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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  March 9, 2017 9:00am-11:00am GMT

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hello, it's thursday, it's 9am. the chancellor, philip hammond, is coming under pressure over his plan to increase national insurance payments for many self—employed workers. some of his own mps are unhappy with the plan. but he's insisting it's fair. those on higher earnings will be paying a little bit more. we think thatis paying a little bit more. we think that is fair, we think it is a reasonable way to go forward, given the benefits entitlement of the self—employed has improved so much. labour threatened to unite with tory rebels to force a government climb—down. also on the programme today... a former undercover policeman who posed as an addict to infiltrate drug gangs tells us about the huge risks he took and how he was stabbed and stripped naked at gun point. and we'll be live in central london as the queen honours british military personnel who have served in iraq and afghanistan. hello, welcome to the programme.
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we're live until ”am this morning. what does the budget mean for you? in half an hour, we'll be answering your questions, so please do get in touch with anything you want to know about your family or business finances. use the hashtag #victorialive. if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today... the chancellor is facing accusations of breaking an election pledge by increasing national insurance contributions for many self—employed workers. after his budget announcement, philip hammond is facing growing pressure to reconsider his plan from some conservative mps. the treasury has rejected calls for a re—think, insisting the increase will make the national insurance system fairer. let's get more on this from our political guru, norman smith. how much pressure is he under? huge
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pressure. it is notjust mr hammond has broken the conservative party election manifesto, many tories oppose on principle a tax rise on people's income, but more than that, they believe this hit on the self—employed is basically hitting people who the tory party believe are there people, they go out, start are there people, they go out, start a business, form a company. look at some of the conservative supporting newspapers this morning. this is no laughing matter, tories break tax vow. laughing matter, tories break tax vow. at the moment, the treasury is hanging tough, saying there is no u—turn. philip hammond is still defending the line that they didn't break the manifesto. we regard that issue has dealt with, we dealt with it in 2015. what i did yesterday was address a basic continuing unfairness in the current
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system, the benefits available to the self—employed have significantly improved, they have full access to the state pension now, that is worth £1800 a year on average to a self—employed person. as we go forward with our negotiations with the eu, we need to make this country strong and fit and ready for the future. my take is either mr hammond isa future. my take is either mr hammond is a much braver chancellor than any of us have given him credit for or his political and ten i have gone on the blink. if it is the former, he is being extraordinarily brawled —— antennae. maybe the treasury think it isa antennae. maybe the treasury think it is a taxonomically that needs to be ironed out. it is simply unfair they pay less tax, the self—employed, maybe. it is costing the treasury a whopping amount of
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money for stock this year alone it is thought it is costing the treasury £5 billion. as we move into an increasingly digital economy, it is thought more people will work for themselves. in other words, the potential for much bigger losses of money down the line are leave very significant and perhaps that is in the back of the chancellor's mind when he chooses to make what is still a hugely controversial decision. what is your thought on that? do let us know. now let us catch up with the rest of the news. scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, has told the bbc that the common—sense time for a second independence referendum would be autumn next year. a vote can only take place with the permission of the westminster government. but her remarks, to the bbc‘s political editor, laura kuenssberg, are the clearest signal yet that the snp is planning to hold another vote before the uk leaves the european union. in westminster, some politicians think you're bluffing
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about holding a referendum. i'm not and i never have been. i always think that sometimes kind of says more about them than it does about me because it suggests that there are politicians in westminster who think brexit and all of this is some kind of game. it's not a game, it's really, really serious and the implications for the uk are serious and the implications for scotland are serious. some of your colleagues talk about autumn, 2018, as a likely date. within that window, as the outline of a uk deal becomes clear, and the uk exiting the eu, i think it would be the common—sense time for scotland to have that choice if that is the road we choose to go down. just to be clear, you're not ruling out autumn, 2018? i'm not ruling out anything, no. theresa may is travelling to brussels today to attend what's expected to be her final eu summit
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before brexit is formally triggered. eu leaders will decide whether to extend the term of the former polish prime minister, donald tusk, as president of the european council, despite opposition from some in his home country. a united nations report is to call for an independent investigation into the potential health impact of the uk's largest opencast coal mine. residents living near the ffos—y—fran site in south wales have led a long campaign against air and noise pollution. the mine's operator, miller argent, says the company has a proud record of mining responsibly. a memorial honouring the british military personnel and civilians who have served in iraq and afghanistan since the first gulf war will be unveiled by the queen this morning. members of the public donated more than £1 million to fund the monument, as robert hall reports. the military deployments to iraq and afghanistan over a 24—year period represent the longest and most intense series of operations since the second world war.
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682 british service personnel lost their lives. many others came home with life—changing injuries. the new memorial was first mooted in 2014 and fundraising began on remembrance sunday of that year. it stands on the bank of the thames, alongside reminders of other military campaigns. the new monument doesn'tjust commemorate the armed forces, it gives equal prominence to the civilians who worked on the humanitarian side of operations. government, aid and charity workers, all of whom showed the twin values of duty and service. although british public opinion was divided over the merits of the campaigns in iraq and afghanistan, no—one questions the dedication shown by both military and civilians trying to get those countries back on their feet. the team behind the memorial accept that there is no clear end to this
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chapter in our history. today's ceremony will reawaken shared experiences for those who were there. the sadness, the pain and the pride. robert hall, bbc news. we will have live coverage from the unveiling of the new war memorial later in the programme. hawaii has become the first us state to challenge president trump's revised travel ban. hawaii's attorney general said mr trump had violated the constitution with his redrawn executive order banning travel from six predominantly muslim countries. he said it would damage state commerce, including its lucrative tourism industry. guatemala is observing three days of national mourning after 22 teenage girls died in a fire at a government—run children's home. police say the fire started after some of the girls set alight mattresses following an attempt to escape from the overcrowded centre. malta's famous rock arch,
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which featured in a number of films and the tv series game of thrones, has collapsed into the sea. the azure window, on gozo, was damaged by heavy storms. the prime minister, joseph muscat, said it was heartbreaking. a study of the arch in 2013 said it was eroding but wasn't in imminent danger of collapse. a man in australia who posed online asjustin bieber has been charged with more than 900 child sex offences. the a2—year old man is accused of persuading fans of the star to send him explicit images. police say he had been using a number of sites, including facebook and skype, to communicate with children. our correspondent has more. we understand that the charges go back as much as ten years, to 2007, and he was actually caught, it is alleged, through an international operation with police in america and europe becoming aware of him, before he was tracked back to queensland here in australia. now they suggest what he was doing was going online,
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posing as justin bieber, and soliciting indecent images from children, so really winning and abusing their trust, some very young and vulnerable victims. and the scale of it, the police say, is really quite horrific. an actor from the harry potter films is in intensive care after a head—on car crash left him with a broken neck and punctured lung. jim tavare, known for his role in harry potter and the prisoner of azkaban, also suffered 15 broken ribs and breaks in his right leg. his wife, laura, posted a picture of him in a hospital bed on facebook. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. more at 9.30am. thank you. just after 9:30am, we will talk to a personal finance expert. if you have any questions about the budget, let us know. do get in touch with us throughout the morning — use the hashtag #victorialive. if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate.
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one person is saying, i watched the budget and i do not understand whether it is business as usual for me. iama whether it is business as usual for me. i am a serving soldier. we will be asking our guest at half past nine the answer to that for you. if you have questions, we would love to have them. right now, let us catch up have them. right now, let us catch up with the sport. there is only one story in town, barcelona pulling off the greatest comeback in the history of the champions league.” the greatest comeback in the history of the champions league. i did not see it because i was watching manchester city against stoke. absolutely gutted! incredible match will stop woody been compared to the greatest comeback in sporting history. —— incredible match. it has already been compared to. liverpool 2005, back from 3—0 down to beat inter milan. barcelona needed to
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overturn a four goal deficit. they we re overturn a four goal deficit. they were 3—0 up after 50 minutes. then this happened. psg scored. absolutely out of sight, 5—3 on aggregate. this from neymar. seven minutes to play. outstanding free kick from neymar to make it 4—1. still needed two. neymar 91st minute with a penalty controversially won by luis suarez. 95th minute, roberto. look at the celebrations! and listen to this commentary on spanish radio. shouting chelsea! chelsea! chelsea! roberto! barca! barca! barca! psg!
