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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  March 30, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm jane hill live in westminster. the headlines at 11. the government is to set out how it plans to incorporate thousands of pieces of european union law into uk legislation. the great repeal bill will be introduced in the house of commons by brexit secretary david davis in around half an hour's time. this is a big transformation. we shouldn't underestimate that we've got a task to do. it is momentous, but it is not beyond us. european leaders, including the german chancellor angela merkel, are discussing brexit at a meeting in malta. the other stories that are developing this hour... more brexit fallout as insurer lloyd's of london says it will establish a new european subsidiary in brussels. the search for a missing helicopter due to stop over at caernarfon airport is focusing on the snowdonia national park. health officials have published voluntary guidelines for limits on the amount of sugar they believe should be in everyday foods. i'm outside the houses
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of parliament in westminster. plans to make britain an "independent, sovereign" nation will be published this morning — just one day after theresa may started the process of brexit. the great repeal bill will outline how the government plans to repatriate more than a0 years worth of powers from the european union and convert thousands of eu rules into british law. yesterday, theresa may described britain's departure from the eu as "an historic moment from which there can be no turning back".
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eleanor garnier reports. cometh the hour, cometh the moment, in westminster, belfast, edinburgh and cardiff — the exact moment the uk took a new and different course. this is an historic moment from which there is no turning back. the letter, hand—delivered by our man in brussels, telling the eu we are on our way out. written in a deliberately conciliatory tone. but a hint, too, of the steel in mrs may's stance. no overt threat to walk away, but a serious warning, as she wrote "a failure to reach an agreement would mean our cooperation in the fight against crime and terrorism would be weakened. we must therefore work hard to avoid that outcome." a sentence that certainly raised eyebrows, here, and across the eu, too. but despite all the difficulties, mrs may promised our relationship with the rest of the continent will be just as good after brexit. what we are both looking for is that comprehensive trade agreement,
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which gives that ability to trade freely into the european single market. and for them, and for them to trade with us. it would be a different relationship, but i think it can have the same benefits in terms of that free access to trade. labour insisted it would hold the government to account at every turn. more than ever, britain needs a government that will deliver for the whole country, not just the few. and that is the ultimate test of the brexit deal that the prime minister must now secure. the clock is now ticking. two years to untangle a ao—year relationship, to unpick all the interwoven regulations and legislation. that task starts today, with more detail from the government on how it plans to bring eu powers back to westminster. eleanor garnier, bbc news, westminster. speaking ahead of his speech in parliament, the brexit secretary david davis said the uk's cooperation
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on security and intelligence was not been used a threat in negotiations. we are trying to do a deal that is in the interests of ourselves and the new union. that is about trade and also about justice and home affairs, which provides safety through security arrangements, through security arrangements, through data exchange and so on. the prime minister was the longest serving home secretary in modern times. she negotiated the deal and she wants to make sure we have the equipment after we leave. 50 she wants to make sure we have the equipment after we leave. so why mention security 11 times? because she is seeing if we don't get a
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deal, we would both be worse off. that seems to be a statement of fa ct. that seems to be a statement of fact. it's not a threat. the issue at hand today is the white paper on the great repeal bill. how much parliamentary time does take up? because we need to discuss other things like customs and fishing and agriculture. can this be done in the time allotted? what it does is it takes all of the 40 years of european low to the we leave a it fits into uk low. that is not a straightforward process, but it is a limited process. and to that so that all the low continues to work. after that, we will have to do legislation on immigration, customs and other things. there will be a number of such lows, i think. but this is a
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big transformation. we shouldn't underestimate that we have attached to do. it's tremendous, but it is not beyond us. our assistant political editor norman smith is at the house of commons. today was a very big day, but yesterday was a big day, and so is today. there is plenty to talk about still and ready to do. it gives us a sense of the huge upheaval involved in brexit. notjust in the casting oui’ in brexit. notjust in the casting our economic and foreign relations, but in terms of the legislative spadework that has to go on to translate that huge, massive european low into british low. we are talking about thousands upon thousands of eu directives and regulations and rules that have been introduced over the past 40 years, covering pretty much every nook and
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cranny of our daily lives. all that has to be put into british low, so that when we eventually leave the eu, that isn't that moment where we suddenly don't have regulations to govern things from consumer affairs to the size of boiled eggs. it is a massive, massive undertaking. and what is striking about it is that even the sort of estimates we've heard from the government seem to be conservative, because we've heard from the former clerk at the house of commons, a man who basically understands her legislation has done better than anyone, we heard from him this morning on the today programme, warning that this could ta ke programme, warning that this could take many years after we have left the eu. it won'tjust be two years. how long will it be? it could go on for a decade, the tidying up. the brexit de arrangements have got to be made, because that is an unmissable deadline, but there will
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be an awful lot to do after that. where this differs politically from the argy—bargy there's going to be in brussels and some of the sort of fows in brussels and some of the sort of rows ahead over new rules surrounding immigration and so on, is that this mass of eu legislation does not seem an obvious political flash point. it seems relatively uncontentious, because the government is not proposing repealing or amending any of the eu lows or the existing lows in areas like employment and the environment, they will simply be translated into british low, so it's not obviously will provide a flash point. but should things get difficult with brussels, should mps get nervous, should they be signs that people don't like the way things are going, the great repeal bill does provide a legislative means by mps who want to cause trouble, to cause trouble. and for that reason, theresa may has to
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be cautious, because legislation is something mps can play around with to the heart ‘s content. so while it's not obvious it's going to be a political flash point, it's not obvious it's going to be a politicalflash point, nonetheless, if mps want to create a political fight, they can use this great repeal bill to do it. our correspondent chris morris is in malta for us... how much of this is under discussion, under scrutiny there? this is a meeting of conservative leaders from across the eu and inevitably, it's in the shadow of brexit. this was to be talking about where the rest of them go from here, what is the future of europe, but brexit is on many people's mind. and donald is to risk is here, the president of the european council. by president of the european council. by this time tomorrow, he will have issued draft guidelines to be debated for the next few weeks by
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the 27 other member states. those guidelines will set the mandate for which the european commission can negotiate with the uk on the terms ofa negotiate with the uk on the terms of a devolved settlement. it is very clear, we heard it from angela merkel yesterday and will hear from others today, that they do want to at least talk about the principles of separation before they move on to talk about things like future trade agreements. that doesn't mean they date to cross a free tea and. every eye, it doesn't mean we have to haggle over earth particular figure, but they want to agree the method by which that bill will be negotiated. the other thing they want to talk about and our government does as well, it's the rights of uk citizens elsewhere in the year, and eu citizens in the uk. politically, there is a lot of goodwill on that issue, but technically, it's extremely complicated. not least the
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issueis extremely complicated. not least the issue is that if you want to guarantee the rights of eu citizens in the uk, what is the ultimate place of legal recourse, because a lot of people say it should be the european court ofjustice. but theresa may has said the european court ofjustice will no longer play a role in british life. thank you very much. that's a good flavour robert there. with me now is henry newman from open europe, which is a think tank that calls for reform of the eu... welcome. your thoughts after a historic day yesterday, whatever one's opinion, it was a turning point, a remarkable moment. good assessment of some of the comments that have come from anger to love merkel and others. it was certainly a poignant day. angela merkel‘s, it
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was overinterpreted. it looked like she had ruled out a parallel negotiation. she said we need to agree the principles first, not that we have to finalise the deal & an enormous check before discussing the future. if you mention the word check. that's interesting, but also how much of that is the issue of other european leaders wanting to make sure that britain pays whatever figure it believes we are responsible for paying. no one is disputing that, but it is an issue. of course it is. they've made it clear we will have to pay all the money we have legitimately promised to pay, but the question is, what is that? but we've also seen berlin in particular has been rather annoyed by the way brussels has pushed this bill onto the table at the very beginning, but now we have notified.
