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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  March 7, 2017 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. facebook underfire. a bbc investigation has found it failed to remove sexualised images of children. a senior mp says the findings cast grave doubts on the effectiveness of facebook‘s systems. good morning, it is tuesday 7 march. also this morning: hundreds of millions of pounds of extra funding to set up new schools, but teaching unions say the money should be spent on existing ones. a british backpacker has been rescued by police in australia after being held captive for two months. tomorrow the chancellor will unveil his last spring budget. all this week on breakfast, we are looking at what it means for each generation. today we are talking about generation x, those born between 1966 and generation x, those born between i966 and i980. generation x, those born between i966 and 1980. i generation x, those born between 1966 and 1980. i am at a sausage factory in north yorkshire to talk to the people here about what they think about the economy. in sport: can anyone catch chelsea? they are ten points clear at the top of the premier league, after a 2—1win at west ham. and the pigeon patrol that is helping scientists fight air pollution in our cities. and carol hasjoined us in the studio for the weather. good morning. it is likely to be
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here although it is chilly outside if you are just stepping out. for many of us it will be a dry start and a sparkly one with a weather front coming in from the south—west introducing some rain later on. i will have more in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story: facebook‘s procedures for vetting content on its pages have been strongly criticised, after a bbc investigation found it was failing to remove inappropriate and sexualised images of children. the chair of the commons media committee, damian collins, has said it casts grave doubts on the effectiveness of facebook‘s systems. our correspondent angus crawford reports. the rules are simple. facebook says it removes nudity or sexually suggestive content. but our investigation last year found paedophiles using secret groups to swa p paedophiles using secret groups to swap obscene images of children. we
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informed the police, and this man was sent to prison for four years. facebook told us it had improved its systems, so we put that to the test. we still found sexualised pictures of children, and obscene comments from men. we reported 100 posts that we felt broke facebook‘s own guidelines. 0nly we felt broke facebook‘s own guidelines. only 18 were taken down. 82 images stayed up. they didn't breach facebook‘s community standards. i find it very disturbing. ifind standards. i find it very disturbing. i find that content unacceptable. i am concerned that that has been brought to facebook‘s attention, and some of those images have not been dealt with and addressed, and this report, this investigation, it casts great doubt on effectiveness of the measures facebook has in place. facebook asked us to send examples of what we had reported. so we did. the company
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then reported us to the police. facebook issued a statement saying... but even now, groups with inappropriate images and comments about children remained on facebook. questions about how the company moderates content won't go away. we will be talking to a former facebook executive at around 7:10am this morning. an extra 320 million for new school places in england will be confirmed in tomorrow's budget. it will go towards the government's existing free school programme, and could be used to support the opening of any new grammar schools. labour has criticised the move for failing to address funding pressures faced by schools, but theresa may insists it is part of her plan to make a good education accessible to every child. well, of course we have protected
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the court schools budget that crucially what we are announcing his £500 million of investment in schools, £320 million of which will be new schools. that will create around 70,000 new school places. what this is about is ensuring that people can know that their child will have a good school place, and all the opportunities that that provides for them. 0ur political correspondent ellie price joins us from westminster. it is interesting, isn't it, funding for new schools were other schools are already concerned about funding. that's right, £320 million of this, as you have just heard, will go towards funding those new free schools, about 140 of them. so that is the majority of the money. then the rest of it is money going towards refurbishing the old buildings of existing schools. if we
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start with that one first, there was a report out a few weeks ago that suggested that there was a bill of about £6.5 billion that needed to be spent on bringing up the buildings of existing schools to a satisfactory standard. you would need to spend another £7 billion on them to bring them up to a good standard. so if you think about that, £216 million that is being talked about this morning is really small fry compared to that. adding to that conversation is being had around the country with head teachers who are complaining about the ballooning costs of... running costs, at a time when spending per pupil has been reduced, it would seem that unfortunately all this money seems to be rather small fry. thank you very much. a british backpacker has been rescued by police officers in australia, after allegedly being held against her will for more than two months. she is said to have been raped and assaulted. the woman was rescued by police when they pulled over the vehicle she was driving and noticed she had serious injuries to herface. police say a man has been arrested.
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0ur correspondent hywel griffith is in sydney. horrible story. what more can you tell us? yes, the police say the woman went through a catastrophic ordeal. she was actually pulled over because she had failed to pay for fuel survey had failed to pay for fuel survey had been warned by the petrol station. however, when they found her she was extremely distressed and had severe injuries to herface. in the back of the vehicle, they allege, 22—year—old man was hiding them. they say he had kept her against her will for the course of about nine weeks. at a press conference moments ago we heard from the detective inspector, paul hart. police subsequently spoke at length with that female, who has been identified as a 22—year—old tourist from the uk. she advised that, over a period of weeks, she had been held against her will by the mail person
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located in the vehicle. it was established that they had previously had a relationship, but at some point that had soured and he had basically deprived her of her liberty, committed a number of offe nces liberty, committed a number of offences against her as they travelled around the state, culminating in their location in mitchell. that mail person has since been remanded in custody, and will appear in court in about a week's time in relation to those charges. we understand that the woman had beenin we understand that the woman had been in australia since 2015 but key to this, police allege the man had damaged her passport to try and make sure that she couldn't flee. he faces multiple charges of rape, as you heard, assault, strang deletion, and will appear you heard, assault, strang deletion, and willappear in you heard, assault, strang deletion, and will appear in court next week. we understand that she has received treatment for her injuries. she has been supported by the british high commission here and she has been able to speak to members of her family back in the uk. but as i said, police are saying that this is
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a catastrophic case which has really upset many people within the backpacking community, queensland and australia as a whole, are very popular destination for people travelling here. the government is facing the prospect of another defeat in the house of lords over the process of leaving the eu today. peers are to vote on an amendment to the brexit bill which calls for parliament to be given a meaningful vote on a final deal. the prime minister has said parliament will have a vote, but only on a "take it or leave it" basis. last week the upper house voted to guarantee the rights of eu nationals already living in the uk. the former conservative leader lord hague has urged the prime minister to seek an early general election. writing in the daily telegraph, he said this would strengthen the government's hand, and help the uk secure a better deal in brexit negotiations. theresa may has repeatedly ruled out going to the country before the next one in 2020. new figures show police forces in england and wales received one call every 90 seconds about a missing person last year.
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that is an increase of 15% on the previous year. police chiefs believe the ageing population could be one reason for the rise. david rhodes reports. steve was a lovely, quiet lad. margaret cooper is still searching for her son, steven, nine years on, after he disappeared from his home in huddersfield. he was last seen in scotland, but despite police searches, he has never been found. that's the worst thing, is not knowing. if you've got a body, because he's died, you can have a grave or whatever, and you can put flowers there, and you can grieve. when you've no idea what's happened to them, there's just nothing. you're in limbo.
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on average last year, 370 people went missing every day, with police forces receiving over 300,000 calls, a rise of 15% on the previous year. the majority forces say they are dealing with more missing people. i think the general public are more aware around people gone missing. i think our practices have improved, which again will account for a rise in the numbers that we are recording. there is not one reason why people go missing, but there are some common themes. where it's an adult that's gone missing, it can be a sign of mental health issues, of relationship breakdown, of disability. where it's a child or a young person, it's often a sign that there's something wrong in the home. whatever the cause, for those left behind, there are only memories to cling to, and questions that remain unanswered. david rhodes, bbc news. a conservative backbencher is attempting to reverse government plans to end the dubs scheme, under which unaccompanied migrant children who don't have relatives in the uk are given refuge here. the mp heidi allen is tabling an amendment to legislation going through the house of commons today. last month the government announced
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that it was limiting the scheme to 350 children. a card which has been sent by a father and daughter to each other on their birthdays for the past 33 years has gone missing in the post. claire fuller from winchester has been exchanging the card with her 78—year—old father, stephen, after she first sent it to him in 1984. the card was last posted in 0xfordshire on 10 february. you would think it would be there by now, wouldn't you 7 you would think it would be there by now, wouldn't you? come on, rack first viewers. we can track this down. —— breakfast viewers. first viewers. we can track this down. -- breakfast viewers. it is probably still in the envelope. that is very true. i'm sorry, with the logic and everything. up until that moment it was a brilliant plan. i was thinking maybe a postcard, but obviously not. let's find it anyway!
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motivation for the nation. carol is with us in the cbo, and jessica with the sport. —— in the studio. and chelsea are doing very well, flying high in the premier league. chelsea continue their march towards the premier league title. they are now ten points clear at the top of the table, after beating west ham 2—1 thanks to goals from eden hazard and diego costa. manuel lanzini got a consolation goalfor the home side in injury time. arsenal manager arsene wenger has dismissed reports of a training—ground row between alexis sanchez and his team—mates. arsenal tonight have the daunting task of overturning a first leg 5—1 deficit to bayern munich, if they are to progress to the champions league quarter—finals. manchester united's zlatan ibrahimovic and bournemouth‘s tyrone mings have been charged by the fa with violent conduct. mings appeared to stamp on the head of the united forward, before the striker caught the defender with an elbow
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to the face moments later. the pair have until this evening to respond to the charges. and the england women's cricket team will make history when they play the first—ever day—night ashes test against australia in november. the match will be played in sydney, starting on 9 november. we will have the papers from you as well in a minute. on that, i wanted to know, i have never spoken to you about this, pineapple on a pizza, yes or no? no. pineapple? definitely. we will discuss it in our paper review in a few minutes' time, just a little tease for you there. in the meantime, while we wait for that, carol is here.
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the temperatures are at freezing or even plus four. widespread frost. a largely dry start start to the day. it won't stay that way through the day. a clump of fronts from the atla ntic day. a clump of fronts from the atlantic bringing cloud and rain to start with. later on, heavy rain. frost and rain in the winds and some cloud around. still some rain in the northern isles. steady in aberdeenshire. it will go away from there ahead to the northern isles. south, a lot of loose guys. —— blue skies. with showers, hit and miss. the london area, cloud producing drizzly conditions first thing. the
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south—west, at this stage, largely dry. however, as we go through the day, here come the fronts introducing some lighter rain at this stage and drizzle and low cloud associated with it. you will find the cloud will build, spoiling earlier sunshine. for many of us, the temperatures will die out. seven -11. the temperatures will die out. seven — 11. through the course of the evening and overnight, that weather front coming in from the south—west will turn more heavy and the rain move towards eastern areas. again, windy conditions. transience know that will quickly turn back into rain to be the first front moves into the north sea. —— transient snow. murky in the southern counties. tomorrow, starting with rain and clad in the south. a blustery day. clearer skies and sunshine. still quite breezy in
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major. a lot of low cloud associated with this weather front. mild. 14 degrees. not pleasant because of other elements. as we go further north, in the sunshine, 7— 12 will look rather nice. this mild theme does continue as we head on into the weekend. then it turns colder and thenit weekend. then it turns colder and then it turns more mild. oh my goodness. very topsy—turvy. then it turns more mild. oh my goodness. very topsy-turvy. as promised, the front pages. the times. leading on the story of donald trump hitting out at the fbi in the 0bama wiretap row. barack 0bama leaving the national gallery of art 0bama leaving the national gallery ofart in 0bama leaving the national gallery of art in washington. a little wave to his public. the latest harry potter programme in the theatre. wheel it sweep the board in the 2017
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0liviers? and theresa may could pave the way for a new generation of grammar schools as the council uses the budget to push on with a controversial policy seen as a priority for the prime minister. and most of the papers have picked up on the grammar school side of it but you can also turn a free school into any sort of school you want to. and the express. blood—pressure breakthrough. they can treat millions of. and nurse gilbert.|j was watching it last night. it was so good. eight happy ever after? i hope so. ——a. so good. eight happy ever after? i hope so. --a. iworry so good. eight happy ever after? i hope so. --a. i worry about these things. they are talking about the school story here. the mirror. paul will tie the knot with his
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boyfriend. and the fact that chelsea are steamrolling ahead in the premier league. and the times are saying that david of arsenal, david 0spina, maybe leaving the club. i told you about the row with alexis sanchez and arsene wenger. alexis sanchez and arsene wenger. alexis sanchezis sanchez and arsene wenger. alexis sanchez is apparently not very popular with the squad. will he go? and mesut 0zil has not signed a contract yet. and now 0spina is possibly on his way out as well. troubling times for arsenal. and arsene wenger, the fact that the manager may not be staying. troubling times. i am sure arsenal fa ns troubling times. i am sure arsenal fans are quite worried. i wonder how it will play at. a massive match tonight. a massive match against bayern munich. weirder things have
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happened. i was talking about pineapple. most people are angry about pineapple on pizza. we are not worried about it. i am not. some people get annoyed. 52% of people according to this yougov poll enjoyed it. that is higher than spinach and sweetcorn. you would not expect that. what is your view? i put an apple on everything. —— pineapple. i love it. i am a big supporter. so, there you go. there you go, two in, one out. thank you very much, jessica, see you later. it's the second day of our budget road trip. yesterday, we looked at what millennials, those born in the 80s and 90s, want to hear from the chancellor tomorrow.
