Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  March 13, 2017 3:00pm-4:01pm GMT

3:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines at 3pm. scotland's first minister takes westminster by surprise as she announces plans to trigger another independence referendum. nicola sturgeon says a second referendum should be held between autumn next year and the spring of 2019, once the terms of the uk's exit from the eu become clear. i believe that it would be wrong for scotland to be taken down a path that it has no control over, regardless of the consequences for our economy, for our society, for our place in the world, for our very sense of who we are as a country. instead of playing politics with the future of our country, the scottish government should focus on delivering good government and public services for the people of scotland. politics is not a game. the announcement comes as mps at westminster prepare to vote again on whether to give the prime minister the power to trigger the brexit process. i'm simon mccoy, live at
3:01 pm
westminster, we will have continuing political reaction, throughout this afternoon. the other main headlines this hour. thousands of commuters are hit by a 2k hour rail strike members from three train companies walk out. and the queen launches the baton relay for the 2018 commonwealth games in australia as it starts its journey around the world. it will take 388 days! it came as something of a bolt out of the blue, the scotland first minister has announced that she would like to trigger a second referendum on scottish independence.
3:02 pm
nicola sturgeon said she wants a vote between autumn next year and the spring of 2019, when the terms of the uk's exit from the eu become clear. ms sturgeon said scotland was on a path to a hard brexit over which it had no control. as we negotiate to leave the european union, i want to negotiate an agreement that is going to work for the whole of the united kingdom, that includes the scottish people, that includes the scottish people, thatis that includes the scottish people, that is why we have been working closely with the devolved administrations, listening to their proposals, and recognising the many areas of common ground such as protecting workers' rights and security from crime and terrorism. the tunnel vision the snp has shown todayis the tunnel vision the snp has shown today is deeply regrettable, it sets scotla nd today is deeply regrettable, it sets scotland on a course for more uncertainty and division, creating huge uncertainty. this is at a time when the evidence is that the scottish people, the majority of the scottish people, the majority of the scottish people, the majority of the
3:03 pm
scottish people, do not want a second independence referendum. instead of playing politics with the future of our country, the scottish government should focus on delivering good government and public services for the people of scotland. politics is not a game. the scene at westminster abbey, the queen is attending a service in celebration of the commonwealth, we are awaiting the arrival of the prime minister, theresa may. but, we are still waiting to hear if she appears there. the queen, the duke of edinburgh, prince charles, prince harry all of them are scheduled to appear. we will go back as soon as there is reaction to the events of today. let's remind you of what nicola sturgeon had to say at a press c0 nfe re nce nicola sturgeon had to say at a press conference today when she said she had something important to say but no one expected this. let me set out a plan that i intend to pursue. first i will continue to stand up for scotland buzz interest during the progress of "brexit"
3:04 pm
negotiations. second, i will now take the steps necessary to make sure that scotland will have a choice at the end of this process. a choice of whether to follow the uk to a hard brexit, or to become an independent country, able to secure a real partnership of equals with the rest of the uk and our own relationship with europe. the scottish government's mandate for offering this choice is beyond doubt. last year we were elected with the highest share of the constituency vote won by any party in the history of devolution on a manifesto that said this: the scottish parliament should have the right to hold another referendum if there is a significant and material change in circumstances that prevailed in 2014, such as scotland being taken out of the eu against our will. these conditions have, of course, now been met. so i can confirm today that next week i will seek the authority of the scottish parliament to agree with the uk government the details of a section 30 order. the procedure that will enable
3:05 pm
the scottish parliament to legislate for an independence referendum. caught many people, including downing street, by surprise, lots of rumours over the past few days of some sort of announcement, adds not this one. if anybody knew that statement was coming it was alex salmond, of course, this is what he had to say a little earlier: the arrogance of downing street. even though they know that they've been caught flat—footed today as norman smith put it... nicola sturgeon was re—elected as first minister with 47 percent of the vote last may on a platform which said if scotland were to be dragged out of europe against the will of the scottish people following the brexit referendum, then the scottish parliament should have the right to hold another referendum. that was her electoral mandate. 0n the contrast david cameron held
3:06 pm
the brexit referendum on 37 percent of the vote. and theresa may has got zero percent of the vote because nobody‘s elected her at all! so the arrogance of downing street and questioning this unimpeachable mandate that nicola sturgeon has to proceed in exactly the way she has proceeded today is called political leadership and downing street should take note. taking you to westminster abbey, prince william arriving there, for that celebration of the commonwealth service. with him, prince henry of wales, prince harry, the duke of york, also attending this service, alongside a number of heads of commonwealth countries, representatives here in the uk. and this being commonwealth day, coinciding with the event at buckingham palace, with the queen launching the bat on relay from buckingham palace, the bat on that will be carried to the host nation
3:07 pm
