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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  April 3, 2017 11:00am-1:00pm BST

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this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11. police charge five people in connection with the attack on a teenage asylum seeker at a croydon bus stop on friday night. three others remain in custody. a war of words over gibraltar — spain says there's no need for britain to "lose it's temper". the foreign secretary says the rock's sovereignty is non—negotiable. the sovereignty of gibraltar is unchanged and is not going to change and cannot conceivably change without the express support and consent of the people of gibraltar and the united kingdom, and that is not going to change. president trump warns that the us is prepared to act alone to tackle the nuclear threat posed by north korea — if china fails to intervene. why more than 20 million adults in the uk are classified as physically inactive and could be at risk of coronary heart disease. also this hour — living in fear of the zombies. the medieval yorkshire villagers who dismembered their dead — to stop them from coming back
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to haunt the living. and the banksy of bad punctuation — why one man is roaming the streets of bristol in secret — making his mark on incorrect shop signs. good morning. it's monday 3rd april. i'm annita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live. five people have been charged over an attack in croydon, which left a teenage asylum seeker fighting for his life. the victim, a 17—year—old kurdish iranian boy, is in a serious but stable condition after he was allegedly chased and beaten by a gang of 20 people in croydon, south london. police investigating last friday's
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taxi three others remain in custody. our correspondent ben bland is in croydon for us. bring us up—to—date. bring us up-to-date. within the last half an hour, the police have been updating us on there in investigation into this attack, which began at that bus stop just over my shoulder shortly before midnight on friday. police said they suspect it was a racially motivated attack. there was no reason for it. they said it was horrendous. the victim so viciously beaten that he was lucky not to have lost his life. the nature of it, it is thought around 20 or 30 people who had left the goat pub, just about 200 yards that way, they approached the victim, asked him where he was from. when he said he was an asylum seeker, they then set about attacking him. witnesses say they think something like ten people were involved in the attack, while ten or
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20 others in the group stood around watching. even as he fell to the flock can they were kicking him in the head. police gave us a bit more details about the victim as well. this is a horrendous attack, racially motivated, there are 11 suspects, we have just arrested one, so suspects, we have just arrested one, so 11 suspects have been arrested. we have identified five others and there are three others that we have put out an appeal for. what i can say is that one of those, the female suspect, has made herself known to us. suspect, has made herself known to us. but we are looking anywhere between 20 and 30 people involved in this attack. i think this is powered by numbers. there has been an incident outside the pub, they have obviously picked on three young men. there was no reason for this attack andl there was no reason for this attack and i believe that because of the numbers involved people have just jumped on the back of it and it has turned into this violent brawl where somebody has been viciously beaten and is very lucky not to have lost
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his life. you may wonder if the area was busy and people around, why did no one step in? witnesses around did call the police but the police here this morning acknowledge that it is very ha rd to this morning acknowledge that it is very hard to intervene when you are facing a group of 30 violent individuals. they also said that the victim had a blood cot on the plane was that he has been in intensive ca re over was that he has been in intensive care over the weekend. they are also asking for anyone with video footage to come forward. you have the detective superintendent saying this has shaken the community and has also appealed to the community to ask them to send any footage they may have, and they say please come to us before we come to you. spain's foreign minister has said this morning that "there's no need to lose tempers" over gibraltar. he was speaking after gibraltar‘s chief minister insisted that the territory won't be used as a bargaining chip in negotiations over britain's exit
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from the european union. spain, which claims sovereignty of the british territory, could be given a veto over decisions affecting it. but yesterday theresa may said the uk remains "steadfastly committed" to gibraltar. this was the spanish foreign minister speaking a short while ago translation: it is not the spanish government'sjob to translation: it is not the spanish government's job to respond to each and every british politician, past and every british politician, past and present. in any case, the spanish government is a little surprised by the tone of comment regarding gibraltar coming out of britain, which is a country known for its composure. the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, has reiterated that the sovereignty of gibraltar is non—negotiable. mrjohnson was speaking to reporters as he arrived at a meeting of eu foreign ministers in luxembourg. well, i think the position of the
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government is very, very clear, which is that the sovereignty of gibraltar is unchanged, and is not going to change, and cannot conceivably change, without the express support and consent of the people of gibraltar and the united kingdom, and that is not going to change. thanks a lot, thank you. 0ur europe correspondent damian grammaticus is in brussels for us. so, where does this go, because the turn of the language that is being usedis turn of the language that is being used is very interesting indeed? yes. i think at the minute what you're hearing is the calls from the foreign minister is, most of whom are meeting in luxembourg today, where the british prime minister, borisjohnson, was, where the british prime minister, boris johnson, was, saying where the british prime minister, borisjohnson, was, saying let's be call about this that is what the dutch foreign minister said. he said let's carry on, not used to harsh language, let's negotiate. you can
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see how difficult brexit and the separation is already. i think that is the concern, that this doesn't get blown up, because from the other foreign minister is, the spanish are also saying they are a bit surprised that this has become such a big issue immediately because this is referring to events in a couple yea rs' referring to events in a couple years' time about the application of a trade deal, if one is agreed, between britain and the eu to gibraltar. everyone at the minute is saying just take a step back and cool it down and that is the hope among the foreign ministers. 0ur political correspondent ben wrightjoins us from westminster now. borisjohnson, ben, boris johnson, ben, saying borisjohnson, ben, saying this issue of sovereignty is non—negotiable at a former foreign secretary jack straw also saying today that he thinks if the uk is pitted against 27 other countries on this potentially then it is at a disadvantage. yes, jack straw
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dismissing as completely absurd any suggestion that there might be actually a military confrontation between spain and the uk over this. did concede that this could be one of the issues among many towards the end of the trade negotiation, after the brexit deal has been done, that could be problematic, because remember at that point any of the 27 countries in the eu has the possibility to veto that final trade deal. what we have learned over the last few days is that spain will have a say, just as any other country will, and for them, unsurprisingly, one of the issues they will be keeping a very close eye on is how that final trade deal relates to gibraltar, and the fact that was made explicit in the eu's d raft that was made explicit in the eu's draft negotiating guidelines has caught westminster by surprise and is responsible for this huge flat we have seen over the last couple of days, even though in the draft guidelines there was no mention of spain's sovereignty over gibraltar.