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today, we're taking a look at what generation x, those born between 1966 and 1980, want to see. steph‘s at a family run business in north yorkshire for us this morning. look at that. a sea of hairnets. look at that. a sea of hairnetslj love a hairnet, let me tell you. i am at love a hairnet, let me tell you. i amata love a hairnet, let me tell you. i am at a sausage factory. many sausages will be running off of this. they make 300,000 of them a day! you will see these in many supermarkets around the country and they are literally just supermarkets around the country and they are literallyjust getting set up they are literallyjust getting set upfor they are literallyjust getting set up for the day. i am definitely in the way for this one. we are here to talk about the economy and the budget coming up in the next couple of days. as you said, one of the big areas we are focusing on is how it affects different generations. brea kfast‘s affects different generations. breakfast‘s john maguire went affects different generations. breakfast'sjohn maguire went to meet some gen x'ers to get there and
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get their opinions. st david's day, the first day of spring. we are in pontypool to find out how people are coping. spring. we are in pontypool to find out how people are copinglj spring. we are in pontypool to find out how people are coping. i love my job. i see a lot of people that are managing. iam job. i see a lot of people that are managing. i am barely managing. job. i see a lot of people that are managing. iam barely managing. and yet i am working. i think that is very, very unfair. they are trying to put people back into work but it is not very easy. i think wages should go up quite a bit more than the budget so we can cope. and what can the chancellor do for the town? so, money for youth centres, please. who are generation x? let us take a spin about the bbc breakfast table to find out. generation x born between 1970 and 1980 are at the peak of their careers and are bringing up children. they are
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feeling the effects of large cuts to welfare. they have fallen between the cracks when it comes to pension saving. we are talking to them now. we are just about managing with the budget. just about managing. as you said, both of you and your wife work. my wife is a social worker. i work. my wife is a social worker. i work part time just to get by. we save money for childcare. gareth hopes the budget will help. increase tax credits. would that help you? yes. and as for pensions? my parents are lucky enough to be retired for ten years. they have gone all over the world. my father has a retirement pension. i look at myself, and i think i will not be able to do that. i really don't do the i think they were the lucky generation. at the top of wendy's
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budget wish list is help for the next generations. help the cost of universities for our children. as the narration ex— took its first tentative steps, they provided one of the best forwards in rugby. —— generation x. they are at a meet and greet in the town's indoor market. there is a mini stepford. peter has been running this business for ten yea rs. been running this business for ten years. it is tough. people have less money in their pockets and are more fussy about how they spend and they wa nt fussy about how they spend and they want value. there is a lot of competition in the food business is well. it is not that straightforward. what can philip hammond do for him? help the economies. help the business rates. economy is to provide work for almost everyone here has almost disappeared. —— the economy that use
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to. and for those who grew up in the 70s, 80s, and 90s, it seems like a com pletely 70s, 80s, and 90s, it seems like a completely different life. what can the budget provide for their future? john maguire, bbc news, pontypool. we will talk about the issues they we re we will talk about the issues they were talking about there throughout the programme. many experts coming to talk about that topic will show you how they make sausages because it is fascinating. this is the chicken italia. and pork sausages over there about to go into the mixer. and over here, you can see that they zip along. typical. every time they come to me it stops again. it will not be long. i will definitely show you all of the sausages. the girls are here and they are packing it into the boxes. there you go. the first few are coming through, obviously. they will get taken off. it is really fascinating to see, isn't it? more
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from me a little bit later on. thank you. iam from me a little bit later on. thank you. i am speechless. i don't know what to say. more on that later. interesting. when we go outside on broadcast businesses, it is almost a lwa ys broadcast businesses, it is almost always transfixing. and hairnets at dawn. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning: can pigeons help in the battle against air pollution? we'll show how the tiny technology being strapped on to birds could help us see how toxic the air is. we don't have a pigeon. but we kind of do. this is a plastic pigeon. this is what helps to read the data. the person we have coming on later, his wife makes these, and her name is cat. so she is quite literally a
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cat among the pigeons. this pigeon needs a name. every pigeon needs a name. iam nervous needs a name. every pigeon needs a name. i am nervous about this topic send something ridiculous to ask. that would be wonderful. —— this. time to get the news, travel, and weather, wherever you are this morning. good morning from bbc london news. the parents of a seven month old baby who are challenging doctors in a high court battle to keep him alive have told the bbc that they deserve the right tojudge his care. charlie gard is receiving treatment at great 0rmond street hospital for a rare genetic condition, which doctors there say has no known cure and charlie should be allowed to die.
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but his parents say pioneering us treatment could save his life. a man has died days after a car ploughed into him and four other pedestrians in south—east london. the car crashed into them on bromley road in bellingham last month. police say a 31—year—old romanian who was in a critical condition, had his life—support machine turned off on friday. the driver was arrested and bailed on suspicion of drink—driving and causing serious injury by dangerous driving. doctors in london say much braver action is needed to clean up london's dirty air. the royal brompton and harefield hospital deals with hundreds of children with asthma and respiratory problems. doctors say the capital's poor air quality will affect more and more people which could potentially cause a "huge economic problem" in the future. the sad truth is that lung function declines from our early 20s. human lifes pa n declines from our early 20s. human lifespan is limited by how much our lungs can do. if your lungs do not grow to their peak, you will find yourself in late middle age with the lungs of an elderly person. what is going on in the air is like a giant experiment on impact in young people growth. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning.
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but on the roads on brompton there's one lane closed opposite harrods that's because of emergnecy repairs taking place. crystal palace park road is closed near penge west station after a large fuel spillage last night. and in the west end: shaftesbury avenue is closed eastbound at cambridge circus for major roadworks. let's have a check on the weather now, with elizabeth rizzini. good morning. idea of sunshine around yesterday. some of us managed to escape the showers altogether. lots of sunny spells today developing. we should be mostly dry. i say that because there is still the possibility of outbreaks towards eastern areas through this morning and certainly thick cloud here. a chilly start to the day as well. temperatures above freezing. sunny spells developing everywhere. top temperatures, 10— 11 degrees. late brightness as we head towards the end of the day. gradually, the cloud will kick in from the west. dry
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through the evening's rush—hour. 0utbreaks through the evening's rush—hour. outbreaks of rain pushing from the west. some could be heavy through the overnight period. a mild start to the day. 7—8 degrees celsius. the rain will never clear away tomorrow. 0utbreaks rain will never clear away tomorrow. outbreaks of rain on and off through the day. plenty of low cloud around. not a very good date tomorrow. the temperatures in the air will be mild. any brightness will help to lift those temperatures up to the values you see here. quite a lot of low cloud and spells of rain at times. that is it from us. we will be back with more from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. back to the breakfast sofa. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. it is 6:30am on tuesday seven march. coming up on breakfast today: steph is out on the road looking at how generation x, those born in the ‘60s and ‘70s, are coping financially ahead of tomorrow's budget announcement. a zoo in cumbria where nearly
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500 animals have died has been ordered to close. we will ask how it was allowed to deteriorate. and he is the uk's fastest—growing children's author. david walliams will be here on the sofa. he has been in that spitfire in preparation for his next book. facebook‘s procedures for vetting content on its pages have been strongly criticised, after a bbc investigation found it was failing to remove inappropriate and sexualised images of children. the chair of the commons media committee, damian collins, has said it casts grave doubts on the effectiveness of the social media sites systems. facebook says it has carefully reviewed the content referred to them, and has now removed all items that were illegal or against their standards. an extra £320 million for new school places in england will be confirmed
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in tomorrow's budget. it will go towards the government's existing free school programme, and could be used to support the opening of any new grammar schools. labour has criticised the move for failing to address funding pressures faced by schools, but theresa may insists it is part of her plan to make a good education accessible to every child. well, of course we have protected the core schools budget. but crucially, what we're announcing is £500 million of investment in schools, £320 million of which will be new schools. that will create around 70,000 new school places. what this is about is ensuring that people can know that their child will have a good school place, and all the opportunities that that provides for them. a british woman has been rescued by police officers in australia after allegedly being held against her will for more than two months. a 22—year—old man from queensland has been charged with several counts of rape and assault, after she was found with injuries
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during a routine traffic check. police subsequently spoke at length with that female, who has been identified as a 22—year—old tourist from the uk. she advised that, over a period of weeks, she had been held against her will by the male person located in the vehicle. it was established that they had previously had a relationship, but at some point that had soured. and he had basically deprived her of her liberty, committed a number of offences against her as they travelled around the state, culminating in their location. the government is facing the prospect of another defeat in the house of lords over the process of leaving the eu today. peers are to vote on an amendment to the brexit bill which calls for parliament to be given a meaningful vote on a final deal.
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the prime minister has said parliament will have a vote, but only on a "take it or leave it" basis. last week the upper house voted to guarantee the rights of eu nationals already living in the uk. the former conservative leader lord hague has urged the prime minister to seek an early general election. writing in the daily telegraph, he said this would strengthen the government's hand, and help the uk secure a better deal in brexit negotiations. theresa may has repeatedly ruled out going to the country before the next one in 2020. a conservative backbencher is attempting to reverse government plans to end the dubs scheme, under which unaccompanied migrant children who don't have relatives in the uk are given refuge here. the mp heidi allen is tabling an amendment to legislation going through the house of commons today. last month the government announced that it was limiting the scheme to 350 children. the fashion designer stella mccartney found a stylish way to pay tribute to the late singer
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george michael during paris fashion week. she closed her show by sending out a troupe of models to sing and dance along to a remixed version of michael's early solo hit faith. he was found dead at his home in 0xfordshire on christmas morning. quite a cool way to finish a fashion show. excellent. absolutely. jessica is here with a look at the sport. chelsea at the moment absolutely loving life and i want to talk to you about them because i feel like after last night's match at the top of the premier league, they are looking down saying where is everyone? they are doing so well. chelsea continue their march towards the premier league title. they are now ten points clear, after a 2—1win at west ham. a ruthless counter—attack was finished by eden hazard,
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who put chelsea 1—0 up. after the break, diego costa added a second with his thigh. manuel lanzini grabbed a consolation goal in injury time, but it was too late. chelsea are now unbeaten in ten games. we must think that we are able to ta ke we must think that we are able to take 26 points, to win this title. but a little bit to go, step—by—step. it is important to see it game by game, yes, the dream is good, but it is important to keep our feet good, but it is important to keep ourfeet on good, but it is important to keep our feet on the ground. they look strong, for me they are not going to lose that. i mean, they ain't going to become... i can't see them being casual. like easing down. they look the part, to be fair.
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arsenal manager arsene wenger has dismissed reports of a training—ground row between alexis sanchez and his team—mates. sanchez is understood to have had an exchange with players last week, and was left out of the starting line—up for the defeat at liverpool on saturday. arsenal tonight have the daunting task of overturning a first leg 5—1 deficit to bayern munich if they are to progress to the champions league quarter—finals. the only advantage of our situation is that we have not much choice to have any hesitation. we have, of course, to go for it and to attack, and take... go forward with determination and flow, and try to score goals. manchester united's zlatan ibrahimovic and bournemouth defender tyrone mings have until this evening to respond to violent conduct charges. it is following their premier league match on saturday. the united striker caught mings in the face, just moments after his head was caught with the defender‘s studs, as he lay on the ground.
