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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 4, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. russian investigators are thought to have identified the man suspected of killing 11 people in the st petersbourg underground attack. reports say the person behind the bomb is in his early 20's and from central asia — three days of mourning for the victims have been declared. good morning, it's tuesday april 4. also this morning: a re—vamp of the government's campaign to help tens of thousands of troubled families — ministers say they want to help struggling children by giving their parents more support. returning to the honeymoon island where his wife michaela was murdered six years ago, john mcareavey tells us about the challenges of his search forjustice. my
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my deepest, darkest fears and nightmares actually came into reality here. so whenever you're actually physically back here,, you know, it's not easy. nearly £30m has been slashed from bus services in the last year, with more than 500 routes cut or cancelled. but could new rules on how bus companies and councils work together change the way they operate? i'll look at the details. in sport — he's apologised, but sunderland boss david moyes will be asked by the football association to explain himself after telling a bbc reporter she might "get a slap". # when i get old and losing my head, many years from now. 50 years on from the release of the album which brought us that song — we've a snapshot of what life's like — when you're 64. it depends on the actual individual person how you look after your body, how you look after yourself. and carol has the weather. good morning. it is a cloudy start
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at the gate —— day across england and wales will stop it will brighten up and wales will stop it will brighten up in the north later. for scotland and northern ireland, a fresh start. a lot of showers in the far north and strengthening wind as well. i will more in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. russian media is reporting that the man suspected of killing 11 people on a st petersburg train is in his early 20s and from central asia. at least 45 people were injured in the explosion between two underground stations on monday afternoon. three days of mourning has begun. sarah corker reports. in russia's second city, a show of grief and solidarity. president vladimir putin was in st petersburg at the time of the attack. above the station where the bombed train ended itsjourney, he paid his respects to those killed and injured on monday afternoon. from underground, images have emerged of the mangled metro train — doors blown out, passengers trying
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to escape the wreckage, bodies lying on the platform. local media are reporting that the suspect is a man in his 20s from central asia but there are conflicting reports as to whether he was a suicide bomber. translation: law enforcement bodies and specia lservices are working and will do all they can in order to find out the cause of what's happened. —— special services. at a nearby station, a second explosive device was found and defused. security has been tightened across the country. officials say this was an act of terror. yet, at this makeshift memorial, russians remained defiant and united. translation: i am certain that we russians will not be divided. at this precise moment, all people of all faiths, all religions, and all political
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borders, everone is united by grief. in recent years there have been several attacks on russia's planes, trains, and airports. 0nce once again, ordinary russians are asking how and why their loved ones we re asking how and why their loved ones were killed. let's speak now to our moscow correspondent 0leg boldyrev from our moscow studio this morning. a £30 million commitment to get unemployed parents of disadvantaged children into work — will form part of the troubled families programme from today. there'll be strong links between job centres and families without working adults. ministers in england want to give children better life chances but the government has been criticised for freezing benefits. alexandra mackenzie reports. it was after the london riots of 2011 that david cameron introduced the troubled families programme. the new government research shows the impact that parental conflict and
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worthlessness have on children's chances of doing well throughout their adult lives. —— worklessness retrieval stopped allah know whether you are living or not living together, married or unmarried, the key is pa rents together, married or unmarried, the key is parents should maintain a good relationship. that is the key to the future success of their children. the £30 million invested will go towards tried to resolve issues that can cause conflict in relationships. unemployment, along with mental health. also drug and alcohol dependency and homelessness. at this family centre, it's welcome news. early intervention is about avoiding escalated situation is further down the line. we believe it is very good value for money in terms of avoiding future problems. 0thers terms of avoiding future problems. others have criticised the scheme for being ineffective and
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antipoverty campaigners say it pales into insignificance when compared to the amount of money millions of families are missing out on duty changes in benefit payments. aleksandra mckenzie, bbc news. a group of mps has accused the government of making "unsubsta ntiated claims" about the potential impact of failing to reach a brexit deal with the eu. 0ur political correspondent ellie price is in westminsterfor us. ellie, what exactly does this report say? well, the main point is that parliament must have say if no deal is reached at the end of the two—year negotiations and that the government must do more to investigate what would happen if no deal was reached at the end of those negotiations. here is what the committee chairman had to say. in the absence of an economic assessment of that outcome, it would meana assessment of that outcome, it would mean a return to tariffs, possible delays of imports, impact of trade between northern ireland and the republic of ireland and without the government setting out what mitigating steps it would put in
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place, the assertion that no deal is better than a bad deal is, in the words of the report, unsubstantiated. now, the government says it is investigating all outcomes and that it does expect to get get a deal. there is another interesting bit to this report as well. this is a brexit committee thatis well. this is a brexit committee that is made up of cross party members, all sorts of members, meant to come to an agreement of all members. what we saw is an number of the probe except backing mps walked out of the meeting with a draft of the guidelines of this report. it was rushed, partisan and skews —— skewed and it was too pessimistic about wrecks it. it matters because these select committees are meant to be holding the government to account —— brexit. it damages their credibility otherwise. theresa may has defended her trip to saudi arabia saying close ties are needed with the kingdom for both security and trade reasons. the prime minister arrives in riyadh later after visiting the king ofjordan in amman on monday. labour has criticised the uk's support for the saudi—led coalition fighting in yemen but mrs may said
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the government was also a significant donor of humanitarian aid to the country. iraqi forces have opened safe corridors in western mosul. it's hoped the corridors will enable trapped civilians to flee the ongoing battle to drive so called ‘islamic state' — out of its last main stronghold in the country. iraqi government forces are planning to launch a major assault to capture the area. new research suggests working in hot temperatures increases the risk of heart attack. scientists were investigating why the most common cause of death for serving firefighters is heart attack or heart disease. our health correspondent sophie hutchinson reports. experienced firefighter simon mcnally used to train new recruits. it meant several times a day he was exposed to fires of up to 100 degrees celsius.
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then one day at work, he had a heart attack. i was kind of in denial at first. you're hoping it was indigestion or you're hoping it's something else. you're hoping it's not going t opve as sinister as a heart attack so it came as a shock. —— it's not going to be as sinister. we keep ourselves reasonably fit in the fire service, we have to pass a standard test every year. we have a check—up every three years. so it was a bit confusing to be faced with those signs and symptoms. heart attacks are the leading cause of death for frontline firefighters. studies in america have shown almost half of all firefighters who die on duty are killed by heart problems. the new research carried out by edinburgh university and published in thejournal, circulation, monitored the hearts of 19 healthy firefighters during mock rescues. it found body temperatures rose by one degree celsius and remained high for up to four hours afterwards. blood vessels failed to relax despite medication and the blood became stickier, carrying a high risk of forming potentially harmful clots. scientists believed the reason was the extreme physical
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exertion and heat. they say simple measures such as staying hydrated and taking breaks to cool down are vital for saving firefighters lives. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. we'll be talking about the research are little later. the first official portrait of first lady melania trump has been released by the white house. the image of the former model was taken in the white house by a belgian photographer and was released with a statement from mrs trump saying she was looking forward to "working on behalf of the american people". social media reaction has been mixed with some saying the first lady looked "beyond beautiful" while others questioned if the photo had been airbrushed. it is definitely a power photo. reminds me bit of dynasty. ajack russell from devon has
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set a new world record — in skipping. eight—year—old jessica — and her owner rachael grylls — clocked up 59 skips in one minute. look at the action! the team train for 15 minutes a day and they beat the previous record — held by a beagle — byjust one skip. impressive stuff. and let's have a look at that technique in slow—mo. it is the timing and the moments and seconds he is in the air. you are talking about a premier league manager under pressure. he
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was questioned by a bbc female reporter about the pressure on him and the fact that the club's owner was in the stands and he didn't like that question at all so he said to her, "you need to be careful with your questions or you might get a slap". a big row brewing and out whether those comments were sexist, inappropriate and david moyes ‘s has apologised and the reporter has accepted it but there is still a lot going on. the fa is investigating and he may even be charged. in sport, the football association ask sunderland boss david moyes to explain comments made to a bbc reporter after a post match interview last month. he suggested the reporter could "get a slap" for asking certain questions but later apologised saying he deeply regrets what he said there are still over three months until the start of the women's european championship in the netherlands but england head coach mark sampson has already
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named his squad of 23 for the tournament. england's first game is against scotland but they won't announce their team until much closer to the championship. world athletics' governing body the i —double a — f admit that they have been hacked by the russian fancy bears group — responsible for leaking data about athlete's use of restricted medicines. -- iaaf. we were all talking about it last time when there were revelations about which athletes were using which restrictive drugs because you have two apply to say you have asthma or a terrible injury. all these questions then arose about legitimacy of some people ‘s performances and some of athletes had to come out and say that they had to come out and say that they had altitude sick nurse or asthma. —— altitude sickness. no names mentioned yet but they will come out in the next few days and weeks. and we have the audio from david moyes. we would love to know what you
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think. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: the government announces a £30 million programme to help unemployed parents find work but is criticised for freezing benefits. authorities in russia are reported to have identified the man behind yesterday's attack on the st petersburg metro. shall we catch up with the weather? go on then. good morning. this morning it is not as cold as yesterday. for others it is a fresh start. what for most, we will see bright spells and some will have warmer conditions and yesterday, some won't be as warm as yesterday. so, what is happening? i weather in charge of the weather. we have a weather front sinking south through the day. that is producing the cloud for england and wales and patchy rain. some of the rain through the
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night has been heavy. you can see where it has been raining through the night. for the next couple of hours we could see the odd heavy burst and the odd rumble of thunder for parts of the south—east. you can see quite nicely on the chart where it is. this morning in london at 8am it is. this morning in london at 8am it will be 10 degrees. there are one 01’ it will be 10 degrees. there are one or two breaks in the cloud for england and were. the main breaks are further north, for the north of england into scotland and also parts of northern ireland —— wales. it is a fresh start here with some showers and through the day the wind is going to strengthen, particularly so for the far north of scotland and especially the northern isles. so, through the day, here comes the rain to the south—east. there will be a veil of cloud behind it. and for some it will take much of the afternoon into the evening before we see the back end of it. it will brighten from the north through the day, but we hang on to showers. temperatures ranging from eight in
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the north to 16 in the south. somewhere like cardiff could see 16 01’ somewhere like cardiff could see 16 or 17 somewhere like cardiff could see 16 or17 and somewhere like cardiff could see 16 or 17 and the same too in the midlands. that will feel pleasant in the sunshine. as we head through the evening and overnight, eventually we will lose the showers, the cloud will lose the showers, the cloud will move away and then for england and the wii will have clear skies. —— england and wales. further north, cloud with gales or severe gales. temperatures in towns, 4—8, in the countryside, much lower. it won't feel cold in the countryside, but we will see some frost around. it is nippy tomorrow with high pressure still in charge of the weather, still in charge of the weather, still windy, not as windy, for the north of scotland. and for most it will be fairly quiet weatherwise. again, sunshine around, variable cloud and breezy. the strongest wind and showers for the north. temperatures ranging from nine in the north to 13 or 1a further south.
