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tv   BBC News  BBC News  March 25, 2017 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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here is an opportunity to take young people all over the world to show them the sites where things have happened in the past and to give them a genuine immersive experience which they could not otherwise get. without being there themselves. these are early days, but the virtual world is without limit, enabling more and more of us to step back in history. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and rachel burden. a blow for president trump as he admits defeat on one of his main campaign promises. he's forced to abandon a vote on health care reform because he couldn't get enough support from his own party. good morning. it's saturday, 25th march. also ahead: did he act alone? police try to piece together the final movements of the westminster attacker khalid masood. a whatsapp message sent minutes
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before his killing spree is being looked at and police released all but two of the people arrested since the attack on wednesday. almost two million people in the uk don't have a bank account. a house of lords report says it's a scandal. we'll look back on red nose day as more than £70 million is raised for charity. it is pole position for lewis hamilton. i'm not even tired! from bedroom to classroom. the mass experiment to see if the clocks going forward tonight affects children's concentration in school. and chris fawkes has the weather. we are looking at a chilly start to the day with a little bit of frost and a few fog patches to contend with, but for most of us, we are
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looking at a dry weekend with plenty of sunshine. in the warmest spots, it is forecast to reach 19 celsius later today. good morning. first, our main story. donald trump has tried to shrug off the biggest setback so far in his presidency, a failure to overhaul barack obama's health reforms. he has been forced to scrap a vote on his plans at the last minute because he didn't have enough backing from his own party. greg dawson reports. it was a promise that became one of the pillars of his campaign and one he repeated at every rally. obamacare has to be be replaced. we're going to get rid of obamacare which is a disaster. repealing and replacing the disaster known as obamacare. his pitch to voters — trust me, i'm a dealmaker. if you can't make a good deal with a politician than there's something wrong with you. you're certainly not very good. throughout friday, the trump administration, led by the vice—president,
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was trying to persuade fellow republicans to back them. but it wasn't working. some wouldn't accept proposed cuts to health coverage. others said they didn't go far enough. my vote is still a no. facing defeat, house speaker paul ryan consulted with the president and pulled the plug on the bill. yeah, we're going to be living with obamaca re for the foreseeable future. i don't know how long it's going to take us to replace this law. my worry is obamacare is going to be getting even worse. donald trump still predicts that obamacare will end in failure, but conceded until democrats agree it's time to make changes, he can't scrap it. it's imploding and soon will explode and it's not going to be pretty. the democrats don't want to see that so they're going to reach out when they're ready and whenever they're ready, we're ready. pushing through healthca re change in america was one of president obama's defining achievements in the white house. it provided more than 20 million people with health insurance, but opponents say it is too expensive and involves too much government
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interference in people's lives. but criticising obamacare has proved much easier than replacing it for donald trump. after his controversial travel ban was blocked, this failure is another blow to his authority less than three months since he took power. counter—terrorism police have released all but two of the ii people arrested since the attack in westminster on wednesday. they are appealing for information as they try to establish whether khalid masood acted alone or had help, as alexandra mackenzie reports. khalid masood, the former teacher and father who became a terrorist. but did he act alone? as police begin to build a picture of the killer it has emerged that minutes before he launched his attack he used messaging service, whatsapp to send an encrypted message from his phone. born adrian elms in kent, by the time he was at huntley's secondary school for boys
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in tunbridge wells, he was known as adrian ajao. but what triggered such a brutal act from a once sporty schoolboy who liked to party? he was an incredible fella. but, you know, like i say, when i see him, i loved him. ijust wanted to give him a lift sort of and talk and balance him up a bit. he had developed a reputation for violence. masood spent time in three prisons. last night, the saudi arabian embassy in london confirmed he had worked there as a teacher around ten years ago. by then, he had converted to islam. the police investigation into wednesday's attack has been swift. it brought them to this hotel in brighton. masood stayed here the night before he carried out his deadly attack which took the lives of four people. described as a nice guest, he said he was visiting friends. in manchester, a car was taken away by police. there were further raids
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and two people, both from birmingham, remain in custody. the police investigation will now focus on finding out if anyone helped khalid masood to carry out his attack and at what inspired him to commit mass murder. khalid masood spent time in prison. now, questions are being asked about whether he could have been radicalised while in jail. earlier we spoke to ian acheson a former prison governor who raised concerns about hmp weyland, which is where masood served time. we were concerned about hmp wayland asa we were concerned about hmp wayland as a place that had an environment that was conducive to radicalised behaviour. he can't be drawn on the details there, but we did draw the general conclusion from our research and our analysis that the prisons outside the high security estate, prisons like wayland which are a