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if found guilty, mings could face a ban longer than the standard three matches, after the fa said the punishment would not fit the case. england women play germany in their final shebelieves cup match in washington. mark sampson's side go into tonight's game after beating world champions usa at the weekend. with the result we got in america, two nights ago, we feel like it will bea two nights ago, we feel like it will be a springboard now, to allow us to get to the level we want to get to. we have made no secret we want to be the best team in the world. that is the best team in the world. that is the standard we are judging ourselves by, and to get there we need to win these league games and big tournaments. so our next task is to win the next game, against germany, but i think the players are in the best position they can ever be to win these kinds of games. you can watch england versus germany live on bbc red button, and on the bbc sport website. ronnie 0'sullivan is
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through to the second round of the players championship, in wales, after a 5—1win over liang wenbo. ‘the rocket', who is a five—time world champion, was rarely troubled, as he eased through to a second—round clash against either judd trump or mark king, in a tournament which sees the world's top 16 players take part. the england women's cricket team will make history when they play the first—ever day—night ashes test against australia in november. the match will be played in sydney, starting on nine november. just like the 2015 series, this year's competition will also feature three one—day internationals and three twenty20 matches. england are looking to reclaim the trophy they lost in 2015. we are going to return to football, finally, and a pretty impressive goal in brazil. everybody says a side is at its most vulnerable immediately after scoring, and that was the case when comercial fc forward mirrai scored directly from the kick—off in sao paolo, against catanduvense. his side went on to win the game 4—1. how impressive was that? an absolute
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beauty. can you show that a bit later on? we need to show that, and replays as well. six years of war in syria has led to a mental health crisis among the country's children, according to the charity save the children. in a report based on 450 interviews with children, adolescents and adults, the organisation said bed—wetting, aggression and problems with speech were common. joining us now is saida salam from save the children. good morning to you. an amazing and battling statistic, 5.8 million children in need of aid in syria, about 2.5 million children at risk of developing a mental health disorder and also a lot of talk in this report about toxic stress, basically we have explained exactly what that is and how that affects children particularly. absolutely, so as you mention this is one of the
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largest and most competence of studies into the state of mental health that children are experiencing inside syria and what we have seen is nearly 3 million children have grown up knowing nothing but this very bloody war and they have suffered atrocities that no child should have to face. they have been tortured, shot at, targeted, many have seen their loved ones killed in front of them, and what we're finding is this protracted exposure to this level of bloody mess and this level of conflict, coupled with the deprivation children are facing in terms of their basic needs like food and water is leading to this condition called toxic stress which many children are now experiencing. we spoke earlier about the symptoms that manifests itself with, so 70% of children we spoke to reported that children were frequently bedwetting and 48% talked about children experiencing speech impediments. i think what is most heartbreaking is to hear the experiences of toxic stress from the children themselves so we have spoken to children, had conversations with five—year—old children, where a gust of wind
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lowing a door shut makes them scream, where a five—year—old keeps shouting repeatedly i hate the aeroplanes, they killed my father, louder and louder. and children talk about fear, they talk about the plane near their homes. they talk about fear going to school. and that is really distressing because schools should be safe havens and places of sanctuary for children. in syria what has happened is every day on average our school has been targeted twice a day since the start of the conflict. these are not safe places any more, for kids. but what is really distressing as they are scared to go to school but they are also really distraught about their future without an education. this is one of the most telling things about the report is that children are experiencing this toxic stress but most of the children we are speaking toa most of the children we are speaking to a still resilient, they have dreams, they want to go on and become doctors and nurses. they do wa nt become doctors and nurses. they do want a childhood, they do want an education, which is good news. given, and it is quite understandable, how they feel, given
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that the situation they are in now, how can you make it better? can it bea how can you make it better? can it be a positive outcome for them, from a mental health point of view? absolutely, so the number one thing we need is for the cause of this toxic stress the end, which is the violent and we need to put all the pressure began on the parties to the conflict and the violence, and the un member states to uphold their own obligations. we don't need to wait for that solution to meet this human need. so we have been operating with our partners inside syria since 2013, reaching 1.5 million children with asic needs, food, water, medicine, but also really basic psychological first aid which can involve really simple things like drawing, art therapy, training teachers, parents, caregivers themselves. and safe places to play. safe places to play, and we have to be quite inventive they are so teachers have started running schools underground so that they are able to avoid the bombings. we have had to move people around, we have
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had to move people around, we have had to move people around, we have had to convert homes and mosques so that we can create these kind of safe play areas for children. but thatis safe play areas for children. but that is an absolute lifeline and one of the things we need now at save the children is to scale up the work, because it is not too late and we can reverse the damage done by this toxic stress, which can go on the adult hood, but we need more funding and we need to scale up. one of the problems is ourfunding funding and we need to scale up. one of the problems is our funding cycle isa of the problems is our funding cycle is a very short term, four the six months arejust as is a very short term, four the six months are just as the child is starting to talk about their distress and make progress, the programme has to close and that lifeline for a child is ended. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: facebook‘s procedures for vetting content and removing inappropriate and sexualised images of children have been criticised after a bbc investigation. a british backpacker has been rescued by police in australia after being held captive for two months.
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an incredibly after being held captive for two months. an incredibly controlled after being held captive for two months. an incredibly controlled sneeze. after being held captive for two months. an incredibly controlled sneeze. i after being held captive for two months. an incredibly controlled sneeze. i am after being held captive for two months. an incredibly controlled sneeze. i am impressed. after being held captive for two months. an incredibly controlled sneeze. i am impressed. we after being held captive for two months. an incredibly controlled sneeze. i am impressed. we will after being held captive for two months. an incredibly controlled sneeze. i am impressed. we will need after being held captive for two months. an incredibly controlled sneeze. i am impressed. we will need umbrellas for that one. a cold start to the day. temperatures hovering around freezing is the frost around first thing. a largely dry start. for some of us, a lovely sunny one as well. the cloud will build from the west. weather fronts coming in weatherfronts coming in producing rain. this morning, we have got a largely dry start. 0ne rain. this morning, we have got a largely dry start. one or two showers. rain coming from the isles of scilly. another band of rain. a weather front clipping the far north—east corner of aberdeenshire and the northern isles. the west, scotland, if you showers. some wintry in the hills. a cold but
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sunny start. a nice start if you like it crisp and sunny in northern ireland. england, some drizzle in the north—east but not much more than that. further south, the north—east but not much more than that. furthersouth, in the north—east but not much more than that. further south, in the london area, also east anglia, part of the midlands, cloud producing drizzle. west. back into the sunshine. the cloud is beginning from the south—west are heralding the arrival of this band of rain. —— thickening. through the day, the rain will not be heavy. the cloud ahead of it will build. you will find there will be milky sunshine. temperature—wise, not in bad shape. 0nly five in the northern isles to be cold. seven, eight, nine, up to 11. the afternoon and the evening and overnight, although it will feel cold under the band of rain, through the overnight period, the temperatures in the south—western parts of wales will actually go up. rain will continue to move steadily across the british isles. transient
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snow in the hills of scotland. that is the first weather front going through. this is the second one in the south. quite a cloudy and murky night in southern areas leading us into a cloudy and murky start to the day tomorrow. a lot of cloud and rain. at times, the rain will be heavy. mostly it will not. moving north, that band of rain, although it will be a windy day, sunshine in double figures. the northern isles, ten, 11 for most. but 14 towards the south. that is amidst the cloud and murk. wednesday into thursday, well, wednesday you will see this weather front clear the south. adhered comes into thursday, look how it is coming back. so, that meant to start the day try and find. —— as it comes. slowly moving north. ahead of this will be some cloud to be the central swathe of the uk once again sees
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some sunshine to the temperatures are not too bad, actually. 14 degrees. that is pretty darned good. not only is it lovely to see you in the studio, you have brought in chocolate. i hoovered up a bit on the way to the studio, but i left you some. i bet you are just saying that. thank you. it's the second day of our budget roadshow today, and this week, steph‘s out on the road speaking to different generations about what they want to hear. we are calling it a generation game. is that why i have this coin? yesterday, it was the millennials, and today, it's the turn of those born in the 60s and 70s. we've sent steph out to a family—run business in north yorkshire, which employs many from generation x. i think it is quite clear what these specialised in. good morning, steph. good morning. it is a family run
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business. every time we go live the sausage stopped coming out. we will definitely see some soon. they are packing them up and sending them to the supermarket. they make something like 300,000 sausages every single day. there you go. lots of different flavours. this one is chicken italia, with sundried tomatoes and the like. tell us about your business. it is expanding and going well. yes. we launched in april, 2013. we are the third fastest growing company in the uk. we are creating further flavours next year. it isa creating further flavours next year. it is a good year. good to here. you are part of generation x which is what we are focusing on today. you have the budget coming up and a lot of uncertainty. what would make a
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difference? breaks that allow us to keep investing in people. people are the most important thing. more training for companies like ours to allow investment to continue. as a family man, this is a family business, what would help you? what are the precious in your personal life? well, we employ a lot of younger people. i know it is hard to get on the mortgage ladder and start buying a property. anything that helps them do that earlier, maybe raising the tax threshold for young people, allow them some help to get on that later, that would be important for me. all of this costs money. it is a sacrifice. are there any areas you think we should spend less on to help in the areas you would like? consecutive governments have really sort of, not, well, you know, they have allowed private
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companies like ours to help. but wasting things in the public sector area bugbearof wasting things in the public sector are a bugbear of ours. they always come to the private industry to find that gap but it comes down to business to try to help the mistakes of successive governments. -- fund. we also have a taxation lawyer. we we re we also have a taxation lawyer. we were just talking about the pressures on generation x. andrew is a businessman and has a family life. what could be chancellor do to help generation x? at the moment, what we are doing is changing some of the salary sacrificing arrangements. previously, if you talk some of your salary in the form of an effort, there were tax savings for the employer and employee. —— form of benefits. they are restricting that, but giving the benefit for employer
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related childcare. if you have to pay for childcare, you still get that benefit. they are also keeping it for pension contributions as well. and for the cycle to work scheme as well. that is good. also, you have the lifetime isa allowance which is basically designed to help people get on the property ladder. if you were under 40 and invest in one of these isas or your parents do one of these isas or your parents do on your behalf, the government will contribute 35%. we would like to see an increase in that in the budget so people can save more to enable their children to get a the housing ladder. you have to stick with us. later we will talk about them other things we can expect as well. for now, let me show you this. it is interesting watching this. it fascinates me. look at these sausages. i will show you the other line as but i will leave you with the chicken italia this morning. thank you very much, steph. they are
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so busy. look at them! working so hard. a lot of sausages are quite a lot of breakfast there. when you think of reducing air pollution, you probably think of electric cars and energy efficient light bulbs, but academics at birmingham university believe pigeons are the answer. they are not exactly like that pigeon. that is a stunt pigeon. we have a reason for having that pigeon, and you will name it later. "city flocks" is a new project which sends pigeons with sensors strapped to their backs off into the sky to record more accurate pollution forecasts. brea kfast‘s graham satchell went to watch their maiden flight. patent pidgins help us in the battle againstair patent pidgins help us in the battle against air pollution? —— can pigeons. it sounds far—fetched, but academics at birmingham university are convinced it can. people give you the look like you are giving me.