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absolutely brilliant. i thought we would play it in full for you because it is brilliant. the reaction on spanish radio. i do not think they have seen anything like it. the celebrations will be going oniam it. the celebrations will be going on i am sure now. i am so glad you played that. i did not think it would end! hill. what about social media? social media went mad. -- brilliant. so many tweets. at one point in one minute, 83,000 tweets sent out about this game. we picked out a couple of them. sergio romero —— roberto, we made it together, incredible! playing at centre back
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last night, a picture of the barca players in the dressing room with messi showing off his 12 pack. good picture. this was from fc arsenal in the official twitter feed. we did it! fabulous to be on the winning side. what about harry st germain? it is how they comeback. —— paris st germain. to lose in that manner, they got the tactics wrong. the manager has three times led his former club seville to the europa league title. they got it wrong last night, sat behind the ball. they we re night, sat behind the ball. they were punished. you look at the french league table, still three points behind monaco. as for barcelona, they have won the european cup five times. after that last night, you would not rule out number six. see you later. neil woods was an undercover
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policeman who risked his life to infiltrate criminal drugs gangs around the uk. posing as an addict, he moved in a violent world where he was stabbed and held at gunpoint. at the weekend, he returned to his normal life as a family man. over his iii—year career, neil's evidence put numerous criminals behind bars. but he now thinks the only way to end the war on drugs is to legalise them. let's talk now to neil. welcome. obviously you go into the police to be a law enforcing member of the community. you found yourself ina very of the community. you found yourself in a very dangerous world. how did you feel about that? i wasn't so great at uniform policing to start with and i was fortunate to find a drug squad attachment for a month. they suggested i tried buying crack
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cocaine. that shaped the next 11! yea rs of cocaine. that shaped the next 11! years of my life. what preparation was there? at the time this kind of undercover work was completely new in this country. the working at the bottom level and working your way up was completely new. there was no training for about four years and then i helped design that for other people. you were feeling your way in a world where, was made clear to you what the moral boundaries where? only when the training came in. but that was after four years. yes, the ethical boundaries were defined as we went along. finding our way with what worked and what didn't. what worked and what didn't? as the job has got longer and longer and more and more difficult as organised crime got used to what i was doing,
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basically i had to befriend people and empathise with people and it became like weapon icing empathy. you have to move amongst the people on the streets, people who are problematic drug users and befriend them. that makes sense but it has to be more than that, doesn't it? don't you have to pass off as somebody credible in that world, doesn't that mean taking drugs?” credible in that world, doesn't that mean taking drugs? i never had to ta ke mean taking drugs? i never had to take heroin or crack cocaine but i once had to take amphetamine. i make the mistake of presenting myself to bea the mistake of presenting myself to be a connoisseur of that drug which was a mistake. somebody gave me a present and it was 40% pure, normally the drug would be 5% pure. to avoid imminent violence i had to ta ke to avoid imminent violence i had to take some of that drug. that was quite terrifying. i was awake for three nights. only on one occasion ever did you take drugs?”
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three nights. only on one occasion ever did you take drugs? i had to ta ke ever did you take drugs? i had to take cannabis in a few times but that was it. what about dealing drugs? i pretended to be a dealer very often. sometimes i would make myself out to be a travelling burglar, wheeler dealer. iwas buying large quantities in order to present that but i would never actually sell drugs. did you raise suspicions, if you are in the world and you want taking drugs? that's where the art of the craft comes in. it's often not too difficult when you are buying heroin. the trade tends to be in those alleys and places where people might find you, organised crime likes to deal in the public eye because that is the safest place to do it. did you ever feel your life was in danger? we said at the beginning there was a
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moment where you were threatened with a knife, you were stripped naked, tell us about those moments. i've had many, many moments where i thought this was it, this is all going to end. in stoke i knocked on a door. i had been buying off a heroin dealer, i thought he was happy with me. he answered the door and put a sword to my throat. i thought this was it. my life is over. then i heard laughing and there was a woman behind him, she said, i thought he was going to say he was drug squad then. they were laughing, they were just winding me up. maybe he wanted to try out his new sword. you talk about it as if it was like another day in the office, but at the time how frightening was that? it's very frightening. if got to keep working all day after things like that. you can't suddenly run away, you have to keep doing it. it adds up and it
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ta kes keep doing it. it adds up and it takes its toll. when you say keep working all day, described how your day was defined, what would you do? i would buy heroin, then maybe do and evidence drop to someone to get that delivered, then i would go and buy some crack cocaine off someone else, then i would go shoplifting with some people. and make friends with some people. and make friends with other drug users. it was all about what connections you can make and how you can manipulate people to introduce you further up the ladder. that takes a lot of time. you did do shoplifting which obviously was a crime. it's only a crime if you don't intend to give it back. so you would return what you take? yes, at a much later time. thankfully it was never me who had to return it!|j mentioned that you were stripped naked at gunpoint and a camera was found on you, what happened?”
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didn't have a camera on me the day i was stripped naked, that was in northampton. they showed me a gun and told me to strip. thankfully i didn't have a camera but i had a camera found once in leicester. a gangster had been very happy with me, i had been trading with him for about four months. on this occasion i went to sell him some counterfeit clothing as part of my cover and he brought two of his friends with me and they were suspicious. one of them searched me and found a camera. i was them searched me and found a camera. iwas in them searched me and found a camera. i was in an isolated car park, i can't say the words i said on the television but i gave them a torrent of abuse to try and interrupted his ability to tell his friend what he had found. i then had to deliberately, as slowly as possible, fold up the clothing. if you run a way that's confirming suspicions. very slowly i walked away. i managed
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to gain enough metres so that when he convinced his companion and they came after me in a car, and tried to run me over, i must have escaped that by two metres. my intelligence guidejoked later that by two metres. my intelligence guide joked later run that by two metres. my intelligence guidejoked later run because he said he didn't know why they didn't just shoot me because they had a gun in the car. at the same time you had two young children and a wife, you would go home to that environment at weekends. would you put everything behind you and slip easily from one well to the other? yes, i don't think my children ever picked up on anything. i would still take them swimming ona anything. i would still take them swimming on a sunday morning. anything. i would still take them swimming on a sunday morningm must have seemed surreal. it did, sometimes. i think i managed them as best i could. there has been a lot of scrutiny of undercover police
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work and we've talked about how when you started out in 1993 it was a very different time. you helped to draw up guidelines at a later stage. now, with that scrutiny, the fact compensation has been paid to women who have been affected by undercover policing, duped into relationships that were not genuine, how do you see what the boundaries are, for insta nce see what the boundaries are, for instance having sex with somebody when you undercover? but was never an issue for the kind of work i did. i hope that as we continue to examine undercover tactics we consider what an impact they have. undercover policing is the nuclear option. you can't go into a community without incredibly affecting people's lives. most undercover policing is about drugs. the harm i caused, the people's
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lives i massively influenced, people who are vulnerable and needed help, andi who are vulnerable and needed help, and i manipulated them, i put them in increased danger, i had them sent to prison where treatment would have been more appropriate. all of these things happened for something which, essentially, there is no evidence that it has any benefit. i put people imprisoned for over 1000 yea rs people imprisoned for over 1000 years from i undercover work. how farup the years from i undercover work. how far up the food chain were they? most of them were very nasty gangsters getting nine years apiece. lots of people were just vulnerable people getting sent to jail for 2—3 yea rs. people getting sent to jail for 2—3 years. the people taking... the people i manipulated to get introductions to the gangsters. i put those people into prison for so long and didn't interrupt the drug supply. they clearly had committed crimes so why does but weigh heavily on you? it doesn't take long to
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realise problematic drug users need help. for example, as any drug counsellor will tell you, two thirds problematic heroin users are self—medicating for childhood abuse. they need help and they are being trampled on by policing drugs. it causes harm and it's futile. futile would be bad enough but actually the tactics i used only causes organised crime to get more violent, because the ultimate defence against the tactics i used is to intimidate whole communities successfully. tactics i used is to intimidate whole communities successfullym that something you saw happening?” saw it happening year after year. give us an example. i gave up undercover work. i'd had enough of the damage it was causing. i think in 2004! the damage it was causing. i think in 2004 i was called up and they said you've got to do this job because these gangsters are raping people as punishment for drug debts.
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they are incredibly vicious. i was tempted back into it again. the same thing happened. it's notjust futile, each year it's the best defence. the most successful organised crime groups are the ones that are most violent. what's causing that never—ending arms race is policing drugs. it sounds like you are putting a lot of the burden of that on your own shoulders. you we re of that on your own shoulders. you were putting people who are doing bad things away. why do you see a direct link between what criminals we re direct link between what criminals were doing to stop getting caught and what you were doing? it's not on my shoulders it's on the shoulders of drug policy. drug policy has created the situation. isn't it on the shoulders of people doing the crimes? if you had a regulated drug market gangsters wouldn't be running the market. brewery bosses don't have shoot outs. if you look at how the murder rate dropped after
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prohibition ended in the united states. violence gets worse at the moment. is the argument you make about that that if something becomes unpalatable enough and the state feels it can't deal with it, you therefore legalise it, so it's almost an incentive for people doing bad things to make it so unpalatable. there's a drastic difference between drug criminality and any criminality because it is a and any criminality because it is a a prohibited thing. burglaries will a lwa ys a prohibited thing. burglaries will always be wrong. drug policy is about health. as soon as you try and make it about policing you've created a nightmare which is organised crime. we need to get drugs under control because they can be dangerous. i know that is something you now work on doing. you are the uk chair of the law enforcement against prohibition. the government is making clear it won't be heading down that path. you can break drug policy into different
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pockets policy. in news this week, in durham they have said they will prescribe heroin. in a similar way to the methadone programme. it isn't decriminalising but is monitored. to the methadone programme. it isn't decriminalising but is monitoredm isa decriminalising but is monitoredm is a regulation because you are taking the market away from gangsters, undermining the power of those people controlling the market with violence. you also cut down on the crime caused by those people trying to feed their habit. drug policy should be about saving lives and reducing harm. this is an example of a policy that does that. what about the message but is sent, if something is illegal kids are brought up knowing it's illegal, that's the framework around it. if something is not illegal it i default becomes acceptable. messages don't save lives. they really don't. drug policy is in a complete mess. you talk about messages to children,
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at the moment gangsters have the m essa 9 es at the moment gangsters have the m essa g es to at the moment gangsters have the messages to children. look at the cannabis market, that is where organised crime recruits for the future. teenagers can't get hold of alcohol. less than 1% of them can buy it but in this country half of them can get easy access to alcohol. we have the easiest teenage access to cannabis and this is where organised crime recruit the gangsters of tomorrow's. how have your colleagues in the police reacted to your new perspective? initially, obviously with writing the book, it's a whistle—blowing book. i was public enemy number one in the covert policing world. in the last few months i've had overwhelming support and we are recruiting massively. only yesterday i met with the police and crime commission of the north wales, he has just joined the organisation. commission of the north wales, he has justjoined the organisation. he isa has justjoined the organisation. he is a serving police and crime commission. he has said he supports ron hogg completely and will be
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looking into how he can implement the same policy. the work you are doing now, do you see it almost as a way of solving your conscience? you have suffered from press dramatic stress disorder of a type which is called moral damage. it is about remembering we can be harmed by threats of violence to ourselves but also by causing harm to others. i am fine now, completely well. it is not so much easing conscience but doing the right thing. undercover i was fighting the good fight, catching bad people, making society safer. once you realise that policing drugs is only causing harm and the evidence does support what i am saying, with my experience, i think i was duty bound to speak out. thank you very much for talking to us. get in touch with
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your thoughts on what neil has been talking about. neil's book good cop, bad war is published today. still to come... we'll have more reaction to the chancellor's budget, including changes to national insurance contributions for self—employed workers. i'll hear from some who may be affected by the change. honouring those who have served in afghanistan and iraq — good morning. the chancellor is facing accusations of breaking an election pledge by increasing national insurance contributions for many self—employed workers. after his budget announcement, philip hammond is facing growing pressure to reconsider his plan from some conservative mps. the treasury has rejected calls for a re—think, insisting the increase will make the national insurance system fairer. what i did yesterday was address a
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basic continuing unfairness in the current system, the benefits available to the self—employed have significantly improved, they have full access to the state pension now, that is worth £1800 a year on average to a self—employed person. as we go forward with our negotiations with the eu, we need to make this country strong and fit and ready for the future. nicola sturgeon has told the bbc the common—sense time for a second referendum would be autumn next year. her remarks are the clearest signal yet the snp is planning to hold another vote before the uk believes that eu. the queen will unveil a memorial in london this morning in honour of all those from the uk who served in iraq and afghanistan between 1990 and 2015. the monument is dedicated to civilians as well as servicemen and women.