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yesterday, incidentally, we had a high in gravesend of 18 degrees, so you can see the temperature just coming down a notch or two. then on thursday high pressure is still with us. thursday high pressure is still with us. still a lot of quiet weather and ram. some of us get off to a chilly start with variable cloud —— quite a lot of weather around. a little sunshine would be lovely, carol. thank you very much. a mixed picture. it was the honeymoon that turned to unimaginable tragedy — a young wife who briefly left her new husband to visit their hotel room but never returned. michaela mcareavey had been murdered. six years on, her husband john is still looking for answers. he's now returned to mauritius with the hope of finally getting justice for her death. from port louis, mark simpson reports. back on the island where his wife
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was murdered. this is a return journey most people thoughtjohn mcareavey would never make. he first came to mauritius six years ago. it was his honeymoon. but 12 days after getting married, michaela mcareavey was murdered. his decision to return has surprised the authorities here. but he says they had better get used to it. if we have to be back next week if we have to be back next month, next year, we will be here as long as it takes to ensure that this case is resolved. if i am still standing here in 20 years, so be it. john and michaela were a well—known couple back home in northern ireland. herfather, couple back home in northern ireland. her father, mickey couple back home in northern ireland. herfather, mickey hart, is one of ireland's most successful gaelic football managers. michaela was killed at this hotel. she disturbed intruders who had broken into her room. they panicked and killed her. two hotel workers later
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went on trialfor killed her. two hotel workers later went on trial for murder but both we re went on trial for murder but both were found not guilty. since then, john mcareavey hasn't spoken about the case but this week he has decided not just to the case but this week he has decided notjust to speak out but to act. in mauritius as a country, you know, i have absolutely nothing against. but the reality is, you know, my deepest fears and nightmares came to reality here. so whenever you are physically back in, you know, it is not easy. the death ofa you know, it is not easy. the death of a young irish woman on honeymoon on this holiday island made headlines around the world, and in mauritius it is front page news again this week withjohn mcareavey‘s sudden decision to return. i think people will be shocked. people will be shocked because we gathered that he had started a new life and that he would move on and forget about this tragedy. i think people will be surprised to see him and to see that
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his quest for the truth is still there. the hotel where michaela mcareavey was killed still exists and is still busy. six years on it has been renamed but what happened here has not been forgotten in mauritius, especially now thatjohn mcareavey is back on the island. and he is insisting this visit won't be his last. mark simpson, bbc news, mauritius. it isa it is a grim story, isn't it? later in the programme, we'll be speaking tojohn mcareavey from port lewis. that's at 8:10am. we are going to have a quick look at the papers. go on then. the telegraph's main story, what happened in st petersburg yesterday, with pictures of the damage done to the underground train when a bomb went off. and they have a story that i suspect people will talk about, the church of england accusing the
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national trust of airbrushing faith after it dropped easter from the easter egg hunt. hundreds of thousands of children searching for chocolate eggs at national trust properties rebranded to exclude easter for the first time whereas previously it was the ease direct railand previously it was the ease direct rail and now it is called the great british egg hunt. the front page of the times, theresa may coming down the times, theresa may coming down the steps in saudi arabia, and foreign aid profiteers. and the interesting juxtaposition on the sun, rather it to spain, the message to the meddling leaders of spain and the eu at the same time as offering £15 holidays to spain. the front page of the daily mirror, victoria derbyshire, one of our colleagues, has done an interview on breast cancer. and how important it has
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been. she is normally on the channel after breakfast. yes. and a story about some robbers who poured boiling water over someone, and they we re boiling water over someone, and they were arrested after they had a £19,000 spending spree in dubai. one story on the back of the sport pages, something entertaining on the inside pages normally, but here is david moyes and the story on his comments to a female reporter after a match dominating the back pages with the mail calling for him to be sacked following those comments. david moyes in slap wrap on the back of the star and lots of analysis on the worst, you know, what is the worst pa rt of the worst, you know, what is the worst part of what he said? sarah sheppard in the times talking about, is it the fact he threatened to slap her, the fact he drew attention to the fact she is a woman, or is it just in general a problem in
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football, that managers are so powerful they get to pick and choose which questions they answer, they can treat reporters as they want to. the interesting reaction to it, gary linekersaid the interesting reaction to it, gary lineker said this is the problem, manages sometimes treat interviewers with such disdain, and that is inexcusable. people at home can make their own judgement because at 6:a0am... their own judgement because at 6:40am. .. we their own judgement because at 6:40am... we have their own judgement because at 6:40am. .. we have the transcript of what happened. and picking up on the financial times, what happened. and picking up on the financialtimes, electric what happened. and picking up on the financial times, electric cars are here to stay when the valley of one of the companies has overtaken that of the companies has overtaken that of ford, tesla shares rose to a value of $47.5 billion, well beyond ford, whose shares fell two points for while tesla made 7000 cars while
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ford made over 2 million. clearly a change in how we get around and tesla wants to get ahead. far more charging points all over the place these days. it is sorting out the battery thing. there are not enough. you don't want to drive down the motorway and sit for one hour while the charges. there is the issue of taking out and recharging with a different battery. you look confused. no, not at all. ijust wa nt to confused. no, not at all. ijust want to know that the battery is good enough. exactly. and that it will get you where you want to go. that is all we want. it's 50 years since the beatles recorded sergeant pepper's lonely hearts club band, and every day this week we're getting the old record player out to give the beloved old vinyl a spin again. today's pop pick is, when i'm 64, a number paul mccartney wrote when he was a teenager. we've been out to hear some of your memories. and, just a warning, there's some screechy singing coming up. yuan, two, three, four. # when i get
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older, losing my hair. # many years from now. we will be sending valentine... # birthdays, greetings... when i'm 64 was one of the favourites, wasn't it? time search change. i 64 isn't old any
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more. i know people who are 64 who area more. i know people who are 64 who are a little bit more wild than i am. # will you still love me when i am. # will you still love me when i am 64? it seems like a lifetime away, and i am sure it did for paul when he wrote it as a teenager and i just think, what am i going to be doing. # we are out until2:45am, will you lock the door? there is no e, will you lock the door? there is no age, you can just will you lock the door? there is no age, you canjust — it depends how the individual looks after your body. # will you still need me when i'm 64? i probably won't still be here on brea kfast
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i probably won't still be here on breakfast when i am 64. well, who knows? who knows these days. so many yea rs knows? who knows these days. so many years away, hundreds of years away, surely. get in touch with us. what will you want to be doing when you're 64? time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm alice salfield. a shop worker from kentish town has two weeks to challenge his deportation from the uk after 20,000 people signed a petition to give him more time. stoly jankovic has lived and worked in the uk for twenty six years. he was arrested last thursday and taken to a removal centre in dorset, but released yesterday. a local mp says he's concerned about how the home office has handled the case.