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it is sort of... is this for real? is this actually going to work as a we have a superfast temperature sensor. . . we have a superfast temperature sensor... this climate scientist will attach these tiny sensor packs to the backs of pigeons. if we know the temperature is above the rooftops, we can test the levels of urban pollution. time for the test flight. urban pollution. time for the test flight. fitting the sensors is a delicate operation. hello, my little friend. they are tiny, just 596 of the pigeon's weight, to protect the welfare of the birds. it has a tiny camera to record the flight. much is resting on the next few minutes i feel nervous. this is the first time we have done this. it is the of many hours of work to get to this stage. i think they will just take off hours of work to get to this stage. i think they willjust take off and find their way home. it is the moment of truth. they looked happy
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enough. they looked like pidgins flying to meet. did they do you? they will fly just over a flying to meet. did they do you? they will flyjust over a mile. this is the disoriented view from the pigeon cam. what is it scientists are trying to discover? they already know that nitrous oxide, the pollution that comes out of diesel engines, rises with the heat coming from roads to rooftop level. but what about the pollution next? where does it go? to model it, they need accurate data in this climate. but how do you get the data? birds fly everywhere. they could carry our sensors. if they could be tiny and accurate enough, we could start to understand the dispersion of air pollution around the city. just six minutes after taking off, the pigeons are back. oh, really and. there is an anxious wait as it is
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retrieved. —— brilliant. there is an anxious wait as it is retrieved. -- brilliant. the light is still flashing. that is a good sign. this is what the data shows that be the routes taken by the pigeons and the data above the rooftops. that is crucial. it will show how it changes across big cities. it will be used by planners, he says, to see where we should build hospitals and schools. it could give much more accurate street by street air pollution forecasts. number80, by street air pollution forecasts. number 80, that is his name. by street air pollution forecasts. number 80, that is his namem by street air pollution forecasts. number 80, that is his name. it is not a particularly heroic in an. but pigeon number 80, we salute you, and your work towards a better air quality. let's have a look at how the sensor works with our own pigeon in the studio. so much information on that. and in less serious news, thank you for all of the names for the lovely studio
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pigeon. i think we should save them for later. what do you think? could you please stop sending in pigeon mcpigeon face? that is my only request. i don't think that is going to happen. anyway, time for the news, travel, and weather, wherever you are. good morning from bbc london news. the parents of a seven month old baby who are challenging doctors in a high court battle to keep him alive have told the bbc that they deserve the right tojudge his care. charlie gard is receiving treatment at great 0rmond street hospital for a rare genetic condition, which doctors there say has no known cure and charlie should be allowed to die. but his parents say pioneering us treatment could save his life. a man has died days after a car ploughed into him and four other pedestrians in south—east london. the car crashed into them on bromley road in bellingham last month. police say a 31—year—old romanian who was in a critical condition, had his life—support machine turned off on friday.
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the driver was arrested and bailed on suspicion of drink—driving and causing serious injury by dangerous driving. doctors in london say much braver action is needed to clean up london's dirty air. the royal brompton and harefield hospital deals with hundreds of children with asthma and respiratory problems. doctors say the capital's poor air quality will affect more and more people which could potentially cause a "huge economic problem" in the future. you might want to look away if you are eating breakfast. asda has been fined £300,000 after dead mice were found at its depot. they were found ata found at its depot. they were found at a site in enfield. they were fined after three food safety and other breaches. yuck. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service
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on the tubes this morning. but on the roads: the a406 is partly blocked eastbound towards brent cross at the staples corner flyover because of a crash. that's making things slow in both directions. crystal palace park road is closed near penge west station after a large fuel spillage last night. let's have a check on the weather now, with elizabeth rizzini. hello. good morning. there was plenty of sunshine around yesterday. and some of us managed to escape the showers altogether. now, again today, we are going to see lots of sunny now, again today, we are going to see lots of sunny spells developing. we should be mostly dry. i say "mostly" because there is still the possibility of outbreaks towards eastern areas through this morning. and certainly thicker cloud here. it's a rather chilly start to the day as well. but temperatures above freezing. sunny spells developing everywhere. top temperatures, 10—11 degrees. late brightness as we head towards the end of the day. but gradually the cloud will thicken from the west. dry through the evening's rush—hour.
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then eventually outbreaks of rain pushing from the west. some could be heavy through the overnight period. but a mild start to the day. around seven or eight degrees celsius. the rain will never clear away tomorrow. outbreaks of rain on and off through the day. plenty of low cloud around. so not a very good day tomorrow. the temperatures in the air will be mild. any brightness will help to lift those temperatures up to the values you see here. but we are looking at quite a lot of low cloud and some spells of rain at times. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. facebook underfire. a bbc investigation has found it failed to remove sexualised images of children. a senior mp says the findings cast grave doubts on the effectiveness of facebook‘s systems. good morning, it is tuesday 7 march.
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also this morning: hundreds of millions of pounds of extra funding to set up new schools, but teaching unions say the money should be spent on existing ones. a british backpacker has been rescued by police in australia, after being held captive for two months. he had basically deprived her of her liberty, admitted a number of offences against her as they travelled around the state, culminating in her location. tomorrow the chancellor will unveil his last spring budget. all this week on breakfast, we are looking at what it means for each generation. today we are looking at generation x, those born between 1966 and 1980. iamata x, those born between 1966 and 1980. i am at a sausage factory in north yorkshire to find out what the
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generation x workers here think about the economy. in sport: can anyone catch chelsea? they are ten points clear at the top of the premier league, after a 2—1win at west ham. and the pigeon patrol that is helping scientists fight air pollution in our cities. and carol hasjoined us in the studio for the weather. good morning. good morning, it is lovely to be here. chilly 0utside good morning. good morning, it is lovely to be here. chilly outside in sa lfo rd , lovely to be here. chilly outside in salford, the temperature currently three celsius. so pretty nippy and cold across many parts of the uk. temperatures hovering around freezing two plus four. a fair bit of sunshine, some frost but rain coming in from the south—west as well. i will have more in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story: facebook‘s procedures for vetting content on its pages have been strongly criticised, after a bbc investigation found it was failing to remove inappropriate and sexualised images of children. the chair of the commons media committee, damian collins, has said it casts grave doubts on the effectiveness
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of facebook‘s systems. 0ur correspondent angus crawford reports. the rules are simple. facebook says it removes nudity or sexually suggestive content. but our investigation last year found paedophiles using secret groups to swap obscene images of children. we informed the police, and this man was sent to prison for four years. facebook told us it had improved its systems, so we put that to the test. but we still found sexualised pictures of children, and obscene comments from men. we reported 100 posts that we felt broke facebook‘s own guidelines. only 18 were taken down. 82 images stayed up. they didn't breach facebook‘s community standards. i find it very disturbing. i find that content unacceptable. i'm concerned that that's been
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brought to facebook‘s attention, and some of those images have not been dealt with and addressed. and this report, this investigation, it casts great doubt on the effectiveness of the measures that facebook has in place. facebook asked us to send examples of what we had reported, so we did. the company then reported us to the police. facebook issued a statement saying... but, even now, groups with inappropriate images and comments about children remain on facebook. questions about how the company moderates content won't go away. and we will be talking to a former facebook executive about how
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they moderate content in just under ten minutes. let us know what you think about that story as well. an extra £320 million for new school places in england will be confirmed in tomorrow's budget. it will go towards the government's existing free school programme, and could be used to support the opening of any new grammar schools. labour has criticised the move for failing to address funding pressures faced by schools, but theresa may insists it is part of her plan to make a good education accessible to every child. well, of course we have protected the core schools budget. but, crucially, what we're announcing is £500 million of investment in schools, £320 million of which will be new schools. that will create around 70,000 new school places. what this is about is ensuring that people can know that their child will have a good school place, and all the opportunities that that provides for them. 0ur political correspondent ellie price joins us from westminster. there is extra funding going to new
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schools, some will be critical as some say that schools already need more money. yes, and some of those will be grammar schools and there is a debate about whether those grammar schools should be extended. the rest of the money, £216 million, will go towards refurbishing existing school buildings. we'll start with that, a report a few weeks ago by the national audit office, the spending watchdog, suggested you would need £6.7 billion to bring existing school buildings up to a satisfactory standard. a further £7 billion to make them a good standard. so that gives you some idea of how this is reallyjust a drop in the ocean. and all this comes, of course, at a time when head teachers have been complaining about the looming costs of running schools. they say that the amount of funding per child has been reduced. a report out a few weeks ago
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suggested that between now and 2020 the amount of money will be going down by 6.5% per pupil and the significance of all of this is that this is money towards buildings and school places. critics say there needs to be more money towards running costs but that money seems to not be forthcoming. for the moment, thank you. a british backpacker has been rescued by police officers in australia, after allegedly being held against her will for more than two months. she is said to have been raped and assaulted. the woman was rescued by police when they pulled over the vehicle she was driving and noticed she had serious injuries to herface. police say a man has been arrested. 0ur correspondent hywel griffith is in sydney. horrible story. what more can you tell us? yes, the police say that what this woman went through was horrific. she met the man, they say, at a party in cairns in northern queensland about three months ago and the two set off on the second of january on three months ago and the two set off on the second ofjanuary on a road
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trip at things seem to have turned particularly nasty. the police allege that the man repeatedly raped, assaulted her, even tried to strangle her and deprived her of liberty, even damaging her passport. they flagged her down after she pay failed to pay for fuel. they didn't know she was missing. this is what she told them, according to detective inspector paul hart. police subsequently spoke at length with that female, who has been identified as a 22—year—old tourist from the uk. she advised that, over a period of weeks, she had been held against her will by the male person located in the vehicle. it was established that they had previously had a relationship, but at some point that had soured. and he had basically deprived her of her liberty, committed a number of offences against her as they travelled around the state, culminating in their location in mitchell. the 22—year—old man who has been
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arrested was found on the back of the vehicle, police allege he was trying to hide from them. he will appear in court next week. meanwhile the woman has been receiving treatment at a nearby hospital. she has been supported by the british high commission and we understand she has been able to contact her family back in the uk, although it is likely she won't be able to leave until she has finished giving evidence to the police about her ordeal. thank you for your update this morning. the government is facing the prospect of another defeat in the house of lords over the process of leaving the eu today. peers are to vote on an amendment to the brexit bill which calls for parliament to be given a meaningful vote on a final deal. the prime minister has said parliament will have a vote, but only on a "take it or leave it" basis. last week the upper house voted to guarantee the rights of eu nationals already living in the uk. downing street has rejected a call from the former conservative leader lord hague to call a snap general election. writing in the daily telegraph, william hague wrote it
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would strengthen the government's hand and help the uk secure a better deal in brexit negotiations. but a source at number ten said teresa may doesn't plan to call an election. new figures show police forces in england and wales received one call every 90 seconds about a missing person last year. that is an increase of 15% on the previous year. police chiefs believe the ageing population could be one reason for the rise. a conservative backbencher is attempting to reverse government plans to end the dubs scheme, under which unaccompanied migrant children who don't have relatives in the uk are given refuge here. the mp heidi allen is tabling an amendment to legislation going through the house of commons today. last month the government announced that it was limiting the scheme to 350 children. our home affairs correspondent june kelly reports. amir‘s family home is in the
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war—ravaged syrian city of aleppo. he is one of the migrants helped by the charity safe passage who came to the charity safe passage who came to the uk alone under the dubs scheme. he is now being fostered by a british family, and a top priority is to improve his english. because he is under 18, we are protecting his identity and havret voiced his words. he left syria two years ago when he was 15. it was like a horror film. everybody scared. the only choice is to wait for death or leave. he says it is sad that the scheme which brought him to the uk is the end. it was my choice from the beginning to come here. in syria, we learnt about the uk. it is a democratic country that is really great and protects minority groups. the mp heidi allen recently visited refugees. with yvette cooper. today in the house of commons, heidi allen
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will be attempting to reverse government plans to end the dubs scheme. she wants local authorities to say how much spare capacity they have to resettle unaccompanied young migrants, and then ministers to make this information public. if the offers of capacity and goodwill are that, we as a nation should be taken up that, we as a nation should be taken up those offers. the dubs scheme, we have chosen at this stage to end it neatly at the end of the financial year. this humanitarian crisis will not end at the end of the financial year, so nor should our compassion. last year, 900 unaccompanied child migrants were allowed into the uk. the majority do have family here. the majority do have family here. the home office said that some councils were being stretched by the demands placed on them. a card which has been sent by a father and daughter to each other on their birthdays for the past 33 years has gone missing in the post. claire fuller from winchester has been exchanging the card with her 78—year—old father, stephen, after she first sent it to him in 1984. the card was last posted in 0xfordshire on 10 february. if you do perchance see this card,