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it simply mentioned spain would have two approved how that deal would apply to gibraltar. i will be talking to the chief minister of gibraltar, fabian picardo, in half an hour's time. donald trump has claimed the north korean nuclear threat will be "solved" under his leadership. in an interview with the financial times, the president said the united states was prepared to act alone if china failed to intervene. pressed on whether he thought he could succeed alone, he replied: "totally." his comments come ahead of a visit to the us by the chinese president this week. let's hear the reaction from china. 0ur correspondent robin brant is in shanghai for us. i guess there are some amusement at donald trump saying he can totally fix this, on his own if necessary,
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when the chinese have been trying to sort this for quite some time, let's said. sylla yes, china once denuclearisation in the whole of the korean peninsula and china fears the colla pse korean peninsula and china fears the collapse of north korea and the possible to you of a humanitarian disaster on the border it shares with the country. it also fears the idea of a reunited korean peninsular some years down the line, the possibility of us troops based right on its doorstep. we have not had official reaction from the chinese reaction today, because it is a public holiday which will continue into tomorrow but i suspect when it comes the language and the tone will be mild. there has been no rising to the bait of president trump and his tweets over the last few months. the focus is on achieving the outcome is china once in terms of its domestic concerns, its broader asia—pacific
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trade concerns and some of the trade issuesit trade concerns and some of the trade issues it has with the united states at the moment. i think though, broadly speaking, as you have alluded to there, china is the only ally in the world of north korea and its current leader, kim jong—un. north korea relies very heavily, in fa ct north korea relies very heavily, in fact exclusively really, on china for its economic survival. and so the idea that north korea would perhaps be squeezed even further to end its nuclear programme without the help all the assistance all the involvement of the chinese government i think is something that many people here would find very difficult to believe. and is the feeling that the tone of president trump's comments will make the discussions when he and the chinese leader meet make those discussions more difficult? this is kind of bang
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on donald trump, isn't it? it is what all of us, including the leaders in beijing, have come to expect. we have had tweets from the president early in the week, about how badly china has behaved, how badly he believes north korea has behaved. he believed north korea has played the united states. this is the man who as a candidate pointed the man who as a candidate pointed the finger at china for raping, as he put it, the united states of tens of thousands of jobs. he put it, the united states of tens of thousands ofjobs. so we have all come to expect this kind of language but also, look, resident trump got some people rattled here, in terms of the chinese leadership, in terms of the chinese leadership, in terms of having that phone calls with taiwan's leader, a hugely controversial issue for beijing. then a month or so later he assured the president that he would abide by the president that he would abide by the decades—old one china policy, which has kind of maintained peace for decades in this part of the world between taiwan, the united states and china. there will be some
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who believe that candidate trump and initially president trump says and does some things, but then when it comes to the serious moments, he sticks to perhaps a more conventional view from washington of china. but trade is going to be crucial, in terms of the discussion between the two men. donald trump has made it clear that in terms of the bilateral relationship, all aspects of trade between the world number one and two economies, all aspects on the table. for china, there are other aspects about security and domestic concerns. what they will want is president trump to assure them on taiwan but also on the debt, that the us won't intervene. thank you very much for that, robin brant. some newsjust coming into us. a 23—year—old man has been remanded in custody, charged with the murders of a mother and son in stourbridge. tracy wilkinson and her 13—year—old son, peers, were stabbed at their home last thursday morning. aaron
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baddeley of no fixed address appeared before a judge at birmingham crown court. —— aaron bali. aaron tim one is also accused of the attempted murder of the husband. there was no application —— aaron barley. there was no application for sale, we are told. —— for bale. the political parties in northern ireland will begin fresh talks today at stormont aimed at restoring the devolved government. power sharing collapsed injanuary because of a row between sinn fein and the democratic unionists about a botched green energy scheme. last week a deadline to form a new administration passed without agreement. caring for a relative with terminal cancer takes an average of 70 hours a week in their final months, and costs the carer nearly £1100, according to a new study. research published in
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the palliative medicine journal says volunteer carers are crucial to the national health service but need more support and training to preserve their own mental and physical health. there's a warning that a third of adults in the uk — or 17 million people — are physically inactive and at risk from coronary heart disease. the british heart foundation says it's costing the health service over £1 billion a year, as graham satchell reports. harriet had no warnings, no symptoms. she was climbing the stairs at home when she had a heart attack at the age ofjust 1m. it was like having the rug pulled from under your feet. i have a very young family, i had a demanding job, which i loved, really enjoyed, so then to suddenly be struck by such a traumatic incident was very difficult. i didn't make time for activity or exercise, so i think, looking back on it now, i was fairly sedentary. harriet is not alone.