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medium secure facility did not possess the capability or the capacity to fully understand the threat of radicalisation. alexandra mckenzie is outside new scotland yard. i notice one or two floral tributes have appeared there. i don't think we are expecting any further police updates this morning, are we? no, that's right. there have been floral tributes here for pc keith palmer and at this time yesterday we had an update, but we're not expecting that this morning. as the investigation enters its third day, a massive investigation involving hundreds of officers who are gathering as much information as possible to piece together exactly what happened. as we said, 11 people have been arrested. all but two have been released and at least 20 properties have been raided and thousands of items have been seized from these properties as evidence which will
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help specialist teams try and picture or paint a picture of what exactly has happened and the main question, khalid masood, did he act alone or did he have help planning oi’ alone or did he have help planning or carrying out the terrorist attack here at westminster last wednesday. as we said, it has emerged that a whatsapp message, an encrypted whatsapp message, an encrypted whatsapp message, an encrypted whatsapp message was sent interest his phone minutes before that attack and police will be particularly keen to find out who received that message and what they knew about the attack and if they were at all involved? thank you. the un has raised concerns about reports of a high number of civilian casualties in the iraqi city of mosul. it's claimed at least 200 people died in an air strike by the us—led coalition. government forces are trying to retake the city from the islamic state group. more needs to be done to help tackle the vicious cycle
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of debt and overcharging, according to a house of lords committee. it says banks are failing customers who need them most, leaving the poorest to rely on expensive products. here's our business correspondent, jonty bloom. banks and building societies are not only there for the rich, but they are more difficult for the poor to access. 1.7 million people in this country have no bank account, many can only borrow at high interest rates even if they aren't forced to use payday lenders. the closure of thousands of high street banks also hits the poorest and especially the elderly as they have less access to online services. 40% of the working age population have less than £100 in savings, and if they have to use pre—paid meters, they also pay more more basic services like gas and electricity. to end such financial exclusion the lords committee is calling for better financial education in schools, a dedicated government minister to tackle the problem and for the banks to have a duty of care to customers. too many people still don't have a bank account or access
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to basic and fairly priced financial services of the sort that most of us take for granted. that means that the poverty premium, where the poor are paying more for a range of things from heating their house to being able to get a loan, is leading them into a vicious circle of further debt and financial distress. the government says four million people are benefiting from basic bank accounts which charge no fees and that tough new rules mean that the number of payday loans has halved since 2014. a ban on taking laptops and tablets on board flights to the uk from six countries comes into force today. passengers travelling from turkey, egypt, lebanon, jordan, tunisia and saudi arabia must put any electronic device larger than a standard smartphone into the hold. the ban was imposed following a similar measure in the united states.
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this year's comic relief has raised more than £71 million. the fundraiser included james corden‘s carpool karaoke with take that and a special love actually sequel. comic relief has raised more than £1 billion since it launched in 1985. getting a runaway cow back in to its pen isn't an easyjob. but it's one a police officer in temple in texas had to to yesterday. he thought he'd managed to get it back in its field, butjust as he closed the gate, the cow came bolting towards him. it looked very much like a bull there. he's fast whatever else was going on there. no one was hurt in the case,
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but police say the cow's still on the run! if we locate the cow by the end of the programme, we'll let you know. it is 9.i2am. a woman who was refused permission to divorce her husband of nearly a0 years has lost her case at the court of appeal. the judges told tini 0wens, who is 66, that being in a "wretchedly unhappy marriage" was not a ground for divorce. it has been described as an "extraordinarily unusual" case. so let's tell you a bit more about it. tini and hugh 0wens married in 1978. last year tini 0wens argued that their marriage had irretrievably broken down, but her efforts at getting a divorce were rejected. the judge in the case said her reasons for wanting a divorce, which included rowing in an airport, were "of the kind to be