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members of the public donated more than £1 million to fund it. we'll be live at the memorial in the next half an hour. a man in australia who posed online asjustin bieber has been charged with more than 900 child sex offences. the 42—year old man is accused of persuading fans of the star to send him explicit images. police say he had been using a number of sites, including facebook and skype, to communicate with children. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. more at 10:00am. is it the greatest sporting comeback of all time? the biggest in champions league history. barcelona overturned a lead against pcg. it saw them through to the quarterfinal with two of them coming in added time. sergio romero toe with the
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winner. arsene wenger has said this morning he has not made up his mind about whether he will stay in the job but he says the opinion of the fa ns job but he says the opinion of the fans will have a bearing. potentially decisive blow for manchester city after a goalless draw at home to stoke. with totte n ha m draw at home to stoke. with tottenham in second place on goal difference, ten points behind the leaders, chelsea. the second round of the wta event, heather watson now faces yet anaconda. —— konta. first to the reaction to philip hammond's first budget, and the chancellor will have woken up this morning to newspaper headlines like this. the chancellor is facing growing
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pressure from backbench mps to reconsider plans to increase national insurance contributions for self—employed workers. he's been accused of breaking a manifesto pledge, but the treasury says the change will return fairness to the national insurance system. let's look now at how the budget might affect you. we are joined by a panel of people here in the studio and in different parts of the country. sean hughes is a pub landlord. oliver beach is a school governor and former teacher. ian adams is a man with a van and is self—employed and he joins us from his white van this morning. suejenkins is a full—time carer for her mum. alettia elwin is self—employed and teaches music to children. and to help with any questions we might have along the way is simon gompertz, who is the bbc‘s personalfinance correspondent, and sarah pennells, editor of savvywoman. co. uk. thank you all forjoining us. let us go straight to ian in the white van. the headlines, philip hammond,
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focusing on white van man. what are your thoughts on the budget?m focusing on white van man. what are your thoughts on the budget? it is a tax hikes, but it is... mr hammond could have done something for all of us, including the self—employed, and that was returned vat to the level it was before the financial crisis. another tax hike on the working people. a lot of us after the financial crisis went out and set up our own businesses. this sends out a bad message to people who may want to do the same. the government and the taxes, never gives. —— only taxes. you are also self-employed, what do you think about it? we have not done the exact figures but it looks like it will be several hundred pounds a year. admittedly, it is not going to make us
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destitute, but with everything else that goes up, the fuel rises, food rises, car insurance, it makes a massive difference. you feel like, why is he targeting small businesses when there are so many global multinational companies that pay very little tax at all in the uk? what do you think about the broken ma nifesto what do you think about the broken manifesto pledge? philip hammond is insisting it is not. most people, the man on the street, find headlines about broken election promises not exactly news. when you are talking about another tax hike, most of us, we are so used to hearing the stories about these politicians breaking promises, i am not surprised. are you angry? do you accept the chancellor's view it is
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about levelling the playing field on tax? not really, no. there was a great increase in the number of self—employed after the financial crash. they properly saw packs reve nu es crash. they properly saw packs revenues fall because of that —— probably saw tax revenues. it is a market they have missed out revenue on. it is not a surprise that this government or any government would again makea government or any government would again make a tax hike. you are a pub landlord, sean, you were unexpected winners in this budget. it seems that way. i represent a lot of pubs, 29 pubs, very large increase averaging 27,000 in rental values. £1000 in the first year is good. we we re £1000 in the first year is good. we were hoping for a fundamental review on the rate system and are
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specifically looking at public houses because they are a community asset. threatened at the moment especially in the south—east. business rate relief being a good thing for pubs. what about the national insurance? the national insurance, iam national insurance? the national insurance, i am self—employed, the national insurance is... i see it as an attack on the entrepreneur, someone an attack on the entrepreneur, someone taking a risk. the idea was you do not get the same benefits as those who are employed. the point of having slightly lower national insurance was to take on the risk level. i am not insurance was to take on the risk level. iam not 100% insurance was to take on the risk level. i am not 100% sure what the figure is we will have to pay in addition but it is another tax on a lot of self—employed people who are supposed to be driving the recovery of the recession. sue jenkins, full—time carerfor your of the recession. sue jenkins, full—time carer for your mum. of the recession. sue jenkins, full—time carerfor your mum. there has been a lot of discussion around social care in the run—up to the budget and whether money would be found for it. the taxes are going
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up, money is being given to social care, how do you see that? it is not enough and it is not going to be enough and it is not going to be enough and it will take time to implement. i am in a crisis situation at the moment. i was looking after my mother, nursing her, for six years under continuing health care funding, a negligent assessment was done last year will, they did not look at all of the evidence. she was transferred to social care on the 13th of january. since then, it has been a disaster. social services have threatened me that if i go over budget which was already out of date with an out of date care plan that i will be personally responsible for the overspend which has forced me into a crisis situation. just explain that. you would be personally responsible for the overspend? yes, they have said that they cannot provide the
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ca re said that they cannot provide the care is to me, chc who are supposed to be funding the night care cannot provide carers which has forced me into going to an agency, a very good one, but they are charging £2150 an hour, which they have to, to get decent care. it is pushing me into an overspend. i am going without essential care i need. i am up night after night nursing my mother because if i do not have a second carer at night, i am the other night care, iam carer at night, i am the other night care, i am on the go all day dealing with massive complex medical issues, dementia, alzheimer's, complex spinal care, a lot of issues going on. she also has epilepsy. this is a serious situation and it is grinding me down into the ground. we absolutely hear the pressure you are under. under a lot of string with that situation. i want to bring in sarah, what has been announced in
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the budget is obviously aimed at trying to alleviate the pressure on people like sue. what difference will it make? not enough difference. £2 billion, £1 billion in the coming tax year. estimates say up to £28 billion is needed in this year to plug the gap. you would like to think sue's express is unusual but sadly i do not think it is. part of the problem is a few years ago people caring for others were given control of their budgets if they wanted to. —— sue's experience. the problem is in the intervening years, any support from local authorities has been taken away. there are people like sue who are not only caring foran people like sue who are not only caring for an elderly mother or father around the clock, but they are also having to deal with essentially mini accounts to try to work out the best way of planning the care and being threatened that if they go over budget, it is their problem. the word crisis has been
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used and i do not think it is incorrect in this case. there was nothing specifically for people like sue who are actually saving the government millions and billions of pounds and one of the things i know from my own work is while there are some carers who qualify for what is called carer's allowance, a benefit you get if you care for someone for over 35 hours a week, 95% of carers careful someone for less time but still over 20 hours and they are losing out on state pension because they are not claiming national insurance credits they are entitled to. the government is aware. there are not any measures to help them. this help, it will make a difference, but there will still be people in a similar situation to sue. oliver, you are here representing the education centre, school governor, former teacher, money for education in this budget
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and focus on technology. the introduction of the t levels which will upscale young people, prepare them for the digital economy and create a parity of esteem on vocational education. there is quite a lot of stigma in secondary schools. it is great. to have an emphasis on the nontraditional routes, away from a—levels to get kids ready for an almost automated economy, to help them get ready for it... the money going into schools, a lot of schools were hoping for something to ease the pressure of the savings that are being made across schools and the money seems to be going to free schools or grammar schools which is not helpful to the platter of secondary schools and primary schools which are suffering huge cuts —— plethora. simon, money is being given to some and taken simon, money is being given to some and ta ken away simon, money is being given to some and taken away from others and some
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people footing a bill for different things. obviously, it is always a balancing act for a chancellor, no free money. what is the overview in terms of what is going where?‘ heightened state of tension in the last few weeks over the problems with social care, it has concentrated minds in downing street. the picture behind the scenes is theresa may wanted more money and the chancellor needed to find it. the thing to do with taxing the self—employed was perhaps in the pipeline, they decided to do it now, despite promises given in the tory ma nifesto despite promises given in the tory manifesto before the election. i think there two things that will strike the self—employed. they felt they were promised there would not be national insurance increases. the pledge in the manifesto, our commitment, no increases in vat, national insurance or income tax. commitment, no increases in vat, national insurance or income taxm the small print, something slightly different. what was that? the problem with national insurance is
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it is very complicated, four classes of payment. class one, employed people pay that. self—employed pay class two and class four. the self—employed thought they were in for a tax cut next year. class two was being abolished. the £2 80 a week they pay. instead the ship has turned around and the government decided it does not want to treat self—employed people in that way and the other class self—employed national insurance class four, a percentage of your income, that will be increased. the chancellor has portrayed this as something that is bad for wealthier self—employed people, they will lose out several hundred pounds, but the fact is, anyone earning over £16,000 will lose out overall. anyone earning over £8,000 a year will lose out from the abolition... increase in class four contributions. the chancellor's perspective is it
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is levelling the playing field and when you look at the situation with needing to find money for social ca re needing to find money for social care this was an obvious anomaly to put right. are you happy to pay the extra tax to take a look at the social care situation? social care definitely needs more money. don't get me wrong. but i think they've taken the easy route by taxing us instead of going for the bigger companies. i think it's a bit lazy of them quite frankly. let's bring in some of your questions from home. one question from a soldier two yea rs one question from a soldier two years away from retirement, he says, on any changes for like me? no specific changes. in some ways it was a thin budget because there were not that many measures. we are now going to have an autumn budget and my feeling is we will see major changes there. there wasn't anything
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specifically, several things have already be announced like the increase in personal allowance. all the budget did yesterday was to reaffirm that would go up to 11 —— 11,000 500. there weren't any specific changes that will leave him any better or worse. another viewer has said, do the self employed receive statutory sick pay, no, this is the nominee that needs to be cleared up. the chancellor says the reason for levelling the playing field is not because of an anomaly like that but because the benefits received at the same for everybody. this issue accounts for a lot of the anger amongst self—employed people. traditionally there has been an assumption that because of the risks they have, they don't have the job security of employed people, and they haven't traditionally had the same benefits from the system, but