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iam i am concerned at the way in which he was detained, and the fact that the proposal was to remove him before he had time to take legal advice or make representations. the bare minimum, it must be right for people to make representations and to have the opportunity to speak with a solicitor. two more people have been charged over an attack on a teenage asylum seeker in croydon. it brings the total to seven charged in connection with incident on friday night. reker ahmed, who is 17 and a kurdish iranian, suffered a fractured spine and eye socket and bleeding on the brain. charlton athletic will pay tribute tonight to pc keith palmer, who died in the westminster attack two weeks ago. pc palmer was a long—time season ticket holder and was stabbed to death by khalid masood. it's the first match played at charlton since the attack, and the club will replace his red seat with a white one bearing his warrant number. meanwhile police say they've
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released all 12 people they arrested in connection with the attack. let's have a look at the travel situation now. part suspension on the district line. but on the roads, the a40 coming into town is down to one lane between hillingdon and the polish war memorial after a crash. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning, it is a rather grey and, for some, good morning, it is a rather grey and, forsome, damp good morning, it is a rather grey and, for some, damp start, with outbreaks of rain this morning and more to come, fairly light, patchy rain and it is going to stay rather cloudy. it is quite misty and murky, especially the further south you are, but it is a mild start. still some spots of rain throughout but, like i said, it is rather drizzly, patchy, light rain, the temperatures 16 degrees. we are still going to have spots of rain at first this evening but gradually they will clear away. they will take the cloud
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with it, so it will become a clear night, the temperatures therefore colder than last night, five or six the minimum in towns and cities. it leads the way to a bright start on wednesday with some sunshine around at lease for the morning. you will notice the cloud sinking south. first turning the sunshine hazy and ending up rather grey. the maximum temperature around 14 degrees. high pressure builds in across the country as we head towards the end of the week but it doesn't mean wall—to—wall sunshine. there is going to be quite a lot of cloud around especially as we head through the afternoon. some sunshine or sunny spells through the morning. so for the next couple of days, yes, cloud around, but gradually the temperature rises just a little as the high pressure builds as we had towards the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to louise and dan. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: it was a horrific and shocking crime. six years agojohn mcareavey‘s
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wife was murdered while they were on honeymoon in mauritius. john has returned to the island and will tell us about his search for justice. there are just twelve months to go until australia hosts the commonwealth games. we'll catch up with several athletes who are preparing to follow the baton to the gold coast for the "friendly games". and as breakfast celebrates a half century of sergeant pepper, we'll see if paul mccartney's lyrics to "when i'm 64" ring true for people in their 60's today. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. russia is still on alert following the explosion between two st petersburg underground stations yesterday afternoon. russian media is reporting that the man suspected of carrying
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out the attack is in his early 20s and from central asia. 11 people were killed and 51 people are being treated in hospital. three days of mourning for the victims have been declared. research has showed that children with nonworking adults achieve less. ministers say they want to give children that life chances but the government has been criticised for freezing benefits. a group of mps has accused the government of making "unsubsta ntiated claims" about the potential impact of failing to reach a brexit deal with the eu. the exiting the eu committee report criticised the prime minister's position that no deal was better than a bad deal and called on the government to carry out an urgent impact
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assessment. some of the committee members say the report is rushed and overly negative. theresa may has defended her trip to saudi arabia saying close ties are needed with the kingdom for both security and trade reasons. the prime minister arrives in riyadh later after visiting the king ofjordan in amman on monday. labour has criticised the uk's support for the saudi—led coalition fighting in yemen but mrs may said the government was also a significant donor of humanitarian aid to the country. researchers say they are closer to understanding why firefighters are at such a high risk of suffering heart attacks. the authors of a new study say firefighters' blood becomes sticky at high temperatures meaning it is more likely to form potentially harmful clots. the national fire chiefs council says it will consider the findings and work on reducing the risk. the church of england has accused the national trust of "airbrushing faith" after it dropped the word "easter" from its annual easter egg hunt.
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the archbishop of york, john sentamu, described the decision as "spitting on the grave" ofjohn cadbury, the chocolate firm's founder. the national trust said the accusations were nonsense. if you like tall buildings and fireworks — stand by — you're in luck... south korea's tallest building, the 123 story — ‘lotte world tower', formally opened on monday. and what better way to celebrate than with fireworks when you moved into a new house, did you celebrate in that style? no. kat, we are talking about david
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moyes. you have the actual interview. we are going to play the interview. we are going to play the interview between vicki sparks come ata interview between vicki sparks come at a female reporter, and david moyes in which he said to her, you know, those questions are getting a bit cheeky, watch out next time you come around here because" you might get a slap" even though you are a woman. it's the even though you are a woman that has introduced the westj et a woman that has introduced the westjet about it being sexist. there isa westjet about it being sexist. there is a huge debate about it. —— about whether it is sexist. the football association will ask david moyes to explain himself about comments he made to a bbc reporter last month. vicki sparks has accepted an apology from the sunderland manager after he told her "she might get a slap". moyes had taken exception to her line of questioning about whether he was feeling
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the pressure after their match against burnley. moyes apologised for this yesterday saying he regrets the comments, and has accepted he made a mistake. but it may not be enough, with reaction to the comments from the group women in football urging more action. what do you think? you work in football. i know that vicki sparks has accepted the apology that people are up in arms and some say he needs to resign or someone should sack him. how do you feel as a woman who worked in that industry?” him. how do you feel as a woman who worked in that industry? i do think it's necessarily as sexist comment. i think the fact that he adds, "even though you are a woman" brings gender in but i think he is meaning to be sexist. i think what is worse for me and i think maybe what is worse for vicki sparks is the fact that he said, "you need to be careful next time". does it give you
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an insight into the sort of control that they have over what is being said? it is this attitude that "i don't have to answer these questions that you are asking me". it is the watch yourself next time you come in because i am the boss around here. i'm not defending david moyes but it isn't very high pressure job. somebody asks question which is valid and you can react in a bad way. what he said was indefensible but the interesting thing is that you're not there and vicky wasn't there in that situation because she was a woman. she is a journalist and that should be the qualification. people are coming out saying that what david moyes said was indefensible. we will be hearing from some of those later in the programme. a full programme of midweek fixtures in the premier league begins tonight. moyes‘ sunderland travel to champions leicester city. the pick of tonight's games is at old trafford, where manchester united will look to close the gap on the top four with victory over everton.
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it's the second of nine games for united in april but despite the distraction of the europa league next week, the united manager isn't looking that far ahead there are still over three months to go until the start of the women's european championship, but england head coach mark sampson has already named his final squad of 23 for the tournament. 19 already have experience from their third place finish at the world cup two years ago, but four uncapped players have been named including three from manchester city. england's first match is against scotland onjuly 19th. we're not afraid to say we want to win this tournament but we know we have to be respectful of other nations. we know that there is a lot of quality out there and ultimately, the best prepared team and the team that prepares well, performs well on the day, winters many games as they possibly can. —— wins as many. scotland won't name their squad until closer to the tournament — but they have named their new coach — shelly kerr says she is "extremely proud and honoured
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to be scotland coach — she'll take over after the summer, having previously coached arsenal ladies — and she became the first female manager in british men's seniorfootball when she took charge of stirling university in 2014. loughborough lightning have gone top of the netball super league after beating celtic dragons 65—45 last night. elsewhere, last year's beaten finallists manchester thunder have moved up to fourth, coming from behind at half time to beat herfordshire mavericks 59 points to 50. the russian hackers fancy bears have struck again, and this time it's the world athletics body — the iaaf — that has been targeted. their president lord coe has apologised to its athletes for the breach in their security of their therapeutic use exemption information — but it's not yet known what will be revealed. we uncovered this ourselves. this wasn't something that just we uncovered this ourselves. this wasn't something thatjust happened. we were looking at the safety and security of our systems.