of the commonwealth games, the gold coast, in australia, kicking off on aprilfour, next year. —— baton. the queen does not comment on political matters but may have noticed that the event was very much overshadowed by the announcement coming from nicola sturgeon, in scotland. prince harry, lots of attention, crowds gathering once they were aware that things were happening. apart from the members of the royalfamily, the queen will be arriving in about eight minutes for the start of the service, dignitaries from commonwealth governments, and in the queen's text of the commonwealth message, perhaps interestingly, perhaps something politicians will have spotted, she has effectively open the doors of buckingham palace, and windsor castle, to commonwealth
3:08 pm
heads over the next 12 months, so that those venues can be used for the first time for events to do with the first time for events to do with the commonwealth, the commonwealth heads of government, has to be said, difficult to find. all of this coming on the eve of the possible triggering of article 50, something nicola sturgeon was stressing this morning, in her speech, that on the eve of possibly a hard brexit being triggered, scotland would have been taken down a road over which it had no control. theresa may feel she has more control over the article 50 triggering, as alex forsyth now reports. voiceover: westminster gearing up for a fight, protest outside, the real battle will take place inside parliament. today, mps and lords will decide whether to sign off the " b rex it" will decide whether to sign off the "brexit" bill. theresa may and her
3:09 pm
government want it passed today with no changes, those who back "brexit" agree. there are no new organs being made, no new suggestions, so i expect we will have to wait and see, and we will see it passed clean, with no amendments, and we will get on with the serious business of negotiation with eu friends. the house of lords has already proposed changes to the bill, to protect the rights of eu citizens in the uk, and to give parliament a say on the final terms of the uk's "brexit" deal, this afternoon the bill is back before mps, who will vote on whether to accept or reject the lords amendments, was they have decided, the bill goes back to the lords this evening. they also have two a p prove lords this evening. they also have two approve it, once it is signed off by mps and peers, it gets royal assent, this is just off by mps and peers, it gets royal assent, this isjust a off by mps and peers, it gets royal assent, this is just a formality. labour wants changes to the bill before that happens. we will be pushing hard, i hope the government rethinks, i hope some of the tory
3:10 pm
mps who are really concerned about theseissues mps who are really concerned about these issues will vote with us, that is the only way that we can win these amendments. some tories might oppose the government, if they don't get a promise that parliament will be able to intervene if the government does not reach and exit deal with the eu. what we will here isa deal with the eu. what we will here is a definite commitment for a vote, if we get a deal, but many of us will be probing the issue if we don't get a deal. despite the threat of some tory rebels, it is unlikely there will be enough to defeat the government and many in the house of lords do not want a prolonged tussle, so, by the end of today, the prime minister could have the power to start the "brexit" process. some still oppose it, it will not be a smooth road, but our departure from the eu is getting closer. theresa may would have appear to be fairly confident that the amendments will not go through the house of commons. joining me now, hilary benn, labour, but you will vote for these two
3:11 pm
amendments. i am, as a labour mp, not as chairfor amendments. i am, as a labour mp, not as chair for the "brexit" committee, we have not considered the amendments in the committee but it is right that we should give reassurance to these eu citizens that are here, it will help us to win rights for our own citizens abroad as well and on the question of the nature of the vote, that parliament will have at the end of the negotiation process, it is right and proper that it should be clear, beyond doubt, put it in the legislation, not only will we have a vote if there is a deal to consider but if the government comes back and says, we have not been able to reach any agreement, parliament in no circumstances should decide how we then leave the european union. it is not a decision that the government can take on our behalf. nobody can second—guess how negotiations will 90, second—guess how negotiations will go, there is some suggestion that theresa may may be considering, once article 50 is triggered, as an act of goodwill, that is the moment to announce the future stages of eu
3:12 pm
citizens in this country. shouldn't it now be something that leaders lead on and she should get on with it. i agree with that, that is why we agreed unanimously that the government should now take a unilateral decision to protect the rights of european citizens here. the sooner the prime minister does that, the better, and i would of course welcome it. i trust that the leaders of the other 27 member states will say to the 1.2 million british, of course you can stay, because it is a not in anybody‘s interests to add to the uncertainty that all of those european citizens have felt since the results of the referendum lastjune. have felt since the results of the referendum last june. you say that, it would strike many people as a bit odd, the prime minister is saying, i just want to get on with it, have the vote, start the process... surely, that is what many people would say, you know, we have back that, let her get on with it. that is why i voted for the article 50
3:13 pm
bill, let's get on with it... no, no, i'm afraid those two amendments, if they remain, they do not stop her from triggering it by the end of march at all, anyone who tries to argue that the purpose of those is to somehow try to prevent our process of leaving the european union, we are leaving the european union, we are leaving the european union because the british people have decided it. what they are saying is that a commitment should be given to eu citizens and two, make it clear, that parliament will get a vote in both circumstances, they have agreed with one of them, they have agreed with one of them, they have agreed with one of them, they have not made it clear in the event of no deal, then parliament will decide how we leave. talking about the other 27 countries, the clear impression was at least one of them were not in a mood to help on them were not in a mood to help on the citizenship issue. so, is it right that perhaps, that issue should be part of the negotiation ploy. should be part of the negotiation ploy, from now on? i don't think so, our committee did not think so, for this reason, the evidence we took from european citizens here and brits abroad, we do not want to be