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thatis same benefits from the system, but that is how you get something back from the system. the situation has changed slightly in that the state pension system was loaded against the self—employed. they could only get the basic state pension, not the various top ups. that's now been reformed. they've done well out of reforms to the pension system but there are other things you don't get. you don't get holiday pay, you don't get sick pay. you are in a more precarious situation as a self—employed person. ithink more precarious situation as a self—employed person. i think there isa self—employed person. i think there is a lot of anger out there, there is a lot of anger out there, there isa is a lot of anger out there, there is a signal in this budget that that need not any longer be recognised. you are nodding vigorously listening to that. i agree, i concur with the whole being. the risks we've taken to set up our business have been massive. we support other self—employed people and they also have ta ken massive self—employed people and they also have taken massive risks. none of us
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get holiday pay, sick pay. unless we work, we don't get the money. to have some more taken of us means we have some more taken of us means we have to work harder in order to stand still financially and it's a blow, it's a knock. one fewer hazards, how is the budget going to benefit those going to in 2017 —— one viewer has said. the only changes announced was that there would be student maintenance loans available for part—time study and also for pre—university degrees. you don't have too necessarily be studying for a university degree. that is coming in in 2018. nothing specific for students starting to do the degree courses that 400,000 students do every year. another viewer says, i was hoping to see a tax for online retailers, how do we protect our way of life from the
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internet? there has to be a bigger look at the tax system. this has already been discussed. i think big companies, whether they are online or off—line have got quite a favourable tax regime. the government has made noises about the fa ct government has made noises about the fact it will look at how online retailers are taxed but for a lot of people working off—line, in the high street or have their own businesses, there is nothing massive in the budget that will make a big change either way. another viewer says, overall state of the nation's finances. it seems there are always mixed messages. second fastest—growing economy in the g7 last year, inflation going up, growth forecast for this year up, the overall tax burden is the highest it's been for 30 years. better just now than highest it's been for 30 years. betterjust now than people highest it's been for 30 years. better just now than people feared. still worrying if you look further ahead. the office for budget
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responsibility tells the chancellor what they think the outlook is. they are predicting a 2% growth this year which is pretty good compared to what people feared, but then going down again later on. because of that great, we are managing not to borrow so much every year. the borrowing remains stubborn in later years. not so bad now, not so good later on. i think particularly this coming year is universally acknowledged its going to be a year of struggle for families. we have these cuts, or this frees to tax credits and benefits at a time when prices are rising. that means people are going to be struggling to make ends meet. a final thought from you as a business owner, do you feel like it's been a austerity for some time and more to come? how do you feel
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about the outlook and particularly bearing in mind the impact on new of the latest budget? it's more taxes, more burden on the people who have to pay them. you tend to find they always come after the people who don't have much power in opposing their tax rises, larger companies, google or these people who have a lot more clout get away with not paying anything. that's because they have clout, people such as me just have clout, people such as me just have to put up and take it from these types of people. the chancellor could have done everybody a favour and returned vat back down to what it was before the financial crisis which would have helped all businesses and everybody. again, more tax hikes. it makes you wonder, where do they spend this money? do we need trident? there's a lot of money being wasted there. it's not
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good news. thank you for your thoughts on the budget macro and thank you for your questions from home. breaking news about knife crime, this is from a home affairs correspondent. the number of people caught carrying knives has risen to its highest level for six years, there were 19,000 offences in england and wales last year, the highest since 2011. figures from the home office show 41% of adult offenders were jailed. the proportion of 10—17 —year—olds sent to prison was 11%. those figures just through, the number of people caught carrying knives has risen to its highest level for six years. the queen will this morning unveil a memorial dedicated to all those who served in conflicts in iraq, afghanistan and the gulf war between 1990 and 2015. the memorial, by sculptor paul day, will also mark the contribution made by civilians in both conflicts. 2,500 veterans have been invited to horse guards parade for a special service. ben brown is at horse guards parade for us now. the queen will be here for this
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service of dedication in horse guards parade starting at 11am. it is to remember all those who served in the conflicts of the last quarter ofa in the conflicts of the last quarter of a century from 1990 onwards up to 2015, in the gulf campaign, in iraq and in afghanistan. notjust the military, the organisers are keen to stress it is civilians as well. aid workers, humanitarian workers, people involved in the reconstruction of iraq and afghanistan. a service here followed by the queen unveiling this specially built memorial which will be on the victoria and and gardens. iam going be on the victoria and and gardens. i am going to speak to the chaplain of the fleet, the man leading the
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service at horse guards parade. tell us service at horse guards parade. tell us what is the ambition of this service and the memorial? this is about recognition of the wider field of participants in the iraq and afghanistan conflicts. there were many people beyond the military who played a role in the reconstruction and the emotional rebuilding of those countries. people like the police force and educators, and the non—government authorities. it really is a very widespread, and quite unusual when we are surrounded by military monuments. one distinctly goes beyond that. this is a period of time, the last quarter ofa a period of time, the last quarter of a century is a long period of conflict that the united kingdom has been involved with in iraq and afghanistan. and i think the recognition is important. it has been a long haul and a lot of dedication from a range of people to do that. the fact that the monument is almost made up of two parts, a
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military and a non—military part, i think we are going to try and so that together in the service today. for the first time we are surrounded by military and i'm going to be backed by the national police choir which is really unusual. they sound fantastic, we are looking forward to it. it is a drumhead service which means they will pile the drums on top of each other to create and alter. on a battlefield where you have no church, typically on eve of battle a thanksgiving service, and alter will be made from a pile of drums. we'll see the bandsmen pile up drums. we'll see the bandsmen pile up the drums and then the standard of the regiment, in this case the national army standard which is a beautiful unionjack, national army standard which is a beautiful union jack, is laid national army standard which is a beautiful unionjack, is laid over the alter of drums to create a sacred place. thank you. the
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chaplain of the fleet who will be leading the service starting at 11am, we will bring you live coverage on the bbc news channel. carol is herewith the weather. it is mild. it's notjust london. this was taken this morning in pembrokeshire. in derbyshire, look at that lovely blue skies. in cornwall it is a bit of a different story. as we travel south—west through cornwall the cloud is thicker, visibility is poor and damp. let me show you the satellite picture. huge areas without cloud. lots of blue skies this morning. this area is a weather front, producing murky conditions across cornwall. tonight it's going to come
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backin cornwall. tonight it's going to come back in again. although the fog we have all lift into low cloud, then it will come back again as folk later on this evening. just affecting the bottom part? explain what will happen. we will carry on with some murky conditions and down into the channel islands through today and later tonight. overnight it. to head east. this morning it has been a fine start to the day for some of us but there has been a bit of cloud breaking up. we are looking at sunny spells almost across the board but not quite. it smiled for the time of year. this is the weather front across the channel islands and cornwall. it will pivot round and take a swipe at the rest of the uk and also the north. today away from but there will be a lot of sunshine. the stronger winds across northern ireland, central and
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southern scotland and england, easing. across the far north of scotla nd easing. across the far north of scotland we will hang on to the stronger winds and the showers. through the evening will see a bit ofa through the evening will see a bit of a change. we hang onto that low cloud across cornwall and also the channel islands. it will be quite murky for some of us at times. for devon as we head into kent and the isle of wight, a beautiful afternoon like a bit of sunshine. the same for wales, the midlands into east anglia. same for northern england and also into northern ireland and scotla nd and also into northern ireland and scotland the showers will continue, some possibly heavy with hail and blunder. somewhere in the south—east could see 16 or 17 celsius. generally across the board we are looking at temperatures higher than we would expect at this stage in march. as we go through the evening and overnight, the temperature will drop quickly in east. cool enough in parts of frost. here is this weather front returning, coming in through
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the west and north. it will deposit some patchy rain and drizzle, primarily on hills and coasts. it will be cold further east under the clearer skies. tomorrow morning will start with some sunshine. the front in the west is drifting eastwards and it does mean it's going to be cloudy tomorrow for most of us than today. having said that, in the west particularly if you are in the shelter of some hills it will brighten up through the day. quite breezy. temperatures across the far north of england and scotland down on today and although they are down in northern ireland, the rest of england and wales are above where they should be. as we move on through the course of the weekend, we've got a couple of fronts. the first one heading south. a bit of a lull and then the next weather front comes in from the west. that doesn't mean it'll suddenly turn cold, just cooler than in the next couple of days. from the abolition... increase in
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class four contributions. hello, i'm joanna gosling. the chancellor, philip hammond, is coming under pressure over his plan to increase national insurance payments for many self—employed workers. he says the change is fair, despite accusations that he has broken an election promise. those on higher earnings, the 40% on higher earnings, will be paying a little bit more. we think that's fair, we think that's a reasonable way to go forward, given that the benefits entitlement of the self—employed has improved so much. at westminster, labour threatened to join ranks with tory rebels to force a government climb—down. ministers say it could mean less cash for social care. a man in the straight here is charged with more than 900 child sex offences after allegedly posing as pop starjustin bieber online. up to 20 of his victims
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are believed to be in the uk. we're live in sydney and brisbane with the latest. and british military personnel who have served in iraq and afghanistan are to be honoured this morning with the unveiling of a new war memorial in central london. we will have full live coverage. here's annita in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. good morning. the chancellor is facing accusations of breaking an election pledge, by increasing national insurance contributions for many self—employed workers. after his budget announcement, philip hammond is facing growing pressure to reconsider the plan from some conservative mps. the treasury has rejected calls for a re—think, insisting the increase will make the national insurance system fairer scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, has told the bbc that the common—sense time for a second independence referendum would be autumn next year. a vote can only take place with the permission of the westminster government. but her remarks are the clearest signal yet that the snp is planning to hold another vote before the uk leaves the european union.