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research from the british heart foundation shows the most inactive part of the uk is the northwest of england, where 47% of adults do not take enough exercise, followed by northern ireland, where 46% are inactive. in wales and the northeast of england, it is 42%. london and the west midlands a0%, and in scotland 37% are too sedentary. we estimate that, on average, most of us spend 78 days of our life each year in a sedentary position. physical activity is important, but you also need to reduce the amount of time each day that you spend sitting at your computer, or whatever it is you do. harriet has now changed her lifestyle — regular exercise, walking, playing with her kids — but inactivity is fast becoming one of the leading causes of premature death. graham satchell, bbc news. the prime minister is to announce that military trainers will be sent
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tojordan to help the nation's air force in the fight to take out islamic state during a visit to the country. theresa may will discuss the enhanced cooperation during a visit to the country. she'll then travel to saudi arabia for negotiations on trade and security. the headlines for you now. five people have been charged in connection with an attack on an asylu m connection with an attack on an asylum seeker in south london. police believed up to 30 people may have been involved in the incident in croydon on friday night. boris johnson says there can be no change in the sovereignty of gibraltar about the express consent of its people. concerns on the rocks have been raised by statements about the issue in eu documents relating to brexit negotiations. president trump warns that the us is prepared to act alone to tackle the nuclear threat posed by north korea, if china fails to intervene. the comments come
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ahead of a visit to the us by the chinese president this week. and in sport, the england squad hasjust been announced for the women's european championship in the netherlands. chelsea's eni aluko has been left out, despite finishing as top scorer in the women's super league last season, and having earned over 100 international caps. american golfer lexi thompson says she did not intend to break tournament rules that the first major of the year. she was penalised for macro strokes and missed out on the title, after a television viewer spotted an infringement. roger federer plans to take a short break after beating rafa nadal the win the naomi —— miami 0pen. he has moved up to number four naomi —— miami 0pen. he has moved up to numberfour in the naomi —— miami 0pen. he has moved up to number four in the world but says he is unlikely to play again until the french open at the end of may. i will be back just the french open at the end of may. i will be backjust after half 11 with more on. significant restrictions on the use of bail by police in england and wales come into force today. the amount of time a suspect released from custody can remain on bail will be limited to 28 days in most cases.
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the decision is in response to concerns that people were being left in limbo for months or even years. but police have questioned the move, as our home affairs correspondent, june kelly, reports. famous faces who've been under police investigation, finally told they wouldn't be facing charges, but only after long months on bail. they were among the 5,000 still on bail after a year. the government says the system needed rebalancing. well, what's happened in the past is people could be put on bail with no end in sight and no check or balance, which means we had thousands of people could be on bail for 12 months or more. in fact, there were examples of people on for several years, and that's just not acceptable. we've got to make sure we've got a proper system that is appropriate and proportionate. it's part of an overhaul of the bail system in england and wales. from now on, some suspects won't be subject to police bail at all. for those who are bailed, in most cases, the limit will be 28 days.
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but a senior police officer will be able to grant one three—month extension in complex cases. the police will have to seek the permission of a magistrate for anything longer. the police federation, which represents rank—and—file officers, is highly critical of the changes. 28 days, in the cycle of a police officer, is not a long time for to investigating a crime. for investigating a crime. you've also got to bear in mind, in relation to external inquiries, what we tend to have is external resource, so we have got the forensic science service, cps, and 28 days is not realistic for them to come back to us with the information we require to make decisions. the police federation said the old system protected complainants and victims and helped prevent further offending. june kelly, bbc news. rescue teams in colombia are continuing to search through tonnes of mud and debris for anyone who might have survived the devastating mudslides in the south of the country. in the last few hours, the president has said 254 people are known to have died — 43 of them children. but he said they were still very much preliminary figures. the mud engulfed the town of mocoa,
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burying entire neighbourhoods, credit card firms must do more to help millions of customers in perpetual debt, the financial regulator has said. the financial conduct authority has brought forward proposals. firms would have to work more closely with people in debt, such as drawing up a fast repayment plan. we can talk now to chris wingert from the financial conduct authority in our central london studio. thank you forjoining us. london studio. thank you forjoining us. what are these extreme cases you talk about, give us an example? so in the uk at the moment there are around 3.3 million people who are in what we call persistent debt, that means for 18 months all link —— longer, they have been paying more in interest and charges than they have been in terms of reducing the debt on the credit card. the measures we are talking about today
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are ensuring their credit card firms talk to them or regularly, and should that debt keep going for another 18 months, then a plan is put in place that helps the customer pay that money back in a more affordable manner. if they can't affordable manner. if they can't afford to pay, then the credit card firm needs to give them help. to what extent are you placing the responsibility here at the door of the credit card companies, to what extent a re the credit card companies, to what extent are you placing it with the people who take out these credit cards in the first instance, and perhaps spend beyond what they have the ability to repay? so around 30 formally and of us have at least one credit card in the uk, and we have found will be looked at this market some months back that it works pretty well for most people, but we can't be complacent about that. there are this group of around 3.3 million people who are in persistent debt. 0ur proposals today are about where people can afford to pay back that debt, and do more for themselves, then they can, but we do
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know there are cases here that are really ha rd cases know there are cases here that are really hard cases where individuals and consumers are going to need help from their credit card firm to make sure that debt can be repaid, rather than continuing for a very long time. what sort of response are you getting from the credit card companies? presumably they are not very happy about this? we have been working with the credit card firms over the period of the last few months. we have actually got some measures they have agreed to voluntarily that help the situation. for example, giving customers more choice around how they receive a credit card limit increase, or if they get that at all, but the rules we have got today we think are necessary to try to make sure that ona necessary to try to make sure that on a consistent basis consumers are helped when they do get into persistent debt, and hopefully by having these rows and place it will also create incentives for those consumers and firms not to get into that situation the first place. thank you ray much. if you're the kind of person whose blood begins to boil when you spot
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a spelling or grammatical mistake on a sign, here's a story for you. i'll own up, i'm like that. in bristol, it's been rumoured for years that there's somebody who goes out under the cover of darkness, correcting mistakes on street signs and shop fronts. jon kay has tracked down the mysterious individual who describes himself as a "grammar vigilante". he's the banksy of bad punctuation. roaming the streets of bristol, righting wrongs. i'm a grammarvigilante. i do take it to heart. i've been doing it for quite a lot of years now. i do think it's a cause worth pursuing. working alone, and in secret, he makes punctuation marks to stick on errant signs. i'm trying to match the colour of the apostrophe that's needed on the shop... he has even made a special device, which he calls the apostrophiser, which lets him reach the highest shop fronts.