3:14 pm
used as bargaining chips in this negotiation. you can only credibly do that if you are prepared, if you don't get what you want, to say, in britain's case, 3 million european citizens here, off you go. no one thing is that is going to happen, that would be undrinkable, frankly it is unthinkable that the other 27 will say that to the british people who have been living and working and making their lives in other countries, paying tax, it is in everybody‘s interest to get an agreement on this as quickly as possible. the argument for britain giving a lead is because it will create a good climate in which that can happen, i agree with you, straightaway, as soon as negotiations begin. just looking at pictures of the queen arriving at the commonwealth service, not far from where we stand. she would never express from where we stand. she would never ex press a from where we stand. she would never express a view about the second scottish referendum, but, one can back—ups have a guess... what did you make of that announcement this morning? i'm not in favour of a
3:15 pm
second scottish referendum, we had won two and a half years ago, there was a clear majority in scotland, to remain part of the united kingdom. all of the questions that were raised during that referendum about what currency scotland would use, the economics of an independent scotla nd the economics of an independent scotland given the oil price is much lower than it was, the uncertainty about scotland and membership of the european union... because it is by no means certain that scotland could just transfer and remain, it may have do apply again. spain, worried about catalonia, they may have a view. for me, the essential argument in the modern world, another division, let's work together on the things we want to achieve, a strong and successful united kingdom. hilary benn, thank you very much. we are going to go to westminster abbey, the queen has entered for the commonwealth service, and let'sjust join the proceedings there are, as she meets the dignitaries, the church leaders, at westminster abbey. formerly her private secretary, now
3:16 pm
shaking hands with her, someone she knows very well. let's join that private ceremony. so, the queen, duke of edinburgh, prince charles, arriving for that service. # send her victorious # happy and glorious # long to reign over us # god save the queen after the national anthem, the service gets underway, the queen in a different outfit from the one she was wearing at buckingham palace a short time ago when she handed over the commonwealth baton to the first
3:17 pm
of the baton bearers as it begins its remarkable journey to the gold coast of australia, for the start of the commonwealth games on april four. the queen issuing a commonwealth day message, pointing out that the battle will visit the people of every continent in the commonwealth and ocean. —— baton. contained within it, a written message that will be opened and read at the opening ceremony of the commonwealth games next year. but, says the queen, and even more powerful message to be seen and experienced as the baton parser from hand—to—hand, from seashore to mounting cop, through towns and villages, it is the message of a peace building commonwealth. —— mountaintop. the commonwealth is such an important thing for the queen, without her as its head, many have said, it would never have lasted as long as it has. yes, i
3:18 pm
think that is right, she is very much a symbolic figure in many ways as head of the commonwealth but she has really been the glue that has stuck all of these separate, desperate, often rival nations together, over the years, when she first ascended to the throne, there we re first ascended to the throne, there were seven nations that made up the commonwealth, now, 52. the queen herself has visited nearly all of them, only two she has not been to, they are relatively newcomers, cameroon and amanda. but she has been to every single commonwealth nation, often a number of times during her reign, such in her view is the important of the commonwealth and what can be achieved by working together. —— rwanda. you touched on her commonwealth message, released today, a little bit like the christmas message but for commonwealth nations on commonwealth day, and the language she uses, talking about consensus and cooperation, the importance of collaborating with one another in a
3:19 pm
spirit of goodwill, the importance of peace and understanding for one another. it shows how she views the commonwealth as an organisation and what it can possibly achieve to be very important, and she has been its greatest supporter over the years. thank you very much. and a little later, thenjessica ennis—hill will carry them at on —— carry baton the up carry them at on —— carry baton the up the hill, —— carry the baton up the hill for this remarkable service, celebrating what many believe is a remarkable organ is asian, 2.5 billion people connected through the commonwealth worldwide. coverage of this event continues on bbc one. but here, on bbc news, let's return to politics. to the decision this morning from the first minister of scotland that a second referendum on scottish independence now looks more than
3:20 pm
likely. let's go to vicky young, who is in the central lobby here at parliament. quite a lot of politics happening today! and "brexit" seems to be at the centre of it, nicola sturgeon arguing that things have changed since the last independence referendum in scotland because of the "brexit" vote, she says scotland is being forced down a road it does not want to take and that justifies her asking the scottish parliament next week to start the process, asking westminster for another independence referendum. i'm joined by the liberal democrat mp for all plea and shetland, alistair carmichael. —— 0rkney and shetland. things have changed significantly, exit is happening, scotland voted to remain. the one thing that has not changed and will never change, the accession the nicola sturgeon and the scottish nationalists have with scottish independence, that is what this is all about, this is something they are really putting their own party interest ahead of the national interest. all of us in whatever part
3:21 pm