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the european court of human rights has backed a key element of the government's anti—terrorism measures. the court rejected a claim the government had acted unlawfully when its stripped the sudanese suspect of his british citizenship. the man was suspected of taking part in terrorism related activities in somalia. hawaii has become the first us state to challenge president trump's revised travel ban. the attorney general said mr trump had violated the constitution with his redrawn executive order banning travel from six predominantly muslim countries. he said it would damage, is particularly tourism. doctors say they have successfully performed in india weight reduction surgery on a woman who was said to be the
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heaviest. her family claim she woman who was said to be the heaviest. herfamily claim she had weighed 78 stone and she was flown to mumbai earlier this year and admitted to a specially built unit ata admitted to a specially built unit at a local hospital. herfamily admitted to a specially built unit at a local hospital. her family said she had not left her house for 25 yea rs. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10:30am. do get in touch with us throughout the morning — use the hashtag victoria live, and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. now the latest sport. many have already labelled it the greatest sporting comeback of all time, the biggest in champions league history. barcelona overturned a 4—0 deficit against pcg. they were 3—0 up after 15 minutes, but then it went 3—1. it looked completely out of sight for barcelona. psg with the away goal. still needed three goals. neymar scored this. luis suarez and won a
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penalty which neymar converted in the 91st minute. still they needed one more goal. they got it through roberto with 95 minutes on the clock and barcelona through to the quarterfinals for the tenth year in a row. a huge reaction on social media to the extraordinary game. between 7:45pm and 11pm, almost 2 million tweets published about barcelona's comeback. the man of the moment said... this was from fc barcelona's official account, simply, we did it. one man linked with the barcelona job is arsene wenger and he says he
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will consider the opinion of fans when he considers his future at arsenal. talking to the media this morning, wenger said he hadn't yet made up his mind, and certainly hadn't told the players of his plans. unrest has grown amongst supporters following a dismal run in the premier league and that 10—2 thumping by bayern munich in the champions league. manchester city could have gone second in the premier league last night but it did not go to plan. stoke helped them to a goalless draw with a game of few clear—cut chances. the first time they have failed to score at home since pep guardiola took over. there'll be an all—british tie in the wta event at indian wells in california. heather watson came from a set down to beat the american nicole gibbs and reach the second round, wherejohanna konta is waiting. it'll be the first time the pair have played each other on the tour. konta will be the strong favourite
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at number 11 konta will be the strong favourite at number11 in konta will be the strong favourite at number 11 in the world. heather watson dropped to 108 this week. the headlines that 10:30pm. more comments from you on the budget. hammond is too scared to go over the —— to go after the big companies. affordable rented housing hit the headlines but no mention of money for it. i am a card—carrying labour member and i regard the furore as unfortunate. i enjoyed generous tax breaks for many years as the self—employed can enjoy much the same support from the state in times of need. if that party is over, so be it. i do not like tory policies but the money has to come
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from somewhere. terry says, the self—employed people will when the government tries to make it fair when compared with employees, those required to pay their fair share they like children deprived of their sweets. more political reaction from norman smith in westminster. thank you. no white flag over the treasury at the moment but there is no doubt the huge pressure they are under this morning, notjust the huge pressure they are under this morning, not just from opposition mps, but predominantly from their own party. and from all wings of the party. eurosceptics are unhappy, pro—europeans, fiscal hawks unhappy, pro—europeans, fiscal hawks unhappy, social... the whole tory party seems to be unhappy with mr hammond. the reason is notjust because of the broken manifesto promise, it is because it is a tax rise on people's basic income which
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is anathema to many conservatives. most tory mps take the view it is a hit on their people, folk who go out, take a risk, start a business on their own and build a company, the sort of people they are seeking to encourage and help. instead mr hammond seems to have delivered a £2 billion hit on them. this morning mr hammond did not rule out a u—turn but it is pretty clear he believes it is essential to introduce these changes, partly on the grounds of fairness, it is not fair people earning a decent amount of money who are self—employed pay less tax than those who work for a company, but above all, i sense, because he fears, down the line, more of us will work on our own. there is a major headache looming for the treasury. no sign of gift from mr hammond this morning. in 2015 we
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introduce legislation to give effect to the tax lots we talked about in our manifesto and we spelt out clearly how we would do it, focusing on class one national insurance, the national insurance paid by 85% of people in this country who are in employment. and what i announced yesterday was a small increase in class four national insurance contributions for the minority of self—employed people who are on higher incomes. the majority of self—employed people will pay less national insurance as a result of the announcements i made yesterday. i think the decision we have made is fair, to ask self—employed people to payjust a fair, to ask self—employed people to pay just a little fair, to ask self—employed people to payjust a little more contribution for the services they receive. this is not in any way an attack on business. hugely supportive of business. hugely supportive of business. i want people to have choices about the way they work. but i want choices about the way they work. but iwant them choices about the way they work. but i want them to make those choices of the bases of what is right, not on the bases of what is right, not on
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the basis of what tax advantages they bring. the treasury do not want to back down. mr hammond said yesterday he reckoned this advantage for the self—employed was currently costing the treasury around £5 billion a year. however, remember the row over tax credits, when george osborne announced the changes to tax credits, huge rumpus on the tory backbenches, in part because it was seen as an attack on people who we re was seen as an attack on people who were working hard, maybe not earning much, but going out and doing a decent day's work and they risked losing tax credits. what happened? george osborne had to beat a retreat. could the same happen? we know there is almost certainly going to bea know there is almost certainly going to be a vote on it. labour will try to be a vote on it. labour will try to force a vote and it may be, i don't know that there has to be legislation to bring about the changes anyway. it looks like a parliamentary showdown on this is unavoidable. thank you. keep your
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thoughts coming in. all of the usual ways of getting in touch. still to come... a man in australia is charged with over 900 child sex offences after allegedly posing online as popstarjustin bieber. we're live in brisbane with the latest. cancer experts have issued a warning that children in the uk could be missing out on potentially life—saving drugs. currently, eu regulations allow drug companies to opt out of trialling on children. scientists are calling for the rules to be changed so that adult drugs can also be tested on children. they argue that many drugs treat a variety of cancers which may have the same genetic target, meaning they could be effective in children, even when it does not seem to be relevant. so, what could these changes mean for families facing this situation? let's talk to professor louis chesler, a leader in child tumors as the royal marsden hospital in london. the charity christopher's smile in memory of their son who died of a brain tumour.