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oh, look at that, that's worked perfectly. a quick demonstration on the dining room wall. what i need to do now is turn the apostrophiser around so i can apply the roly—poly end here. by day, he's a highly qualified professional. only a handful of his closest friends and family know what he gets up to after dark. i have felt extremely nervous, the heart has been thumping. i've got to make sure that it's technically right. he started his campaign 13 years ago. this was the first sign he tackled, "amys nail‘s". apostrophe deleted. he's left his mark throughout this area of bristol, his punctuation mark. apostrophes added. apostrophes removed. there will be some people, maybe the owners of these shops, who say, hang on a minute, you haven't got permission, we haven't asked you to do this, what you're doing is a crime, vandalism.
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what do you say to them? i'd say it's more of a crime to have the apostrophes wrong in the first place. i think i can do it without causing anybody too much offence and just discreetly do it. there's one sign he has been desperate to correct for years — cambridge motor‘s. motors with an apostrophe s. itjust makes me feel gross... i just think this is just wrong. it's not meant to be like this. it really does need sorting out. the garage is right outside bristol's high security prison. but, tonight, he's going for it. using a purpose—built, home—made trestle, he climbs up, cuts a piece of yellow sticky—backed plastic to size, and covers the rogue apostrophe. reporter: notice anything? not really, no.
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we went to see the man who has owned the garage for 30 years. who's done that? there is a man... yes. who lives around these parts, i can't tell you about him. i thank him for what he's done. you don't mind? no, i don't mind at all! no, it's good to see people still caring about english grammar, isn't it? when you go past a sign that you've corrected, and you know that you've made... the word you are looking for is pride. pride. yeah, i've been the one who has been there and sorted it out and got it grammatically correct. it does make my heart swell slightly when i see the correct apostrophe. doris day has received an unusual — and perhaps unwelcome — surprise on her birthday — she's two years older than she thought. the actress, who starred in hollywood classics, including calamityjane and pillow talk,
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always said that her date of birth was april 3rd, 192a — making her 93 today. but her original birth certificate has been uncovered, showing she was born in 1922, which makes her 95. and ina and in a statement, she said she never paid much attention to birthdays anyway, but happy birthday to doris day. time for the weather forecast. good morning to you, we start off pretty chilly across england and wales with some folk around for eastern areas. let me show you the satellite picture. you can see how the fog has been shrinking back to coastal areas, and it may linger through the english channel and ran on through the coast through the rest of the day. in the north—west, though, thicker cloud bringing some rain down from the north—west, heavy rain down from the north—west, heavy rain over the hills of western scotland, eastern scotland still likely to be dry and england and wales as welcome with some sunshine
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around, quite warm too, looking at highs in the south—east even after that fog of 18 degrees. through this evening, some rain coming in the western pa rt of evening, some rain coming in the western part of inman and wales. these two weather fronts on the scene. as they slip eastwards, the cloud clears across scotland and northern ireland. there will be chillier than last night but a milder night for england and wales with a good deal of cloud and quite a grey start of the day, a bit them as well. not much rain, just a bit ofa as well. not much rain, just a bit of a nuisance and it will then go all day for the south—east. —— it will linger all day. for all of us, it will feel a little cooler than today. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: police in croydon in south london have charged five people in connection with an attack on a teenage asylum seeker. there was no reason for this attack, and i believe that
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because of the numbers involved, people have just jumped on the back of it. spain's foreign minister has said the spanish government's been "surprised by the tone of comments coming out of britain" about gibraltar. it comes after the eu said any brexit decisions affecting gibraltar would be run past spain. president trump has suggested the united states would be prepared to act alone to counter the nuclear threat from north korea. research suggests more than 20 million people in the uk are physically inactive and at risk of heart disease. time now for a look at the sport. good morning. chelsea's eni aluko has been left out of england euros squad despite finishing as the top scorer in the women's super league and having earned 102 england caps... she's the big omission.
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four selected for their first major tournament. england play scotland in their first match in the let us, —— netherlands. it is going to be a great tournament, how it has been organised, but already we have said to the players, ten weeks, wejust cannot wait to get stuck into scotland. we are looking forward to that. and shelly kerr has said she is "extremely proud and honoured to be named as coach of the scotland women's national team". kerr, a former boss of arsenal ladies, became the first female manager in british men's senior football when she took charge of stirling university in 2014.