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expected in marriage". yesterday the court of appeal backed that decision. sirjames munby, the most senior family courtjudge in england and wales, said parliament has decreed that "it is not a ground for divorce that you find yourself in a wretchedly unhappy marriage, though some people may say it should be". to get a divorce in england and wales, you must prove that a marriage has broken down irretrievably. there are five ways to show this — adultery, unreasonable behaviour, desertion, living apart for two years and both sides agreeing to a divorce, or living apart for at least five years, even if your partner disagrees. this has been the law since 1969. the case has certainly highlighted a peculiar quirk in english and welsh divorce law. joining us in the studio isjo edwards, head of family law at forsters. jo, jo, first of all, did thejudges make the correct decision in this case? based on the law as it
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presently stands the judges made absolutely the right decision and effectively what the court of appeal said yesterday is, we are hands strung, we're not happy about it, but we're hand strung by the present state of the law. this led to a wider debate about why the law presently is as it is. it has been this way for 48 years and should there be a change? we say, practitioners say, national family lawyers says there should be a change in the law. it is unusual, isn't it? we heard about a similar case a couple of months ago and people said this rarely happens and 110w people said this rarely happens and now we have another one. there was a change to the law in scotland. so it is different there. and should we be following their lead? well, we certainly should change. i think in scotla nd certainly should change. i think in scotland what's happened is about ten yea rs scotland what's happened is about ten years ago, they reduced the periods of separation that you have to have so here as you mentioned, you have to be separated for two yea rs you have to be separated for two years and both agree to a divorce or five years and only one party needs to proceed with the divorce. in
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scotla nd to proceed with the divorce. in scotland the periods are one year and two years respectively. since that change came in, 95% of divorces in scotland are on the periods of separation. actually in england, i would like us to go further. what resolution advocates is a period of six months. at the start of which one 01’ six months. at the start of which one or both parties can say we think this marriage has broken down. they should have access to counselling services and discussions about children and about money. if at the end of the six month period, one or both feel the marriage is broken down, they should be entitled to their decree. how unusual is it one party is saying, i want out, i want a divorce, the other side is saying, "everything is fine. i won't agree." it is incredibly unusual. the last statistics we have are for 2014. in england and wales there were 111,000
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divorces. the reality is the court will say if one party isn't happy, how can a marriage continue? but the point in this case was on the facts and on the state of the law, mrs 0wens hadn't proven to the court's satisfaction that the behaviour was such that she couldn't reasonably be expected to live with her husband and therefore the marriage hasn't broken down. all she can do now, u nless broken down. all she can do now, unless mr 0wens will become down is wait until she has been separated for five years. wait until she has been separated forfive years. ie wait until she has been separated for five years. ie another three yea rs for five years. ie another three years time. is it because there is concern about splitting the assets? i know you can't say in this case? some practitioners suggested that maybe the motivation. you're right to identify. 0ne can't access financial remedies until a divorce process is in train so that does create difficulties. mr 0wens, i think, would just say, i still think there is life left in this marriage andi there is life left in this marriage and i want to save it. should it be
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right for one party to be able to dissolve a marriage or should it be by mutual consent? jo, thank you very much. jo edwards who is a family lawyer. here's chris with a look at this morning's weather. high pressure is firmly in charge and forjust high pressure is firmly in charge and for just about high pressure is firmly in charge and forjust about everyone that means plenty of sunshine. the weather watchers have been out snapping the early morning spring sunshine. there is mist on the horizon, but blue skies for most of us. if you have been outside this morning, you will know how chilly it has been. temperatures got down to minus five celsius last night. but with the sun in the sky now, temperatures in west wales have reached 12 celsius and through this afternoon, the warm spots likely to be west wales. 18 celsius, 19 celsius. if we get to 19 celsius that would make it the warmest day of the year so far. things are looking up. it is not sunny everywhere. for the far north of
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scotland, we have got more in the way of cloud and that clawed will threaten the occasional spot of rain. it should stay dry in 0rkney, but the cloud coming and going here. plenty of sunshine elsewhere in scotlandment highs reaching 17 celsius. 1 celsius likely to be the top temperature this northern ireland. probably for western counties. 17 or 18 celsius around greater manchester, merseyside and cheshire and maybe a 19 celsius for west wales. 18 celsius for the south—west of england. towards the south coast, some strong gusts of winds. gusting at around 30mph. that will knock the edge of the temperatures. those winds keeping the frost at bay overnight across the frost at bay overnight across the south of england. in the countryside, where the winds fall light across the heart of the uk, that's where temperatures are going to plummet once again. a widespread frost. temperatures as low as minus five celsius. sunday, another beautiful day. spring sunshine. again, those chilly easterly winds move again, those chilly easterly winds m ove a cross again, those chilly easterly winds move across southern counties.