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professor, first of all, explained the situation as it stands. currently drugs can be trialled on adults that could be trialled on children but they are not. explain. as you may know, there is a new generation of cancer medicines being tested recently and in the last decade, it attacked particular cancer targets, proteins and jeans driving the cancers. in large part, these drugs have been developed to attack adult cancers and there has been a loophole in eu legislation that says if a particular cancer does not exist in a child, it is not mandated that they targeted cancer drug would be developed simply because the adult cancer does not
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exist in a child. now what we calling for and what the eu legislation is addressing is to close the loophole. what it says is that if the cancer target is present in the children's cancer, even if it isa in the children's cancer, even if it is a different kind of cancer from which the drug initially was not developed for, companies will stall have to study that drug in children's cancers have to study that drug in child ren's cancers and have to study that drug in children's cancers and potentially make them available to clinical trials. kevin rudd karen, what difference do you think it would make? —— and karen. difference do you think it would make? -- and karen. it would make a huge difference in terms of a step change in how we treat children. it would offer the opportunity to move away from using what i would call the blunt tools of chemotherapy and radiotherapy and give us a chance to make a difference to those children who currently with the old treatments sometimes do not have a chance of a queue and there are certain types of childhood cancers
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we re certain types of childhood cancers were that is still the case —— cure. the only way to move forward is by having access to the new targeted drugs which we believe are going to work ina drugs which we believe are going to work in a much cleverer fashion than the old standard treatments which in the old standard treatments which in the main is still all we have access to for our children. tell us more about how your experience has shaped your view. after you see children in a paediatric oncology ward, showing so much courage and hope, and yet you know that a quarter of them went make it. that's a hard, hard thing to ta ke make it. that's a hard, hard thing to take in and you never forget it. that's what has provided the backbone of our enthusiasm and our
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passion to try and make things better for other children. we couldn't do anything for christopher sadly. we lost him in 2008. we want to make a difference for the children that will be diagnosed tomorrow, in a month's time, in a yea r‘s tomorrow, in a month's time, in a year's time. did you feel at the time that you were battling red tape? i think when we went through treatment with christopher, that was pretty much the only thing we could focus on. it is an unbelievably tough time, you exist in a parallel world. we didn't have a lot of opportunity to be honest to look beyond what was available for christopher at that time. a couple of months after he died, in the october 2008, we started working with christopher smile to fund
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research into new treatments, knowing that there were children who weren't going to survive with what was on offer at the time. it is something you have to go through to understand the challenge of sitting beside your child and suffering alongside them, wishing every moment of the day you could be in their place. i think that will always live within us and that is our driver, to make that difference for other families and other children. professor, do you believe there are treatments that could actually be saving lives right now if only the red tape where changed? there's no question that this modern generation of cancer drugs is more effective. i think in terms of red tape, it is one factor. it's complicated to deliver these drugs, as you know,
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they are very expensive to produce. the issue of delivering them effectively to children is multifactorial. i think we are seeing changes to the legislation which will help, clinical trials are becoming better and we sequence children now with genomic technology so we children now with genomic technology so we know that the target is president. that maximises the chance that these drugs can work more effectively. —— that these drugs can work more effectively. — — that that these drugs can work more effectively. —— that the target is present. many clinicians and parents are working together to help deliver these drugs to children and we are seeing an increase in the number of compounds and drugs available. seeing an increase in the number of compounds and drugs available]! this a case of regulation, catching up this a case of regulation, catching up with where the science is? or are they good reasons behind not giving these drug trials to kids? could they do more harm then good?” these drug trials to kids? could they do more harm then good? i don't think anyone consciously would want
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to restrict a life—saving drug from a child with cancer. developments of incredibly expensive drugs for very small patient populations is very challenging. what it needs is a concerted effort from changes in legislation, which this change addresses, it'll close a loophole that should increase the number of drugs we see for these kids. there are other approaches. we need academia, governments and pharmacology to work together to create incentives and creative ways to help us as clinicians and carers to help us as clinicians and carers to deliver these drugs to patients. thank you. nhs bosses are to report back to mps today about how the roll out of seven—day—a—week services is going for gps. the government has previously committed to providing an extra £528 million of funding by 2021 to help this happen. but doctors have warned they are already feeling over worked.
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the mps' committee will be asking how many surgeries are switching to a seven—day service and whether this is what patients want. let's talk to drjohn cormack, a gp from essex, who says he'd consider quitting if he was forced to open seven days a week. and bridgit sam—bailey, a retired teacher, from london, who says she can rarely get an appointment at her gp. thank you forjoining us. why would you consider quitting if you had to go seven days a week? well, because iam go seven days a week? well, because i am pushing 70 and because i work with the nhs than nothing. in a sense i do work seven days... so you work for the nhs for nothing? the practice is poorly funded so in order to make it work we have to use more nurses than is usual in a practice and i have to work free of charge. you don't have a salary? no,
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i've changed my name by deed poll in order to embarrass the people who hold the purse strings at the nhs but unfortunately they aren't easily embarrassed. is that how you sign your name? unfortunately the gmc won't let me use that name in practice because if you put that name on a death certificate it won't go down very well. i think that's a reasonable decision. in terms of funding, you've got 6000 patients at your practice. what do you get per year from central funding for each patient? well, it's something like 95- £99 patient? well, it's something like 95— £99 per year per patient. patient? well, it's something like 95- £99 per year per patient. that's about £600,000 per year for your practice. we've recently taken on a lot of extra patients. so you've got
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more than 6000? we were 4500, we are now 6000. there is vast disparity. in terms of your practice, you've got £600,000 coming in a year but you say that level of income isn't enough for you to get a salary? it's not been enough to pay me until now, because obviously, you could say the choice is yours, you could sack if you staff, you could cut down on the service. in order to provide a reasonable service we have to work with nurses and with me not taking a salary. you said until now you've not been able to have a salary.” haven't taken a salary. we lost about £10,000 last year. in a sense not only do i not take a salary but i have to pay in at the end of the year. use a seven week services is
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not viable for your practice?” year. use a seven week services is not viable for your practice? i go in at weekends for terminal care patients, i give them my mobile phone number so they can get seen. if people who are working in the practice are worried about a patient ona practice are worried about a patient on a friday they will leave me a message so why will see them. i was forced to open and run regular surgeries on saturday and sunday would cause problems because then the running costs would go up. would cause problems because then the running costs would go upm that what you would like to see practice is doing? i think there is a need for gps to work seven days a week, not necessarily the same gps. there should be a writer. after all, gps are human beings, they've got family commitments. they need time off to re—energise. for the same gp working seven days a week... but as a patient you would like to be able to access the server seven days a week? yes. was your current
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experience? as it is now, if! week? yes. was your current experience? as it is now, if i want to see my gp, it is impossible. i have to queue up in the morning from about 7am. queue at the gates and because i'm not really physically mobile, when the gate opens the able—bodied people just rush through, and i'm left at the end. or my son has to leave his home and come and stand in the queue to make me an appointment. when he's given an appointment he will telephone me and say, is this going to be all right? we liaise like that and he lets them know if it's acceptable. as an older person, i must say we have got rather complex needs. we need to be able to access a gp more easily. when a person has, for example, high blood pressure, you
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end up having diabetes or something like that. you could have coronary problems. so you need to be able to access your gp. another thing is, problems. so you need to be able to access your gp. anotherthing is, i don't like changing gps. i would rather see the same person every timel rather see the same person every time i go. sol rather see the same person every time i go. so i become accustomed that person. but doctor doesn't have to start all over again. that's very important. what do you think is the best way to go about setting up services in order to deliver that sort of care? well, the way we do it is to make access more straightforward. we do do and unbacked surgery where people piling everyday and will be seen because there is a demand. every practice does it differently. a lot of practices have a system whereby you either have to turn up early or start phoning at 8am. that makes it difficult for patients to get
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appointments at times that suit them. i think patients with complex needs me to see the same gp. small practices have advantages but are closing in droves because of the push to open super surgeries. also because of the financial pressures. indeed, small practices are under huge financial pressure. the move is to make them federate or to formally join together in these huge practices which are very impersonal and where you don't always see the same person. would you be prepared to do away with that if there was less of a personal service, but more ofa less of a personal service, but more of a guarantee you could get what you wanted when you wanted it?” think we need both. you need that bit of personal confidence in your gp. but of course it needs funding. without the funds they can't give you the service. i'm not complaining about the gps, i'm complaining about system. that causes them to work in
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that way. there's got to be funding, they've got to be supported, and they've got to be supported, and they have to have more staff. they need stability because i find that each time i go to my surgery, someone i saw the last time is no longer with the surgery. so we start all over again. thank you very much. we have a statement from the department of health saying we want all patients to have access to high—quality surgeries which is why we have invested an extra £2.4 billion as well as boosting the workforce with an extra 5000 doctors in general practice by 2020. some gp practices open, close or merge, what is important is that patients continue to get access to the services they need and there is already a clear legal responsibility for nhs england to make that happen. we asked for a minister to come on the programme, but they declined.