of the uk we are in face an enormous amount of uncertainty as a result of the vote last june, amount of uncertainty as a result of the vote lastjune, this is one of the vote lastjune, this is one of the few things you can imagine will actually make this worse. this is something that the bull of scotland do not want or need and it should not be happening. nevertheless she says that scottish people do want another chance, she says you have to have the vote before it is too late, before scotland is taken out of the european union. one of the biggest contradictions at the heart of the case today by the snp, they say we wa nt case today by the snp, they say we want to have an informed debate... they will not even tell us if they think an independent scotland should bea think an independent scotland should be a memberof think an independent scotland should be a member of the european union or not, and of course the timetable they have brought forward, of course, they have brought forward, of course , we they have brought forward, of course, we will not know at that stage what the future relationship between the uk and the european union will be. so, where can you possibly in the circumstances make what they say they want, and informed decision? this is not about "brexit", this is about the accession that the snp have with
3:22 pm
getting scotland out of the united kingdom, breaking up the united kingdom, breaking up the united kingdom, and frankly, if it was not this, it would always be something else, that is never going to change. isn't the truth that the unionist parties in scotland are very worried about a second referendum, a lot of you have been reduced to very few mps, who is going to lead the campaignfor mps, who is going to lead the campaign for keeping the uk together? if there is a referendum, these decisions will be made in the fullness of time, i am confident that if there is a referendum, then we will get the same result that we got in 2014. i don't detect among my constituents any appetite to have a referendum, and! constituents any appetite to have a referendum, and i don't see either among my constituents all in the opinion polls any big shift in opinion. i don't take it for granted that somehow, because there is a referendum, everything else is going to fall into place. it will have to bea to fall into place. it will have to be a hard—fought campaign. we know that. but it is a campaign that
3:23 pm
those of us who want to see scotland in the united kingdom and a united kingdom in europe can win. thank you very much indeed. all of that going on while the "brexit" bill goes through parliament, may be getting to its final stages later on this evening. vicky young, too polite to tell me that i put you in the wrong place(!) very much for that —— thank you very much for that. i know where iam(!), college you very much for that. i know where i am(!), college green, outside of westminster, back to the studio. studio: we will speak with you later, thank you very much. iraqi forces say they are continuing to win back districts of mosul. the us envoy coordinating the fight against so—called islamic state says the last road out of mosul has been captured, and any is fighters still in the city will die there. mosul is iraq's second biggest city and has been in the hands of the is group for over two and a half years. richard lister has the latest. gunfire.
3:24 pm
v0|ceover: street by street and house by house, of islamic state are losing mosul. this rare footage shows these militants under pressure. they are outgunned and outflanked, surrounded by iraqi troops, relying on mortars, car bombs, and makeshift exploding drones like this one. it's not working. they've lost a third of their territory in less than ten days. but civilians are paying a terrible price. some are taken to safety ten minutes away but there is little to go back to. my entire family, they are gone, said 0mar. he is 17. more casualties arrive every day. at this stage we have approximately 60, we get around ten cases every day.
3:25 pm
hundreds of thousands of people are thought to be in the city as the shelling continues. with all major escape routes cut off, the iraqis and their american allies believe the fight for the city is entering a decisive phase. any of the fighters left are going to die there because they are trapped. we are very committed to making sure these guys cannot escape. the narrow streets and crowded neighbourhoods make for a crowded battle ground. for a nightmarish battle ground. thousands have fled since february. many more will make this harrowing journey before the battle is over. studio: let catch up with all of the weather news now. on the weather balcony, thomas! the weather is great outside right
3:26 pm
now, blue skies, if you have managed to enjoy it today, it has really been a smashing day, if you cloud in the sky, nothing more than that, look at this lovely picture, that is the name of the weather watcher tom because clearly that is a sunny picture. this is what the satellite picture. this is what the satellite picture looks like, a whole load of cloud heading our way, in place across northern areas through tonight, not in the short term, second—half of the afternoon, 16 in london, really pleasant, and across scotland, blustery period, wind racing of the atlantic bringing on and off showers. very blustery end to the night, and start to the day, to the night, and start to the day, to the night, and start to the day, to the south, quiet, and tomorrow, nice enough across most of the uk but look at that, blowing a gale in the north, 70 mph gusts forfriends in 0rkney and shetland, but other than that, not a bad state, sunshine
3:27 pm
around, and the next couple of days, not bad, towards the end of the week, not looking good. downhill. that is it. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines at 3.30pm. scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, has confirmed she will seek to hold a second referendum on scottish independence. she wants the vote between the autumn of next year and the spring of 2019. theresa may has reacted sharply. instead of playing politics with the future of our country, the scottish government should focus on delivering good governance. politics is not a game. at westminster legislation which gives theresa may the power to begin formal brexit negotiations faces its final hurdle in parliament this afternoon. the us envoy coordinating the fight against so—called is says any fighters from the group who are still in mosul will die there after the last road out of the city was captured by the iraqi army.