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temperatures a notch of a degree down. the cloud will take a while to break up, but the sunshine will come through. we will see the temperatures climbing into the high teens. so pretty good for temperatures really this weekend. plenty of spring sunshine to look forward to, but also an hour less in bed. the clocks are going to be put forward one hour. darker mornings on the way, but brighter evenings too. that's the weather. thaumpks chris. —— thanks, chris. more than half of mothers who breastfeed stop after six to eight weeks, according to a survey by public health england. their research found although three—quarters of new mums chose to breastfeed from birth, this figure dropped significantly within two months, as frankie mccamley reports. like many new mums, laura started breast—feeding as soon as autumn was born, but after six weeks, they both fell ill so she had to stop. when i
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decided to give up breast—feeding, i kind of didn't really want to. it was something that i thought about a lot. i did lots of research about how to try and get my supply back up with power pumping and things like eating oats. so i tried a lot of those things, but unfortunately, it just didn't really work at all. the whole experience left her feeling extremely anxious of breast—feeding. i definitely felt like people would be judging i definitely felt like people would bejudging me when i definitely felt like people would be judging me when they saw me feeding her with a bottle. to some extent i still do. i find that very kind of difficult when i feed her in public, i kind of think maybe people are wondering why i'm not breast—feeding her and kind of thinking that i'm not a good mum or maybe i don't love her as much as other people love their babies because i'm not doing what's considered best. according to public
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health england, little autumn is not alone when it comes to drinking formula milk. a survey of 500 mothers found whilst almost three—quarters of women started breast—feeding when their child was born, less than half of them were still doing that six to eight weeks later. it is now launching chat bot an around the clock support tool to help mothers with any concerns they may have. according to public health england, breast—feeding can boost a ba by‘s ability to england, breast—feeding can boost a baby's ability to fight illnesses and infections and for mothers it can reduce the risk of ovarian and breast cancer and it also burns 500 calories a day. as for laura and her family, they say the new service wouldn't have changed their minds to stop breast—feeding, but a support like it would have been a huge help at the time. we had a couple of guests this after
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the story and they really stole the show. we will tell you about that shortly. some of you have been getting in touch on this story. stacie said, "i know breast is said to be best, but i was unfortunate after having a lump removed. i couldn't breastfeed and feel i'm judged for it." dad simon said, "my wife started breastfeeding both of our babies, but she wasn't suited to it. they're both thriving. fed is best!" we spoke about this earlier with new mum emma blinkhorn, but it was her daughter lily—may who stole the show and charlie's script. she started reading the news and just took over! quite a lot of people were saying all eyes on lily—mae. don't let itv see that, she will be
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presenting the nightly show next week! it's time for a look at the newspapers. journalist and broadcaster, ian collins is here to tell us what's caught his eye. police are claiming he may have taken instructions from other accomplices in the moments before he struck. still vgting whether there was a network behind him. on the front page of the mail, the middle—classjihadi they're saying as more details emerge of khalid masood's past. the front page of the mirror. they have what they claim as an exclusive, an interview with the wife who was married to khalid masood for weeks before fleeing after he attacked her. she says he was a psychopath and she was scared of him. she went to the other end of the country. the front page of the guardian how boyfriend came from kent, became an outsider. ian, where
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are you going to start? there is nothing like a parking story to start the day off in fine fashion. this comes under the category at what point did you think that was 0k? it is people who park on pavements. interestingly, ididn‘t realise that local authorities are restricted about what they can do about pavement parking. 0utside london it was made illegal. there are exceptions, every now and then you see a sign that says you have to park on the pavement. but than you get the other side of things, where i live for example there is no pavement on one side of the road, on the other side particularly on a weekend, people just the other side particularly on a weekend, peoplejust park the other side particularly on a weekend, people just park right across and you couldn't get a pushchair a wheelchair, a guide dog, it is completely thoughtless for anybody that does it, but local authorities are quite impotent about what they can do about it. they want to change the laws to give them greater powers. i assumed that everywhere you can't park on the pavement? so did i. there is always
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strange laws and bye—laws.“ pavement? so did i. there is always strange laws and bye-laws. if you have a road that's narrow, sometimes you think maybe i'm doing the right thing by leaving a wider gap for ca rs thing by leaving a wider gap for cars to thing by leaving a wider gap for ca rs to pass thing by leaving a wider gap for cars to pass by. you would use your brain and say hang on a second, there is a road, there is no pavement that side, if i park fully, nobody can walk past without walking into the middle of the road. you have to take the common sense approach. i was wacking past a residential area the other day where the grass verge along the pavement had been cut up, it was just tyre marks and it looks a mess. people will try and park wherever, there will try and park wherever, there will be a story of the daily mail that turned part of their small garden into a driveway and lowered the kerb and done the whole thing and they get into trouble for that, but yeah, it's difficult. there is thousands more cars than there ever we re thousands more cars than there ever were and it is not about to get easier. your newspaper review
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illustrates the stuff that we worry about and the really big stuff that is so in people's minds at the moment? yes, i had an experience of this, about 15 years ago, i saw one of these trucks on the road. i was driving through a part of london and suddenly i was aware of blue lights in my rear view mirror and i pulled over and 17 of these things went past and it was harrowing. i have never seen one of these things before. than the next time was last wednesday. i went down to trafalgar square and last thursday, evening, where the mayor of london and the home secretary and the police chief we re home secretary and the police chief were giving this kind of set of talks, speeches to thousands of people and it was interesting to me that these things that look like space ships have landed into our lives and try to get past this, past a wall of very heavily armed police officers to be told by the mayor of london that nothing changes and we all get on with our lives, this is, of course, a nonsense that's a myth that's pedalled out by politicians that's pedalled out by politicians that the stiff upper lip, we just get on with it. well, you do to a