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while they were holding to the line that we couldn't negotiate without notifying, they were presenting this build £60 billion. the problem that berlin sees is that if you put a bill on the table at the beginning and insist that theresa may has to sign that, to write the enormous cheque, she will be in a difficult position and she might have to think she needs to walk away from it. you meana she needs to walk away from it. you mean a difficult position domestically, how that'll play back here? yes. there was also concern yesterday that theresa may had u nfa i rly yesterday that theresa may had unfairly linked trade and security, but this is a misreading. what she was saying from my point of view is that if we don't secure a deal with europe, if we leave without unpicking and reforming our relationship in a clear way, apple have an effect on security in two. first of all, a lot of the
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architecture that enables the security corporation, like sobbing of passenger information on planes is part of european low. but we don't resolve that, it will have an effect on security. and if we leave without a deal, it will be assembled at our relationship has broken down, so it will make it harder to work together on other failures like sanctions. we inevitably have been talking over the last 24 hours about how the big european countries are reacting, like france and germany. they have nine months to think about this. a referendum was lastjune. is your sense that there has been rather more prepared and thought about, that they are ready for the beginning of these negotiations and perhaps we have been reflecting? because they have had a good few months to think about it. we have
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also seen quite a few people thinking that britain was not really going to go through blizzard. they we re going to go through blizzard. they were exacerbated in that misapprehension by listening to people here, who thought article 50 would never be triggered. although they have had nine months, they have been labouring under the misconception that britain would never really pulled the trigger. the problem will have over the next few months as there will be speculation and analysis of every tiny comment coming out. the difficulty of this, with at least 27 actors involved, it will be hard to find the wood from the trees. you and i will be talking plenty in that period to try and do exactly that. thanks very much for your time. the implications of today are significant for every part of the united kingdom — england, scotland, wales and northern ireland. our scotland correspondent nick eardley is watching proceedings from central london for us.
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you heard norman mentioned the complexity of getting this through the houses of parliament. there is also the complexity of getting the consent of the devolved parliaments around the uk. because the lows that are being repudiated it will inevitably impact on here, they will need that consent. uk ministers have conceded that is the case, so we'll start to hear today warn about how that'll happen. but there is also a sense that, what happens is that consent is withheld? that would mean we have a hole in scottish, welsh and northern irish legislation. there is also a question about where the powers review page aged from
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brussels will call. the scottish government will want that to come back immediately to holyrood. i think we'll hear more today about that. but we'll all powers inevitably be devolved ? that. but we'll all powers inevitably be devolved? i'm not so sure. there could be a row about that. better than lewis is in cardiff. while a similar questions and concerns there? yes, and the welsh government, like the other devolved administrations, will be looking for information on what the prime minister meant when she talked about a significant increase in powers for the devolved administrations as a result of brexit. she said that yesterday, and they will be looking for hints, if not all the answers, from the white paperon not all the answers, from the white paper on the great repeal bill. one of the first minister's greek concerns is that westminster will use it as an excuse to centralise more powers in whitehall. but the
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welsh government are very keen to emphasise it is things like agriculture that is already devolved, so don't be a case of power moving from brussels to london and then being transferred to cardiff. they say the powers already lie there and they will stay here after brexit. in terms of the talk, there's a balance to be struck by there's a balance to be struck by the labour welsh government between the labour welsh government between the vote in wales to leave the european union and their personal views that brexit holds all sorts of issues for wales in the long term. he said yesterday that the uk government had shown a persistent lack of respect towards the devolved administrations. this definitely some frustration that wales doesn't have a bigger role in shaping the uk negotiations. this morning, they said they are starting from the position that they want to succeed
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in negotiations and they want to help do that. let's assess the route in belfast. chris page is better. northern ireland is in a different situation, in that at the moment there is no devolved government. the power—sharing coalition collapsed, and talks to restore the government failed on monday. another set of talks will start by the end of april. but the absence of any official leadership in the northern ireland executive, this letter has been written to the readers of the five main parties at stormont. there is the suggestion that more powers could be passed on to the devolved administrations. mr davies says further devolution of powers passed
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back from brussels, that would be to be discussed. he says there will be areas where common frameworks may be required. he says there might be some matters which are officially devolved to stormont, but in reality, what stormont scanned you might be limited, because it has to be managed on a uk wide basis. that would have to be worked out with all the nations. this is the only part of the uk that will have a land border with another eu state. very important issues for the stormont assembly to consider if there executive and assembly comeback. very interesting. thank you very much for now. we will have much more from westminster. we'll keep an
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eye on everything here. we can go back to my colleague annita mcveigh in the bbc newsroom for today's other news stories. the headlines on bbc use. the government is to set out how it plans to incorporate thousands of pieces of european low into your venus leads —— into uk legislation. lloyds says it will establish a new european subsidiary in brussels to avoid leading business on the continent. the search for a missing helicopter travelling from milton keynes to dublin is focusing on the snowdonia national park. and in sport, the arsenal manager refused to confirm weather he'll remain at the club after the summer, but said he believes the players wa nt to but said he believes the players want to stay, despite speculation about their futures. manchester
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city's women take a 1—0 aggregate lea ked city's women take a 1—0 aggregate leaked at home to danish side. it is their first season in the competition. joanna contour is into the semifinals. she'll face venus williams in the last four in the early hours of tomorrow. i'll be back with all those stories later. the insurance market, lloyd's of london, says it will open a new office in brussels in early 2019. lloyds says it's concerned that once the uk has left the eu, it will lose the right to sell its products across the single market, but its chief executive said customers shouldn't be concerned about the move. nothing to worry about, in fact, what it doesn't help to secure the future of lloyd's. about 5% of our business is impacted by the cutie coming out of the eu. we want to be
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able to provide continuous coverage and issue insurance policies for customers based in the eu, hence the need to set up eu subsidiary. our business correspondent is here. tell us more business correspondent is here. tell us more about why lloyds are making this move? they don't have a choice, if they want to retain business in the single market. we don't know what the framework will be, but the insurance market is heavily regulated and lloyds deal is a need to set up a subsidiary in brussels that will be regulated according to eu low and protect its ability to do business. she has been trying to reassure customers, seeing business. she has been trying to reassure customers, seeing the brussels office is an additional bays, but could more of their offices move? it is a fairly minor move at the moment, fewer than 100 staff and about 5% of the business. the companies that will be more severely affected potentially are the banks. we know that a number of
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them are talking about moving jobs to other european cities. hsbc has already suggested it could move up to 1000 jobs to paris, others are looking at headquarters like frankfurt. what people see, to a degree, is a trend for post some point to be moved out of london and inter—continental cities. but it's not like jobs inter—continental cities. but it's not likejobs are moving inter—continental cities. but it's not like jobs are moving wholesale from london to frankfurt and paris, it does seem that be spread out among the continental cities. a privately—owned helicopter with five people on board has disappeared over north wales. the aircraft is believed to have been travelling from milton keynes to dublin, via caerna rfon bay. holly hamilton has this update from canaerfon. weather conditions have not improved
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since the search was cold off late last night. we're waiting to hear when it will resume on the search for that missing helicopter. we know it left milton keynes shortly before midday yesterday morning. he did not arrive, all contact was lost, so the uk coastguard was informed immediately. the search operation was launched just after four o'clock yesterday afternoon. that involved to coastguard helicopters, but because of the brew visibility and the weather, that search was cold off last night. police have resumed the search today on ground. they have cold in mind mountain rescue teams and they are focusing on snowdonia. we know little about the five individuals on board that aircraft. we know it was a privately owned helicopter. members of the
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public have been asked to get in touch, dial 999, if they did see that red helicopter yesterday afternoon. we're waiting for an update currently on when the search will resume. they have said they're unable to start the search again while the weather remains like this. so as anything changes, there will be no updates in the next while. new guidelines for the amount of sugar that should be in everyday foods — from breakfast cereals to chocolate bars — have been published by public health england. the aim is to cut the amount of sugar children consume by 20 per cent by the end of the decade. our health correspondent, jane dreaper has the details. it is tempting stuff. but eating too much sugar is rotting children's teeth and fuelling obesity. one third of children are overweight or obese when they leave primary school. now as part of government plans to tackle the problem, the food industry has been given new limits for how much sugar should
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be in nine popularfoods. companies are being urged to reformulate their product so that they contain less sugar, or to make them smaller. the aim is for the uk's yearly diet to contain 200,000 fewer tons of sugar by 2020. we expect people to see over the time smaller cakes, biscuits, chocolate bars. especially when they eat out of home, in family restaurants and so on. we also expect that people will not notice the changes because we know if changes are gradually made, generally we don't notice them. bread is now 40% less salty than it was ten years ago and i bet you have not noticed. public health england says these guidelines lead the world although the nine foods still account for less than half of children's sugar intake. health campaigners say the plans are bold but it is important to keep up pressure on food companies. there will be a progress report in a year's time.