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they would really like it back. as you pointed out earlier, it is probably in an envelope, but still, come on. we can't let history down here. we can sort this out, i'm sure. there are grave doubts over the way the social media network facebook handles reports of inappropriate images of children. those comments from the chair of the commons media committee came after the bbc reported dozens of pictures to the site, but more than 80% of them weren't removed. joining us now is a former facebook executive, elizabeth linder. nice to see you. it is a difficult story, this. tell us, would you, what the procedures are and do you think they are being followed? well, generally speaking facebook operates
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ona generally speaking facebook operates on a report and takedown model. so because of the size of the platform, 1.8 billion people using facebook every month, they rely on people to be their police forces. in some cases, in certain types of content, there are also technical solutions that facebook will use, certain types of images, for example, will be taken a look out across all kinds of social media platforms that sometimes are indicative of the kind of material that would not be allowed. but people are really encouraged to report on content they think might violate facebook‘s terms of use, which will go into a queue which is usually reviewed by facebook employees to determine whether or not it actually violates the terms of service for the platform. so you talk about the size of it, do you think it is actually too big to be policed in this way, and really it needs a professional force to actually make sure that it is safe in this way? well, no one has ever been a police force quite
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this big, if you will. but i think it is also important to remember that facebook is not a law enforcement agency, and that is a really significant danger for young people, is actually mistakenly thinking that reporting content on facebook is reporting it directly to the police. it is not. when people see something that is seriously concerning online... and see something that is seriously concerning online. .. and you press the report button. they need to report on facebook at the first thing they should do, especially the greater the potential crime, they have to get in touch with law enforcement and directly in touch with the police. i am interested, because the facebook employ people to be doing this, to be checking and all the rest? do they have people doing that? or are theyjust when forbidden to report it? they have employees around the world doing that. they have to be trained globally to uphold the same standards around the world. cultural
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differences, you know, are huge problem. you are training aid him in hyderabad and austin, taxes the same. “— hyderabad and austin, taxes the same. —— training them. facebook should welcome as much information as it can get from journalists and law enforcement and citizens because thatis law enforcement and citizens because that is the under way to sustain policing on the platform. they should do it with cybersecurity. you can get paid to report a bug you identify with the form of facebook. that is something the site does. what is the next sanction? when they are being reported and are not taking down images, should there be sanctioned? there is to lay a breakdown somewhere in this. ——
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definitely. i am sure the company is looking into that and working out what went wrong. in lots of the situations, it is contextual. whoever is reviewing the report, for whatever reason, they did not have enough context or information to understand why that report potentially violates the law. they have said they carefully reviewed the content and removed all items illegal or against their standards. talking about how long the process can take, from the point of flagging something and saying it is an appropriate, how long would it take for that to be assessed by the facebook team looking at that to ta ke facebook team looking at that to take it down? it depends on what kind of content is reported. something reported as somebody potentially imminently considering suicide, that will go into a quiet high—profile queue. —— quite. it is
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important. it really can vary. content such as that exposed by your story would be treated quite seriously by the company because of what it is. ok. thank you very much. always lovely to have you. it is against the law for anyone to distribute images of child explication. this issue is now in the hands of authorities. that is from simon from the company. and now for the weather. if you are just switching on, she is back. a treat to be here. did you notice how cold air is this morning? this is sa lfo rd. air is this morning? this is salford. it looks nice and still. a temperature range of between freezing and plus four. 0n temperature range of between freezing and plus four. on with the weather. a chilly start with rust
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around. largely dry. some sunshine. some will hang on to that for a while today, especially in the east. a clutch of weather fronts coming in from the south—west introducing cloud. later on, heavy rain, as the light rain, at the moment. also some showers in western scotland. all of the weather fronts plaguing the western isles are clipping aberdeenshire. that will clear that, but hanging around, especially in shetland. despite a cold start, some sunshine. northern ireland, a bright and cold start to the day. the same in northern england. showers are more or less gone. drizzle in the north—east. the london area, part of the east midlands, cloud big enough to produce drizzle. that will fade. as we drift over to the south—west and wales, again, a lot of dry weather. you will notice the rain on the charts. through the morning, the wind will pick up. generally speaking, the rain in the west of
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england and wales will be light. it will be chilly underneath it. away from that, the cloud will build in turn hazy. averages between seven and 11. again, if you are stuck in the rain in shetland, for example, live. good evening and overnight, and as the rain turns heavier as it comes from the west, temperatures will actually go up through the evening and overnight across south—west england and wales in particular. the band of rain does is dropping transient snow in the hills of scotland. —— goes east. . murky with a mild start in southern areas. murky in the north. tomorrow, another murky start. rain and breezy conditions in southern england and wales. as we go into northern england, northern ireland, in scotland, much brighter skies for you with sunshine. blustery, though. still some showers are towards the west. temperatures by then, up to
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14. rain in the south. not special. newcastle, and ten in glasgow. the weather will push up towards the english channel. the channel islands will see some rain from that. thursday, look at it goes around. 0n thursday, look at it goes around. 0n thursday, eventually we will see some more cloud and rain coming in from the south—west later on in the day. for many, dry with a few showers. some sunshine. temperatures up showers. some sunshine. temperatures up generally to 10—14. not bad at all. i am looking forward to it. thank you. and now for the budget. the breakfast version of the generation game. it is all about the money. it's the second day of our budget road trip. yesterday, we looked at what millennials, those born in the 80s and 90s, want to hear from the chancellor tomorrow. today, we're taking a look at what generation x, those born between 1966
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and 1980, want to see. steph's at a family run business in north yorkshire for us this morning. sausages are on the menu. good morning, steph. i feel like i am sausages are on the menu. good morning, steph. ifeel like i am on the generation game this morning but it is all sausages. i am at a sausage factory where they make something like 300,000 sausages every day. you can see them coming off the line. if you look up over here you can see the mix going in there. that will be mixed into the system. it doesn't look that nice at that point to be fair. but the end result looks great. sausages coming up result looks great. sausages coming up the line. this is a family run business. we thought we would come here to talk to people in generation x, people born between 1966 and 1980. breakfast‘s x, people born between 1966 and 1980. brea kfast‘s john x, people born between 1966 and 1980. breakfast‘s john maguire x, people born between 1966 and 1980. breakfast'sjohn maguire went to meet some people from generation xto to meet some people from generation x to find out what they think about what concerns them with the economy. brass band. it's st david's day,
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and the first day of spring. time to take stock, and time to look ahead to brighter days. we are in pontypool to find out how people are coping. i teach. i love myjob. i used to work with the programme over here. i see a lot of people that are managing. i am barely managing. and yet i am working. i think that is very, very unfair. they are trying to put people back into work but they are not making it very easy. i think wages should go up quite a bit more than the budget so we can cope. and what can the chancellor do for the town? so, money for youth centres, please. so, who are generation x? let's take a spin about the bbc breakfast generation game table to find out. generation x born between 1966 and 1980 are at the peak of their careers and are bringing up children. those on low incomes are feeling
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the effects of large cuts to welfare. these are the ones who have fallen between the cracks when it comes to pension saving. we are talking to them now. we are just about managing with the budget. just about managing. looking at the market and different things. as you said, both you and your wife work. and you very much need to work to make ends meet. my wife is a social worker. she earns more than me. i work part time just to get by and to save money for childcare. gareth hopes the budget will help. increase tax credits. and that would that help you? yeah, considerably. and as for pensions? my parents are lucky enough to be retired for ten years. they've gone all over the world. my dad's got a retirement pension. i look at myself, and i think i will not be able to do that. i really don't. i think they were the lucky generation. yet, at the top of wendy's budget wish list is help
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for the next generations. i would like more help with the cost of universities for our children. as generation x took its first tentative steps, this town provided one of the most famous forwards in world rugby. there are three here today at a meet and greet in the town's indoor market. there is a mini—ice—stedford. peter has been running this business for ten years. it is tough. people have less money in their pockets and are more fussy about how they spend and they want value. there is a lot of competition in the food business is well. it is not that straightforward. what can philip hammond do for him? help the economy. help the business rates. the economy that used to provide work for almost everyone here in these valleys have all but disappeared.
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and for those who grew up in the 70s, 80s, and 90s, the past seems like a foreign country where things were done differently. but what can the budget provide for their future? john maguire, bbc news, pontypool. well, we will be putting some of those concerns to some experts we have got coming down shortly. i am just among the chicken italia sausage line. you can see them zipping down. plenty more sausages a little bit later on. you can never have enough sausages. little bit later on. you can never have enough sausageslj little bit later on. you can never have enough sausages. i am not sure about that to big arrears an awful lot to eat there. —— that. where is the pigeon? can they help with air
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quality? we will show you how this device on the back of this pigeon can help us understand how toxic the air is. we want a name for this pigeon. thank you for the names. collette says arsene winger. walter pigeon. gregory peck. 0rjust stop. thank you for the suggestions. we will have a poll. carol can decide. more on that interesting technology later. time for the travel, weather, and other news, wherever you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm claudia. the parents of a seven month old baby who are challenging doctors in a high court battle to keep him alive have told the bbc that they deserve the right tojudge his care. charlie gard is receiving treatment at great 0rmond street hospital for a rare genetic condition, which doctors there say has no known cure and charlie should be allowed to die.
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but his parents say pioneering us treatment could save his life. a man has died days after a car ploughed into him and four other pedestrians in south—east london. the car crashed into them on bromley road in bellingham last month. police say a 31—year—old romanian who was in a critical condition, had his life—support machine turned off on friday. the driver was arrested and bailed on suspicion of drink—driving and causing serious injury by dangerous driving. doctors in london say much braver action is needed to clean up london's dirty air. the royal brompton and harefield hospital deals with hundreds of children with asthma and respiratory problems. doctors say the capital's poor air quality will affect more and more people which could potentially cause a "huge economic problem" in the future. now, if you're about to tuck into your bowl of cornflakes, you might want to look away from this next story. that's because asda has been fined £300,000 after dead mice and flies were found at its north london depot. they were discovered last may
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in the site in enfield, which delivers food to customers in london and essex. the supermarket was fined on friday after admitting three food safety and hygiene breaches. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. that remains the same. the a4 is slow to hammersmith due to a crash. crystal palace park road is closed near penge west station after a large fuel spillage last night. let's have a check on the weather now, with elizabeth rizzini. good morning. there was plenty of sunshine around yesterday. and some of us managed to escape the showers altogether. now, again today, we are going to see lots of sunny spells developing. we should be mostly dry. i say "mostly" because there is still the possibility of outbreaks towards eastern areas through this morning. and certainly thicker cloud here. it's a rather chilly start to the day as well. but temperatures above freezing. sunny spells developing everywhere. top temperatures, ten
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or 11 degrees celcius. late brightness as we head towards the end of the day. but gradually the cloud will thicken from the west. dry through the evening's rush—hour. then eventually outbreaks of rain pushing from the west. some could be heavy through the overnight period. but a mild start to the day. around seven or eight degrees celsius. the rain will never clear away tomorrow. outbreaks of rain on and off through the day. plenty of low cloud around. so not a very good day tomorrow. the temperatures in the air will be mild towards the end of the week. any brightness will help to lift those temperatures up to the values you see here. but we are looking at quite a lot of low cloud and some spells of rain at times. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it's back to louise and dan. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. facebook‘s procedures for vetting
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content on its pages have been strongly criticised, after a bbc investigation found it was failing to remove inappropriate and sexualised images of children. the chair of the commons media committee, damian collins, has said it casts grave doubts on the effectiveness of the social media site's systems. facebook says it has carefully reviewed the content referred to them, and has now removed all items that were illegal or against their standards. an extra £320 million for new school places in england will be confirmed in tomorrow's budget. it will go towards the government's existing free school programme, and could be used to support the opening of any new grammar schools. labour has criticised the move for failing to address funding pressures faced by schools, but theresa may insists it is part of her plan to make a good education accessible to every child. an australian man has been charged with several counts of rape
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and assault, after allegedly holding a british backpacker hostage since early january. police in queensland say they made the arrest when a car being driven by the woman, who was visibly distressed, was stopped for a routine check. she is a 22—year—old who had been in the country for two years. police subsequently spoke at length with that female, who has been identified as a 22—year—old tourist from the uk. she advised that, over a period of weeks, she had been held against her will by the male person located in the vehicle. it was established that they had previously had a relationship, but at some point that had soured. and he had basically deprived her of her liberty, committed a number of offences against her as they travelled around the state, culminating in their location. downing street has rejected a call from the former conservative leader lord hague to call a snap general election.