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degree, but to say nothing changes and life goes on, to me walking through the streets of the capital seeing these as your defought police vehicle and dozens of police vehicles means that life has changed. it is worth showing people this, this morning. people are teaching their cats to use the toilet! this is no yokejoke, it is not 1st april! i don't know why you'd want to own a cat. they have no loyalty to you. they have about ten owners each anyway, don't they? let's face it. you've upset half the nation! get a dog. how does that work? it is toilet train your cat plain and simple. it is a guide that will allow you to show your cat, they don't have to use the litter tray or dig they don't have to use the litter tray ordig up they don't have to use the litter tray or dig up your garden, thick use a conventional loo! that cat clearly is in the wrong position, it is not going to work. it is clearly not a toilet trained
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cat! it has been coerced up there against its fee line will. our cat can't do that, but i saw our cat sitting on the toilet seat the other day, but he had his head in the bowl and he was dripping drinking the water. —— drinking the water. we're on bbc one until ten o'clock this morning, when angela hartnett takes over in the saturday kitchen. angela, what's on the menu for us? we have got an amazing guest, badell. what is your favourite food? curry. i think it is a lamb curry. beautiful lamb curry with lamb chops, we've grilled. it sounds like heaven. you better be nice. what about food hell? well, i don't like, i like some fish, butjust ordinary whitefish, you know, the way that you sometimes get it in hospital! laughter that is my hell, i think. so you
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have met nathan, a fish chef! i'm sure it is not hell when he cooks it. what are you going to cook today? boring jacket potatoes with cod and parsley, no, no. cod and parsley jacket cod and parsley, no, no. cod and parsleyjacket potatoes. cod and parsley, no, no. cod and parsley jacket potatoes. it wasn't boring. we tasted it in rehearsal and welcome dan from new york. what are you going to cook today?‘ vegetable pulp cheeseburger with hamburger buns and a slab of bacon. nothing vegetarian today. we will see you at 10am. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and rachel burden.
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coming up before 10am: chris will have the weather for you. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. president trump says he's surprised and disappointed after failing to secure support from his own party for plans to replace 0bamacare. he had to withdraw his health care bill after it failed to get enough support ahead of a vote. president trump has said there were parts of it he didn't like anyway, and it'll mean a better bill at some point in the future. speaking earlier on breakfast, former advisor to george w bush, anneke green, told us president trump still has support in his party. it is coming across in the press as a blow, but he will portray this as the smart move and something he is doing for the american people, and i do not think it will affect his core supporters. we see that even in the praise coming from the groups in the house
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who refused to vote for the bill. counter—terrorism police have released all but two of the 11 people arrested since the attack in westminster on wednesday. the attacker, khalid masood, killed three people when he drove into pedestrians on westminster bridge before stabbing a police officer to death outside parliament. police are still trying to establish whether he acted alone. questions are being asked about whether he could have been radicalised while in prison. earlier we spoke to ian acheson, a former prison governor who raised concerns about hmp weyland, where masood served time. we were concerned about hmp weyland as a place that had an environment that was conducive to radicalised behaviour. i cannot be drawn on details, but we did draw the general conclusion from our research and analysis that prisons outside the high security estate, prisons like hmp weyland, which are a medium secure facility, did not possess the capacity
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to fully understand the threat of radicalisation. the un has raised concerns about reports of a high number of civilian casualties in the iraqi city of mosul. it's claimed at least 200 people died in an air strike by the us led coalition. government forces are trying to retake the city from the islamic state group. a recording has been released of the hollywood actor harrison ford calling himself a "schmuck" after accidentally landing his plane in the wrong part of an airport in california. the star wars actor, who has a pilot's licence, was talking to air traffic controllers atjohn wayne airport immediately after the incident last month when he flew directly over a waiting passenger plane. yes, hello. the controller did not raise any eyebrows over the name. this year's comic relief has raised more than £71 million.
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the fundraiser included james corden's carpool karaoke with take that and a special love actually sequel. comic relief has raised more than £1 billion since it launched in 1985. getting a runaway cow back in to its pen isn't an easyjob. but it's one a police officer in temple in texas had to yesterday. he thought he'd managed to get it back in its field, butjust as he closed the gate, the cow came bolting towards him. he had to make a quick run for it and managed not to get hit. no—one was hurt in the case, but police say the cow's still on the run. i know that they can move at the
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speed of 40 mph. a couple of years ago, we had a showjumping who became very famous on this programme. i think the farmer was called mr onions. that maybe another story. no red bull showing in the formula 1. but lewis hamilton was fast. it hurt him to finish second last season to nico rosberg and he is desperate to get his fourth world title. formula one is back, and so is lewis hamilton, who's dominated qualifying in melbourne. hamilton claimed pole position for a record—equalling sixth time, at the australian grand prix, as the new era of faster, more demanding cars got off to a promising start. he was more than a quarter of a second quicker, than ferrari's sebastian vettel, with hamilton's new mercedes team mate valtteri bottas in third. and good luck later today to the four british riders in qualifying for the opening moto gp race of the season in qatar.