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senior executives from companies such as microsoft, facebook, and google will meet the home secretary later, to discuss ways to tackle extremism online. amber rudd will ask them to do more to help counter terrorism by focusing on areas such as extremist content and encryption. the duke and duchess of cambridge and prince harry have released a series of films as part of their ‘heads together‘ campaign — designed to encourage people to talk about mental health. the project aims to help end the stigma around mental health. the former england cricket captain andrew flintoff and the rapper professor green, were among the celebrities who've been sharing their experiences. the hardest thing for me initially was talking. i'm not a big talker. i don't talk about... i'm from the north of england! i'm from a working—class family. we don't talk about our feelings. yeah, it was no different for me, growing up in a council estate in east london. it's just not something you sort of spoke about. time now to take a look at the
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weather forecast. we are in for the warmest in use today. the temperature might get up today. the temperature might get up to 22 in the south—east. that's not the case everywhere. some of us are still stuck under the cloud and there has been rain around as well. you can see the rain across western areas, but the warm weather is wafting from the south. this portion of the uk you will probably warm up to at least 20 degrees and 22 in one or two spots. but many western and northern areas not quite so warm. still a respectable 15 for newcastle at this time of year. for tonight, it stays quite damp at times. it stays dry in the east, but where ever you are, it will be my yield.
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then friday, we will have rain in the morning, then in the afternoon, it will brighten up. some sunshine, a few showers and a little bit fresher. this is bbc newsroom live. we are waiting for david davis to stand up in the commons in the next little while because we're going to get a lots more about how all those eu laws are going to be incorporated into british law. our assistant political editor norman smith is outside the house of commons. it isa it is a gargantuan project that awaits. expect what we are going to hear. what david davis will say is that this bill is designed to transfer all existing eu laws, regulations, directives into british law. the point being this is a crucial part
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of brexit because if we didn't do that when we leave the eu we would find all these eu rules and regulations which are part of our lives would not exist. they would be no rules on employment, customer rights, environmental rights. this isa rights, environmental rights. this is a way of pre—empting that and ensuring a smooth the process when we eventually leave the european union. that those laws were still exist and they will have been put into british law. it is a gargantuan task. we have been a member of the european union for more than 40 yea rs european union for more than 40 years and over that time it is estimated there have been 80,000 different directives, regulations, rules, all of which will have to be amended. a lot of that are technical twea ks amended. a lot of that are technical tweaks here and there but some of it will require mps to devote hours to
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going through it. the estimate of how long this might take, we heard from the man who used to be responsible for legislation in the commons, the clerk to the commons, he speculated far from being a job done and dusted in two years it could take ten years. way down the line after we have left the eu, mps could still be mulling over eu regulations now—defunct and had to put them into british law. it is a colossal legislative undertaking. the politics of it are theirs. if you get a bill like this, it is an opportunity for mps who want to cause trouble to cause trouble. as soon as you cause trouble to cause trouble. as soon as you have legislation it can be amended, it can be changed, voted on. there is the potentialfor this great repeal bill to be a vehicle for mutiny over brexit. my sense is
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it isn't going to be that. mps on to make a stand, they will make it of issues like immigration where there will have to be a separate immigration bill and went theresa may comes back from europe without deal, which we now will be voted on in parliament, that will be the occasion for mps to make a stand. just worth stressing, if mps felt so inclined that they could theresa may a lot of grief through this great repeal bill. we will hear from david davis we will hearfrom david davis in we will hear from david davis in the next little while. looking down, an element of the day ‘s business is still underway. we want to hear from david davis but let's pick up on some of the points norman was making. iamjoint some of the points norman was making. i am joint by professor catherine barnard from cambridge university. good to see you. you
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have reflected since the referendum about the sheer scale of the task. norman was talking about some of the politics of it. in terms of actually what has to be done now, it is an enormous task. it is a fast task, you use gargantuan and that is right. the great repeal bill which we are going to hear about today is going to do three things. it will repeal the european community's act, the actor took isn't it be with the first place. secondly, it will incorporate all existing europe law into british law. a lot has been done because directives are part of our law. thirdly, this is the biggest part of the exercise, there will be powers given to the executive, the infamous henry viii powers, they will amend, repeal,
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replace those bits of eu law that does work for us any more. that is going to be a massive undertaking. nobody knows how many pieces of legislation that are. the number being banded about is 20,000. it is going to be a huge task to work out what changes need to be made to be adapted but also whether we want to keep those rules, how are they going to fit with eu institutions particularly when the eu will no longer be doing some of the heavy lifting that it has done. when you say it has to be decided regards to some elements that don't work for us, to use the phrase, who makes the decision as to whether a piece of legislation does not work? is that a political decision? that is a good question. this is where the debate over the so—called henry viii clauses coming. will it
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bea henry viii clauses coming. will it be a very prosaic working through the registration to say, that piece of legislation makes reference to win eu institution which we are not members of any more, we need to cut that out. the latter, which is a technical exercise, can be done pretty well by the executive but bigger policy decisions about taking rights away or curtailing or improving consumer legislation, for example, that is a policy issue which is a political issue. that needs parliamentary scrutiny. people listening to this and trying to follow the process that begins today, some people might think if i voted to leave the eu i thought i was getting rid of all of that. i thought one of the things we were waiting for was we didn't like the fa ct a waiting for was we didn't like the fact a lot of british laws or rules that govern our life are begun in
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brussels or strasbourg. there are so many areas covered here whether we look at that food, fisheries, environment. the question is, can we get rid of those and who decides whether we keep that piece of legislation? the practical answer is, no, we can't clear it all away with one big room. that would generate such legal uncertainty for employers, businesses and employees that the government has taken the view that legal uncertainty isn't a price worth paying for complete tabular starting from scratch. the government has been pragmatic and said we will incorporate all the eu law, that'll give us time to work through in a calm, considered way to look at those pieces of legislation is that suits us and those that don't. the reality is, because of
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the huge amount of ladies who have been talking about we can'tjust dream up ourown been talking about we can'tjust dream up our own legislation. the process is a pragmatic one. they will keep on board eu legislation for the time being and it will be for the time being and it will be for the time being and it will be for the parliament or the executive to go through it in a more considered way to work out what we will keep and what will go. i hardly dare contradict the picture but there are issues around devolution. some laws may be something the scottish government might have control over. theresa may said yesterday that their powers will come back to westminster so it'll be a centralised approach but then she will be centralised them, she would give powers back to the devolved administrations. she recognised this might be giving more powers to the
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devolved administrations. it is something that the devolved administrations will be very, watching very carefully because they wa nt to watching very carefully because they want to make sure they do get the powers back in the area where they already have devolved competence. as you can see, it is a multi dimensional jigsaw you can see, it is a multi dimensionaljigsaw puzzle. it isn't a one—dimensional one. it looks at the many facets of this. and this is what is going on at domestic level. ann be level, there is issues about divorce and any future trade deal. —— on the eu level. it'll be a demanding time for both the executive of the government and for the civil service. we might be able to talk about that little later. for now, thank you very much. we will be able to talk to professor barnard later. we are waiting to hear from to professor barnard later. we are waiting to hearfrom david davis. let's had backed norman in the
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commons. one of the consequences of this great repeal bill and the huge amount of legislative time it is going to take up is it constrains the ability of the government to do much else, to pass other legislation, carry reforms, it cu rta ils legislation, carry reforms, it curtails its ability to grapple with any of the other big issues. you think about social care where we have been promised radical reform to try and ease the pressure. it limits the space and time and resources that the government has got to deal with those issues because so much has to be devoted to be spadework partly of translating the eu law into british law but also the big key bills which we know are going to have to introduced around new immigration rules, new rules to replace the common agricultural policy, new laws to change our trading relationship. they will
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this is going to be the brexit parliament. although theresa may has been keen to try to present herself as more than a brexit prime minister, we've had various initiatives on an industrial strategy, the chance of theresa may being able to follow those initiatives during this parliament seem initiatives during this parliament seem to be extremely limited just because the time available is going to be so constrained by the independent of dealing with the brexit legislation. that means this is going to be a narrowly focused government. for all the talk it isn't going to be dominated by the issue of leaving the eu that seems to be the reality of what is going to be the reality of what is going to happen. that is a concern for some people. people will be watching saying, what
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about health and education and transport and god forbid, any national crisis that might occur in the future that we don't yet know about? i suppose you are saying that is how it is. there is nothing that can be done about that, the scale of the task is search that this is how it is going to be. i know people who are involved in policy making and thatis are involved in policy making and that is a few serious policy reform will have to wait until the next parliament. i don't think any of them are in any doubt they wouldn't be able to carry through significance of reform while brexit is underway. if you want real evidence of that just is underway. if you want real evidence of thatjust look is underway. if you want real evidence of that just look at the response of mrs mater nicola sturgeon where her famous response of mrs mater nicola sturgeon where herfamous phrase, now is not the time and the reason it is not the time is theresa may needs to devote —— devote all their energy to brexit. there is in the