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writing in the daily telegraph, william hague wrote it would strengthen the government's hand and help the uk secure a better deal in brexit negotiations, but a source at number ten said teresa may doesn't plan to call an election. a conservative backbencher is attempting to reverse government plans to end the dubs scheme, under which unaccompanied migrant children, who don't have relatives in the uk, are given refuge here. the mp heidi allen is tabling an amendment to legislation going through the house of commons today. last month the government announced that it was limiting the scheme to 350 children. vets in thailand have operated on a green sea vets in thailand have operated on a green sea turtle to remove more than 500 coins from its stomach. it swallowed them after they were thrown into its enclosure for good luck. it was kept at a conservation centre near bangkok. it has been the
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named bank, that turtle, for obvious reasons, because of the appetite for loose change. thankfully it is all going well. you sort of hope they might not return her to an enclosure where they throw money in. must be heavy as well, all those coins in his gut. coming up on the programme, carol will be here with the weather. are genuinely rare occurrence to have carolina studio! jessica is here. and a big match in the premier league last night. the chelsea train rolls on. they can't stop winning, can they? they are marching clear at the top of the premier league. they are now ten points clear. after a 2—1win at west ham. a ruthless counter—attack was finished by eden hazard, who put chelsea 1—0 up. after the break, diego costa added a second with his thigh. manuel lanzini grabbed a consolation
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goal in injury time, but it was too late. chelsea are now unbeaten in ten games. we must think that we are able to take 26 points, to win this title. but a little bit to go, step—by—step. it is important to see it game by game. yes, to dream is good, but it is important to keep our feet on the ground. they look strong. for me, they are not going to lose that. i mean, they ain't going to become — i can't see them being casual, like, easing down. they look the part, to be fair. arsenal manager arsene wenger has dismissed reports of a training—ground row between alexis sanchez and his team—mates. sanchez is understood to have had an exchange with players last week, and was left out of the starting line—up for the defeat at liverpool on saturday.
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arsenal tonight have the daunting task of overturning a first leg 5—1 deficit to bayern munich if they are to progress to the champions league quarter—finals. the only advantage of our situation is that we have not much choice to have any hesitation. we have, of course, to go for it, and to attack, and take — go forward with determination and flow, and try to score goals. manchester united's zlatan ibrahimovic and bournemouth defender tyrone mings have until this evening to respond to violent conduct charges. it is following their premier league match on saturday. the united striker caught mings in the face, just moments after his head was caught with the defender‘s studs, as he lay on the ground. if found guilty, mings could face a ban longer than the standard three matches, after the fa said the punishment would not fit the case. ronnie 0'sullivan is through to the second
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round of the players championship, in wales, after a 5—1win over liang wenbo. ‘the rocket', who is a five—time world champion, was rarely troubled, as he eased through to a second—round clash against either judd trump or mark king, in a tournament which sees the world's top 16 players take part. the england women's cricket team will make history when they play the first—ever day—night ashes test against australia in november. the match will be played in sydney, starting on nine november. just like the 2015 series, this year's competition will also feature three one—day internationals and three twenty20 matches. england are looking to reclaim the trophy they lost in 2015. i want to take you back to the football for a second. and a pretty impressive goal in brazil. everybody says a side is at its most vulnerable immediately after scoring, and that was the case when comercial fc forward mirrai
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scored directly from the kick—off in sao paolo, against catanduvense. his side went on to win the game 4—1. that was his first goal for the club. i want a replay. can we see it again, or do we need to wait? white pack his team had just conceded, they have gone 1—0 down, and this is his response. perfectly struck. it is audacious. the keeper is devastated, hasn't got a clue. he didn't even know it was coming. a zoo which destroyed healthy lion cubs, and allowed other animals to become dangerously obese, faces closure after its owner failed in a bid to renew his licence yesterday. it has raised questions as to why the south lakes safari zoo, in cumbria, was allowed to continue, amid long—term concerns over how it was being run. in a moment we will talk
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to the british and irish association of zoos and aquariums. first, danny savage has more details on what went wrong at south lakes. south lakes safari zoo. conditions for some of the animals here have been so bad it has now been ordered to close. the problem is animal welfare. an inspection injanuary found poor accommodation, uncontrolled breeding and exotic animals living in unheated, rat infested conditions. the zoo has been dogged with trouble for years. keeper, 24—year—old sarah mclay, was killed by a tiger in 2013. the man refused a licence to run the zoo todayis refused a licence to run the zoo today is david gill, described by inspectors as being desperate to
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keep control here, one way or another. no longer wants to operate the zoo, but without his licence, the zoo, but without his licence, the new company now running it can't function. so the site is now facing closure and the animals may need new homes. joining us now is kirsten pullen, who is chief executive of the british and irish association of zoos and aquariums. thank you very much forjoining us. i understand they are not a member of your organisation, but tell us, if you would, we have heard about some of the things that are going on there, and what do you make of what was happening to these animals? well, it's clear that there are some very real well, it's clear that there are some very real concerns well, it's clear that there are some very real concerns about the welfare of the animals within the park. there seem to have been some very clear breakdowns in management practices which have led to the worst outcomes for some of the animals that have been involved, and thatis animals that have been involved, and that is something that is absolutely shocking and very distressing, both... i know the keepers there will be very passionate about the animals they work with, but also
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from the wider zoo community which works so hard to maintain high standards of welfare and activities for conservation within their zoos. and let's talk about david gill, he has handed management of south lakes safari zoo to the cumbria is a ltd but they don't have a licence because he has the license holder. so what happens right now? yes, so this is the slightly awkward situation that the council are now in and have to deal with as the licensing authority for the park. the decision yesterday, which i com pletely the decision yesterday, which i completely support, to refuse david gilla completely support, to refuse david gill a licence, does leave them with looking at what they have to do. now, there is a 28 day period where david gill can contest that claim, and we have to wait and see whether he does. but the council also have to make a decision regarding whether the new company who run the zoo are in fact the new company who run the zoo are infacta the new company who run the zoo are in fact a capable company, of doing so and improving the standards for
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those animals. and the concerning thing for this point is there are animals in the zoo today. can we guarantee that they are being looked after? beekeepers will still be in place, but we need to make sure that the standards, and the council have to look and make sure the standards are being raised within the zoo, and the animals are getting their needs. this is the difficulty we face when closing zoo, particularly zoo which has large animals such as white rhinos, as south lakes safari zoo does. it is logistically difficult to move those animals on. the zoo community will rally around, looking at the breeding programmes and seeing if we can find suitable homes for the animals but there will be a period of time needed to put those moves in place. and the zoo will have to manage to operate on some level to meet the needs of those animals until moves to new homes can be found. and i suppose the question is, how did it get to this? two snow
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leopards found partially eaten, a pairof leopards found partially eaten, a pair of squirrel monkeys diagnosed with septicaemia. are they regularly inspected, and how could it have happened? zoo licensing in the uk is run through the local authorities. but there are regular inspections. the licence is issued for six years after an inspection and then every three years on the interim there is an inspection to see how they go experts come from the local authority and defre to see what is happening in the zoo. and this has led to the causes of the outcome the other day. but i think it is releva nt to other day. but i think it is relevant to say that we support a stronger licensing process within the uk, it is very important for us and perhaps it is time to look and review the process is here, to see what has happened and whether they can be any tightening up of our legislation. and looking at the
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death level of that zoo, there must be figures for other zoos, is a very out of sync with other zoos?|j be figures for other zoos, is a very out of sync with other zoos? i think the key thing is to look at the underlying causes of death. it is very ha rd to underlying causes of death. it is very hard to do comparisons across zoo very hard to do comparisons across zoo sites. some animals have a much shorter lifespan, so you might get a higher natural death rate. the key thing is to look at the underlying causes of the deaths, and it is very clear that there are some very strong management issues, or very definite management issues, that have been happening at south lakes safari zoo, which have led to compromise welfare for the animals. thank you. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: actually, the weather. it is quite chilly this morning. you can say that again. -4 in some areas. a cold start to the day. temperatures
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between zero and freezing and four degrees. 0n the coast, more mild. for most of us, largely dry today. cloud coming in from the atlantic. this is a set of weather fronts producing rain later. at the moment, showers in western scotland. rain in the northern isles going to the north—east of aberdeenshire. that will clear aberdeenshire but not the northern isles. a bright start but a cold one for northern england. drizzle to be north—east. that will fade. further south, that too will fade. further south, that too will fade. wales. south—west england. dry weather. cloud continuing to build from the west. as the next weather front comes in bringing rain. through the course of the day, the rain will not be particularly heavy, but underneath it, it will feel chilly. away from that, back into the sunshine, the sunshine will turn
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more milky. temperatures between seven and 11. up here, it will feel cold with a high of only five. the evening and overnight. the rain was an heavier in south—west england and wales. the temperatures will rise. —— the rain will turn. quickly, the rain pushes off to the north sea. transient snow in the hills of scotland. a second weather front goes south, bringing more rain to the southern counties of england and also wales. not as cold a night here, but chilly. tomorrow, murk in southern areas starting us off. low cloud and rain and hill fog around. northern england and scotland and northern england and scotland and northern ireland, some brighter skies and sunshine and a blustery day wherever you are, really. look at the temperatures, going into double figures readily. ten in aberdeen to a high of 14 in london.
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for the rest of wednesday, you can see how the weather front pulls away, bringing rain to the channel islands. then it turns around and d ivots islands. then it turns around and divots back in our direction during the course of thursday. translated, a chilly start for some of us. a weather front is not that far away. still in the rainy side. the rain will build ahead of this. it is the north that is david best for all of the sunshine. temperatures, ten in the sunshine. temperatures, ten in the north. —— the best. then a high of 14 towards london. all in all, the temperatures are going up. but on the weekend, going down. then next week, back again. prepare for anything. if you like fried brea kfast. anything. if you like fried breakfast. enjoy this. it's the second day of our budget roadshow today, and this week, steph's out on the road speaking to different generations good morning. good morning,
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everybody. they are making sausages here. these are the sausages that will be packed up and send off to supermarkets across the country. just this morning they have packed thousands and thousands of sausages. every day they produce 300,000 of them. many different flavours. we have come here to talk about the budget. that is happening soon. we are looking at each different generation and how it impacts them. amelie is here. she is part of generation x, born between 1966 and 1980. i know you are busy. good
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morning. good morning. how is lie for you at the moment? what pressures have you got?” for you at the moment? what pressures have you got? i have two children. —— life. my biggest cost is child—care. i spend more on that than my mortgage. any help with childcare would be fantastic. i know the government is bringing out an extra 1500 hours. i know they are trialling it in northern ireland that the they are starting it in september. but i know there are significant implications that it is financially important. more detail needs to be looked into how exactly it is going to work. it may end up ina it is going to work. it may end up in a shortage of childcare providers. your childcare costs more than your mortgage! how much money are you than your mortgage! how much money a re you left than your mortgage! how much money are you left without the of the month? not much, really. after food, nothing really. i have a husband
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that works, luckily. he is effectively our savings account. that works, luckily. he is effectively our savings accountm is good that you can actually save. we are able to save a little bit. what would you compromise in order to be able to have better childcare? of course, it is a tough time for the economy. there is not much money out there. what would you sacrifice? i don't know we could do that to be we don't go on holidays. there is not much that we could sacrifice. —— could. lovely to see you. helen is here. we were talking to emily about the pressures of her family faces. what is it like out there at the moment for a generation x family? we are finding prices are rising, putting pressure on the incomes of the income families. inflation will hit at 3%. the incomes of the income
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families will go down an following yea rs. families will go down an following years. winnie need to put in protection for low income families. unfreezing benefits so that some can keep up with prices in the shops. and also putting money back into universal credit to help low income working families keep body.“ universal credit to help low income working families keep body. if you look at the figures, unfreezing benefits, it is something like £4.2 billion it would cost the economy. that is the ifs telling us that. one of the things they are choosing to do is to cut income taxes for better off people. that is going to cost over £2 billion a year. that is money they could choose to actually put into the lives of working families, bringing costs down. prices will rise and it will become harder to cover the essentials so this would help every week. thank
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you very much for your time this morning. shall we look at some or sausages before we go? why not? you don't get this opportunity much. these are the chicken italia sausages. 0h these are the chicken italia sausages. oh no! it is finished ain! sausages. oh no! it is finished again! sundried tomatoes and chicken in them, as you would guess! look at this guy. look at his little face. bless him, he is trying to time it for us. tada! 0h bless him, he is trying to time it for us. tada! oh no! steph! i am sure it is not you or anything, is it? you have ruined the sausage machine. you ruined it! she will not get another invite after ruining the sausage production. and we got a
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name for the penguin? lots of suggestions. we will decide by the end of the programme. —— pigeon. carol will decide for us. we have it here because of this. when you think of reducing air pollution, you probably think of electric cars and energy efficient light bulbs, but academics at birmingham university believe pigeons are the answer. iam i am trying not to be distracted. "city flocks" is a new project which sends pigeons with sensors strapped to their backs off into the sky to record more accurate pollution forecasts. brea kfast‘s graham satchell went to watch their maiden flight. can pigeons help us in the battle against air pollution? it sounds far—fetched, but academics at birmingham university are convinced it can. people give you the look like you are giving me. it is sort of... "is this for real?" is this actually going to work? we have a superfast temperature sensor... this climate scientist will attach
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these tiny sensor packs to the backs of pigeons. if we know the temperatures above the rooftops, we can test the levels of urban pollution. time for the test flight. fitting the sensors is a delicate operation. hello, my little friend. they are tiny, just 5% of the pigeon's weight, to protect the welfare of the birds. it has a tiny camera to record the flight. much is resting on the next few minutes. i feel nervous. this is the first time we have done this. it is the result of many hours of work to get to this stage. i think they will just take off and find their way home. it is the moment of truth. they look happy enough. they look like pigeons flying to me.