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u nfortu nately, security of our systems. unfortunately, during that process, we discovered that we had been accessed. we have now done everything that we possibly could to put new systems in place. so the iaaf know they have been hacked. the last time they were hacked, it was the likes of alistair brownlee who had to have drugs for altitude sickness. serena williams, alistair brownlee and bradley wiggins, last time. we will see who comes at this time. russian security services are on high alert following yesterday's explosion on the metro system in st petersburg, which killed 11 people and left more than 40 injured. russian investigators are treating the blast as a terrorist act. 0ur correspondent 0leg boldyrev is in moscow for us this morning. thank you for your time on this. can
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you bring us up to date because there are developments all the time. what more do we know this morning. very little concerned that apart from the number of deceased stands at 11 and the number receiving help for wounds is around 50. there have been things leak to us from forces and some will be disproved. yesterday they were claiming that two suspects and later that was corrected. it looks like now the investigation is looking into a single perpetrator who left one explosive device on one central station in st petersburg. that device failed to go off and was later found and deactivated. device failed to go off and was laterfound and deactivated. and then the man will, reportedly a young man, 22 or 23—year—old, blue and other device and himself in the process. we get now conflicting reports that he might have been born
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in one of the central asian republics, either kazakhstan kazakhstan. we're not sure whether this be followed up on. —— we are getting confirmation in several hours. what has the reaction been like in moscow and st petersburg? most people are horrified. there are flowers a nd most people are horrified. there are flowers and candles both in st petersburg on the station where it happened and in moscow. the security situation here in moscow is pretty calm. i was travelling this morning to the office and there was no heightened police presence but reports from all major russian cities are they are putting forces on high alert. the question is
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whether even more higher security measures can be implemented. there are measures can be implemented. there a re lots of measures can be implemented. there are lots of those who say that some sweeping antiterrorism measures which have been passed last year, for example, would have been ineffective in a situation like this because we have some leaks from other sources close to the investigation saying that security services in st petersburg had some fragmented information about a terror plot but they didn't have enough to act upon it. obviously, a lot of questions to security services in this particular incident. you're watching bbc breakfast. lots coming up on the programme this morning. carol is looking for the weather. it's not as chilly as it was, is it? forsome weather. it's not as chilly as it was, is it? for some of us this morning, no. yesterday for example in london, it was around about five or six celsius. at the moment, it is
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now ten. what we are looking at todayis now ten. what we are looking at today is a bright spells. some of us will have some sunshine and for some, it will feel fresher than it did this morning. high pressure still firmly in charge of the weather. a weaker weather front sinking southwards. that is introducing the cloud we currently have across england and wales. also the patchy rain. some of the rain, albeit patchy, is heavy and will continue to be so for the next couple of hours. with without a rumble of thunder. the thunder risk at about eight o'clock. the showers and patchy rain continuing. you can see a lot of cloud across england and wales with temperatures widely into double figures. we move into the far north of england and scotla nd the far north of england and scotland and also northern ireland, are much fresh start to the day with clearer skies. a lot of showers coming in, especially across the far north of scotland. especially the northern isles. through the day, the
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wind will strengthen. up through the course of the morning and the afternoon, the cloud tends to push down and following on the weather front into the near continent but it will brighten up until probably this evening in the far south—eastjust before dark. you can see behind it, the sunshine prevails with temperatures widely eight to about 16. that eight in the northern isles will feel cold and the showers and gales. for example, cardiff, parts of south—west england, it is not without possibility that you could get 16 or indeed 17 celsius. in the sunshine, that will feel pleasant for this time of year. the sickening and overnight, we lose the rain and the cloud. clear scope dominate across the likes of england and wales. a bit more clout in scotland. —— clear skies dominate. the odd eight and sixes and sevens. it will be much colder than that in the countryside. we are looking at frost across england and wales. it will be
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across england and wales. it will be a cold start the day tomorrow. still under the influence of high pressure. you can see the squeeze of the isobars, still windy in north but not as windy as it will be later today and tonight. for most of us tomorrow after a bright start, you will notice the cloud starting to push down from the north. parts of south—west england, for example, hanging on to the sunshine at it longer that a lot of this will be high clouds which will be right or hazy sunshine rather than wall—to—wall blue skies. temperatures tomorrow, 8— 14. with each passing day, the temperature just drops by a couple of degrees but for most, the weather remains fine and a settled, dan and louise. i like that. you know that we like a little bit of sunshine. in the last year, hundreds of bus routes have been reduced or scrapped altogether, but new laws could change that. yes, they could. many people rely on those services. yes, those new rules will give city councils more power over routes, fares and schedules,
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in the same way that a separate body, transport for london, governs public transport in the capital. and it's vital. five billionjourneys were made on british buses last year. but not all of them are profitable, particularly in remote areas, so they get a subsidy from the local authority. but those subsidies have faced big cuts over the last year, amounting to £28 million, that's about a third slashed from budgets in england and wales. you can see on the map, the darker the map, the bigger the cuts. so the smallest cuts were in the west midlands. cuts of about 2%. the biggest was in the south—west. 17% cuts to budgets there. the north—west also saw big cuts too. four councils — middlesbrough, lancashire, torbay and the isle of wight — have had to stop bus subsidies altogether. and that can have a big impact on services, as these people in cumbria noticed after subsidies
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there were cut two years ago. we had a regular bus service that ran up and down the valley and it was how people got to work, the hospital and school.|j was how people got to work, the hospital and school. i have used buses not to go to carlisle or the hospital if necessary. it isjust impossible. if anything happened to my husband, i would be stark. i have a daughter who lives here who doesn't drive. i don't drive. my daughter goes to school 80 miles away and since they cut the bus i have had to rely on friends to get her to school. somewhere that spends a lot of money on public transport, for example jersey, visitors will use the transport system to get around the island very easily. if we
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are competing with them, then we will lose out. we are currently working with the different operators to try to find a way to get the service up and running. in the long—term, it is hard to see. cumbria council say they are supporting various community transport projects. let's speak to giles fearnely, boss of one of the country's biggest bus companies, firstgroup. he's in bristol this morning. good morning. iam interested in what the cuts to subsidies mean for you. we have seen the headlines. ask services have to be cut. talk me through from eight business services point of view. outside london nine out of ten bus services are run commercially. —— bus. bus services rely on public funding. there are not enough passengers to pay the cost of the service. you rely on local authorities to come forward to provide funding to help the services operate. this is the dilemma. as a
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commercial organisation, you exist to make honey, to make a profit with shareholders. that is what businesses do. on the other hand, councils say, we want these services in remote areas that when make money. you cannot square the circle. how can you do both went there is not enough money to go around? local authorities have a duty to decide whether or not a service should operate when there is not enough passengers to run it commercially and we have worked closely with other operators with local authorities to try to find solutions. for instance in the west country services are under threat and some services have been withdrawn. we were struck by the local community who were determined to save the service. for six months we found extra money and worked with the community to try to save the service to encourage people to use it. this is all about the people
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using the service. it is working very well and people are using the service thanks to the local community coming together and encouraging people to use it. we implore other communities to come together to try to work with the local authority to save these services. if the changes to the bus services. if the changes to the bus services bill are brought into force it would give councils more control over the services that they provide. for the passengers you might say it isa for the passengers you might say it is a good thing. is it the case that the council is asking you to do more and not willing to pay for it? we welcome the bus services bill and encourage those who were closely to benefit passengers. it doesn't solve customers and passengers' issues, one is congestion, it will make bus journeys less attractive, and secondly it will not create more money for services like those we are talking about. it has to be local decisions, local allocation of