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space to think about a scottish independence referendum and the reason dunkley is because of brexit. one of the other things which we might get some inkling of today when we hear from david might get some inkling of today when we hearfrom david davis is we might get a sense, potentially, of what sort of additional powers might be devolved to scotland and the devolved to scotland and the devolved administrations because we did hearfrom devolved administrations because we did hear from theresa devolved administrations because we did hearfrom theresa may devolved administrations because we did hear from theresa may when she made her statement yesterday. she talked about a significant increase in decision—making powers for the scottish government and those in belfast in cardiff. she was talking about powers coming back once we leave europe and the areas such as fisheries and agriculture. today might bea fisheries and agriculture. today might be a moment when david davis can sketch out a bit more. he is the man who is meant to respond to the various devolved administrations, all of whom have submitted their
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proposals of what life should be like after brexit. when we hear from himi like after brexit. when we hear from him i would not be surprised if the scottish national party and others might challenge him about what is going to happen in terms of those bits of eu authority, where will they go when they come back to westminster after brexit. we might get some clarity and then we can gauge how far that might assuage opinion in scotland. it would ease the concerns within the scottish government to clearly take the view devolving back fisheries and agriculture is the bare minimum. it doesn't go anywhere near to meeting their demands. with might get a sense of what the government has in mind as an olive branch. 0k, mind as an olive branch. ok, norman, thank you. david davis still not in the commons. we will be back there as soon as the secretary of state for exiting be used and is up of state for exiting be used and is up and makes those comments. we will
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keep an eye on that as it gets underway in the next half an hour or so. underway in the next half an hour or so. you can send us your questions, we are going to do and other ask this session later. that is coming up this session later. that is coming up on that later this evening. i can't remember what time! du centre questions. —— do send us your questions. for now i will hand you back to a neater. families of prisoners are being targeted by criminals using extortion and blackmail. but is according to organisations which support relatives. the former head of the prison services has told the bbc families are paying a heavy price for the drug crisis in
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prisons. inmates are threatening to harm people's relatives unless they pay off drug debts. the letter which arrived at her house spoke of last chances but i am tired of being nice, said its anonymous author.|j was in complete shock. you are in a panic. the family tell me they had no choice. you knew he had a drug habit but there are people watching think you shouldn't payet. at the end of the davy russell and you are going to do that to make sure they say. but but his mother tells me he wasn't safe. beatings, stabbings, black eyes, dislocated jaw, broken
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nose, you name it, he has had it done. where does the protection in that? none at all. i think he will ta ke that? none at all. i think he will take his life before long. there's not a day that goes by when i don't think what is happening to him, not one. the recent month, mobile phone footage and tv cameras have captured spiralling chaos in prisons. the drug problem is well documented, what is less documented is how it is paid for. who is paying? the families are paying. they are paying a heavy price. this is an illustration of that. we show the families interview to john, a former prison governor and one—time head of the prison service anti—corruption unit. is it the family ‘s fault? it is not the fault of the family.
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the crime here is blackmail, extortion and everything else that goes with that. the family should not be suffering this way. we should be protecting the community. not be suffering this way. we should be protecting the communitym not be suffering this way. we should be protecting the community. is this a wider problem? we have spoken to three support groups which work with the families of prisoners who tell me it is. those charities told that they are supporting more families who are the victim of blackmail and extortion. they say the numbers are still small but it is a growing problem. the ministry ofjustice gave us this statement. we showed john this letter. it is from the prison service. it concludes, the only way to resolve this issue is for your son to stop taking drugs and for you to stop
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funding his habit. this letter is saying, sorry, not our problem. this is extortion, it is blackmail. yes. do you think it is blackmail. yes. do you think it is happening to otherfamilies? yes, i know it is. the duke and duchess of cambridge and prince harry have released a series of films as part of a campaign designed to encourage people to talk about mental health. the campaign aims to lift the stigma of mental health and features celebrities talking about their own issues. let's watch ruby max and her husband talk about their first ever conversation about her mental health issues. we didn't have far to go, we were walking down the aisle. there was no aisle. you told me those three
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things. how old are you really were. i had been married three to —— twice before and i was mentally ill. you can imagine a grenade went off and they were sudden explosions. then i started laughing and i got confused and i signed the register, best wishes, ruby wax. then we never mentioned it again. not really. did it scare you that i mentioned that? it wasn't a huge surprise but it made things click. i keep thinking about the day, this is when i realised you were the best news ever. i had to interview somebody who was mentally ill and we were filming here. everybody in the institution said, are you insane? then they came near an interview the
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person with depression and i could see the person with the press and looking at me thinking, you are sicker than i looking at me thinking, you are sickerthan i am. looking at me thinking, you are sicker than i am. everybody clapped and said, that was not. whenever you got the press and you could see there was a panic because of the confusion about what is happening in your head. if you are close to somebody with depression, you have got to help them to make the first move to make them understand they are sick. in your case it is being immense people who suffer from the same thing. i have seen you talk to other people and it is like a unique club. i am only relieved with other people who have mental illness. we have this understanding that is the healing. imagine going to a restaurant with a
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meal costs a pound. that was the aim of national kitchens, set up by the government during the first world war to help ensure everyone had access to food. 100 years on the records to revive the concept. one did years ago, 1917, and national kitchens were introduced. they were food shortages during world war i. the idea was to feed people healthily and cheaply. is it an idea which could catch on one small? that is the hope of those organising this national kitchens eventin organising this national kitchens event in liverpool today. why are you doing at? we have forgotten social eating. you think about food poverty, food banks and the basic food bank model is, go there, get your ticket take your food. this is about coming together community, socialising together and
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the decoration. the ministry of food said these places should be centres of civilisation. gramophones, pianos, flowers. what were national national kitchens? they were up 2000 in britain. they were run locally. when the state sponsors than they become nationalised and run by the state on a line of price control but also nutritious eating. it is cheap food and healthy food. let's have a quick chat with somebody who is putting this together. how do you do it? what kind of budget a working with? the food we are going to be serving up this evening will come together for the equivalent of 2.70 nine. we intercept stuff that would have been thrown away. we're hoping to recreate often take many years. what
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kind of ingredients are you working with? sausage and pt , some vegetables, we're going to make stew and we're going to use traditional recipes for the cakes. pallister demand will there be for this? —— how much demand. we are expecting 120 people but there will be a series of events over the next few weeks and hopefully that will lead to more regular things like this. thanks very much indeed. let's have a quick chat with some of the volunteers. they are wearing authentic costumes. why did you want to be involved ? authentic costumes. why did you want to be involved? it is important for us to be involved? it is important for us to remember what happened ended years ago. people of my generation 's communal living and dining is something we don't really do. it is good for us to re—enact and remember 100 years ago these national kitchens were helping people.|j
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100 years ago these national kitchens were helping people. i will let you carry. the event kicks off tonight and there are others over the uk such as cardiff and manchester. there are people who think cheap, healthy food and eating communally is something which could catch on one small. we are waiting for the brexit secretary, david davis, to introduce the great repeal bill. they are running a little behind schedule but should be happening soon. let's have a look at the weather. for many parts of england is to set to be the warmest day of the year so far the temperatures into the 20s. but for many of us it is not the case, it is cloud and rain. this high pressure is affecting eastern areas but western parts will keep cloud. early on we had the rain
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pushing into south—western parts of england, wales, the lake district. spots of rain across scotland but ahead of that band of rain we've got warm aircoming from ahead of that band of rain we've got warm air coming from the south. i will have to hand it back to any car. we're going to go to the house of commons where david davis is introducing the great repeal bill. it reflects the results of last year ‘s it reflects the results of last year ns __ it reflects the results of last year ‘s —— instruction. it is ourfirst determination to get the right deal for every single person. now is the time to come together to ensure the uk as time to come together to ensure the ukasa time to come together to ensure the uk as a whole is prepared for the challenges and opportunities presented by our exit from the eu. we are being clear we want a smooth and orderly exit and the great repeal bill is integral to that approach. it will provide clarity and certainty for businesses, workers and consumers across the uk on the day we be. it mean that as he
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exited the eu and seek a new deep and special partnership with the european union we will be doing so from the position where we have the same standards and rules. it will ensure we deliver on our promise to end the supremacy of european union law in the uk as we exit. our laws will be made in london, edinburgh, cardiff and belfast and interpreted byjudges across the uk. some have been concerned that parliament will not play enough of a role in shaping the future of the country when we have left the eu. today's white paper shows how wrong that is. this publication makes clear there will bea publication makes clear there will be a series of bills to debate and vote on before and after we leave as well as many... if you like to continue to watch this comedy was on bbc two will need to switch to the bbc news channel.