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cal crutchlow, bradley smith, scott redding arejoined by sam lowes making his debut. seamus coleman suffered a broken leg in the match between republic of ireland and wales. the match ended goalless. gareth bale had the only real chances for either side, but he'll miss the next game against serbia, after receiving a yellow card. of course the main talking point though is that awful injury to seamus coleman. manager martin 0'neill, said it was a bad break — it wasn't a malicious tackle, but it was mistimed and a very poor challenge. neil taylor was sent off for it, as coleman was carried off on a stretcher, needing gas and air, to help him cope. a real blow to him. he was having the season of a lifetime at club level. he is a great player for us, a great captain. a great character. it is a big, big loss. a big loss. a big loss to everyone, a big loss to us. but he will fight back, i hope.
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it puts things in perspective, i suppose. taylor is not that type of player. he has had a serious injury himself. he is a great boy, a cracking lad. i have not seen the challenge, but i have seen the outcome, if you like. it is a bad one for seamus, and that is a shame because he is someone i respect. i think he is one of the best fullbacks in the premier league. it was a busy night in rugby league's superleague, and we have new leaders in hull fc, thanks to their win at wigan. but at the other end of the table, things have gone from bad to worse for warrington, who've lost every game this season, just six months after they were in the grand final, they were beaten 31—6 by st helens. adam swift with the pick of their five tries. in rugby union's premiership, gloucester comfortably saw off local
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rivals bristol 32—14. england wing jonny may sealed the bonus point win for gloucester and bristol's hopes of avoiding relegation straight back to the championship look slim — they're seven points adrift at the bottom of the table, with four games to play. in rugby union's premiership, gloucester comfortably saw off local rivals bristol 32—14. but scarlets are also chasing that play—off place — and they're just three points behind ulster now, after getting a bonus point in their 26—10 win over edinburgh. britain's johanna konta is through to the third round of the miami 0pen tennis, after beating aliaksandra sasnovich. we're going to return to football now, and a very special little boy who will be at wembley tomorrow, for england's world cup qualifier against lithuania. you may have seen him before, five—year—old sunderland fan bradley lowery, who's suffering from a rare type of cancer. he's going to be a mascot tomorrow,
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and this is how his mum gemma told him he'd also be reunited with his herojermain defoe. guess who is going to the england match next week? who? jermain defoe. hooray! are you buzzing? yeah! at the very beginning it was just amazing. it was his dream come true. now he just callsjermain defoe his best friend. it is normalfor him now, but at the beginning it was fantastic and to have that experience and all the experiences he has at the moment is quite surreal. and not only for him. it gives us memories that we can carry with us for the rest of our lives. they have done it in sunderland
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colours. tomorrow, they will walk out together, both as proud as each other. a special moment indeed. now, could you last a whole hour doing a non—stop, whole body work out? well, add a live band, complete mayhem and a lot of laughter? you've heard of zumba, and street dance, well now barn dancing could be the way to improve your fitness. i went to a class in birmingham to try it out. it's time to cast aside all we thought we knew about barn dancing. it's not about do—si—does at this former swimming baths in birmingham. iforgot my hat! obviously the hat could be a health and safety issue. this is far more than a hoe down. this is barn dance fitness.
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they take the best bits from traditional dances across the world and put them together in an hour—long workout. this gets faster! this isjust a warm—up. if you go to the gym, you use one machine to work a certain set of muscles. here, you use all the muscles and so we do a lot of shaking and we use our faces as well, so we are getting a total workout. it is believed by many that barn dancing started a couple of centuries ago in parts of the british isles where farm peasants would gather in barns to copy the ballroom dances of their wealthy land owners. it is sociable and yet it brings people together because you are always swapping partners and positions. it is mentally challenging as well as physically. as you can tell. it is so much fun and exercise.