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money, which can be difficult at times. that is the local authorities having to work hard and look carefully at how to allocate their money. i wish we could talk more but time is done. the boss of firstgroup speaking to us. more from me later. thank you. to a young paul mccartney, being 64 meant hair loss, digging the weeds, knitting by the fireside and grandchildren on the knee. but do the famous lyrics to "when i'm 64" ring true for people in their 60s today? for our special series on sergeant pepper's half century tim muffet has been to the isle of wight to find out. # when i get old, losing my hair, many years from now... a whimsical song about getting old, knitting sweaters and wasting away. for 64—year—old gavia it doesn't ring
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true. it is different from the beatles‘ song. true. it is different from the beatles' song. it is rather different. i am beatles' song. it is rather different. iam not beatles' song. it is rather different. i am not aware of being 64. iam having different. i am not aware of being 64. i am having the time of my life. # when you still need me, when you still feed me when i'm 64.|j # when you still need me, when you still feed me when i'm 64. i feed myself. i am fairly independent currently and long may it be thus. there has been huge changes in life expectancy over the last 50 years. so if we look at the 64—year—old in 1967, you would have on average 12 years of life expectancy. a woman would have around 80 years life expectancy. today that has transformed, especially for men, and actually a man aged 64 will have 23 years of life expectancy ahead, so thatis years of life expectancy ahead, so that is over a doubling. not all 64 —year—olds are as active as gavia
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but better diet, less smoking and medical advances have all helped.- when i get old... paul stevens is also 64 and works part—time as a road patrol officer. he has been married to gwen for it years. both we re married to gwen for it years. both were previously divorced. commonplace today. not so 50 years ago. it just commonplace today. not so 50 years ago. itjust makes life easier rather than being frowned on. yes, a lot of people were stuck in unhappy marriages before that. # grandchildren on your knee... grandchildren on your knee. not fear, chuck and dave. we have george, lenin. if we look back to 1967 and those aged 64, about 5% of their marriages entered —— ended in
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divorce, which results in more blended families. # every summer we can rent a cottage in the isle of wight. so, a cottage in the isle of wight. so, a cottage in the isle of wight. # we will scrimp and save. you are both 64 and this is yours. and it is not too dear. do you scrimp and save? at the end of the day, yes. colin and jenny rent out holiday homes and run a garlic farm. neither have immediate plans to retire. i run the holiday cottages and part of the restaurant and the shop. the big change has been in women. so, if you go back 50 years, only a quarter of women aged 60— 64 we re only a quarter of women aged 60— 64 were in the market. today it is two thirds. changes to the state pension age as well as laws banning age and gender discrimination have all played a role. compared to 1967,
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being 64 today is a very different experience. tim muffet, bbc news, on the isle of wight. wonderful to see everybody clearly enjoying themselves. yes, we will be speaking to the isle of wight festival later on. we have been asking what you want to do when you are 64. how would will be riding a harley—davidson across the planes with tears in his eyes for love lost, and getting on with the caring duties. tony says i will be 64 in june andi duties. tony says i will be 64 in june and i live in the philippines, hopefully i will drink beer with this ongoing down. i would like to live by the sea. and would you like to tell the bbc breakfast viewers what you will be doing?” to tell the bbc breakfast viewers what you will be doing? i will be writing books. that isn't exactly what you said. ok. you can all look forward to that, maybe. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. we will see you in a few minutes‘
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time. good morning from bbc london news. i‘m alice salfield. a shop worker from kentish town who‘s lived in the uk for 26 years has two weeks to challenge his deportation. 20,000 people signed a petition to give stolyjankovic more time after he was arrested last week and taken to a removal centre in dorset. the home office says it doesn‘t routinely comment on individual cases but a local mp is worried about how it‘s been handled. i‘m concerned at the way in which he was detained, and the fact that the proposal was to remove him before he had time to take legal advice or make representations. at the bare minimum, it must be right for people to make representations and to have the opportunity to speak with a solicitor. tonight charlton athletic will pay tribute to pc keith palmer,
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who died in the westminster attack two weeks ago. he was a long—time season ticket holder. the club placed a scarf on his seat the day after his death. but in the first match played at charlton since the attack, they will replace his red seat with a white one bearing his warrant number. meanwhile police say they‘ve released all 12 people they arrested in connection with the attack. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the district line, there‘s no service between turnham green and ealing broadway. it‘s looking good on the other lines, though, at the moment. 0n the roads, the a40 coming into town is down to one lane between hillingdon and the polish war memorial after a crash. there are severe delays with queues from the m40 junction 0ne denham roundabout. you can see the stationary traffic there. and there are long queues on the m1 in both directions approaching junction 6a for the m25 after two separate collisions. let‘s have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella.
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good morning, it is a rather grey and, for some, damp start, with outbreaks of rain this morning and more to come, fairly light, patchy rain and it is going to stay rather cloudy. it is quite misty and murky, especially the further south you are, but it is a mild start. still some spots of rain throughout but, like i said, it is rather drizzly, patchy, light rain, the temperatures today getting up to 16 degrees. we are still going to have spits and spots of rain at first this evening but gradually they will clear away. they will take the cloud with it, so it will become a clear night, the temperatures therefore a little bit colder than last night, five or six the minimum in towns and cities. but it leads the way to a brighter start on wednesday with some sunshine around at least for the morning. you will notice the cloud sinking south. first turning the sunshine hazy and ending up rather grey. the maximum temperature tomorrow around 14 degrees. high pressure continues to build in across the country as we head
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towards the end of the week but it doesn‘t mean wall—to—wall sunshine. there is going to be quite a lot of cloud around especially as we head through the afternoon. but some sunshine or sunny spells through the morning. so, for the next couple of days, yes, cloud around, but gradually the temperature rises just a little as the high pressure builds as we head towards the weekend. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. russian investigators are thought to have identified the man suspected of killing 11 people in the st petersbourg underground attack. reports say the person behind the bomb is in his early 20‘s and from central asia — three days of mourning for the victims have been declared. good morning, it‘s tuesday april 4. also this morning:
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a re—vamp of the government‘s campaign to help tens of thousands of troubled families — ministers say they want to help struggling children by giving their parents more support. returning to the honeymoon island where his wife michaela was murdered six years ago, john mcareavey tells us about the challenges of his search forjustice. my deepest, darkest fears and nightmares actually came into reality here. so whenever you‘re actually physically back here, you know, it‘s not easy. nearly £30m has been slashed from bus services in the last year, with more than 500 routes cut or cancelled. but could new rules on how bus companies and councils work together change the way they operate? i‘ll look at the details. in sport — he‘s apologised, but sunderland boss david moyes will be asked by the football association to explain himself after telling a bbc reporter she might "get a slap". # when i get old and losing my hair, many years from now. 50 years on from the release of the album which brought us that
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song — we‘ve a snapshot of what life‘s like — when you‘re 64. ican imagine i can imagine everybody is going to be singing that all morning, like me. and carol has the weather. we have some rain pushing south eastwards but it will be pushing up. some cloud around the northern ireland and scotland but some sunny spells and a strengthening weed and across the far north. more in about 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. russian investigators are thought to have identified the man suspected of killing 11 people in the st petersbourg underground attack. reports say the man is in his early 20s and from central asia. at least 45 people were also injured in the explosion between two stations on monday afternoon. three days of mourning have begun. sarah corker reports.
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in russia‘s second city, a show of grief and solidarity. president vladimir putin was in st petersburg at the time of the attack. above the station where the bombed train ended itsjourney, he paid his respects to those killed and injured on monday afternoon. from underground, images have emerged of the mangled metro train — doors blown out, passengers trying to escape the wreckage. local media are reporting that the suspect is a man in his 20s from central asia but there are conflicting reports as to whether he was a suicide bomber. translation: law enforcement bodies and special services are working and will do all they can in order to find out the cause of what‘s happened. at a nearby station, a second explosive device was found and defused. security has been tightened across the country.