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—— continued to watch this those on bbc two. businesses will continue to operate knowing the rules have not changed overnight and providing fairness to individuals whose rights and obligations would not be subject to sudden change. third, the bill will create the necessary powers to collect the laws that do not operate appropriately when we have left be you. our legal system will continue to fill ask function correctly outside be you. i will address these in turn. let me begin with the european communities act. it will enable the return of this parliament to 1972. it ends the supremacy of eu law in this country. it is necessary to deliver on the results of the
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referendum. repealing the eca alone is not enough. a simple repeal would give holes in our statute book. the eu regulations will apply in the uk will no longer have any effect on many of the domestic regulations will fall away. to provide the maximum certainty, the great repeal bill will convert eu law into uk law on the day we leave the eu. this means worker rights and environmental protection will continue to be available in uk law after we have left the european union. once eu law has been converted into domestic law, parliament will be able to pass legislation to amend, repeal or improve any piece of european law it chooses, as will devolve legislatures where they have the
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power to do so. further steps will be needed to provide a smooth exit. this is because a large number of laws will not work properly if we leave the eu without taking further action. some laws run functions to an eu institution with which the uk will no longer have a relationship. to ove rco m e will no longer have a relationship. to overcome this, the great repeal bill will provided power to correct the statute book when necessary to resolve the problems that will occur asa resolve the problems that will occur as a consequence of leaving the eu. secondary legislation will make sure we have put in place the necessary corrections before the day we leave the european union. i can confirm that this power will be time limited. parliament will need to be satisfied that the procedures of the bill for making and improving the secondary legislation are appropriate. given the scale of the changes necessary and the finite amount of time available, there is a balance to be struck between the
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importance of scrutiny and correcting the statute book in time. as the constitution committee in the other place recently put it, the challenge parliament will face is in balancing the need for speed and governmental discretion with proper parliamentary control. parliament of course can and does regularly debate and vote in secondary legislation. we are not considering some form of executive orders, but using a lesser process of long standing. i hope today's white paper can be the start ofa today's white paper can be the start of a discussion between parliament and government on how best to achieve this balance. we propose the bill will also give ministers in the devolved administrations a power to amend devolved legislation to correct their law in line with the wea k correct their law in line with the weak uk ministers will be able to correct uk law. let me turn to the
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european court of justice correct uk law. let me turn to the european court ofjustice and its case law. i can confirm the great repeal bill but provide no future role for the european court and the ill will not but oblige her cause to consider cases decided by the european court of justice consider cases decided by the european court ofjustice after we have left. but for as long as eu law remains on the uk statute book, it is essential that there is an understanding of what the law means. the government believes is best achieved to provide continuity before and exit stage. two smites certainty, the bill will revert to caselaw as it exists on the day we leave the european union. any other starting point would be to change the law and create unnecessary uncertainty. this approach maximises
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legal certainty on the point of departure, but our intention is not to fossilise past decisions by the european court of justice. to fossilise past decisions by the european court ofjustice. we propose european case court clerk will be given the same status as decisions by our own supreme court. the supreme court doesn't often depart from its own decisions, but it does from time to time. we expect this to take the similar approach with european court. of course, parliament will be free to change the law and overturned caselaw with it decides it's right to do so. today's white paper also sets out the great repeal bill approach to the great repeal bill approach to the charter of fundamental rights. let me explain a reproach. the charter of fundamental rights only applies to member states when the act within the scope of european law. this relevance is removed by
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our withdrawal from the eu. law. this relevance is removed by our withdrawalfrom the eu. the government has been clear that in leaving the eu, the uk's leading role in protecting and advancing human rights will not change. the fa ct human rights will not change. the fact the charter will follow we will not mean the protection of rights in the uk will suffer as a result. the charter of fundamental rights is not designed to create new rights, but rather to catalogue rights already recognised in eu law, something recognised in eu law, something recognised by the labour government that brought in with the protocol attached to it in 2007. where cases have been decided by reference to those rights, that case law will continue to be interpreted for the rights. i now want to turn to devolution. the united kingdom's domestic constitutional arrangements have evolved since the uk joined the european economic community in 1973. the current devolution settlement is
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well agreed after the uk joint. the current devolution settlement is well agreed after the ukjoint. in areas where the devolved administrations and legislatures have competence, such as agriculture, environment, transport, this competence is exercised within the constraints set by european law. the existence of common eu frameworks has had the effect of providing a comment uk three in many aliens, safeguarding the functioning of the duty internal market. as paris return from the eu, we have an opportunity to determine the level best placed to make sure the power sits closer to the people of the uk than ever before. it is the expectation of the government that the outcome of this process will be a significant increase in the decision—making power of each devolved administration. but they must also make sure that as we leave the eu, no new barriers to living in doing business within our own union are created. in some areas, this
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will require comment uk frameworks. decisions will be required about where a framework is needed and how it might be established. the devolved administrations also acknowledge the deeper frameworks. we will work closely with devolved administrations to get an approach which works for the horse united kingdom and reflects the need an individual circumstances of scotland, wales and northern ireland. let me conclude by stressing the importance of the great repeal bill. it will help to ensure certainty and stability across the board. it's vital to ensuring a smooth and orderly exit. it will stand us in good stead when negotiations over our future revision is with the eu and will deliver greater control of our laws to this parliament and devolved administrations. these tips are crucial. i hope all sides will recognise that and work with others to achieve these aims. i commend
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this statement to the house. thank you for this statement. nobody underestimates the task of converting eu law into domestic law. but the question is how is it done and what is done? the white paper on the question of how gives sweeping powers to the executive. sweeping, because it proposes a power to use delegated legislation to correct and thus change primary legislation and also devolved legislation. sweeping, because of the sheer scale of the exercise. in those circumstances, one might expect some pretty rigorous safeguards to the use of these sweeping powers. but none are found in the white paper. on the
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contrary, in paragraph 3.20, the white paper says, given the scale of the changes that will be necessary in the finite amount of time to make them, there is a balance that will have to be struck between the importance of scrutiny and the speed of the process. it goes on to say the government proposes using existing types of statutes. so there are now enhanced safeguards for this sweeping use of powers. in those circumstances, we have to go back to first principles, and that is, there should be no change to rights and protections without primary legislation, that is a starting and basic principle, and the same goes for policy. i add this, when we see the bill, you must be no power to change rights and obligations in the future by delegated legislation. i ask the secretary of state to
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provide assurance on those basic principles this morning. and i ask him to look again at safeguards for the delegated legislation procedures that are proposed. asked about what is to happen in relation to converting law and domestic law, there have to be clear principles. all rights and protections derived from eu law must be converted into domestic law. all rights and protections, no limitations, no qualifications and no sunset clauses. this morning, we need an assurance from the secretary of state that he will face down those on his own side who will not be able to resist the temptation to what are these rights and protections down before they had even put into this bill. i remind him that the international development secretary in the referendum campaign said she thought we could have the burden of human rights. we need an assurance