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she'll succeed anna signeul after the european championships in june. congratulations are in orderfor celtic. it may be only the first week of april but brendan rodgers' side have clinched the scottish premiership again, after beating hearts 5—0 yesterday. they have done it in real style — scott sinclair scored a hat—trick which helped put them 25 points clear of second—placed aberdeen, and they're still on for the domestic treble having won the league cup they are also into the last four in the scottish cup. luke shaw has been told to "pull his finger out" to save his manchester united career by former united defender phil neville. his future is in doubt after his managerjose mourinho said the england international isn't even deserving of a place on the bench saying he lacks commitment, focus and ambition... and former united player neville said he needs to buck up his ideas. i think luke needs to take a look at himself. he is a winger. darmian has
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been left back. not out and out left backs. i think he has got the potential to be one of the best left backs in europe. he needs to take a look at himself. but this could be jose mourinho, trying to get something out of him. lexi thompson the american golfer must be heartbroken after an eagle eyed television viewer called in to say they'd spotted an infringement that cost her a major title... it happened at the first women's golf major of the year, the ana inspiration — with thompson holding a two shot lead in tournament. she only found out with 6 holes to play and the infringement happened a full 2a hours beforehand. she was left in tears, calling it ‘ridiculous' — as she was handed a four stroke penalty, losing her lead and eventually the title as well in a play—off to so yon yoo of south korea. the decision hasn't gone done well. the 14—time major winner tiger woods tweeted "viewers at home should not be officials wearing stripes." while former us open winner graeme mcdowell said "another rough day for the deep dark complex rules of golf —
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simplification cannot come quick enough." finally lexi thompson herself took to instagram a few hours ago saying "well it was an emotional day here for me, first off i do want to say what i had done was 100% not intentional." i have played amazing today, probably the best golf all week. but i was not expecting that, whatever hole it was. i was not intentionally doing that. that was not my purpose. i had not even realised i had done that. but i didn't give up. i knew i could still win. but so many of them played great. in rugby union, gloucester have announced former springbok johan ackermann as their new head coach for next season. ackermann is currently in super rugby with the lions but willjoin up with the cherries when his current campaign ends in august. that's all sport for now. i'll be back in the next hour.
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let's return to the news that spain's foreign minister has said this morning that "there's no need to lose tempers" over gibraltar. he was speaking after gibraltar‘s chief minister insisted that the territory won't be used as a bargaining chip in negotiations over britain's exit from the european union. gibraltar‘s chief minister, joining us. it is good to have you worked us. it is good to have you worked us. you have said gibraltar is not going to be used as a bargaining chip, but does it feel that way at the moment? certainly not. it has been an attempt by spain, to' gibraltar for negative treatment, if there is... a big question... if there is... a big question... if there is... a big question... if there is a new trade deal between there is a new trade deal between the uk and european union. 0therwise, the uk and european union. otherwise, it could have been amicable for gibraltar. that is the
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issue, it is not related to the sovereignty of gibraltar. when i have talked about gibraltar not being a bargaining chip, i have talked about the context of gibraltar‘s sovereignty somehow being in play. it is not. but you cannot be completely confident at this stage, that you will not be in a disadvantaged position, as a result of these brexit negotiations? gibraltar voted overwhelmingly to remain. we accept the result of the referendum, and the opinion of the hall of the franchise of the british people, and we need to work with the british government, under the leadership of theresa may, to deliver the best possible deal for the united kingdom and gibraltar. but i have got to tell you this. i think it has been helpful of spain to put this front and centre. i was being questioned a couple of weeks ago, about spain possibly putting a
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spanner into the works. you have said that is going to be helpful, but sovereignty absolutely trumps membership of the eu? absolutely. sovereignty absolutely trumps membership of the eu. no question of the people of gibraltar selling sovereignty, to have access to the single market. we will not even agree to unlock the second part of the double lock, the uk gave gibraltar, to allow the united kingdom to even discuss and negotiate sovereignty with spain. and that possession, entirely independent of what deal emerges at the end of negotiations, even if that was for trade? specifically absolutely it is independent of that. this is not negotiating a price of the sovereignty of
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gibraltar, the question about what deal could apply, it is irrelevant. i think deal could apply, it is irrelevant. ithink spain deal could apply, it is irrelevant. i think spain had made a huge error ofjudgment, notjust doing this early, but denying their own citizens that application of that deal, if they work in gibraltar. after the 31st of march 2019, any spanish people working in gibraltar are not going to have the benefits, if spain gets its way, of any trade deal, that could bestow benefits for workers. it seems to me, cutting your nose to spite your face. and also, an error of judgment, your nose to spite your face. and also, an error ofjudgment, for michael howard to say that theresa may would be fighting for gibraltar, like button had been dating for the falkland islands. i think lord
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howard was being figurative. i think he was talking about how passionate the united kingdom is about gibraltar. i do not think he was actually talking about war. and i would not for one moment think that he was pretending to do anything other than that. thank you very much for you, other than that. thank you very much foryou, —— yourtime other than that. thank you very much for you, —— your time today. let's return to the news that donald trump has claimed the north korean nuclear threat will be "solved" under his leadership. the comments came just days before he is due to meet the chinese president. with me isjohn everard, a former british ambassador to north korea between 2006 and 2008. thank you forjoining us. what do you make of these typical comments from donald trump? going to solve
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north korea, do it alone, with no one else? these raise many more questions than answers. just a warm up questions than answers. just a warm up to his summit on friday with the chinese president, sending a warning flare he wants to talk tough? possibly signalling that he has given up on core population —— corporation from china? listening to that interview, he said that donald trump's possession seemed to be a lot more nuanced than the tweet suggested. and one would perhaps expect that. but if the world sees the tweet, this bombastic position, it perhaps makes the tone more difficult, when the chinese president meets donald trump?|j