3:28 pm
members of the rmt union employed by three rail operators in england are striking in a dispute over whether the doors on trains should be operated by drivers or guards. and the queen's baton relay has been officially launched at buckingham palace ahead of next yea r‘s commonwealth games on australia's gold coast. has bought now and hugh has all the details. rebecca, hello. 0n the day the queen's baton relay marks the beginning of the countdown to next year's commonwealth games, the 2022 event suddenly doesn't have a host city anymore. the games will now not take place in durban. the south african city was going to be the first african host city, and had been the only one to bid for the games, but had indicated recently it faced financial difficulties. an official announcement is expected later today. liverpool has already expressed an interest in stepping in to stage the games.
3:29 pm
the commonwealth games federation are probably unwilling to exceed to some of the demands of the south african department of sport which are responsible for providing the funding for the games. i believe the department of sport wanted a return on the investment. there was also a discrepancy on the budget. it was believed to be $120 million less than what was said to be provided by the ministry of sport. i think the issues of funding and the country's economic growth was said to be 0.3% last year, said there are much more pressing needs and the treasury has not been able to provide the kind of funding that has been required to host the games. three—time tour de france winner chris froome has given his backing to team sky principal sir
3:30 pm
dave brailsford, saying without him, "there is no team sky." froome has so far been silent on his embattled boss, who has said he won't resign as uk anti—doping continue their investigation into a ‘mystery package' from 2011. but today froome has apologised for the way it's been handled. both brailsford and team sky deny any wrongdoing. here is some of froome's statement, in which he says: "i completely understand why people feel let down by the way in which the situation has been handled, and going forward we need to do better." he goes on to say... "i know it will take time for faith to be restored, but i will do my utmost to ensure that happens, along with everyone else at team sky." either chelsea or manchester united will later ensure that the four fa cup semi—finalists are all taken from the premier league top six, for only the second time this century. they play the last quarter final tonight, and one willjoin arsenal, spurs and manchester city in the draw for the last four. manchester united is too big. manchester united is too big. manchester united is the winner of the competition. it is much of the's fault that we were given this monday
3:31 pm
match so we have to make changes for sure. if we play thursday against rostov and rostov plays sunday, but we cannot go to stamford bridge.|j think we cannot go to stamford bridge.” think manchester united is together a city the best squad in the league and because they have a lot, a numberof and because they have a lot, a number of great players with great talent, with great experience to win, and the sure it would be a very tough game for us and for them. so the last of the quarter—finals — chelsea against manchester united — is live on bbc one. coverage starts at 7.30. there's also commentary on radio 5 live and coverage on the bbc
3:32 pm
sport website. two of the biggest clubs in french rugby union have announced they are to merge. paris—based stade francais and racing 92 say they need to pool their resources "to cope with the challenges of performance and education." it's a huge shock, as our reporter chrisjones explains. their owners say they have to pull the resources and the come on club. it is the equivalent of saracens and ha rlequins it is the equivalent of saracens and harlequins merging or to use a football analogy, to lament arsenal merging. it is a bizarre story, the kind of story that only french rugby seems able to throw up. that's all sport for now. i'll have more in the next hour. let's return to the announcement that nicola sturgeon will seek the power to call another referendum on scottish independence. in a speech
3:33 pm
in edinburgh she accused theresa may of refusing to move an inch in pursuing hard brexit. simon mccoy is on college green for us and we can rejoin him. thank you. every now and then there isa thank you. every now and then there is a news conference which actually does make news and nicola sturgeon's news co nfe re nce does make news and nicola sturgeon's news conference this morning was one of those. she said she had something important to say that pretty much eve ryo ne important to say that pretty much everyone seemed to be wrong—footed by the strength of the announcement she had. she said she wanted to trigger a second referendum on scottish independence. she said she wa nts scottish independence. she said she wants it between autumn of next year and spring of the following year, 2019. she said the uk was being taken down a route to hard brexit over which scotland had no control. downing street said this was a divisive move but they too were caught by surprise. so when nicola sturgeon took to the podium this morning, this is what she had to say.