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that temptations will be faced down when this bill is put before this house. i turn to the charter of fundamental rights, which is proposed will be left out altogether. bapco devising modern form all eu rights. it's not directly enforceable, but it is wrong simply to leave it out. i know what is said in the white paper, but i seek from the secretary of state an assurance that all relevant rights in the charter, i accept some are not relevant, the right to vote in the european parliament, for example, but all relevant rights will be converted into to domestic law. on devolved bodies, brexit should not be an excuse to hoard powers in whitehall. there has to be a heavy presumption that devolved matters remain devolved, as powers
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and responsibilities transferred from the eu to the uk. i ask the secretary of state to give that assurance this morning. let me start. he said no change to rights by delegated legislation. i would've thought that without saying. it almost goes without saying, but actually said it in my statement, if he reads it. let me reiterate, the use of delegated legislation will be for technical changes, the sort of alterations we were talking, as i said, on one occasion to the regular
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‘s body in the european union, which clearly has been replaced by one within the uk. i think that he is quite right, things like the right to stand as an mep or elect an mbe p, he accepts that. a reasonable man. in terms of charter rights, let mejust remind him of what happens in the lisbon treaty in 2007, the labour government of the day because he did that and they negotiated protocol, which the prime minister of the day said, it is absolutely clear we have an opt out from both the charter and the judicial home affairs. but tony blair was wrong to say that. he had misunderstood their own protocol. what the protocol did was to guarantee there were no new rights arising as a result of the
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charter of fundamental rights. that was refused deleted later by the then government in court, by the europe minister, the protocol confirms that the charter creates no rights or circumstances and does not change the status quo. the white paper of 2007 said the same and only last year in december, thejoint committee on human rights reiterated that understanding. we look at that very careful, because this is an api to betty sees using indeed. if i make this offer to him, apart from the fundamentals, if we turn out in the fundamentals, if we turn out in the next two years to find something remiss, we will put it right. people put it right. on that basis, i don't think we have an argument. i don't
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actually think that will happen either, because a clause by clause search through the whole charter didn't throw up a significant issue, other than things like members of european parliament and so on. in terms of the treatment of devolved administrations, the first thing to say is no power is currently exercised by them will be taken away, that's the first thing. you said that time and again. we also expect there to be a significant increase in the power is exercised by devolved administrations. but i say this to you, we have to maintain the united kingdom internal market as well. that is four times as important to the scottish market as the european marketers. it's incredibly important to northern
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ireland and welsh administrations as well. we will be having discussions with them at length, we've already discussed that and i'm very happy to talk to him directly on the matter is that is useful to him. i reiterate, this is a difficult task, but it is by no means beyond this cows to achieve this and to achieve this properly, respecting our democracy, but also delivering for the british people. i remind members who arrived after the statement that they should not expect to be called. although i am keen to accommodate the extensive interest in this statement, there are two well subscribed debates under the auspices of the backbench business committed to follow, to which i have to have regard. so we need short questions and short answers. may commend my right honourable friend on the clarity and thoughtful analysis of lies beyond this white paper. can i also say that as
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respects the great repeal bill, the reality is that what will be doing is returning sovereignty to this house, so that the decisions that are taking in our lawmaking power made by the british people's representatives in this house, in line with the wishes, and advise the opposition to bear this in mind, the european strategy committee is often behind closed doors.|j european strategy committee is often behind closed doors. i thank him for his comments and for his work in this area. some of the ideas in this policy area came from his writing in the past, so he is right. i will also make the point that people who make complain about the use of secondary legislation, the secondary legislation we're talking about, we use 8000 items of that to implement
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european law under this section to two in 1972, so it's a bit hypocritical. but i thank him for his comments and i commend him for the work he's done. on these benches, we think the triggering of article 50 yesterday was a sad day for everybody in europe, including everybody in the silence. the eu had for yea rs everybody in the silence. the eu had for years has brought us peace, security, stability and prosperity. we're turning the clock back 50 yea rs we're turning the clock back 50 years and i'm glad he reminded his own frontbenchers that devolution exists in a way it did 40 years ago. scotland's aspirations for a voice have also been given the henry viii treatment. can i ask the minister will he tell us where the legislative consent will be required, queer responsibility will
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fall from brussels to edinburgh, hardly touching the sides on the way, and who does he mean by democratically elected representatives in section 4.2? it strikes me that the government has pushed the big red button marked brexit with their fingers crossed and very little idea of what comes next. let me say this to the honourable gentleman. he lost his henry viii clause, he thinks the public at large will think that some executive from the middle ages. what we re executive from the middle ages. what were talking about here is the use of procedure that has been used down the last century and over which this house has complete control. complete control. so that's the first thing. the second thing is, i have been in joint committees with his colleague
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in the scottish government and other devolved administrations over the last six months or more. and these issues i have raised and said to them that we will have serious discussions with them about this, because my preferences for more devolution rather than less, that is my simple viewpoint. the constraint on that is where it has direct effect on the whole united kingdom's interest, so that is the united kingdom market, it would be very bad for scottish farmers and producers in the uk market became separated from them. issues of national security, issues of international negotiation and observing of international obligations, such as environmental law. so there have been plenty of areas where it is clear we need to have a uk wide framework, and that is the sort of criteria we will apply and we will
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discuss it at length with devolved administrations at every step. this should be called the continuity bill and it should be very reassuring to all remained voters because it is the means to keep all those laws that they liked. which he confirmed that they liked. which he confirmed that any mp who wants to keep eu employment rights, for example, must vote for this bill? he is right. i claim some of the ideas, but not to that. it is to an extent continuity bill. it is a way we will protect employment rights and environment rights and a whole series of rights. he is right, those who want to preserve those rights, should vote without any thought for this though. can he confirm he would incorporate into uk law some of the jewels in
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the crown like the working time directive, he will know that as a fork in the road. the government will either have to keep those provisions and domestic legislation, in which case they will reasonably say, what is the point of leaving the eu, or he will remove those, which will mean we will receive cards to make sure we're not undercutting eu standards. they confirmed to the house that he it is impossible to participate in crime—fighting, anti—terrorism eu measures without access to the databases which i rememberfrom my time in government, are such devastating crime—fighting tools, without abiding by eu data protection directive is overseen by the european court of dusters? after the european court of dusters? after the commendation like that, my
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career is over. what the prime minister was very to yesterday, because he is half right to have from, what the prime minister was referring to yesterday is the importance of maintaining the importance of maintaining the importance of maintaining the importance of european treaties. he is right in one respect, we will undoubtedly, not just dealing is right in one respect, we will undoubtedly, notjust dealing with the eu, but the united states and other countries, have data protection, data laws, which meets those standards, in order to exchange data with them. we will be at that point, on the day may leave the european union. what this bill does is make sure we have at that point and it continue exchanging data. that is no doubt thereafter that there will be continuing
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discussions about how we maintain all our standards at the same level, but not just the all our standards at the same level, but notjust the european union. with all our allies, everybody. will he confirm that the directive is referred to are already in british law? what were talking about are the 6987 regulations that have to be applied in british law through this, but referring to directives such as solvents in june, which but referring to directives such as solvents injune, which is used as an example for the equity release industry in the united kingdom, imposes significant extra costs, and i think imposes significant extra costs, and ithinka imposes significant extra costs, and i think a british directive would have, but if we have the opportunity to examine that within the timescale. his general point is right and timescale. his general point is rightand a timescale. his general point is right and a specific point is right in that the low point of this is to bring it back to the united kingdom.