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did they to you? they will flyjust over a mile. this is the disoriented view from the pigeon—cam. what is it scientists are trying to discover? they already know that nitrous oxide, the pollution that comes out of diesel engines, rises with the heat coming from roads to rooftop level. but what about the pollution? where does it go? to model it, they need accurate data in this climate. but how do you get the data? birds fly everywhere. they could carry our sensors. if they could be tiny and accurate enough, we could start to understand the dispersion of air pollution around the city. just six minutes after taking off, the pigeons are back. 0h, brilliant. there is an anxious wait as it is retrieved. the light is still flashing. that is a good sign. this is what the data shows that be the routes taken by the pigeons and the data above the rooftops.
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that is crucial. it will show how it changes across big cities. it will be used by planners, he says, to see where we should build hospitals and schools. it could give much more accurate street by street air pollution forecasts. his name is number 80. it is not a particularly heroic namem, but, pigeon number80, we salute you and your work towards a better air quality. graham satchell, bbc news. we will have more on that later. and carol will have the name for the pigeon. whatever you decide, we will stick with that. what is winning? quite
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predictable. pigeon mcpigeonface. time to get the news and travel wherever you are! oh my god! time to get the news and travel wherever you are! oh my god! sorry. good morning from bbc london news. the parents of a seven month old baby who are challenging doctors in a high court battle to keep him alive have told the bbc that they deserve the right tojudge his care. charlie gard is receiving treatment at great 0rmond street hospital for a rare genetic condition, which doctors there say has no known cure and charlie should be allowed to die. but his parents say pioneering us treatment could save his life. a man has died days after a car ploughed into him and four other pedestrians in south—east london. the car crashed into them on bromley road in bellingham last month. police say a 31—year—old romanian who was in a critical condition, had his life—support machine turned off on friday. the driver was arrested and bailed on suspicion of drink—driving and causing serious injury by dangerous driving.
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now, if you're about to tuck into your bowl of cornflakes, you might want to look away from this next story. that's because asda has been fined £300,000 after dead mice and flies were found at its north london depot. they were discovered last may in the site in enfield, which delivers food to customers in london and essex. the supermarket was fined on friday after admitting three food safety and hygiene breaches. doctors in london say much braver action is needed to clean up london's dirty air. the royal brompton and harefield hospital deals with hundreds of children with asthma and respiratory problems. doctors say the capital's poor air quality will affect more and more people which could potentially cause a "huge economic problem" in the future. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. but on the roads, there's the usual morning delays northbound approaching the blackwall tunnel.
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crystal palace park road is closed near penge west station after a large fuel spillage last night. let's have a check on the weather now, with elizabeth rizzini. good morning. plenty of sunshine around yesterday. some of us managed to escape the showers altogether. lots of sunny spells developing today. we should be mostly dry. i say "mostly" because there is still the possibility of outbreaks towards eastern areas through this morning. and certainly thick cloud here. a chilly start to the day as well. temperatures above freezing. sunny spells developing everywhere. top temperatures, 10—11 degrees. late brightness as we head towards the end of the day. gradually, the cloud will kick in from the west. dry through the evening's rush—hour. outbreaks of rain pushing from the west. some could be heavy through the overnight period. a mild start to the day. 7—8 degrees celsius. the rain will never clear away tomorrow. outbreaks of rain on and off through the day. plenty of low cloud around. not a very good day tomorrow. the temperatures in the air will be mild. any brightness will help to lift those temperatures up to the values
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you see here. quite a lot of low cloud and spells of rain at times. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it's back to louise and dan. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. facebook under fire — a bbc investigation has found it failed to remove sexualised images of children. a senior mp says the findings cast grave doubts on the effectiveness of facebook‘s systems. good morning, it's tuesday 7th march.
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also this morning... hundreds of millions of pounds of extra funding to set up new schools — but teaching unions say the money should be spent on existing ones. a british backpacker has been rescued by police in australia after being held captive for two months. he had basically deprived her of her liberty, committed a number of offences against her as they travelled around the state, culminating in their location. tomorrow the chancellor will unveil his last spring budget. all this week on breakfast we're looking at what it means for each generation. today we are talking generation x, those people born between 1966 and 1980. iam those people born between 1966 and 1980. i am at a sausage factory in north yorkshire to find out what the generation x people here think about it. in sport, can anyone catch chelsea?
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they are ten points clear at the top of that when your league after a 2—1 win at west ham. —— at the top of the brummie league. flying high — david walliams tells us how his grandad, who was in the raf, inspired his latest children's book. and carol's joined us in the studio for the weather. good morning, a chilly start not just insulted but wherever you are. it will be try, a frosty start with some sunshine, cloud coming into the west will introduce rain. more in 15. thank you. good morning. first, our main story. facebook‘s procedures for vetting content on its pages have been strongly criticised after a bbc investigation found it was failing to remove inappropriate and sexualised images of children. the chair of the commons media committee damian collins has said it casts grave doubts on the effectiveness of facebook‘s systems. 0ur correspondent angus crawford reports. the rules are simple. facebook says it removes nudity or sexually suggestive content. but our investigation last year
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found paedophiles using secret groups to swap obscene images of children. we informed the police, and this man was sent to prison forfour years. facebook told us it had improved its systems, so we put that to the test. but we still found sexualised pictures of children, and obscene comments from men. we reported 100 posts that we felt broke facebook‘s own guidelines. only 18 were taken down. 82 images stayed up. they didn't breach facebook‘s community standards. i find it very disturbing. i find that content unacceptable. i'm concerned that that's been brought to facebook‘s attention, and some of those images have not been dealt with and addressed. and this report, this investigation, it casts grave doubt on the effectiveness of the measures that facebook has in place. facebook asked us to send them
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examples of what we had reported, so we did. the company then reported us to the police. facebook issued a statement saying... but, even now, groups with inappropriate images and comments about children remain on facebook. questions about how the company moderates content won't go away. angus crawford, bbc news. an extra £320 million for new school places in england will be confirmed in tomorrow's budget. it will go towards the government's existing free school programme and could be used to support the opening of any new grammar schools. labour has criticised the move for failing to address funding pressures faced by schools,
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but theresa may insists it's part of her plan to make a good education accessible to every child. 0ur political correspondent ellie price joins us from westminster. the question of funding is huge when it comes to education, i suppose many people will say that the money is good, but why not invest in existing schools? the majority of the money will be sent to building new free schools, as you mentioned, a number of which could be grammar schools. there is plenty of controversy around that already. the rest of the money, £260 million, will be spent refurbishing existing school buildings. recently there was a report by the spending watchdog the national audit office that said in order to get existing
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school buildings to a satisfactory level you would need to spend more than £6.5 billion, to get them to a good level you would need to spend a further £7 billion, so this is a small drop in the open. we are hearing plenty from head teachers complaining about the ballooning running costs of schools at a time when they're spending per pupil has been dropped. recently it was estimated that the amount of funding per pupil would be reduced by 6.5% between now and 2020. i am giving you lots of numbers and it sounds like a maths lesson, but the significance is that this new money goes toward school places and school buildings, critics say it should go towards running costs and it would seem towards running costs and it would seem that the money for that is not forthcoming. nothing wrong with an early maths lesson! thank you. a british backpacker has been rescued by police officers in australia after allegedly being held against her will for more than two months. she is said to have been raped and assaulted. the woman was rescued by police when they pulled over the vehicle she was driving and noticed she had serious injuries to herface. police say a man has been arrested.
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let's get more from the officer in charge. police subsequently spoke at length with that female, who has been identified as a 22—year—old tourist from the uk. she advised that over a period of weeks she had been held against her will by the male person located in the vehicle. it was established that they had previously had a relationship, but at some point that had soured and he had basically deprived her of her liberty, committed a number of offences against her as they travelled around the states, culminating in their location. the government is facing the prospect of another defeat in the house of lords over the process of leaving the eu today. peers are to vote on an amendment to the brexit bill which calls for parliament to be given a meaningful vote on a final deal. the prime minister has said parliament will have a vote — but only on a take it or leave it basis. last week, the upper house voted to guarantee the rights of eu
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nationals already living in the uk. downing street has rejected a call from the former conservative leader, lord hague, to call a snap general election. writing in the daily telegraph, william hague wrote it would strengthen the government's hand and help the uk secure a better deal in brexit negotiations. but a source at number 10 said teresa may doesn't plan to call an election. a conservative backbencher is attempting to reverse government plans to end the dubs scheme under which unaccompanied migrant children who don't have relatives in the uk are given refuge here. the mp heidi allen is tabling an amendment to legislation going through the house of commons today. last month the government announced that it was limiting the scheme to 350 children. our home affairs correspondent june kelly reports. amir‘s family home is in the war—ravaged syrian city of aleppo. he is one of the migrants, helped by the charity safe passage, who came to the uk alone under the dubs scheme. he is now being fostered by a british family, and a top
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priority is to improve his english. because he is under 18, we are protecting his identity and have re—voiced his words. he left syria two years ago, when he was 15. it was like a horror film, everybody scared. the only choice is to wait for death or leave. he says it is sad that the scheme which brought him to the uk is to end. it was my choice from the beginning to come here. in syria, we learnt about the uk. it is a democratic country that is really great, and protects minority groups. the conservative mp heidi allen recently visited refugees with yvette cooper. today, in the house of commons, heidi allen will be attempting to reverse government plans to end the dubs scheme. she wants local authorities to say how much spare capacity they have to resettle unaccompanied young migrants, and then ministers to make this information public.
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if the offers of capacity and goodwill are there, we as a nation should be taking up those offers. the dubs scheme — we have chosen at this stage to end it neatly at the end of the financial year. this humanitarian crisis will not end at the end of the financial year, so nor should our compassion. last year, 900 unaccompanied child migrants were allowed into the uk. the majority do have family here. the home office said that some councils were being stretched by the demands placed on them. a card which has been sent by a father and daughter to each other on their birthdays for the past 33 years has gone missing in the post. claire fuller from winchester has been exchanging the card with her 78—year—old father stephen after she first sent it to him in 1984. the card was last posted in 0xfordshire on the 10th february. it seems to me that they have
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written in it every single year for all those years. they would really like it back. you know we said we were trying to search for it, somebody suggested is that the reason it has gone missing is it might have fallen out of the envelope, so you might spot it lying around in the street. it would be great if we track that down and got it back to the family. you are watching bbc breakfast. there has been a massive increase in the number of calls received to the police about a missing persons this year. new figures show about 370 people were reported as missing every day last year — an increase of 15% on the previous 12 months. it's a call margaret cooper made nine years ago. her son steven is still missing. steve was a lovely, quiet lad. very laid back. quite shy. wouldn't hurt a fly. he was a lovely dad and his son thinks the world of him. but he's got two grandchildren now that he's never seen, which is not very nice.