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think the chinese, preparing the president, are going to be getting a little bit nervous. i think they have already concluded that president trump is unpredictable, and the chinese heat this unpredictability. it could be a risk, that the president is embarrassed by donald trump, in the run—up to an important congress. the congress this autumn has gotten go well. in simple terms, america solving north korea... 0n well. in simple terms, america solving north korea... on its own, thatis solving north korea... on its own, that is not something that can possibly work? no simple terms. the united states could take much more dramatic action against north korea. we have got to remember, that before president trump did that interview, the security council had handed him the security council had handed him the dossier. doing a full analysis
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on policy options or north korea. that could have looked at more kinetic options than those that have currently been explored. but all of these options have terrible risks. as the united states really good to risk nuclear war? and we have talked about china's reaction, what about north korea's reaction, the thinking inside north korea, when the seaport donald trump has said? we have seen over recent weeks, north korea doubling down on nuclear programmes, andi doubling down on nuclear programmes, and i think these comments are just going to harden that attitude, and we have got the risk of another test. that has been good to talk to. thank you. a study of human bones excavated from a deserted village in north yorkshire suggests our medieval ancestors believed in the "living dead" and took steps to ward them off. researchers analysed bones dating from the 11th to 14th centuries,
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and found they show signs of having been burnt and mutilated. joining us in our southampton newsroom is simon mays, a human skeletal biologist at historic england. thank you forjoining us. this tells usa thank you forjoining us. this tells us a lot about the folklore, superstition and lack of enlightenment? i think it shows that attitudes were different. we think about the importance of christianity, for medieval people, but these things, bounded in folklore, also how they saw the world. about why was the best belief, that people rose from the dead? it was reported as fact, chiefly by churchmen, laywriters, that people who had expressed strong illwill in life, corpses could be
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reanimated. and we think that with this archaeological evidence, we could have got some evidence that this actually was a belief, measures taken against it. and these mutilated remains, those of outsiders, that was the reason why people had been killed? one of the things that we thought of, were these people strangers to the communities? that was the reason for these strange treatments of the bodies? but my colleagues at the university of southampton have done some analysis, and these people were local to the area. probably coming to the village itself. how widespread was this? we have got some sparse documents, but some have come from other areas. and of course, the medieval documents, only a small set of the ones that had
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been written in that period. it is difficult to see how we'd spread the belief was. but this seems to be the only archaeological evidence of that. it could have been a belief that. it could have been a belief that was widespread but not active. and this, giving rise to the notion that you could have the living dead, zombies? bit is different, zombies, really rooted from west africa, caribbean culture. something that is more closely parallel to the eastern european vampire belief. with the belief of zombies, it is the idea that the dead are raised from graves, magical means. buck you, the belief was that the corpses rose by their own violation. gruesome! thank
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you for that. there we go. more about vampire traditions, than zombies. let's return to the news that significant restrictions on the use of bail by police in england and wales come into force today. the amount of time a suspect released from custody can remain on bail will be limited to 28 days in most cases. the decision is in response to concerns that people were being left in limbo for months or even years. with me is neil wallis, the former deputy editor of the news of the world. he spent over a year and a half on bail over the phone hacking scandal. what did that time, that period on bail do to you? what were you not able to do, that you could beforehand? it completely devastated my life. it is important to understand, i was not a one off. when i started talking about this, i
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discovered that affects thousands of people. in short... i was sacked from myjob, as a managing director ofa pr from myjob, as a managing director of a pr company, the day i was arrested. it destroyed my marriage, seriously affected both of my children, their lives, devastated my family finances. i was on bailfor 20 months. iwas family finances. i was on bailfor 20 months. i was unemployable. living off savings, investments. meant to kick in when we retired. it was enormous pressure. i meant to kick in when we retired. it was enormous pressure. i worked 100 hours a week. to someone, stuck at home. it was difficult to even go out. fan before the scandal, you must have been reporting on, and involved with many stories of people on bail. that is exactly the point.
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ijust on bail. that is exactly the point. i just thought what is bail? on bail. that is exactly the point. ijust thought what is bail? but it devastated my life. and what was worse, the police used endless bail asa worse, the police used endless bail as a tactic. they knew the pressure that they were putting on me. i was arrested, one day, three hours of interviews, and never spoke to me again for one year. just left me, hanging, overa again for one year. just left me, hanging, over a year. you think that was a tactic, rather than a consequence? it was absolutely a tactic. the arrest was a fishing expedition. they didn't need to release me. they could just have kept me going, i was under constant stress, pressure, and the 20 months that i was on bail, because i was eventually rearrested, that i was on bail, because i was eventually rea rrested, before that i was on bail, because i was eventually rearrested, before going on trial, i was arrested four times.
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about colleagues had similar experiences, and did just being with you. they would say that we have arrested you, on the 14th ofjuly, we wa nt arrested you, on the 14th ofjuly, we want you to come back in september. in september, he cancelled that and changed it to 0ctober. cancelled that and changed it to october. you think these changes, overdue, but you accept that you could have some specific uses, when keeping somebody on bail for longer is necessary? i think it is catch 22. police abuse of the system has brought about this reform. hopefully, with the judicial oversight, they can go back and get an extension, but they are going to have to argue for that, and not actually it is going to keep pressure on them, we could find something else. we have got to stop abusing the system. thank you.