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we don't want to change everything, we may want to maintain a degree of parallel standards, as part of our own national decision, but it will be brought back to this house of commons and we will make the decision on what is best for this country. the government game, that eu law will remain in place, but the secretary of state will be aware of concerns that others might try and use this process to get rid of eu laws they've never like to use these powers to make changes beyond their own necessary. all he therefore commit to consult closely on the scope of the bill and is it his intention to publish a draft of it for a pre—legislative scrutiny?” will happily —— happily undertake to consult. i've told him privately already, we would be publishing d raft already, we would be publishing draft legislation, but we will be
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taking on board a great deal of consultation, including the select committee. i commend him for his statement today and assure him that i always listen very carefully to what my right honourable friend says. i heard on the radio this morning explaining that what i had thought was a guarantee that there would be, in his words, an absolute guarantee to deliver exactly the same benefits in the deal in relation to trade and customs, is now apparently an aim, but i'm sure he will be true to that aim. this is really a great transfer bill. that's what it is. could the secretary of state given and unequivocal undertaking for workers' rights, environmental protections and consumer protections, that they will be in no way changed as a result of those ill and indeed anything else taken into consideration? the prime
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minister has already given those undertakings. i commend the statement. it is the right approach to it. in relation to the devolved administrations and greater powers, though he be engaging intensively with the devolved administrations in the two—year period that lies ahead? in relation to where powers should like, whether in london, belfast, ca rd like, whether in london, belfast, card for edinburgh? the straight a nswer card for edinburgh? the straight answer is yes. one of the reasons this white paper is later in publication than i would've preferred, is that we don't have at this stage in northern ireland executive. we waited for the three weeks and i hope we would have won, but we can't wait any longer. we will be continuing to consult with the devolved administrations in the run—up to the election in northern ireland, i invited the outgoing ministers to come, just to make sure
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we had a mechanism there, and i will make sure we have another mechanism. i'm not sure what it is shipped for northern ireland, and am happy to hear his idea. we will make sure we consult with northern ireland, whether its executive or not. thank you for making it clear that two yea rs you for making it clear that two years from today, our sovereign parliament will indeed have the power to amend, repeal or improve all those ghastly eu legislation. i will pass on the assessment of the legislation, but i will reinforce the point of already made, which is the point of already made, which is the aim of this bill at the end of the aim of this bill at the end of the day is to bring decisions back to this house. the secretary of
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state says that over the next few yea rs, state says that over the next few years, he wants to see maximum scrutiny of legislation, but given the sheer volume, should he have delegated legislation that he has outlined, does he think it is really feasible to reduce the number of mps by50? feasible to reduce the number of mps by 50? this is a question that is stratospherically above my pay grade. but let me pick up the underpinning point in terms of the volume of legislation. i would say to the carries that in the course of bringing a large amount of legislation straight into uk law without change. the reason for the change, as i said to the labour spokesman earlier this that there will be technical amendments that will be technical amendments that will come up. there will be
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legislation on a variety of other areas, that's different, but the technical legislation will be aiming to make things practical, not to maintain great changes in policy. and this house should be well able to do that. remain campaign is at my eu law and wa nted remain campaign is at my eu law and wanted provisions to continue. can the secretary of state think of any good reason why the great repeal bill should not be passed unanimously? no. the secretary of state needs to make it clear that all of those regulations, protocols relating to justice, home affairs, protection and terrorism aren't going to stay our laws because in article 50 letter yesterday, the government suggested that circumstances where we might considering withdrawing or
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weakening our cooperation. should he not realise that sort of squalid negotiation tactic will result in less good deal done a better one. the honourable gentleman should know better. the leader of the house was here who was previously a europe minister and he made it clear in terms that the prime minister was talking about was that existing treaty arrangement which will end when we leave the european union will fall by the wayside so we will have to find an alternative. not our internal legal rights and privileges both the treaty arrangements. that is the important thing.” both the treaty arrangements. that is the important thing. i welcome the pragmatic approach that the secretary of state has approached in this document and in particular his emphasis on legal certainty and continuity which is in vital. going
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forward , continuity which is in vital. going forward, does he agree that it will be important to maintain a mechanism for ensuring continuing regulatory equivalence is not just for ensuring continuing regulatory equivalence is notjust in data protection but financial sectors. how might that be taken forward? iam going how might that be taken forward? i am going to secure protection, thatis i am going to secure protection, that is two people have finished my career today, being called pragmatic as well. when we come to do the trade deals and the other deals which go forward, there will be relationships between others to ensure that we maintain common standards. the point the ex—leader of the liberal party made about data protection, they will be things on which we will negotiate but it'll be surprised if we talk about those negotiations in this place at this time. ido time. i do worry because the secretary of
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state says in his white paper existing parliamentary procedures allow for parliament is to scrutinise as many or as few studies of the instrument as it sees fit. that is untrue. it took 2014—2015, nine negative instruments were played against by the opposition and only one was allowed a debate and that was not on the floor of the house. in 2015—16, 19 were played against by the opposition and only five were allowed debates. only in committee, not a single one was allowed a vote in the house. this is not bringing back control to this house. we will be worded unless you change the process. we start by obeying the conventions applying to the house and we do have applying to the house and we do have a procedure which is a positive and negative. if he was to come and talk to us about how he thinks he can improve that i am happy to see him.
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the ukjudges improve that i am happy to see him. the uk judges will be less creative, is an open question. the notion of incorporating eu regulation and indeed caseload gives me the collywobbles. i assure my right honourable friend of my support in the division lobby because he has biggerfish to fry. as the white paper says, we may an explicit decision we would aim to make this supreme court level. that is to reduce the number of cores that can deal with this, just the supreme court. the supreme court is very careful about changing its own president, it does so relatively rarely. that is what we expect to be the case. anything they do, this
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house can change. plaid cymru is demanding a continuity bill in the assembly for wales to enshrine european law in welsh law. will he confirm westminster will not block our parliaments's westminster will not block our pa rliaments‘s right for full governors in wales. i will reiterate, no powers that are currently exercised by the devolved administrations will be taken away from them. there's my right honourable friend agree that the key point about the great repeal bill is the legal precedents of laws imposed on this country by the eu will and. well, the legal precedent won't and that there will be susceptible to our change. we will be able to change them both in our courts and parliament.
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with reference to the criminal justice measures of which we are already a part, and the prime minister's article 50 letter yesterday, can the signatures they set out house how these safety and protection of the public will be enhanced by us and reducing our cooperation on crime and terrorism? as the prime minister made plain yesterday, she wants to see a comprehensive agreement. people have interpreted that as comprehensive trade agreements, it is an agreement across all the issues where we have across all the issues where we have a relationship with the eu. if you would like to see the rest of this debate, it has another half—hour to run, you can switch to our sister channel, bbc parliament. that was the secretary of state of exiting be you, david davis, talking
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about what will happen on the day britain finally leaves the eu, talking about the great repeal bill, saying he will ensure a smooth and orderly exit, he said, talking about how they will convert eu law into domestic law on the day that britain leaves. let's get the thought of norman smith who has been listening to this as well. your thoughts on what we have been hearing and some of the questions put to david davis. what is interesting was we got a lot of the technical detail about the tra nsfer of of the technical detail about the transfer of eu rules into british law but david davis pitched this in a bigger picture than the great repeal bill was integral to delivering brexit. he said it was pa rt delivering brexit. he said it was part of ensuring this smooth and orderly departure from the european union, there wasn't a moment of massive destruction as we left. secondly, he said it provides
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clarity and certainty for business in these uncertain times as we negotiate our departure. above all, because it marks the end of the supremacy of european law and the european court ofjustice, in future mr davies said british judges would be supreme and it was interesting the reaction from pro—brexit mps. they were infused about the measure, not because it is illegal tidying up but for them it is the transferring back of powers, the return of sovereignty to westminster which was an absolute pivotal part of the whole referendum debate. the great repeal bill in that sense is an absolutely central plank of brexit in the minds of ministers and brexit supporting mps. yes. i noticed there were a few questions about the scrutiny of this legislation in the coming years. we
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spoke the plenty of people here yesterday who said that is absolutely their raison d' tre trevor being inside parliament. it is to scrutinise that. i suppose that takes us back to the thought that takes us back to the thought that the scale of this, the fact the domestic agenda, regular politics, goes on the back burner rather. the attack from labour and other opposition mps spoke that focused more on the process of this legislation that many of the changes, the governors will simply be able to write themselves without parliamentary approval. secure starmer said these were sweeping powers. these powers do great to technical changes to particular parts of legislation so if in eu law there is a reference to the european commission that are no longer be applicable when we leave the eu. the
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government was the ability to score out the name eu commission and replace it with, i presume, uk government. those are the sort of details the government is envisaging using. but it does mean that the process could be decidedly long, decidedly protracted if we get into a trench warfare over the process of the transfer of eu rules. some estimates said the whole thing could ta ke estimates said the whole thing could take ten years which would be an extraordinary thought. many, many yea rs extraordinary thought. many, many years after we extraordinary thought. many, many yea rs after we have extraordinary thought. many, many years after we have left the european union people in this place could still be discussing how to tra nsfer could still be discussing how to transfer old eu laws into british law. that is quite a thought! thank you. thank you very much. more from norman later. leaders of centre—right parties from across the european union are meeting in malta, as the eu considers its formal response to britain's notification that it is leaving the bloc.