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officials say this was an act of terror. yet, at this makeshift memorial, there was a sense of defiance. translation: i am certain that we russians will not be divided. at this precise moment, all people of all faiths, all religions, and all political borders, everyone is united by grief. in recent years russia‘s planes, trains, and airports have all been targeted by extremist groups. once again, ordinary russians are asking how and why their loved ones were killed. sarah corker, bbc news. let‘s speak now to our moscow correspondent 0leg boldyrev from our moscow studio this morning. there is more information coming out about what happened ? there is more information coming out about what happened? the media noise is picking up this morning. in the past alloa, two reports from two separate central asian republics
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saying that the local authorities are assisting russian investigators. working on the assumption that a young man who is a russian citizen living in russia but from either kazakhstan or kyrgyzstan. early reports are saying that the person left first of explosive device and then went and blue a second device similarto then went and blue a second device similar to the first one, killing himself in the process. the first device was found and deactivated. 0ne device was found and deactivated. one of the bodies found could have
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been the one of the bomb. —— bomber. a revised plan to get parents from troubled families back into work is being launched by the government today. research shows that children from families with no working adults achieve less at school and into adult life. alexandra mackenzie reports. it was after the london riots of 2011 that david cameron introduced the troubled families programme. new government research shows the impact that parental conflict and worklessness have on children‘s chances of doing well throughout their adult lives. one of the things that really matters is the relationship between parents. we know that relationships break down but whether you‘re living together or not living together, married or unmarried, the key is that the parents should maintain a good relationship. that is an absolute key to the future success of their children. the £30 million invested will go towards trying to resolve issues that can cause conflict in relationships. unemployment, along with mental health. also drug and alcohol
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dependency and homelessness. at this family centre, it‘s welcome news. early intervention is about avoiding escalated situations further down the line. we welcome that but also believe it is very good value for money in terms of avoiding future problems. others have criticised the scheme for being ineffective and anti—poverty campaigners say it pales into insignificance when compared to the amount of money millions of families are missing out on due to changes in benefit payments. alexandra mckenzie, bbc news. injusta injust a few in just a few minutes time will be working to that and pensions secretary damian green. a group of mps has accused the government of making "unsubstantiated claims" about the potential impact of failing to reach a brexit deal with the eu. 0ur political correspondent ellie price is in westminsterfor us. ellie, what exactly does this report say? article 50 was triggered to break
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fa nfa re article 50 was triggered to break fanfare here last week and that was essentially when the stopwatch started on the brexit negotiations. what this report says that if the government needs to do more in case no deal was reached. the government has previously said it wouldn‘t offer. here is what the chairman had to say. in the absence of an economic assessments, it would mean tariffs, and impact on trade between northern ireland and the republic of ireland and without the government setting out what mitigating steps it would put in place, the assertion that no deal is better than a bad deal is, in the words of the report, unsubstantiated. the government says it is looking into all potential outcomes and it expects a deal to be reached. another interesting port —— point, is made up of mps from all
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the parties and mps who voted pro, — remain and pro— brexit. the probe brexit people walked out last week when it was being discussed and said that the report was rushed, partisan and skewed and too pessimistic about brexit. why does it matter? the select committees are meant to hold the government to act count and if they can‘t all come to an agreement, it is as eventuallyjust pro remained mps to come to the conclusion is and it brings its credibility into question. theresa may has defended her trip to saudi arabia saying close ties are needed with the kingdom for both security and trade reasons. the prime minister arrives in riyadh later after visiting the king ofjordan in amman on monday. labour has criticised the uk‘s support for the saudi—led coalition fighting in yemen but mrs may said the government was also a significant donor of humanitarian aid to the country. the church of england has accused
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the national trust of "airbrushing faith" after it dropped the word "easter" from its annual easter egg hunt. the archbishop of york, john sentamu, described the decision as "spitting on the grave" ofjohn cadbury, the chocolate firm‘s founder. the national trust said the accusations were nonsense. researchers say they are closer to understanding why firefighters are at such a high risk of suffering heart attacks. the authors of a new study say firefighters‘ blood becomes sticky at high temperatures and their blood vessels fail to relax in response to medication. our health correspondent sophie hutchinson reports. experienced firefighter simon mcnally used to train new recruits. it meant several times a day he was exposed to fires of up to 100 degrees celsius. then one day at work, he had a heart attack. —— 1000 degrees celsius. i was kind of in denial at first. you‘re hoping it was indigestion or you‘re hoping it‘s something else.
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you‘re hoping it‘s not going to be as sinister as a heart attack so it came as a shock. we keep ourselves reasonably fit in the fire service, we have to pass a standard test every year. we have a check—up every three years. so it was a bit confusing to be faced with those signs and symptoms. heart attacks are the leading cause of death for frontline firefighters. studies in america have shown almost half of all firefighters who die on duty are killed by heart problems. the new research carried out by edinburgh university and published in thejournal, circulation, monitored the hearts of 19 healthy firefighters during mock rescues. it found body temperatures rose by one degree celsius and remained high for up to four hours afterwards. blood vessels failed to relax despite medication and the blood became stickier, carrying a high risk of forming potentially harmful clots. scientists believe the reason was the extreme physical exertion and heat. they say simple measures such as staying hydrated and taking breaks to cool down are vital for saving firefighters lives. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. we‘ll be talking about the research are little later.
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the first official portrait of first lady melania trump has been released by the white house. the image of the former model was taken in the white house by a belgian photographer and was released with a statement from mrs trump saying she was looking forward to "working on behalf of the american people". social media reaction has been mixed with some saying the first lady looked "beyond beautiful" while others questioned if the photo had been airbrushed. ajack russell from devon has set a new world record — in skipping. eight—year—old jessica — and her owner rachael grylls — clocked up 59 skips in one minute. the team train for 15 minutes a day and they beat the previous record — held by a beagle — byjust one skip. impressive stuff. and let‘s have a look at that technique in slow—mo. dog news on bbc breakfast.
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as we‘ve been hearing this morning, children from families where no—one works are almost twice as likely to fail in education according to the government. today, ministers are announcing a £30m plan to help these children succeed in life. key to that plan isjobcentre plus and increasing their role in helping long—term unemployed parents into work — seen as a big barrier to the development the strategy is an extension of one announced by former prime minister david cameron in 2011. that came just after the london riots with the aim of turning round the lives of 120,000 so—called "troubled families", who the government said were costing the state billions of pounds. so will this new idea be effective? joining us now from westminster is work and pensions secretary damian green. thank you forjoining us. let‘s
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start with how to define a troubled family, one would be getting access to this kind of development and education, and money. families that have multiple problems, so often out of work, which is obviously where my department comes in, to help them work, and also commonly parents may have problems with addiction to either alcohol or drugs, they may have debt problems, they may have housing problems. it is solving the multiple problems at once that we need to do notjust for the adults in the family but specifically for the children in the family so that they get the best start in life and so that their chances are not defined by the first few years of it, that is this programme, and that is why we are dealing with workless nurse and also with issues like the rental conflict which can lead to much poorer performance in schools for children —— worklessness. much poorer performance in schools for children -- worklessness. is it
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a government role, do you think, to start dealing with relationship problems in some ways? we won't do it directly. the money you mentioned will go to charities and voluntary organisations experienced in helping people maintain relationships even if their own relationship with the adults has broken down. we have research which shows whether or not the parents stay together, even if they split up because they cannot live with each other, if they can maintaina good live with each other, if they can maintain a good relationship it is much betterfor maintain a good relationship it is much better for the children‘s performance generally and that is what we need to do. and if the state doesn‘t intervene at this point, then we know it is going to have to intervene further down the line, possibly through the criminal justice system or the health system. quite a lot of these problems can lead to mental health problems later in life. this is part of a programme
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that has gone on for some years with many millions already spent on these troubled families programme. there is research from the national also to research which said they could not find consistent evidence that it had any significant or systematic impact. is the programme itself in trouble? i don't agree with that national institute report. i thought it was on the programme. there are improvements that can be made to the troubled families programme. that is what we are doing. we are bringing it closer together with job centres. we have found that being workless is almost the key to a lot of other problems. if we can get people back to work it will help the other problems. one of the insights of the troubled families programme is you need a key worker who is responsible for helping the individual family. to often in the past the police would be dealing with one family member, maybe the child was not go
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to school, and these were never joined—up. having one individual responsible for that is much better. of course every programme can be improved. that is what we are trying to do. just explain, you are investing money in these families, at the same time as freezing their benefits. we -- these are not the same families at all. many of them would be, wouldn‘t they? same families at all. many of them would be, wouldn't they? not necessarily. there is clearly overla p. necessarily. there is clearly overlap. we are doing a lot for people at the lower end of the income scale. we have improved the national living wage, that goes up this week. we are taking people... we are increasing the tax allowance, so we take them at a income tax. and later this year we are introducing 30 hours of childcare. we are doing a lot to help families at the bottom
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end of the scale. —— out of income tax. thank you for your time this morning. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. let‘s have a look at what is happening in the weather with carol. i love a little bit of tyne & wear action. what we have at the moment is a cloudy start for some and it will brighten up where we have the dull skies, except for the south—east. and you will find it will feel fresher than yesterday. in the southern areas it is a mild start because of the cloud amongst the high pressure and a weather front sinking south with patchy rain. look at these queries on the isobars in the north of the country. later it will be very windy. the weather front has been producing showers, the bright colours indicating they we re the bright colours indicating they were heavy, and the odd rumble of thunderfor another
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were heavy, and the odd rumble of thunder for another hour. showers continue but for the rest of england and wales it is cloudy with the odd spotin and wales it is cloudy with the odd spot in the breeze. it is not very cold. as women into northern england, scotland and northern ireland, there is cloud around —— as we move. it is fresh with showers. for the north of northern ireland and the north of scotland, the wind will pick up here, touching gale force, possibly severe gales in the northern isles, especially set shetland —— shetland. we are left with cloud and showers in the afternoon. in wales, scotland and northern ireland, it will be largely dry with sunshine. temperatures feeling cold at around eight in the northern isles. 15 or 16, possibly 17 in cardiff, south—west england and the south—west midlands. it will
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feel pleasant for the time of year. 0vernight we lose the cloud from the south—east. clear skies around, still severe gales for the north of scotland, and it will be a cold night. we are looking at temperatures in towns and cities, seven or eight, and in the countryside temperatures will be lower. it will be low enough for a touch of grass frost here and there. tomorrow a chilly start to the day. under the high pressure things are fairly settled. it will be windy for the far north of scotland. just not as windy as later today and don‘t stop and what he will find is we get off toa stop and what he will find is we get off to a bright start and cloud pushes down from the north. it will be bright rather than wall—to—wall blue skies. in the south—west of england, should hang on to the sunshine for the longest with temperatures between eight and 14. a quick look at thursday, mep start to
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the day with clear skies overnight, sunshine, variable amounts of cloud and showers in the north—west ——a nippy start. temperatures between about ten and 15. thank you. just discussing how lovely it is to have light evenings as well. yes. thank you. you love a warm evening. yes, i do. some of girl, hey? definitely. 0k. you wait ages for a business story then three come along at once. ben‘s here with the latest on changes to bus services and more. nearly £30 million has been slashed from subsidies for bus services in the last year across england and wales. that‘s led to a reduction or cancellation of 500 services. the biggest cuts were in the south—west and north—west of england. but new rules are expected to hand more powers to city councils giving them greater control over routes, ticketing, fares and information.