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in a moment, a summary of the business news this hour. but first, the headlines on bbc newsroom live: five people have been charged in connection with an attack on an asylum seeker in south london. police believe up to thirty people may have been involved in the incident in croydon on friday night. borisjohnson says there can be no change in the sovereignty of gibraltar without the express consent of its people. concerns on the rock have been raised by statements about the issue in eu documents relating to brexit negotiations. and president trump warns that the us is prepared to act alone to tackle the nuclear threat posed by north korea — if china fails to intervene. the comments come ahead of a visit to the us by the chinese president this week. in the business news... debt relief! credit card interest ‘could be waived' for those in persistent debt.
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that's just one of the recommendations laid out in new proposals from the financial conduct authority, aimed at helping the millions of people across the uk struggling to find their way out of money trouble. i'll have more on that injust a moment. the chips are down! shares in uk chip designer imagination technologies have plunged almost 70% after apple said it would end a deal to use its products. the move by apple, imagination's largest customer, means the loss of lucrative royalty payments. shrinking to grow! lloyds bank has announced plans to shrink hundreds of its branches in size, in some cases boarding up the old counter sections. the new "micro branches" will be staffed byjust two people, and help customers to use self—service machines like pay—in devices. lloyds says the move reflect our changing banking habits with many more of us moving online. millions of people across the uk
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are stuck in a cycle of debt, and credit cards firms must now do more to help. that's what the financial conduct authority — or the fca — has said this morning. it's published proposals that say firms need to work more closely with customers in debt, drawing up faster repayment plans. and it could, in the most extreme of cases, see credit card companies having to cancel any interest or charges altogether. joining me now is peter tutton, head of policy at step change debt charity. what does this actually mean, to be an persistent debt? that is when the credit card borrowing goes on for yea rs credit card borrowing goes on for years and years, credit cards are supposed to be short—term products, that you could use for some months, but what the fca has found, it can
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be ten years, even more. this is the essence of that, people stop in long—term oral and, on products not meant for that. it becomes expensive. i mentioned the most extreme proposal, rating interest, charges that have been in court, but a postates charges that have been in court, but apostates that have been opening today by the fca, what do you make of them? the biggest debt we see, the most common, credit cards. it is a huge part of the household story. we should be happy about this, but it has not been mistreatment of change that we hoped to see. we hoped to see more about what could be done to prevent a new group of people, falling into persistent date. that is not in this report, it could come later, but it has not saved enough, about who to stop the next group of people falling into
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debt. some welcome relief, but it is still going to take some time. the estimates that the fca have proposed, people could still be paying 1a years, six, seven, and thatis paying 1a years, six, seven, and that is a long time, on credit card borrowing with high rates of interest. some useful things, borrowing with high rates of interest. some usefulthings, but borrowing with high rates of interest. some useful things, but it seems halfway to what we need. we need stronger action, that credit ca rd need stronger action, that credit card debt is good to be addressed earlier, and more completely. you have said that more preventative action is what is needed. how have the credit card companies responded? it remains to be seen. i think we have cautiously welcomed this. they should. it looks towards, more towards, what they may have put forward , towards, what they may have put forward, rather than what consumers could have put forward. we would have wa nted could have put forward. we would have wanted to see some stronger action. i think credit card
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companies are going to realise that change has got to con. this goes some way towards that. but if it goes all the week, we have got credit card companies, fit for purpose, that still remains to be seen. . . purpose, that still remains to be seen... thank you. and if you feel you have been affected by this, more information on the website. and the markets, the blue chip 100, kicking off the week, flat note. burberry. top riser today. 1.2%. earlier, 1.796. top riser today. 1.2%. earlier, 1.7%. that was after it said it would transfer the beauty business. 0il stocks, shell rising. thanks to crude oil. but among the losers, british banks. and outside those blue chips, imagination
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technologies, plunging more than 60%. that's all the business news. thank you. much more coming up. the gibraltar situation, david davis is in spain today. in a moment we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. first, we leave you with for a look at the weather. apologies. some problems with the sound. we can just apologies. some problems with the sound. we canjust remain true, apologies. some problems with the sound. we can just remain true, that the brexit signatory, david davis in spain, but apparently this has been one client, not a specific response to gibraltar. we can go back to darren. we can try that again. derbyshire, sun is out, warming up.
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but it is a different story, when we have got the fog at the eye will fork. about 9 degrees. the fog has been lifting, but it could persist around some of these english channel coasts. towards the north—west, we have got some changes coming, and the weather front pushing in, increasing cloud. and the rain getting heavier at west of scotland. england and wales, hanging onto some sun, more cloud. not much room for eastern scotland, moray firth. but still, some bands of showers. dry for england and wales but then increasing amounts of cloud. western
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coasts towards the end. chilly. fog through the english channel, temperatures are about 15 degrees, 11 at the london area. high pollen. the highest it is going to be, probably all week. that is because we have seen some changes, and we have got these weather fronts, with cloud and rain, wales, but it is becoming patchy. skies clearfor scotla nd becoming patchy. skies clearfor scotland and northern ireland, but going to be chillier. cloud for england and wales, much milder. grey start. south eastern part, it could stay that way all day, but then brightening up from the north—west, and we could see some showers to scotland, northern ireland, the heaviest at the northern parts, and for all of us, it is going to the colder than today. high pressure group to dominate over the —— going
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to dominate over the week ahead. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at midday. police charge five people in connection with the attack on a teenage asylum seeker at a croydon bus stop. three others remain in custody. a war of words over gibraltar — spain says there's no need for britain to "lose its temper". the foreign secretary says the rock's sovereignty is non—negotiable. the sovereignty of gibraltar is unchanged and is not going to change and cannot conceivably change without the express support and consent of the people of gibraltar and the united kingdom, and that is not going to change. president trump warns that the us is prepared to act alone to tackle the nuclear threat posed by north korea — if china fails to intervene. credit card firms must do more to help millions of customers in persistent debt,
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the financial regulator says. also, fans have bought it in their millions and musicians the world over have talked about its lasting influence... # with sergeant pepper ‘s lonely hearts club band. we take a fresh listen to the album widely considered a ‘musical masterpiece'. and the banksy of bad punctuation — why one man is roaming the streets of bristol in secret — making his mark on incorrect shop signs. good morning. it's monday 3rd april. i'm annita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live.