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we couldn't really believe that he'd just taken off for no reason at all, and we thought, "oh, he'll come back. he's gone off in a huff and he'll come home." but every day that went by and we went out searching and we couldn't find him, we just got more and more worried. and then we knew that something drastic had happened. i look for him. people of a similar build or... at one point i actually sort of went to touch someone on the shoulder because i thought it was him. i just sort of held back then and thought, "no, it isn't." but it's there in your mind all the time. louise vesely—shore is senior officer at the national crime agency's missing persons bureau. shejoins us now from central london. thank you very much for your time this morning. to go back to those figures, the latest figures, a 15% increase in the number of suspected
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mrs persons reported. what do you think is behind it? difficult to say. -- suspected missing persons reported. it is partly about reporting. we need to improve our picture of the people who go missing so we can respond more picture of the people who go missing so we can respond more effectively. how much time is being devoted to trying to find these people and investigate the cases? 240,000 incidents a year, that is an awful lot of time, even if it only takes 20 or 30 minutes to find the person and confirmed they are safe and well, that is an awful lot of time, and some cases take far, far longer. it is difficult to put an exact figure on it because every case is different but it is a lot of hours. for the families and friends of those involved, they all think that case is most important so there must bea case is most important so there must be a balance between the amount of time and care the family would like you to put a mad case and balancing
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that with police resources? certainly, we had to balance resources with the risk to the individual. we look at the circumstances and try to understand what is our priority, how can we find that person as quickly and safely as possible. some cases need priority because of the danger to the individual. there are suggestions that the increasing number of missing persons reports might have to do with an ageing population, might that be true?m is difficult to state the fact is exactly but individuals with alzheimer's and dementia who go wandering ra significant number reported, we suspect that the ageing population will have an impact if thatis population will have an impact if that is not what is contributing already. what sort of support to families get when a person goes missing, what resources are put into it when they can't find a family member? police are focused on trying
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to locate that individual, but we try to support the families by keeping them updated. we work with the charity missing people, they are there to provide support to the family, it is a partnership between the police and the charities to provide that. thank you louise vesely—shore, talking about the fact that there is a 15% increase in the number of suspected missing persons reported. it's 8.15am and you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories: facebook‘s procedures for vetting content and removing inappropriate and sexualised images of children have been criticised after a bbc investigation. a british backpacker has been rescued by police in australia after being held captive for two months. yes, that's an extraordinary story. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather.
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i need smelling salts because you came to me in time! i'm in shock! good morning. 0utside this morning, it is nifty. in salford this morning for example we have a temperature currently around about three celsius. and it is nice and it is still and it is nice and calm. for many parts of the uk today, it is a cold start. we've got temperatures still minus four in braemar, but generally they are between zero and four celsius. this morning hardly surprisingly there is frost around, but it is mostly dry. now, there is sunshine across many area, but as we go through the day and this set of fronts coming in from the atlantic advance eastwards, well you will find the cloud will continue to build. we have another weatherfront playing the northern isles. you will see rain. but in between this, a fine, dry and bright start to the
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day, with just a fine, dry and bright start to the day, withjust a little bit fine, dry and bright start to the day, with just a little bit of drizzle which will continue to fizzle out. through the day the rain coming into the south—west will be fairly patchy in nature. it will be windy particularly so in the west. even into the afternoon, that is the scenario. so this afternoon in scotland, a mixture of bright spells, sunshine, and just a few showers, but still this rain across the northern isles. temperature wise we are looking at highs of eight celsius in edinburgh. by the afternoon we will see patchy rain across northern ireland, but for much of england and through central and eastern parts, it will be bright. there will be sunshine the further east you travel, but cloud will be building in ahead of the weather front. we have got the rain still across the south—west. here it will feel nippy. but as the rain comes in, it will turn heavier in western areas. the temperature in south—west england and wales will go up south—west england and wales will go up as we south—west england and wales will go up as we go south—west england and wales will go up as we go through the evening and overnight and as the first front goes through, it will be windy and it will deposit snow on the hills. so behind it, it will be cold across the northern half of the country. we
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have a second weather front sinking south. under that, it have a second weather front sinking south. underthat, it is have a second weather front sinking south. under that, it is not going to be particularly cold. so, a murky start across southern areas with rain, some low cloud. as we push further north, for northern england and northern ireland and scotland, well, drier and brighter. and northern ireland and scotland, well, drierand brighter. some sunshine around. but again, showers just flirting with parts of the west as we go through the day. temperature wise, up to 14 celsius. now through wednesday the front sinks into the channel islands taking its rain with it, but you can see the back edge of it here. it is going to pivot around and it will come back in across south—western parts later on in the day. ahead of it once again we will see more cloud build. breezy across the english channel. move away from the cloud across the midlands, wales and east anglia, we're into sunnier skies across northern england and scotland and northern ireland. for murs, into friday even, we hang on to that mild airas friday even, we hang on to that mild air as denoted by the yellows and the ambers. it looks like the
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temperature may well dip, but having said that, as we start the new working week what is going to happen the temperature likes like it will climb up again. that doesn't mean it will be bone dry and we're going to have wall to wall blue skies, but what we are looking at is some u nsettled what we are looking at is some unsettled weather and rain at times, but in the sunshine it will feel pleasant. it is not looking too bad at all and certainly with the temperatures. thank you very much, carol. see you later. it's the breakfast version of the generation game. all week we're taking a look at what different groups want to hear from the chancellor in tomorrow's budget. today it's the turn of generation x — those born between 1966 and 1980. steph's at a family run business in north yorkshire. you will be aware they make sausages. good morning! yeah, good morning do you. we're talking bangers and cash this morning because we're here at tech.
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they make 300,000 sausages every day. since 6am they have made nearly 50,000 sausages. it has been busy. this is a family run business and there is lots of family members who work here. andrew is the boss. andrew, for you, business is going well, isn't it we're growing quickly at the moment. yeah, the nation needs its bangers. it is an early start and they're flying out. you're expanding your business as well, aren't you, but given it is the budget tomorrow, what do you think could help business more? well, i think innovation is the key to any, it is the lifeblood of any business. sol it is the lifeblood of any business. so i think any help that we get from the government in the way of tax breaks to help us keeping innovating and new products, that's the lifeblood of our business. there is, of course, if businesses need help, that means money needs to come from somewhere else to help. what do you think needs to be the compromise in
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terms to help businesses more?” think it isjust the way terms to help businesses more?” think it is just the way that tax in general impact. tax has to be paid and we don't mind paying tax, it's fine, but ijust think that public sector pay, needs to be really checked out. we live in the real world. we deal with all the retailers and the golden handshake pensions that the civil service have been getting, you know, there is a huge amount of waste in there and also the nhs is struggling. we had a experience with the nhs. it is a fantastic organisation, but it is struggling to cope. it needs more money and the tax has to come from private business. thank you for your time. we're talking to different people in different generations and today's is generation x, andrew is pa rt today's is generation x, andrew is part of that generation and john maguire went to meet some of them to find out what they feel at a rugby clu b find out what they feel at a rugby club in south wales. brass band. it's st david's day
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and the first day of spring. time to take stock and time to look ahead to brighter days. we're in pontypool to find out how people are coping. i teach. i love myjob. i used to work with for the work programme over here. i see a lot of people that are managing. i am barely managing. and yet i am working. i think that is very, very unfair. they are trying to put people back into work but they are not making it very easy. i think wages should go up quite a bit more than the budget so we can cope. and what can the chancellor do for the town? so, money for youth centres, please. so, who are generation x? let's take a spin around our the bbc breakfast generation game table to find out. generation x born between 1966 and 1980 are at the peak of their careers and are likely to be bringing up children.
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those on low incomes are feeling the effects of large cuts to welfare. these are the ones who have fallen between the cracks when it comes to pension saving. both are issues for people here. we are just about managing with the budget. just about managing. looking at the market and different things. as you said, both you and your wife work. and you very much need to work to make ends meet. my wife is a social worker. she earns more than me. i work part—time just to get by and to save money for childcare. gareth hopes the budget will help. increase tax credits. and that would that help you? yeah, considerably. and as for pensions? my parents are lucky enough to be retired now for ten years. they've gone all over the world. on my dad's got a retirement pension. i look at myself, and i think i will not be able to do that.
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umm, i really don't. i think they were the lucky generation. yet, at the top of wendy's budget wish list is help for the next generation. i would like more help with the cost of universities for our children. as generation x took its first tentative steps, this town provided the most famous forwards in world rugby. there are three here today at a meet and greet in the town's indoor market. there is a mini—ice—stedford. pete has been running this business for ten years. business is ticking over, but it's tough. people have less money in their pockets and are more fussy about how they spend and they want value. there's a lot of competition in the food business as well, you know? so, it's not that straightforward. what can philip hammond do for him? help the economy. parking and business rates. the economy that used to provide
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work for almost everyone here in these valleys have all but disappeared. and for those who grew up in the 70s, 80s, and 90s, the past seems like a foreign country where things were done differently. but what can the budget provide for their future? so we will be finding out from experts how some of the issues could be solved by the chancellor. that will be in half an hour's time. let me show you more of this mad sausage making! so you've got the chicken ones being made here. you can see the different ingredients and what happens is, if you come over here, that's one of the typical pork sausages. the meat going into the system. so that's going to be poured over into there. and then once it's in there, it zips down the line and goes through the little sausage skins. you can see them coming off here and something like 1,000 a minute apparently we've worked out can zip off this line and over on the other side as well, those are the other side as well, those are the chicken ones. you've got your
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typical pork sausages. so certainly, a lot of sausage here. i will see you in half an hour's time. studio: that's a good way of putting it, steph. it is tough to beat bangers and cash! author and entertainer david walliams willjoin us later. he will talk about lots of things including writing the children's books. he went in a spitfire actually to help write one of them which was inspired by his grandad. his grandfather was in the raf as well. i love it when we get a reaction to a story, you know we were talking about the lost birthday card that was sent since 1984. it has gone missing, bbc breakfast viewers. they have given optimism for finding things. sarah says i lost a diamond earring, it was missing for fend days. i found it earring, it was missing for fend days. ifound it when i was vacuuming the bedroom carpet. ali my
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passport which i lost, i had to cut the holiday short and pay more to change flights. and get express fees to get a new one and then it turned up to get a new one and then it turned up the back in a notebook. that's the sort of thing i do. cara says my auntie received a christmas card in november one year. that turned up 11 months late. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. it isa it is a chilly start to this morning but at least to compensate many places saw sunshine. it will be a
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downhill trend across southern and western areas because of the weather front slowly encroaching of the day wears on. many central and eastern parts hold onto the drier and brighter weather. a few showers across western scotland will fizzle out, show become confined to the northern isles. turning wetterfor the west country in toward southwest wales and into northern ireland with increasingly southerly winds. staying dry, the clouds increasing, the bus across the east. single figure temperatures for most, —— foremost, it could be ten or 11 and brighter areas. the weather front spreads across the uk, transient snow over the scottish mountains but a wet and breezy night to come, by the end of the night temperatures will be rising, five to seven celsius. for wednesday, temperatures will be rising, five to seven celsius. forwednesday, it looks like a north south split. for scotla nd looks like a north south split. for scotland and northern ireland, windy with blustery showers, the weather
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front will trail for the bulk of england and wales, rather damp, spills of rain, mist and smirk at times but very mild, temperatures in double figures for most up to the mid—teens celsius for parts of central, southern and eastern england. for thursday, the weather front slowly clears away from scotland, the winds begin to ease but we have another weather front bringing in figure clouds, maybe some spots of rain to the extreme south. some showers across western scotland but a good slice of the country will see brightness and a very mild day, temperatures of ten to 14 degrees. staying miles into the end of the week and the weekend, there will be outbreaks of rain at times. —— staying mild. this is business live from bbc news with rachel home and sally bundock. va va voom — the press are at the geneva motor show taking in the latest models, but despite record sales profitability remains low in europe. we find out why.
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live from london, that's our top story on tuesday 7th march. stuck in first gear — we'll look at the problems facing the european car industry ahead of the continent's flagship motor show. also in the programme — snap, crackle and flop. shares in the company behind snapchat fall 12% following their sparkling debut on the new york stock exchange.
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