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iam going i am going to talk more about that in around half an hour. chancellor philip hammond starts a major trade mission to india as he looks to secure new trade deals after the vote to leave the eu. 0n the first day of the two—day trip to delhi and mumbai, mr hammond is expected to open talks with indian finance minister over establishing a new economic and trading partnership. since 2000, the uk has invested more than £19 bilion in india, more than the us or any other european country. 0nline clothing retailer asos has just reported what it calls solid uk growth with sales up 18% in the uk. but in a sign of the changing way we shop, it says 58% of all orders were placed via a mobile device. but the cost of dealing with returns remains a problem for online firms with customers ordering more than they need before sending back for free. that‘s an expensive cost for retailers. we are going to talk more about this
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in about half an hour. thank you. it was the honeymoon that turned to unimaginable tragedy — a young wife who briefly left her new husband to visit their hotel room but never returned. michaela mcareavey had been murdered. six years on, her husband john is still looking for answers. two hotel workers were accused of her murder but later they were acquitted in court. john has now returned to mauritius with the hope of finally getting justice for her death. from port louis, mark simpson reports. back on the island where his wife was murdered. this is a return journey most people thought john mcareavey would never make. he first came to mauritius six years ago. it was his honeymoon. but 12 days after getting married, michaela mcareavey was murdered. his decision to return has surprised the authorities here. but he says they had better get used to it. if we have to be back next week, we will be back.
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if we have to be back next month, next year, we will be here as long as it takes to ensure that this case is resolved. if i‘m still standing here in 20 years, so be it. john and michaela were a well—known couple back home in northern ireland. herfather, mickey hart, is one of ireland‘s most successful gaelic football managers. michaela was killed at this hotel. she disturbed intruders who broke into her room. they panicked and killed her. two hotel workers later went on trial for murder but both were found not guilty. since then, john mcareavey hasn‘t spoken about the case but this week he has decided notjust to speak out but to act. mauritius, as a country, you know, i have absolutely nothing against. but the reality is, you know, my deepest fears and nightmares came to reality here. so, whenever you‘re actually physically back here, you know, it‘s not easy.
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the death of a young irish woman on honeymoon on this holiday island made headlines around the world. and in mauritius it‘s front page news again this week, with john mcareavey‘s sudden decision to return. i think people will be shocked. people will be shocked because we gathered that he had started a new life and that he would move on and forget about this tragedy. i think people will be surprised to see him and to see that his quest for the truth is still there. the hotel where michaela mcareavey was killed still exists and is still busy. six years on it‘s been renamed but what happened here has not been forgotten in mauritius, especially now thatjohn mcareavey is back on the island. and he is insisting this visit won‘t be his last. mark simpson, bbc news, mauritius.
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later in the programme, we‘ll be speaking tojohn mcareavey from port lewis. that‘s at 8:10am. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning: there‘s just a year to go until the next commonwealth games, our reporter steve godden is with some of the athletes who‘ll be swapping the firth of forth for australia‘s gold coast. morning. yes, good morning, welcome to the outskirts of edinburgh are not somewhere that you would mistake for the gold coast. as you can see, the volleyball players are going through their paces for the first time the sport will appear at the commonwealth games. a big moment for the sport, and for these players here. we will speak to them a little bit later on. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i‘m alice salfield. a shop worker from kentish town
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who‘s lived in the uk for 26 years has two weeks to challenge his deportation. 20,000 people signed a petition to give stolyjankovic more time after he was arrested last week and taken to a removal centre in dorset. the home office says it doesn‘t routinely comment on individual cases but a local mp is worried about how it‘s been handled. i‘m concerned at the way in which he was detained, and the fact that the proposal was to remove him before he had time to take legal advice or make representations. at the bare minimum, it must be right for people to make representations and to have the opportunity to speak with a solicitor. tonight charlton athletic will pay tribute to pc keith palmer, who died in the westminster attack two weeks ago. the club placed a scarf on his seat the day after his death. but in the first match played
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at charlton since the attack, they will replace his red seat with a white one bearing his warrant number. meanwhile, police say they‘ve released all 12 people they arrested in connection with the attack. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tubes the central line has severe delays westbound. 0n the roads, the a40 coming into town is down to one lane between hillingdon and the polish war memorial after a crash. there are severe delays with queues back to the m25. you can see it‘s looking very slow there. and there are long queues on the m1 in both directions approaching junction 6a for the m25 after two separate collisions. and in lakeside, the m25junction 31 roundabout is partly blocked after the trailer of a lorry became detached from its cab. let‘s have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it‘s a rather grey and, for some, damp start to the day. we‘ve already seen some outbreaks
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of rain this morning and more to come, fairly light, patchy rain and it is going to stay rather cloudy. it is quite misty and murky, especially the further south you are, but it‘s a mild start. still some spots of rain throughout but, like i said, it is rather drizzly, patchy, light rain, the temperature today getting up to 16 degrees. we‘re still going to have spits and spots of rain at first this evening but gradually they will clear away. taking the cloud with it, so it becomes a clear night, the temperatures therefore a little bit colder than last night, five or six the minimum in towns and cities. but it leads the way to a brighter start on wednesday with some sunshine around at least for the morning. but you will notice the cloud sinking south, first turning the sunshine hazy and ending up rather grey. the maximum temperature tomorrow around 14 degrees. high pressure continues to build in across the country as we head towards the end of the week but it doesn‘t mean wall—to—wall sunshine. there is going to be quite a lot of cloud around, especially as we head through the afternoon.
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but some sunshine or sunny spells through the morning. so, for the next couple of days, yes, cloud around, but gradually the temperature rises just a little as the high pressure builds as we head towards the weekend. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. investigations continue in the explosion in the russian metro in which 11 people were killed and 51 injured. the suspect could be a kyrgyzsta n injured. the suspect could be a kyrgyzstan russian. these are live pictures from st petersburg where three days of mourning have been declared. president putin visited the scene of the explosion late last night. moron—mac at the programme. —— more
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on that. a revised plan to get parents from troubled families into work is being launched by the government today. research shows that children from families with no working adults achieve less at school and into adult life. a £30 million fund will try improve links between out of work parents and job centres. ministers say they want to give children better life chances but the government has been criticised for freezing benefits. a group of mps has accused the government of making "unsubstantiated claims" about the potential impact of failing to reach a brexit deal with the eu. the exiting the eu committee report criticised the prime minister‘s position that no deal was better than a bad deal and called on the government to carry out an urgent impact assessment. some of the committee members say the report is rushed and overly negative. researchers say they are closer to understanding why firefighters are at such a high risk of suffering heart attacks. the authors of a new study say
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firefighters‘ blood becomes sticky at high temperatures meaning it is more likely to form potentially harmful clots. the national fire chiefs council says it will consider the findings and work on reducing the risk. we will be speaking to those behind the research later on. prince harry is to give his support to a campaign to rid the world of landmines by 2025. the prince is expected to pay tribute to his late mother, diana, princess of wales, in a speech at kensington palace later to mark international mine awareness day. princess diana travelled to a minefield in angola shortly before her death and prince harry has made similar trips since becoming patron of the halo trust charity. the church of england has accused the national trust of "airbrushing faith" after it dropped the word "easter" from its annual easter egg hunt.