3:34 pm
ido want i do want the uk to... i am farfrom alone in fearing a bad deal or indeed no deal. noram i alone in fearing a bad deal or indeed no deal. nor am i alone in fearing that even a so—called good deal would be significantly inferior to membership of the single market and that it will set scotland on a course that will not only damage our economy, but change the very nature of the society and country that we are. the problem with doing nothing now is that by the time these fears are realised, it will be too late for scotland to choose a different
3:35 pm
path before the damage is done. that would not be right orfair. whatever path we take, it should be one decided by us, not for us. so let me set out the plan i intend to pursue. first, i will continue to stand up for scotland's interests during the process of brexit negotiations. second, i will now take the steps necessary to make sure that scotland will have a choice at the end of the process. a choice of whether to follow the uk to a hard brexit or to become an independent country, able to secure a real partnership of equals with the rest of the uk and our own relationship with europe. the scottish government's mandate for offering this choice is beyond doubt. last year, we were elected with the highest share of the constituency vote won by any party in the history of devolution, on a
3:36 pm
ma nifesto in the history of devolution, on a manifesto which said this: the scottish parliament should have the right to hold another referendum if there is a significant and material change in the circumstances that prevailed in 2014, such as scotla nd that prevailed in 2014, such as scotland being ta ken that prevailed in 2014, such as scotland being taken out of the eu against our will. these conditions have, of course, now been met. so i can confirm that next week i will seek the authority of the scottish parliament to agree with the uk government the details of a section 30 order, the procedure that will enable the scottish parliament to legislate for an independence referendum. nicola sturgeon at that news co nfe re nce referendum. nicola sturgeon at that news conference this morning. downing street appeared to be wrong—footed. they put out a statement saying the decision appeared to be divisive. when theresa may did give an interview she was a lot stronger than that. as we negotiate to leave the european
3:37 pm
union, iwant we negotiate to leave the european union, i want to work closely with those scottish first minister. we have been recognising the common ground we have such as protecting workers' rights and dealing with terrorism. but on the first minister has shown today is deeply reg retta ble. has shown today is deeply regrettable. it set scotland on a course for uncertainty and division, creating huge uncertainty. this is a time when the evidence is the majority of the scottish people do not want a second independence referendum. so instead of playing politics with the future of our country, the scottish government should focus on delivering good government and public services for the people of scotland. politics is not a game. and all this of course as we could be on the eve of the prime minister
3:38 pm
triggering article 50, perhaps tomorrow. westminster, rebecca, is buzzing. indeed it is! talk to you later. earlier, i spoke to charles livingstone, a constitutional lawyer. i asked livingstone, a constitutional lawyer. iasked him how livingstone, a constitutional lawyer. i asked him how the section 3o lawyer. i asked him how the section 30 would work in practice. section 3o 30 would work in practice. section 30 refers to the scotland act of 1998. it contains an schedule a list of issues which are reserved to the uk parliament and over which the scottish parliament does not have power and among those are various constitutional issues. section 30 sets out a process by which an order can be made by the uk government with the consent of the scottish parliament, the house of commons and house of lords to change that list of reserved matters. in 2014 for the independence referendum, there was an exception inserted into the scotla nd an exception inserted into the scotland act to that reservation of union that allowed for one referendum to be held before the end of 2014 and on a one question two a nswe rs of 2014 and on a one question two answers ballot. legal and
3:39 pm
constitutional terms, can you talk us constitutional terms, can you talk us through what the process will be now? nicola sturgeon has announced she will hold a vote in the scottish parliament next week. that is not the scottish parliament consenting toa the scottish parliament consenting to a section 30 order because there has to be a draft of the order before that. nicola sturgeon is seeking authorisation to go to the uk government to ask for and assuming that the uk government is imminent ortwo assuming that the uk government is imminent or two negotiating the terms of the section 30 order. last time the section 30 order was made so there was no legal doubt about the lawfulness of the independence referendum but there were caveats inserted as to when that could take place, and performed that it had to take. —— and the form but it had to take. —— and the form but it had to take. you say that permission has to be sought effectively from the uk government and you mentioned if the uk government is amenable, what
3:40 pm
happened out of interest if it is not? what happens then? that was one of the earliest oddments in the 2014 referendum campaign. at that time the scottish government maintained the scottish government maintained the scottish government maintained the scottish parliament did have the power unilaterally to legislate for an independence referendum. that was disputed by the uk government. that never came to a head because an agreement was reached. if no agreement was reached. if no agreement was reached this time, the scottish government may take the view that they may press ahead with legislation in the scottish parliament, but if there is no section 30 order then it is pretty likely that that would end up being the subject of a court challenge as to whether it was lawful for the scottish parliament to have done that. what would happen if the uk government said it can have a referendum but not for another two yea rs referendum but not for another two years where we will know more about the kind of deal that britain will strike with the eu to leave the european union? what would happen then? it is really a political
3:41 pm