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—— good afternoon. five people have been charged over an attack in croydon, which left a teenage asylum seeker fighting for his life. the victim, a 17—year—old kurdish iranian boy, is in a serious but stable condition, after he was allegedly chased and beaten by a gang of 20 people in croydon, south london. he is now said to be starting to make a recovery. police investigating last friday's attack say three others remain in custody. 0ur correspondent ben bland is in croydon for us. what is the latest police are saying about this investigation? well, we know from police that five people have now been charged in connection with it, another 11 were arrested and questioned, it is all in connection with the attack that happened not far from me connection with the attack that happened not farfrom me herejust at that bus stop actually is where it began late on friday night, about 20 to midnight. the 17—year—old boy was there, he was there with a couple of friends come he had just been at their house and was making
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his way home, when a group of perhaps 20 or 30, police think left the pub, which is about 200 yards in that direction. they approached him, asked where he was from, and when they said he was an asylum seeker, they said he was an asylum seeker, they then set upon him. it is thought about ten people or so from the group began chasing him and attacking him, even when he fell to the floor he was repeatedly kicked in the head. police say the attack was so vicious, he was being so viciously attacked, he was lucky not to have died. this is a horrendous attack, racially motivated, there are 11 suspects, we have just arrested one, so 11 suspects have been arrested. we have identified five others and there are three others that we have put out an appeal for. what i can say is that one of those, the female suspect, has made herself known to us. but we are looking anywhere between 20 and 30 people involved in this attack. i think this is powered by numbers. there has been an incident outside the pub, they have obviously picked on three young men. there was no reason for this
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attack and i believe that because of the numbers involved people have justjumped on the back of it and it has turned into this violent brawl where somebody has been viciously beaten and is very lucky not to have lost his life. the detective superintendent also updated us on the condition of the victim. she said he was making progress and they were hoping to move him to a general ward, out of intensive care, at some point today. they will then interview him about what happened. it is thought he is here on his own. the police are now trying to make contact with his family to let them know what has happened. in terms of people who may have seen this, who were nearby, police technology at its very hard to step in and intervene when you witness a group of 30 violent people. though some people, we understand, did try to step in but police are urging anyone who had either phone footage or photos to
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hand that in, to supply that so it can help police with the investigation. because this was an attack on it seems unprovoked, on a 17—year—old asylum seeker, who came here because he thought he would be safer. finn, thank you for that, then bland reporting. spain's foreign minister has said this morning that "there's no need to lose tempers" over gibraltar. he was speaking after gibraltar‘s chief minister insisted that the territory won't be used as a bargaining chip in negotiations over britain's exit from the european union. spain, which claims sovereignty of the british territory, could be given a veto over decisions affecting it. but yesterday theresa may said the uk remains "steadfastly committed" to gibraltar. this was the spanish foreign minister speaking a short while ago. translation: it is not the spanish government's job to respond to each and every comment by any british politician, past and present.
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in any case, the spanish government is a little surprised by the tone of comment regarding gibraltar coming out of britain, which is a country known for its composure. the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, has reiterated that the sovereignty of gibraltar is non—negotiable. mrjohnson was speaking to reporters as he arrived at a meeting of eu foreign ministers in luxembourg. well, i think the position of the government is very, very clear, which is that the sovereignty of gibraltar is unchanged, and is not going to change, and cannot conceivably change, without the express support and consent of the people of gibraltar and the united kingdom, and that is not going to change. thanks a lot, thank you. gibraltar‘s chief minister fabian picardo told me a little earlier that the territory's sovereignty
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trumps membership of the eu. the position has been an attempt by spain in the draft a single larger balta for negative treatment if there is, and this is a big question, if there is a new trade deal in future between the united kingdom and the european union, which relates to services that might otherwise have been applicable to gibraltar. that is not an issue related to gibraltar‘s sovereignty. when i have talked about gibraltar not being a bargaining chip, i have dealt with that in the context of people putting it to me that gibraltar‘s sovereignty is somehow in play, which it certainly is not. you can't be utterly confident at this early stage, can you, that you won't end up in a disadvantage age the macro disadvantages position? gibraltar voted overwhelmingly to stay in the eu. we accept the view
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of the whole of the franchise of the british people, including gibraltar, and therefore we now need to work with the british government under the leadership of theresa made to deliver the best possible deal for the united kingdom and gibraltar. but i must tell you this. it is very helpful of spain to have put this front and centre this early on. you will recall i was being questioned a couple of weeks ago about whether spain might put a spanish spanner in the works in relation to the balta at five minutes to midnight, they have done no sooner than the process= have done no sooner than the procese= is of iei
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