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a spokesman for the department of health has previously told us it's invested an extra £2.4 billion into primary care, and is boosting the workforce with an extra 5,000 gps by 2020. let us know your thoughts and experiences on gp practices. a man in australia who allegedly posed online asjustin bieber and persuaded fans to send him explicit pictures has been charged with more than 900 child sex offences. police believe he had around 150 victims, up to 20 of them from the uk. our correspondenet, hywel griffith, is in sydney. this man was apprehended after an international search involving police in the uk. we understand in mainland europe and in the us as well. they believe that this man from brisbane was using his computer to pose online as the canadian pop singerjustin bieber, enticing and targeting young fans, winning their
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trust and then using communication through social media and skype sadly to solicit explicit images. when they confiscated his computer, they came across a huge cachet of images resulting in 930 new child sexual offences against him, including charges of rape and indecent children of children, as well as multiple charges of making, possessing and distributing indecent images. he will be in court next week. what are police saying about online safety? they say it is a reason for a big rethink as to how society deals with online safety for children. it is a difficult area to police. what they want is for children to be educated and police themselves, to understand that on
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themselves, to understand that on the internet particularly not everything is as it seems. you get a sense of scale with this, you may have a potential offender in australia but children in the uk, the us and many other countries are targeted and the technology means sadly they can then share, be abused, and the images can be shared multiple times. although the police have found 157 victims, they believe there may be many more out there. the investigation is going on. thank you. still to come... we're be live as the queen and other members of the royal familty arrive for the unveiling of a new war memorial for those who served in iraq and afghanistan. and we'll have more on barcelona's spectacular comeback against paris st germain in the champions league. that's coming up in sport. let usjoin the let us join the newsroom for an update. good morning. the chancellor is facing accusations
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of breaking an election pledge, by increasing national insurance contributions for many self—employed workers. after his budget announcement, philip hammond is facing growing pressure to reconsider the plan from some conservative mps. the treasury has rejected calls for a rethink, insisting the increase will make the national insurance system fairer. the number of people caught carrying knives in england and wales has risen to the highest level for six yea rs. risen to the highest level for six years. the home office says there we re years. the home office says there were more than 19,000 offences of knife possession last year. government figures show a record 41% of adult offenders were jailed. the european court of human rights has backed a key element of the government's anti—terrorism mergers. it stripped the sudanese terror suspect of his citizenship and barred him from re—entering britain —— measures. the man was suspected of taking part in terrorism related activities in somalia. malta's famous rock arch,
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which featured in a number of films and the tv series game of thrones, has collapsed into the sea. the azure window, on gozo, was damaged by heavy storms. the prime minister, joseph muscat, said it was heartbreaking. a study of the arch in 2013 said it was eroding but wasn't in imminent danger of collapse. an actor from the harry potter films is in intensive care after a head—on car crash left him with a broken neck and punctured lung. jim tavare, known for his role in harry potter and the prisoner of azkaban, also suffered 15 broken ribs and breaks in his right leg. his wife, laura, posted a picture of him in a hospital bed on facebook. doctors in india say they have successfully performed weight reduction surgery on an egyptian woman believed to be the world's heaviest. eman ahmed, who's believed to have weighed 500 kilos, or 78 stone,
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was flown to mumbai earlier this year and admitted to a specially built unit at a local hospital. herfamily said she had not left her house for 25 years. that's a summary of the latest news. join me for bbc newsroom live at 11am. we will have coverage of the unveiling of the iraq and afghanistan memorial. let us go to the sport. is it the greatest sporting comeback of all time? it's certainly the biggest in champions league history. barceolona overturned a 4—0 deficit against paris st germain with a 6—1 win in the most dramatic fashion at the camp nou. barca scored three goals in the last seven minutes to see them through to the quarterfinal, with two of them coming in added time. arsenal manager arsene wenger has said this morning that he hasn't yet made up his mind whether to stay on in the job but admits that the opinion of the fans and potential protests will have a bearing on his decision. a potentially decisive blow for manchester city's premier league
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title hopes after they were held to a goalless draw at home to stoke. they're now 10 points behind leaders chelsea and with tottenham in 2nd place on goal difference. and there'll be an all—british tie in the second round of the wta event at indian wells in california. heather watson beat nicole gibbs and now faces johanna konta. it'll be the first time the pair have played each other on the tour. we will have more sport for you on the news channel throughout the day. thank you. let's get more reaction now to the chancellor's first budget with our political guru, norman smith. a fairly unique moment. he has managed to unite notjust the conservative party but also labour mps, liberal democrat mps, all of whom seem opposed to the £2 billion hit on the self—employed. albeit mr hammond and the treasury team at the moment are insisting no retreat. we shall see. let us discuss that with
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the conservative mp nigel mills and labour's member of the treasury team. is mr hammond going to have to back off? i suppose we will see how much the government feel they need to make the reform. there is a problem to address. if you are employed, the national insurance bill isjust employed, the national insurance bill is just under 26%, self—employed, 9%. there is a big unfairness. costing 5 billion to the exchequer, you can see why they need to tackle it, especially with rising self—employment. the issue is lots of people are made to be self—employed by employers, they are banking the saving, and they would much rather be employed. we need to work out how we can fix that situation and then look at how we change the tax position. if we can fix it, the amount being lost would be less. what happens if mr hammond
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sticks to his position? he has to get a bill through parliament to get the rise through, he has until next april. people across the spectrum wa nt april. people across the spectrum want to see how we fix the self—employment situation so only those people who are actually self—employed are self—employed. it is that they have a slightly lower tax rate because they get fewer benefits. i think he needs to work out the overall big picture rather than starting with the difficult tax rise... than starting with the difficult tax rise. . . what than starting with the difficult tax rise... what do you say to the labour people who say, philip hammond is onto something? it is a progressive and fair tax change. bottom line is the government have already set in play a review of self—employment and the gig economy with the whole ambit of it. it has not reported yet, not until the summer. he has not even had the provisional findings. summer. he has not even had the provisionalfindings. what summer. he has not even had the provisional findings. what is the point of setting off a review in train of this type of issue and then pre—empting it in advance question
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that it seems a bit crass. your shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell was pretty clear this morning labour will oppose the changes. the question is, why? why would you want a differential taxation system between people employed by a boss and people who employ themselves? the point at the end of the day and i think nigel picked it up, it is not just about the rates, i think nigel picked it up, it is notjust about the rates, the whole point is people are effectively enforced to be self—employed. i know lots of them are forced to do it and the employer is getting away without paying a fair share of national insurance. it falls to the employee in effect to pay their share and now they are getting clobbered for it and it is not right. it has to be dealt with in the round. the way this was managed, the politics, it is becoming increasingly ludicrous for ministers to insist they have not broken the tory manifesto.” think the manifesto was pretty clear, it said no national insurance rise. the government have a
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technical defence that the building put through did not say class four. i think what i'd stood was there would be no rise overall. i would say it looks like a breach. —— i understood. some grounds for saying it isa understood. some grounds for saying it is a situation that we have to look at, we cannot allow the 5 billion revenue... in terms of selling it, an old maxim, when in a hole, stop digging. accept, we have had to break the manifesto, there are reasons for that. i would rather than use that defence, yes, it would be more honest and transparent. the people will understand, when you have very high earning lawyers and accountants in partnerships who are paying a lower rate of national insurance than people earning a low—wage, people understand that perhaps ought to change. they will also understand what we do not want to do is have a system where we are encouraging unscrupulous employers to pretend their employees are
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self—employed. we need to level the playing field. there are good grounds for this but those people who are genuinely self—employed trying to grow the business, who get less rights, they would quite rightly probably be quite angry about this. picking up that point, we have heard from the resolution foundation, hang on a sec someone earning up to £50,000 self—employed could be paying less tax than someone earning less because they are employed by a boss. the problem with the house of commons, we are in a binary position. i do not think it is one or the other. it has to be in the round. you cannot say, we will deal with one element, the rate of national insurance contributions, it has to be in the round. the government recognise that and that is why they have set up the review. what in god's name is the point of setting up a review if you com pletely setting up a review if you completely pre—empt it? setting up a review if you completely pre-empt it? a last word,
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at your brief, short advice to the chancellor, about what he should do now. i think he should go away, think again and pull the plan.” think again and pull the plan.” think he should get the review of theissue think he should get the review of the issue of self—employment out so we can look at it in the round and see what the fair policies are to tackle it. thank you very much. huge pressure on the chancellor to address some of the concerns we have been hearing about. to date, no signs so far of a rethink. thank you, norman. let me tell you, we are going to bring you coverage of the queen unveiling a memorial dedicated to all of those who served in conflicts in iraq and afghanistan ina in conflicts in iraq and afghanistan in a little while. this is horse guards parade in central london where the memorial will be unveiled and we will be there in a few moments. first, scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon has told
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the bbc a common—sense time for a second independence referendum would be autumn, 2018. a final decision on holding such a vote has not yet been taken, but ms sturgeon insisted she was "not bluffing" about holding another referendum. she was speaking to the bbc‘s political editor laura kuenssberg. in westminster, some politicians think you're bluffing about holding a referendum. i'm not and i never have been. i always think that sometimes kind of says more about them than it does about me because it suggests that there are politicians in westminster who think brexit and all of this is some kind of game. it's not a game, it's really, really serious and the implications for the uk are serious and the indications ——implications for scotland are serious. some of your colleagues talk about autumn, 2018, as a likely date. within that window, as the outline of a uk deal becomes clear, and the uk exiting the eu i think would be the common sense time for scotland to have that choice if that is the road we choose
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to go down. just to be clear, you're not ruling out autumn, 2018? i'm not ruling out anything, no. let us get the thoughts of ian murray. from edinburgh, the snp, miles breaks. ian murray, what do you think about the prospect of a referendum? completely unnecessary. with the uncertainty across brexit, the last thing you need is another scottish referendum. if you want to destroy the scottish economy, this is the best way to do it. maybe we will have one... it looks as if we have more clarity today. it is clear the scottish people do not want another independence referendum. the polls have shown that. the snp wake up polls have shown that. the snp wake up every single day of the week to try to deliver independence and they