disagreement in that case. whether the order would be made, the uk government could always plays a d raft government could always plays a draft of that order before the scottish parliament. if the scottish government considered the terms to be unacceptable and importantly the green party got the same way in the scottish parliament, then they presumably would not content to —— consent to that section 30 order. the legal framework —— the legal framework creates a political imperative. i'm joined framework creates a political imperative. i'mjoined now by framework creates a political imperative. i'm joined now by kezia dugdale, leader of the scottish labour party and she joins us from edinburgh. thank you so much for talking to us on bbc news. do you support a second referendum? absolutely not and i am very angry and disappointed at the news i have heard from nicola sturgeon. scotland is divided enough and we do not want to be divided again. when you look at the detail of what independence would mean, when you look at what we raising taxes on what we spend on public services, the economic case is we
3:42 pm
can now buy was 2.5 years ago when they faced that question. scotland has already had a say on that issue. 85% of the public voted on that. we voted no that we wanted to remain pa rt voted no that we wanted to remain part of the united kingdom. i think there will be many people in scotla nd there will be many people in scotland who will be angry that they are being dragged back to the arguments of the past. serve theresa may decided not to grant a referendum he would back her? ruth davidson has urged theresa may not to block the referendum. you will hear labour politicians say time and time again that independence is bad for scotland. it would be bad for jobs, bad for the economy. most importantly for me it would be bad for the poorest most vulnerable people in society because it would mean even greater cuts to public services, far greater than what we
3:43 pm
already face from the tories and their austerity plans. there would be turbo—charged posterity. i am so firmly opposed to the independence referendum and firmly opposed to independence itself. the difficulty of the snp promised another referendum if there was a significant material change to scotland's circumstances, and ultimately, that is what brexit is, isn't it? actually, if you look at the line which precedes that, in the ma nifesto, the line which precedes that, in the manifesto, they talk about a line if scotla nd manifesto, they talk about a line if scotland was to oppose the referendum. the majority of people are against the independence referendum. they believe the country is divided enough. we need a first minister who is focused on bringing the country back together. ten days ago we launched a campaign together stronger where people who share the values of the labour party can sign
3:44 pm
up values of the labour party can sign up and pledge their support for remaining part of the united kingdom. that is because we believe we camped that public services in this country. independence would destroy that. it would mean turbo—charged posterity and we are firmly against it. nonetheless, people in scotland were promised voting no to independence would mean staying in the eu and things have changed? let's talk about brexit for a second. i have had nicola sturgeon sadist because of brexit she is pursuing a second independence referendum and she would rather not be here. that is a joke because nicola sturgeon has spent her whole aduu nicola sturgeon has spent her whole adult life pursuing independence at all adult life pursuing independence at a ll costs. adult life pursuing independence at all costs. she is telling us that brexit is bad forjobs and the economy because it creates uncertainty and division. yet her plans for a second independence referendum would increase that uncertainty and increased the division. that is why it doesn't stack up and white doesn't make sense. i have mentioned the economic
3:45 pm
arguments about why i believe the evidence posts towards having less money for public services but let's not forget that the snp have hard questions to answer as well. would an independent scotland get to stay in the eu? i have been yet to see a single scrap of evidence. what currency would they use? that was one of the reasons they lost the referendum last time. they wanted to keep the pound but how would that work with a bank in another country? there is a mini challenges and i cannot help but conclude that what they are doing is offering false hope to the poorest communities of this country and it will come down yet again for the labour party to make the case for the alternative, to stand up for public services and make the case for why we should remain part of the united kingdom. we have to leave it there. kezia dugdale, thank you forjoining us. meanwhile, sinn fein's leader
3:46 pm
michelle 0'neill says this is an issue for the scottish people but she did at that brexit increases the need for a referendum on irish unity and she said one should be held as soon as possible. that comes after plaid cymru in wales also said a conversation is needed about the situation in wales. i also want to bring you some news from the west midlands, that police there have said the m6 motorway northbound is blocked between junctions six and seven, that is north of birmingham, due to a collision involving two ca rs due to a collision involving two cars and a lorry. it happened shortly after three o'clock this afternoon. there are no further details at the moment but the m6 northbound is currently blocked between junctions six and seven north of birmingham. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour but first, the headlines on bbc news: nicola sturgeon announces plans to trigger a second independence
3:47 pm
referendum in scotland. she wants a vote after brexit terms become clearer from the autumn 2018. it comes as mps at westminster prepare to vote again on whether to give the prime minister the power to start the brexit process. and the queen launches the baton relay for the 2018 commonwealth games in australia. hello, i'm susannah streeter. in the business news... energy supplier sse is to raise the price of electricity by 15%. it will cost an average user an extra £73 a year. the increase is the latest in a series of big price hikes for energy customers and comes into force at the end of april. sse says it last raised prices three and a half years ago. shares in bovis homes have soared as the troubled housebuilder remains mired in takeover talk which could see it become a £2.4 billion business. shares in the companyjumped 7% on the london stock exchange as the market digested a flurry of weekend announcements, confirming that rivals galliford try
3:48 pm
and redrow had made offers for the firm. rail staff from three firms across england have started 24—hour strikes in a dispute over the role of guards. guards and drivers working for northern rail and merseyrail are striking over the introduction of driver only operated trains — and similar action is continuing on southern rail. what does the image of a text festival conjure up? lots of images of people wearing trainers and smart watches and perhaps angel investors looking for start—up opportunities. would you expect to see a catholic bishop from the vatican? perhaps not. 0ur reporter dave lee is at the
3:49 pm