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you meet amazing people. it is fun and it keeps you fit. so they say. you make friends as well. it is good. we have all done this before at weddings. it is a form of dance that really gets people who have no dancing ability or interest up onto the dancefloor like nothing else. you learn the moves eventually as you go along. it does not matter if you embarrass yourself and it is fun to be here. i like it because it is energetic and it is really fun. the other thing that strikes me is how much everybody is laughing. it is great fun. to your left! when it goes wrong, i shout. it is just laughter. my partner looked bemused rather than amused. with the band keeping the energy
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going, the hourflew by. goodness me, that was extreme! exercise is so much better when you don't win it is it happening and the music keeps you going. a huge crowd, they get that several times a week. i would be like you, standing on everyone's feet. i kept going the wrong way! i kept bumping into people, but that was pa rt bumping into people, but that was part of the fun. if you want to have your fun outside, you need decent weather. that is the image outside our studio this morning. what a beautiful day. it is getting quite mild. yesterday,
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we mistakenly said it was going to be 88 degrees. and that made the papers. we are talking about 18 or 19 degrees in some places, so it is looking rather... it is glass like water. it is incredibly still, but they do a lot of sport there as well. as far as i am where, it is pretty much the picture around the country. it looks good for the whole country. it looks good for the whole country today, although this morning, when i got out of bed and came downstairs, i had to scrape ice of my windscreen. the reason we are lingering slightly longer, let's be honest, chris is not ready with the weather so we are doing and ad hoc weather so we are doing and ad hoc weather forecast for you. it is a bit like that in most cases. actually, i think chris is ready but
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he has got technical issues.|j actually, i think chris is ready but he has got technical issues. i am not having a go at him. it is not like he is doing his hair or having a banana, it is technical issues. hello, chris! it is coming! the hair is looking good, iam it is coming! the hair is looking good, i am just waiting for my computer to wake up. can you give us the verbal version? yes, we have high—pressure in charge today. temperatures last night got down to minus five celsius, so a cold start to the day. the fog has pretty much laid out of the way. r, finally. we have got scenes like this up and down the country, with plenty of sunshine. temperatures could hit 19 celsius later on. but these were the temperatures we had earlier today, —4 or minus five celsius. with the sun up, tempters are already 12 in west wales, and we
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expect the western side of wales to reach the highest temperature is, up to 19 celsius. let's look at the weather in detail. sunny skies for most of us, but across the northern isles of scotland, it is different with more loud and that will bring some rain for shetland. 0therwise, plenty of sunshine. gusty winds across the south of england, making it feel a bit cooler. in the sunshine, in scotland and northern ireland, the warmest spots could hit 17 or 18 celsius. western wales up to 19 celsius, and probably 18 celsius for western areas of south—west england. temperatures kept a bit lower by the gusty winds in east anglia and south england. 0vernight, the wind will keep the fast at bay. temperatures down to
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minus five celsius again, with the cold really across northern england, scotla nd cold really across northern england, scotland and northern ireland in the countryside. again, you will be scraping the car windscreen first thing in the morning, but another day of glorious spring sunshine with high pressure in charge. early fog clearing quickly, and then sunny pretty much all the way into the afternoon. temperatures similar, maybe a degree down on today, but still good for the time of year. before i go, a reminder that the clocks are going forward by an hour tonight, though the mornings will get a bit darker and the evening is a bit lighter. for those getting up early tomorrow, and our less in bed. back to you both. the clock is the important thing to finish on. a reminder to everyone. we've all heard of bucket lists for people, but what about for dogs? when lauren watts' dog gizelle was diagnosed with bone cancer, she created a bucket list to make the most of the time they had left. their story went viral,
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and has now been turned into a book. laurenjoins us now. good morning. we are going to show you some of the pictures of gizelle. could you first establish, when debating of you come together? we came together when i was 19 years old. i was a transfer in college, and it was a summer in tennessee and my mum was pretty impulsive, and she so struggled with addiction, and one morning she woke up and decided that we should get a really big dog. i was a big dog girl and we already had two dogs, so that day we drove and got them to macro. was she that size when you got her? no, she was a puppy- size when you got her? no, she was a puppy. when we made eye contact, i knew she was my dog. they keep
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growing, and she became one had £60 in weight. dash—macro 160. growing, and she became one had £60 in weight. dash-macro 160. a lot of people have a special relationship with their dog, but how did gizelle help you? for me, she was a co nsta nt. i help you? for me, she was a constant. i have to fund the ages of 19-25. it constant. i have to fund the ages of 19—25. it was the last summer my pa rents would 19—25. it was the last summer my parents would live together, they got a divorce shortly after gizelle came into my life. my mother was struggling with addiction and there we re struggling with addiction and there were a lot of ups and downs with that, but a dog is always there when you get home, she was my best friend, very loyal. these pictures area sink friend, very loyal. these pictures are a sink from all the lovely things you did together on the bucket list. tell us about your bucket list. tell us about your bucket list. tell us about your bucket list. i think a dog bucket list is quite simple. dogs are a
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reminder to enjoy the little things in life, so we did quite simple things. we went to the beach, that was one of my favourite things. i a lwa ys was one of my favourite things. i always said i wanted to take her to the beach but we had not done it, and when i found out she was sick, we had to go. giving her a stake was another one. she kind of swallowed it in one! i thought she would enjoy it in one! i thought she would enjoy it like a lion and rip it to shreds, but it was just one to. it like a lion and rip it to shreds, but it wasjust one to. obviously you had a lot of fun doing this, presumably this is all part of you getting used to the idea that she was very ill, getting used to the moment when she would not be around any more. yes, that is the hardest pa rt any more. yes, that is the hardest part about it. coming up with the idea, iam part about it. coming up with the idea, i am going to do these things, finding out your dog will not live much longer is devastated because she was my very best friend, so i wa nted she was my very best friend, so i wanted to do something to make the most of the time we had left and try
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not to be so sad about it. are you ina not to be so sad about it. are you in a better place now? yes, yes, i have a new dog now and we have a bucket list going. lovely to see you this morning, thank you. thank you for having me. and lauren's book is called gizelle's bucket list. it can be a bit of a nightmare getting children to bed on time, but with the clocks going forward by an hour tonight, what impact will it have on their sleep pattern? as part of the bbc‘s terrific scientific project to get more young people involved in science, school children are teaming up with academics from oxford university to try to measure the impact of that lost lie—in. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin went to hull to join the experiment. bedtime in hull. or so it should be. this is eli's house. can you tell me about bedtime? a nightmare. he is never tired. he always wants to watch tv. he argues that his brothers go to bed later than he does.