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president of the european council donald tusk told them of his reaction to britain triggering article 50. yesterday, right after receiving the letter from prime minister theresa may invoking article 50, i said that paradoxically they'd is also something positive in brexit. brexit has made us a community of 27 more determined and more united than before. i am fully confident of this especially after the rome declaration and i can say we will remain determined and delighted also in the future. also during the negotiations ahead. president of the european commission jean claudejunker said that brexit would not be the end of the eu,
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and accused the us president donald trump of wishing to break up the block. i wish to say here that brexit isn't the end of everything. we must considered to be a new beginning, something that is stronger, something that is stronger, something that is better. brexit is not the end. a lot of people would like it that way. even people would like it that way. even people on another continent. whether newly elected us president was happy that the brexit was taking place and has asked other countries to do the
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same. if he goes on like that i am going to promote the independence of ohio and austin, texas in the united states of america. it is business as usual in europe, we must continue, we must forge ahead. that meeting is continuing in malta. we will have more from there over the course of the day. just to remind you, 3:30pm this afternoon here on bbc news we'll have an ask this where you can put your questions to chris morris, our reporter in malta where european leaders are working out their response to the uk giving notice of leaving the bloc. breaking news. police who say the
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bodies of five people have been found with the wreckage of a missing helicopter in snowdonia. we understand the aircraft had left the luiten area, not the ed balls, the luiten area, not the ed balls, the luiten area, not the ed balls, the luiten area and was en route to dublin. police are not aware of any plans for the helicopter to stopping caernarfon as was reported earlier. they say the police and mountain rescue teams searching for the helicopter found the wreckage and sadly, the bodies of five people in the rhinog mountains area of snowdonia. the exact location is not been revealed to allow a dignified
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and unhindered discovery of the bodies in what is described in challenging terrain. they were on board a bread helicopter which had failed to arrive in dublin as planned yesterday afternoon. formal identification of the five on—board has not yet taken place. that from north wales police. also, this coming into us from west midlands police. a mother and her son have died after being stabbed in their home. the police say the boy was 13 yea rs home. the police say the boy was 13 years old, his mother and her husband were also discovered at the housein husband were also discovered at the house in stourbridge shortly after 8am this morning. our west midlands police said the woman who was in the 50s was pronounced dead at the scene. the teenager was pronounced deadin scene. the teenager was pronounced dead in hospital. her husband remains in hospital with stab wounds to his chest and back. detectives
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say a man aged in his 20s was arrested in a nearby road 30 minutes later. police are saying they understand the suspect was known to the family and may have been living at the address but was not a relative or stop they don't think this was a burglary or robbery. that news also coming into as this afternoon. the government has set out plans to tra nsfer the government has set out plans to transfer later from the european union to westminster. the brexit secretary david davis tells mps do great repeal bill enables them to abolish and improve laws. the insurance firm, lloyd's of london is to move its eu business to brussels to maintain a presence in continental europe after brexit. police in north wales say the bodies of five people have been filed with the wreckage of a missing helicopter in snowdonia. ken livingstone faces expulsion from the labour party over
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controversial comments he made about adolf hitler. the former mayor of london is appearing before a misconduct panel hearing today, facing charges that his comments were "grossly detrimental to the party". our deputy political editor, john pienaar is in westminster. reminders of the background to this. this is a significant political moment. ken livingstone has been a prominent personality for labour. today, this morning, he has been sitting metaphorically in the dock facing labour bosman ruling executive committee and answering accusations and criticism of what he has been saying. you might remember he was suspended at the height of labour's rap about anti—semitism in the party after a number of things including appearing to suggest adolf hitler was a zionist. this morning, he had more to say. to some he
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compounded the offence. look at this. that is what supporters. he didn't just signed the deal, the ss set up training camps so german dues could be trained to cope with a different sort of country when they got there. whether zionist movement asked whether the nazi government would stop a jewish rabbi doing their sermons in yiddish and make them do it in hebrew, he agreed to that. they passed a law saying only the zionist flag and swastika could be flown in germany. they started selling pistols to the underground jewish army. right at the start of the second world war, you had real collaboration. as you can imagine that has caused
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controversy. the holocaust educational trust has said enough is enough. one historian speaking to bbc described as rubbish. this hearing is going on. his membership going back for decades is on the line here. the hearing could take two days that we may get some sort of result before that. back to the main story of the day — the government's publication of the great repeal bill. we can now cross to my colleague jane hill who is in westminsterfor us. welcome back to westminster. i am joined by the shadow foreign secretary emily thornbury. she has just left the chamber come and talk to us. david davis talking about this providing a smooth and orderly exit. are you happy with what he has been outlining? the thing about the government is words are easy, it is what they
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actually do. what is important is we are going to be moving a huge amount of european legislation into british law ina of european legislation into british law in a short period of time. we have to watch them very carefully because there are devious —— senior conservative mps who think the repeal bill should be about repealing laws from europe. when they say red tape, we say working time directive, we need to make sure we have clean beaches. we need to make sure that another sunset clauses. we have to make sure there are no conditions. in the huge amount of legislation that we will need to go through we need to be on our toes because we don't trust them. i know david davis was saying, trust me, i'm afraid we don't. the scale is enormous. everyone acknowledges that. is that part of your concern? that are so many laws that will be brought across on the
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day we leave the eu that some of it will be pushed through? first of all, it may be badly drafted, they might simply make a mistake about things. we also are concerned they would try to make changes without there being problem screws cine without votes on it. he says we're going to make little twea ks. says we're going to make little tweaks. we are concerned about that. we need to make sure that is look thatis we need to make sure that is look that is properly. in his huge amount of registration, there are senior conservatives who have said, for example, we should get rid of the half of protections people in employment have at the moment. the daily telegraph was running a campaign saying we should cut european red tape. we have to make sure we will be doing everything we
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can to ensure we continue to have environmental protections, protections that everybody and make sure we keep the employment rights people enjoyed. the government has a small majority so you are saying it is up to your party, labour, to continue to scrutinise all of this are the next couple of years. they will be a large group of conservatives who think the great repeal bill means we will be repealing large amounts of european laws. we need to make sure that what is being put into legislation is being done properly. thoughts about where this leaves the domestic agenda in the coming years, given we keep using the word scale, given we keep using the word scale, given scale of what you and others will be debating. what are your concerns about what we will consider as everyday politics? the conservatives say they want to cut the number of mps from 650 to 600 which strikes me as crazy. of
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course it will mean the government are likely to be so preoccupied with brexit and with moving this legislation from europe into british law whilst negotiating as well, we are concerned their eyes will be taken away from what is happening in our schools, hospitals, the general business of government. it is our job to make sure we continue to raise the concerns of our constituents about how we're not moving forward, how things are going backwards with our public services, how we need to make sure we continue to have a proper government governing our country. before i let you go, a quick final thought about the ken livingstone story. you couldn't hear what was being said earlier he is appealing before the committee. is it you're feeling he should be expelled from the labour party? what is important is that the nec make a decision based on the
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evidence and they do it fairly and it is not myjob to interfere in that. they are doing it and the recommendations, the changes that are recommended. we need to make sure we have proper hearings that are fair. i hope that'll happen. it is not for me outside of that room to tell them what they should do. thank you very much forjoining us. we will of course have much, much more from here at westminster over the course of the day. that debate is continuing. david davis still taking questions inside the commons. if you want to see the rest of that debate, you can do that on our sister channel, bbc parliament. more from here to come. back to the studio. we will have the news as one ina studio. we will have the news as one in a moment burst first studio. we will have the news as one in a moment burst first he studio. we will have the news as one in a moment burst first he is studio. we will have the news as one in a moment burst first he is the weather. some stark contrast to the weather
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today. very warm in the sunshine the sun and very wet for others. the rain pushing up through england, wales, said showers in the midlands. locally, rather disappointing. somebody, somewhere here will reach 21, possibly 22 degrees. that is pretty warm for late march. the odd shower still possible across parts of the midlands, across parts of southwest england too. many places will stay dry with further hazy sunshine. further west, it will stay dry with further hazy sunshine. furtherwest, it is will stay dry with further hazy sunshine. further west, it is a different story. you can see the rain pushing up through west wales and into south—west scotland. northern ireland, a few showers, lookout cooler it is here. as we head into the evening, a chance of a shower breaking out that the main thrust of the wet weather will be
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further north and west. this wet weather pushing through scotland as weather pushing through scotland as we go through the early hours and further batches of rain into northern ireland and western parts of england and wales. a mild night, muqqy of england and wales. a mild night, muggy across the south—east. a different feel to the day tomorrow. we're going to see cloud increasing and some showers whipping across. the heaviest of the rain further north. it will start to improve, another batch of show was pushing in across parts of northern ireland and west wales. not as warm as to date was pleasant and the sunshine. cooler underneath the rain clouds. the cool air bringing in by a cold front. this weekend, we have this trough of low pressure which will have showers in it. let's deal with saturday first. hit and miss, some places getting lucky. torrential
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thunderstorms possible in mind. you have to write your log on saturday. it will be chilly overnight and then sunday will be completely different as the ridge of high pressure builds in. nearly all of the showers will be squeezed away and plenty of sunshine remaining. temperature is still good for the time being. the government sets out its plans to convert eu law into uk legislation. the brexit secretary david davis says the great repeal bill will ensure a smooth and orderly exit from the european union. we have been clear that we want a smooth and orderly exit — and the great repeal bill is integral to that approach. it will provide clarity and certainly for businesses, workers and consumers across the united kingdom on the day that we leave the eu. angela merkel says after brexit, the eu to put —— the uk has to put effort into europe. we'll be live at both westminster
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and in malta for the very latest. also this lunchtime. the bodies of five people have been found inside the wreckage of a helicopter which has crashed in snowdonia.
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