning. what is happening there today? just behind me, from this boat is the spot just behind me, from this boat is the spotjust ahead behind me, from this boat is the spot just ahead behind behind me, from this boat is the spotjust ahead behind this harbour wall here where the herald of free enterprise sank. it capsized and it
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was the most simple, careless and catastrophic mistake that the staff didn't shut the bow doors. the assistant, mark stanley was asleep he told an inquest later in his cabin. thousands of tonnes of water went into the vehicle deck and within 90 seconds the ship had capsized and 30 years on, i'm on a navy boat. this is part of the commemorations, but on this boat some of the families, some of the survivors, some of the rescuers as well are coming back to place flowers in the water at exactly the same spot. let me bring in one of the rescuers. this is daniel. you we re the rescuers. this is daniel. you were one of the military divers that day. it is clearly, you know, 500 people on board, 193 people died. can you tell me a bit about what you rememberfrom that can you tell me a bit about what you remember from that day being on the water? that day, i was on duty at
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home and the telephone rings and the officer said, "i and two other divers must go to zeebrugge because a boat was sinking. we arrived here on another boat. you worked underwaterfor on another boat. you worked underwater for hours on end. tell me about that. and you came across survivors as well. i rescued only dead people because i was not the first on board. the first was a commander. he was one of the first. he rescued ten, 20, maybe 30 people. did you say there were three british lorry drivers in a cabin who were trapped thaw managed to get to? yes. tell me about that. that's true.
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that was 5am in the morning, i think so, but they were not underwater, they were in the cabin. they were in they were in the cabin. they were in the cabin. we rescued them. you saved their lives? no, because they are not in the water. it was very cold for them, of course, but not in the water. let me ask you, what does it mean for you to be back here today commemorating like this? they invite me and i don't say no out of respect to the people who died here. that's the reason i am coming. thank you. thank you for talking to us daniel. there is a lot of people on this boat that are finding it really difficult, i have to say today and many people who have decided not to come today, it is such a difficult moment, but so many more sayjust to
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see the moment when the flowers are laid to pay their respects will be very powerful in a short while too. i'm sure it will be a very poignant day there today. thank you, gavin. more now on the £1.9 billion deal that will see french company psa buy the european arm of general motors. the deal has huge implications for the 4,500 workers at vauxhall‘s plants at ellesmere port and luton. joining us is karel williams, professor of accounting and political economy at manchester business school. good morning to you. so first up, i suppose, you know, what do you think, right at the start for people going into work today at these plants, are they worried? should they be concerned ? plants, are they worried? should they be concerned? is this a good thing? well, they shouldn't worry about this year and next year, the big thing in the car industry is when they change over the models. the astra is safe until 2020, the vivara until 2025, the astra is safe until 2020, the viva ra until 2025, but the astra is safe until 2020, the vivara until 2025, but there is a
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big question and this increases the certainty about whether the models will be replaced. if you go back to psa in the uk, and in 2007, that was about the run out of the 2006 and the new models going to be built elsewhere. and in addition to that, i suppose, when those contracts come to an end, there is broader concerns about the way the motor industry is developing and how we'll buy our ca rs developing and how we'll buy our cars in the future as well? well, i think there are very large questions about autonomous cars, battery cars, changes in the whole business which will mean that car companies are competing with tech companies, but leave that to one side, i think someone like the ceo of psa will be concerned to take cost out of the operation, will be concerned to close plants and i think if you add brexit to the mix, that's another complication because luton and ellesmere, like the rest of the british industry, are importing most of their components and exporting most of their output. and that could
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have, are you saying cost implications? well, i think, have, are you saying cost implications? well, ithink, ithink this is probably a more important point beyond luton and ellesmere port. if you look at the industry as a whole, 60% of the components are imported. 80% of the output is exported. mainly to europe. and any kind of customs friction in that movement is going to greatly complicate things and make the industry much more nervous. what does this mean for the rest of the car industry in the uk? if they're worried here, i know it might be yea rs worried here, i know it might be years down the line, how might that affect the rest of the industry? we need import substitution in components quickly. the government has succeeded in pushing up count of ca rs has succeeded in pushing up count of cars from 36% to 41%, they need to have targets of 60% so they reduce
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the friction. that gives efficient pla nts the friction. that gives efficient plants the chance to compete on the basis of efficiency. it's time for the news, travel and weather where you are. hello. a wet start to the day in the south west. rain in the north. into the afternoon things will brighten up the afternoon things will brighten up and there will be some sunshine around. the wet start across the south—west corner of england will be because of the biggest area of low pressure bringing damaging winds
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across north—west france. the rain will clear the way and eventually from the channel islands. we will see sunshine returning to many south—western areas for the showers across northern and eastern areas. an increasing chance of showers in northern ireland. in the afternoon, nine, maybe 12 celsius. mild dampers and in the sunshine. the showers will continue for the first part of the night but will start to fiddle —— fizzle out. a touch of frost in places with clear skies and light winds will appear as the ridge of high pressure which will slowly ebbed eastwards. many places will start tuesday on a fine note. quite chilly with a touch of frost around. across the west and south—west increasing cloud and strengthening winds. we channel but eastern parts of scotla nd winds. we channel but eastern parts of scotland and central and eastern england was hewitt will stay dry until the end of the day. the rain will move right across the uk during
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tuesday evening and the course of the night. turning windier across scotland. you can see the area of low pressure in the north. a blustery day on wednesday with frequent showers. for england and wales, it would be a wet start. conditions will gradually improve with brightness moving in behind. but be very dry across england and wales. thursday looks like it will be another bright day in the east with rain across the south. this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and susannah streeter. a european car colossus in the making. france's peugeot—citroen is buying general motors' european business, including the 0pel and vauxhall brands, for $2.3 billion. live from london, that's our top story on monday 6 march. two car giants come together but is today's deal a sign of things to come for the european autos industry?
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what does it mean forjobs and the choice of vehicles on the road? we will be getting an expert view. also in the programme... china's premier cuts the economic growth target for this year.

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