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eventually the routine begins for eli. how about mornings? mornings are more of a struggle. i ask amy once to get up, and then five minutes later, get up, get up and get up. it can be tough. one thing can make it tougher. in this house that one thing is the clock change. it is a nightmare — something i did not consider until i had children. it really does affect things. it knocks everything out. it is a disaster either way. and each time it happens i wish it wouldn't. so for some it is a problem. but how much of a problem? well, now for the very first
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time, oxford university with the help of children here at this primary school, will try and measure the problem. what we are trying to see is if people who are more tired have slower reactions. these children are being monitored in the days before and after the clocks change. their reaction time is measured and their sleep patterns recorded. you got seven? seven is your best? how many times did you drop it? ooh... i dropped it all the time. do razor—sharp reactions follow a good nights sleep? does the clock change stuff it up? you see children who are not alert, they are not taking anything in. are you curious about what this
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experiment will show? i am really looking forward to seeing the effect on the reaction tests. as for miss... i caught it. not great to be fair! what time did you go to bed? i dare not tell you. i am not a great sleeper. sleep matters. good night. just how much it matters we will find out in the next month when oxford university report theirfindings. lam asleep! that does not look like sleeping to me. the scientist and broadcaster fran scott is an ambassador for terrific scientific. she can tell us more about this. how disruptive is the clock change to children? it is disruptive because it changes how light it is
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and how dark it is when we wake up and how dark it is when we wake up and go to sleep, and our body clock is affected by a part of the brain. what that does is it talks to another part of the brain and tells it to produce, or not produce, a hormone called melatonin. that is the dracula of hormones, so it only comes out at night. the more melatonin we have, the more sleepy we feel. that is good, but it is affected by light. so, if it is light when we are trying to get to sleep, then the light signals do not go through, melatonin is not produced, and therefore we do not feel sleepy. so that is the science, the natural part of this. but the unnatural part is that we message with this, we change the clocks. we do. of course it will affect us because it is not dark when we go to sleep. it is about making it dark at night, getting blackout blinds, and not being exposed to screens because screens produce a higher
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concentration of new light, and that affects how much melatonin is produced, compared to natural light. so stay away from screens. how much time away from a screen before their time? i would say an hour to be careful. that goes for all of us. just even glancing at your phone before you go to sleep. yes, and in the morning before you get going, have an hour outside to get you going. and our is a big shift in a child's's schedule. perhaps think back four days before, adjusted by quarter of an hour each day in turn. notjust be going to bed time, but the whole bedtime ritual. so when the whole bedtime ritual. so when the clocks actually change, they are more used to it. sometimes people say it helps them sleep, and others say it helps them sleep, and others say it helps them sleep, and others say it doesn't, a night—time drink. a nice cup of tea or something. i am sure scientists say it is the last thing you should do. it is all about routine. your brain is marvellous
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and it loves routine. if you always doa and it loves routine. if you always do a certain thing before you go to sleep, then your brain will say are, sleep, then your brain will say are, sleep is due in half an hour. it is different for each person. if you keep the same routine, your brain will learn that sleep is coming. you won't be getting to change clock tonight, will you? i won't, won't be getting to change clock tonight, will you? iwon't, buti won't be getting to change clock tonight, will you? iwon't, but i am an excellent sleeper falls stop. thank you forjoining us. that final reminder for you, thank you forjoining us. that final reminderfor you, the thank you forjoining us. that final reminder for you, the clocks go forward tonight. that's it from us today. i'll be back tomorrow morning from 6am on bbc one with rogerjohnson. have a lovely weekend. goodbye. this is bbc news. i'm reeta chakrabarti. the headlines at 10am: donald trump remains defiant after failing to overhaul barack 0bama's health reforms. the president was forced to abandon his healthcare bill because of lack of support within his own party. two men remain in custody as investigations continue into the westminster terror attack.
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it's emerged the attacker, khalid masood, sent whatsapp messages moments before hitting the bridge. almost two million people in the uk don't have a bank account, according to a house of lords report. it says the poorest people are being barred from basic financial services. also in the next hour, the eu turns 60 years old. leaders of the 27 member countries, minus the uk, are meeting in rome to celebrate the anniversary of the treaty. and in sport, it's pole position for lewis hamilton.
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