south by south west festival. what mission is the vatican pursuing? the vatican told me they are interested at being ahead of the next technological development. this festival is known as being popular for being at the forefront of tech developments. this is the chance of getting an early glimpse and being pa rt getting an early glimpse and being part of the early conversation about how technology is developed and worked on in the future. and it is also a place for hope. lots to gain attention and funding, isn't it? yes, it really is. i'm joined by one of those start—ups trying to get some attention here and there are huge amount trying to do that. michael, you are from a site called anchor. this makes it really easy for anyone to broadcast a radio
3:50 pm
station from their phone. given there are hundreds of panels and discussions, how you stand out and get attention? i think the key is to be simple. i do think you have to spend a tonne of money. you have to engage with your existing audience. icame engage with your existing audience. i came from a pod casting event where we were hosting broadcasters and networkers. where we were hosting broadcasters and networke rs. last where we were hosting broadcasters and networkers. last night we threw and networkers. last night we threw a launch party to celebrate our most re ce nt a launch party to celebrate our most recent release and our new round of funding and we invited all of our users and friends and had a good time. it is all going well for you. you are getting some new users hopefully. this event is famous because twitter launched here ten yea rs because twitter launched here ten years ago. can the event still have that impact for new apps?” years ago. can the event still have that impact for new apps? i think so. that impact for new apps? i think so. i think this is a great showcase for new technology and people doing interesting and creative things and
3:51 pm
i feel fortunate to be here presenting in front of so many potential users. hull what are the challenges when you bring a new app into the market? when there are so many existing social networks already, how'd you find a niche and what is your niche, do you think? i think doing something interesting and different and creative. there are a lot of companies which are recreating existing experiences. i like to think anchor is doing something different to make audio and broadcasting easy enough so that anyone can do it. sounds like a start—up which might consider pete with the bbc! there are many others trying to do the same thing —— it might compete with the bbc! the key ican might compete with the bbc! the key i can tell is to have a good party with lots of alcohol and try and attract as many investors as you can! thank you. let's check in with the financial markets now — and both the blue chip index — the ftse 100 and the pound have been edging higher today. . .ahead
3:52 pm
of the expected trigger of article 50 — which would set britain on course to leave the eu by march 2019. it was the later timing which pushed up it was the later timing which pushed up sterling. there have been some big news in the ftse 250 today. aberdeen based oil services company wood group has reached an agreement to take over rival amec foster wheeler in a £2.2 billion deal. and shares in bovis homes have surged following an approach by construction company galliford try for a merger. it's rejected the proposal — and another one from redrow — but remains in talks about a possible deal. that is certainly one to watch, or that takeover talk surrounding bovis homes. that is all the business news from me, back to you, rebecca. thank you. and let's cross the news
3:53 pm
room now and join nick miller for the weather forecast. how is it looking? hello, it has been a gorgeous day today. lots of sunshine. this is a weather watch review from northern ireland. we have had a lot of sunshine into south—east england —— a weather watcher view. it has been cloudier and south—west england and parts of the humber and to the north of scotland. another area of patchy rain working across scotland into parts of northern ireland as we go through the night. increasing cloud in england and wales. their wolves to be some clear spells around. temperatures are holding up as a result. we are not worried about frost going into tomorrow morning. here is the picture at eight o'clock in the morning. it looks like a
3:54 pm
cloudy, misty murky start across england and wales. 0n the hills of north wales you could encounter some drizzle. brighter skies after a little bit of overnight rain into northern ireland and scotland. in the north of scotland some heavy showers around and strengthening winds. in two parts of the northern western isles we could see some gusts around 70 mph, maybe a little bit stronger. a very windy day to come. elsewhere, lighter winds bit stronger. a very windy day to come. elsewhere, lighterwinds as you come further south. more cloud than today. some patchy rain to the hills of wales and north—west england and may be coming back to parts of northern ireland. some spots in the mid—teens. looks like some light rain sinking further south as we go through tuesday night. what is left of the weather system giving more cloud to southern
3:55 pm
england, south wales northern ireland. stilton showers in northern scotland. looks like the best of sunshine on wednesday will be in parts of northern and eastern england. a weather front moving southwards on thursday the stronger ones following into the weekend as our weather becomes much more active, changeable and windy. thursday, a spell of rain spreading its way south eastwards. 0n thursday, a spell of rain spreading its way south eastwards. on friday, more wet weather spreading from north—west to south—east of the uk, cooling things down with stronger winds as well. we have got that look forward to later this week as the jet stream becomes stronger pushing the weather systems our way. until then, it is reasonably quiet. get a forecast for where you are always new going online. —— or where you are going online. this is bbc news. i'm rebecca jones. the headlines at four: scotland's first minister takes westminster by surprise as she announces plans to trigger another independence referendum.
3:56 pm
nicola sturgeon says a second referendum should be held between autumn next year and the spring of 2019, once the terms of the uk's exit from the eu become clear. i believe it would be wrong for scotla nd i believe it would be wrong for scotland to be taken down a path that it has no control over regardless of the consequences for our economy, our society, our regardless of the consequences for our economy, oursociety, our place in the world, our very sense of who we are as a country. instead of playing politics with the future of our country, the scottish government should focus on delivering good government and public services for the people of scotland. politics is not a the people of scotland. politics is nota game. the announcement comes as mps at westminster prepare to vote
3:57 pm
3:58 pm
3:59 pm
4:00 pm

15 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on