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are using brexit to do that and the people who suffer will be the scottish people in terms of economic downturn. 2014, the issues then more prominent now and the fiscal deficit scotla nd prominent now and the fiscal deficit scotland currently carries would be detrimental to any kind of independent scotland and there is no a nswer to independent scotland and there is no answer to the big questions about people's jobs, answer to the big questions about people'sjobs, livelihoods answer to the big questions about people's jobs, livelihoods and what the scottish economy would look like in the future. miles? i agree with what ian has said. yet more uncertainty. the politics of nicola sturgeon. for the last ten years, she has used this issue to divide our country and she is continuing to do that today. we need to move on as a nation and look at how we better run public services in scotland and it is that fact nicola sturgeon does not want to maybe look at the failings for government have that she is using this issue yet again. it is time to turn the page on the constitutional demons dividing our country and work to get the best
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deal for the uk leaving the eu scotla nd deal for the uk leaving the eu scotland did not want brexit.” voted remain but it was a uk wide referendum and we as a country now are all leaving the eu and we need to get the best possible deal. that is where i have been really impressed with the way the uk government has been engaging with the scottish parliament and with all parties across scotland, to listen to the views of industry in scotland, to make sure we get the best possible deal for scotland and the uk. theresa may could block a referendum if that option was to be pursued. do you think she should? the issue has never been that there bea the issue has never been that there be a referendum, both the prime ministerand our be a referendum, both the prime minister and our leader ruth davidson have been clear. the issue is, should there be? people do not want... ifa is, should there be? people do not want... if a decision was taken by the snp, yes, we will go for one,
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theresa may could block it, should she? they are a minority government in the scottish parliament so they would have to bring forward the vote and we would see how parties approach it. for people in scotland, they would want to see how the government is thinking this through. over the next two years, there is a lot of work to do to secure the best deal for scotland. i am lot of work to do to secure the best deal for scotland. lam not lot of work to do to secure the best deal for scotland. i am not sure the focus is currently on that and i think that is why people in scotland will soon punish them for that at the local elections in may, the best opportunity voters will have to knocked a strong team of conservative councillors to send a message to the snp on this issue —— to elect. nicola sturgeon would need to get permission from westminster to hold a referendum, should they withhold it? the issues around it would be pa rt it? the issues around it would be part of the negotiations so it would depend what that negotiation looks
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like. i agree with everything he's just said. if they have brought us to this brink. they ran an election campaign pitting scots against england. david cameron came to the steps of downing street the morning the result was announced and announced english votes for english laws. then they brought us to a position brexit. it's about time his party brought responsibility. let's get the second referendum of the table and work to get the best possible brexiteer over scotland and the uk. -- possible brexiteer over scotland and the uk. —— best possible brexit deal for scotland and the uk. nicola sturgeon's interview was recorded for the bbc documentary brexit: britain's biggest deal — to be broadcast this evening on bbc two in england, wales and northern ireland at 21:00 and on bbc two scotland at 23:15. thank you for your comments on our interview with niall woods. one
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viewer has said, good to hear an honest account of the drug trade and a pragmatic sensible approach to minimising it. nealworked a pragmatic sensible approach to minimising it. neal worked as an undercover policeman who risks his life to infiltrate criminal drug gangs. he describes some of his experiences and how he was able to cope. basically i had to befriend people and empathise with people. it became like weaponising empathy. you have to move among people who are problematic drug users and befriend them. but doesn't it have to be more than that, don't you have to pass off as somebody absolutely credible in that world, doesn't that mean taking drugs? i never had to take heroin or cocaine. but i once had to ta ke heroin or cocaine. but i once had to take amphetamine. i made the mistake of presenting myself to be a connoisseur of that drug which was a mistake in the end. someone gave me
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a present and it was 40% pure. normally the drug would be 5%. to avoid imminent violence i had to ta ke avoid imminent violence i had to take some of that drug. that was quite terrifying. i was awake for three nights. only on one occasion in14 three nights. only on one occasion in 14 years three nights. only on one occasion in14 years did three nights. only on one occasion in 14 years did you take drugs?” had to take cannabis a few times. but that was it, other than those occasions. what about dealing drugs? we didn't deal. i pretended to be a dealer. sometimes i would make myself out to be a burglar, wheeler dealer. i was buying large quantities in order to present that. i would never actually sell drugs. i did have a camera found once in leicester. i'd been trading with a gangster for about four months. on this one occasion i went to sell him some counterfeit clothing as part of my cover. he brought two friends who
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we re my cover. he brought two friends who were instantly suspicious. one of them searched me and found a camera. i was them searched me and found a camera. iwas in them searched me and found a camera. i was in quite an isolated car park. i can't say the words i said. basically i gave him a torrent of abuse to try and interrupters ability to tell his friend what it found. then i had to deliberately and as slowly as possible fold up the clothing. if you run a way that is confirming someone's suspicions. very slowly i walked away. i managed to gain enough meat so that when he convinced his companion and they came after me a car, i escaped it by two metres. my intelligence guy joked saying he didn't know why they didn'tjust shoot joked saying he didn't know why they didn't just shoot be joked saying he didn't know why they didn'tjust shoot be because a p pa re ntly didn'tjust shoot be because apparently there was a gun in that car. the queen is unveiling a
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memorial to all those who served in iraq, afghanistan and the gulf war between 1990 and 2015. we are here ina between 1990 and 2015. we are here in a horse guards parade. the queen will be arriving soon with many other members of the royal family for this service of dedication here. at shortly after 11:30am the queen will unveil the iraq afghanistan memorial at victoria embankment gardens. its cost about £1 million to create. members of the public have donated that money and it recognises the contribution not only of the troops who have fought and served in the various conflicts since 1990, the gulf campaigns in iraq and afghanistan, but also civilians, aid workers, people who have worked in the reconstruction of iraq and afghanistan, in that long
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period of 25 years from 1990 until 2015 and the withdrawal of british troops from afghanistan. the service of dedication here at horse guards parade is going to be witness not only by the queen and members of the royalfamily only by the queen and members of the royal family but the prime minister, theresa may and former prime ministers david cameron, tony blair and so on are here as well. my colleague is going to be watching events unfold here at horse guards parade. the emphasis of this memorial is notjust to remember those who fought on behalf of the military, but also those who served in iraq and afghanistan. civilians, aid workers, humanitarian workers and so on. yes, that's been particularly challenging for paul dave who designed the memorial. obviously aware of the complexities of trying to bring all of that together. there's a lot of
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controversy in the uk politically about those conflicts. in a way it's unfinished business. what he's done is on one side there is a medallion in the centre of the memorial, it picks the armed forces. on the rear side there is the civilian services. you will see later on a mass of faces and scenes. the stonework is partly unfinished. as paul said, this is unfinished business. he had to reflect that. we are talking about the contribution by hundreds of thousands of people. the military and those civilians involved in reconstruction words, aid work and so on. obviously the people who lost their lives are at the heart of any ceremony like this. we seem discussion over the attendance of war widows. one of those said to us
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that it was a shame they couldn't all be here but that she recognised there was a shared pride in the achievement that could be attached to those people who served. it is a very difficult story to tell. we are just seeing the prince of wales and the doctors of cornwall arriving. this service we are going to have hit is a drumhead service. it is a military tradition where they pile drums from the military band on top of each other. this goes back centuries in british military tradition where they have services in the field. it was a way of creating a central focus for troops to gather. they will pile drums, create and alter and the service will be held around that. it goes back a awful long way. it goes back to the second world war weather type
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of service was held, its a very old tradition. —— where that type of service was held. this memorial is not just about be fallen although service was held. this memorial is notjust about be fallen although it does remember the fallen who have lost their lives. there was some controversy, some widows were saying they should have been invited to this when they weren't. as we were touching on, it's a wider memorial. it's about untold stories. that's what paul day wanted to try and get across. a terribly difficultjob for him. it's the stories, obviously there is a focus for remembrance but this is a way of saying thank you and paying tribute. both iraq and afghanistan were politically controversial. the country was
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divided. there was a unity in the country behind those who fought there and served both military and civilian. that was recognised at the time. we remember the stop the war marches and subsequent controversy. the enquiries. tony blair is sitting watching the ceremony here this morning. no one has ever doubted the dedication of the armed services. i was speaking to one and he lost a leg, he was very badly injured in the conflict. they both said that whatever the back story, whatever the political back story, they are here to share memories and to pay tribute to the courage and the good job done by all of those in uniform or out of uniform in iraq and afghanistan. as we were talking, 2500 people here to watch this service of dedication. many members of the royal family, service of dedication. many members of the royalfamily, many service of dedication. many members of the royal family, many senior politicians as well. it's quite an
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extraordinary event. it is, ithink one should note the public engagement with this. when the government backed this it kicked off but the public, through the sun newspaper, paid an awful part towards funding this. there has been public engagement for three years to get this underway. without that, we probably wouldn't be where we are now. it's important to stress that the government and british legion are part of this. there were almost two sides to this, there was this event which is the more formal event, but across the road, although you save the queen will be there to unveil the monument, that is in a way a symbol of public engagement and public respect for the jobs that we re and public respect for the jobs that were done. this period we are talking about which began in 1990 after saddam hussein invaded kuwait, and the conflict that ensued and the gulf campaign, and then of course
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the invasion of iraq in 2003, and the invasion of iraq in 2003, and the campaign in afghanistan as well, it represents the longest period of continuous service by the british military since the second world war. it does, and very intense. very intense military service. and complex politically, very difficult. but there was a great feeling amongst returning troops, i remember speaking to a lot of them when they came home, that they felt they had done the best they could. the felt thejob done the best they could. the felt the job they done the best they could. the felt thejob they had done the best they could. the felt the job they had dug was the best they could. they accept its unfinished but at least they did something to give those countries a start. national anthem plays. her majesty the queen and the duke of edinburgh here. they are arriving for the service of dedication. here at horse guards parade. national anthem plays.
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and the queen will be greeted here by the chief of the defence staff air chief marshal sir stuart peach. and lord lieutenant ken lisa. the start of this service of dedication which we will be bringing to you live here on bbc news. after the service, just after 11:30am the queen will make her wait to victoria embankment gardens, where the memorial is situated overlooking the
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thames. the iraq afghanistan memorial and she will unveil it, that £1 million memorial that has been created by paul day with two stones to represent iraq and afghanistan. and a bronze disc linking them. in civilian and in the gulf region, in iraq and afghanistan, we commit ourselves to work —— for all those members of the military and

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