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the archbishop of york, john sentamu, described the decision as "spitting on the grave" ofjohn cadbury, the chocolate firm‘s founder. the national trust said the accusations were nonsense. coming up on the programme, carol will have the weather for you. and it is a morning of sport. the back page dominated by the future of david moyes and white —— what might happen to him. some people are calling thing to be sacked or at least resigned. the comments he made toa least resigned. the comments he made to a bbc reporter where he said the question was a bit cheeky and you might geta question was a bit cheeky and you might get a slap next time you come in, you should be careful next time you come to sunderland. they were both laughing but i think after the event, once the laughter stopped, people were analysing those comments and thinking there was something of its sinister perhaps behind them. lots of people reacting very differently to this story on twitter. we have been talking all morning. rachel bald island says" it is called banter. " it should be the
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reporter‘s decision if she was offended. eden says a man is verbally abusive to women because he thinks he can. this man says not only was it sexist and aggressive, but sinister. he should so —— show respect to reporters. lots of people say if fair enough, it is disrespectful to the reporter, whether or not she is a woman. vicki sparks has accepted the apology.- a pinch you lodged a complaint in the first first place. the football association will ask david moyes to explain himself about comments he made to a bbc reporter last month. vicki sparks has accepted an apology from the sunderland manager after he told her "she might get a slap". moyes had taken exception to her line of questioning about whether he was feeling the pressure after their match against burnley. a full programme of midweek fixtures
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in the premier league begins tonight. moyes‘ sunderland travel to champions leicester city. the pick of tonight‘s games is at old trafford, where manchester united will look to close the gap on the top four with victory over everton. it‘s the second of nine games for united in april but despite the distraction of the europa league next week, the united manager isn‘t looking that far ahead. this week is a week without europa league. this week is easy but the focus point of view is easy. we have to play everton, we have to play sunderland and these two matches, we have to go for them thinking about the premier league and nothing else. there are still over three months to go until the start of the women‘s
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european championship, but england head coach mark sampson has already named his final squad of 23 for the tournament. 19 already have experience from their third place finish at the world cup two years ago, but four uncapped players have been named including three from manchester city. england‘s first match is against scotland onjuly19th. scotland won‘t name their squad until closer to the tournament — but they have named their new coach — shelly kerr says she is "extremely proud and honoured to be scotland coach — she‘ll take over after the summer, having previously coached arsenal ladies — and she became the first female manager in british men‘s seniorfootball when she took charge of stirling university in 2014. keep us updated with what you think about the david moyes situation. whether or not you think it‘s sexist, the wrong thing to do, just a bit of banter, all kinds of opinions out there at the moment. we
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will look again in a few hours time. —— in a few moments. australia‘s gold coast is the setting for the 21st commonwealth games which begins exactly one year today. 70 nations will compete across 18 sports and seven para—sports. for the first time, beach volleyball will be included in the line up and steven godden is live this morning near edinburgh on the site of two new courts. 0na on a morning like this, you could just about confused this beach with the gold coast in australia. particularly where you hand the camera around and see beach volleyball going on. it is the first time the sport will appear in the commonwealth games. it has been an 0lympic commonwealth games. it has been an olympic sport since 1996. scotland hopefuls are going through their paces here. here is lin beattie who is hopeful to qualify. is this a typical morning? we have been pretty lucky with the weather this morning.
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we have been down here all winter, training in all sorts of ways. this is ourtraining training in all sorts of ways. this is our training base. training in all sorts of ways. this is ourtraining base. we training in all sorts of ways. this is our training base. we are grateful to have new permanent post behind us. the wind and rain you have experience throughout the weather, will that be in a vantage? i hope so. we don‘t know what the weather is going to be like —— and find it. we havejust been back from syd ney find it. we havejust been back from sydney and the weather is very scottish, if you like. we think it is an advantage. the mental advantage that we get from training in this weather has got to be a benefit. what are you hoping the experience will bring from the olympics? think i have learned a lot stop now moving onto the beach and an operant junichi to play the commonwealth games representing scotland. —— opportunity. showing people that
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scotla nd opportunity. showing people that scotland are a team to be reckoned with in the world of each volleyball —— beach volleyball. with in the world of each volleyball -- beach volleyball. what are the differences between normal volleyball and beach volleyball? the biggest change is the mental side. there is only two of you out there on the beach so if one of you is not having a good day, you have to work ha rd to having a good day, you have to work hard to get over that. the game can be over in a second. that is something we have been working hard on. scotland had their most successful commonwealth games the last time, the host games in glasgow. they are hoping for the best overseas. the beach volleyball players are hoping to play their part. it does look like a lovely day but slightly unusual outfits. from one commonwealth athlete to another, we‘re joined by the current commonwealth flyweight champion nicola adams. nicola is also a double 0lympic, world, and european title holder.
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but she is leaving amateur boxing behind and this weekend faces her first bout as a professional. we will come to that in a minute that lets rewind to the commonwealth games. it is so exciting. what are your favourite memories? just being in the arena and the buzz of the crowd. everybody was so excited. it was the first time women‘s boxing was the first time women‘s boxing was involved. it was nice to create that bit of history. becoming the first female to get a medal. gold medal. there were questions about you turning pro. what was it that made you finally decide, 0k, you turning pro. what was it that made you finally decide, ok, this is it. i'm made you finally decide, ok, this is it. i‘m not going to do the amateur side again, and to gopro.” it. i‘m not going to do the amateur side again, and to gopro. i wanted to follow in the footsteps of muhammad ali. he went from being an 0lympic muhammad ali. he went from being an olympic champion to be in a world champion as a pro and i want to be
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able to emulate that and follow my hero. explained to us who are not familiar, it‘s completely different for you, isn‘t it? what are the different priorities? the number of rounds i will do. i will do tend to minute rounds and there will be no headgear. you will see a little bit more of me now. talk to us about your opponent. the matches taking place in manchester. this is the first time you have fought in the uk since the olympics. are really excited about this weekend. i can‘t wait. the first time competing in the uk since 2012. they expect my opponent will come to win. ——i expect. i think i will have the edge and come away with a victory. tell us about the olympics as well. you could have gone for three. oakwood. i had to think a lot about that. go for the triple or do i turn professional. —— yes, i could.
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hopefully become a multi— weight world champion. i know you are just starting out with a pro career but have you got any idea how long you wa nt to have you got any idea how long you want to be involved? the maximum, probably four years, i reckon.“ four years? i have other interests as well. i think that will be a nice time to gracefully disappear from the sport but not entirely. —— why. and your partner is also a boxer? you used to be on the same podium but now you a different fight weight so you would never fight each other. we have been in the same weight class through the amateurs for nine yea rs. we class through the amateurs for nine years. we never fought class through the amateurs for nine years. we neverfought because class through the amateurs for nine years. we never fought because of the draw, so strange. it must be
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nerve racking watching her.” the draw, so strange. it must be nerve racking watching her. i was nervous for the whole two weeks. to use bar with each other? no. no, we don‘t. —— do you spar. just thinking about the tactics, having fun, enjoying myself. most importantly, getting the victory. how have things changed for you in the last few yea rs ? changed for you in the last few years? you have been around for an awfully long time. have things changed, have attitudes changed to women‘s boxing in the last few yea rs ? women‘s boxing in the last few years? there, attitudes have changed immensely. i think after the 0lympics immensely. i think after the olympics in 2012, i was so surprised and shocked how britain and the rest of the world took to women‘s boxing. it has just grown and grown. of the world took to women‘s boxing.
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it hasjust grown and grown. you must get young girls going up and saying that they are doing it because of you. i actually had one girl come up to me saying that she had done ballet for the last five yea rs had done ballet for the last five years and after seeing me win the 0lympics, she has taken up boxing. and actually ballet is not a bad preparation, is it? yes! is there enough competition in women‘s boxing to keep you going for the next four yea rs ? to keep you going for the next four years? are they more light is coming in? yes, a lot. especially from the amateur ranks. as the media and the professional boxing rows, there will bea professional boxing rows, there will be a lot more. i‘m going to be kept quite busy. —— grows. be a lot more. i‘m going to be kept quite busy. -- grows. are there any women particularly that you want to fight? pretty much anybody who is holding the title. you are going after them! yes, i will be coming
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after them! yes, i will be coming after them. great to talk to you again. thank you. all the best this week. to a young paul mccartney, being 64 meant hair loss, digging the weeds, knitting by the fireside and grandchildren on the knee. is it like that? do the famous lyrics to "when i‘m 64" ring true for people in their 60s today? for our special series on sergeant pepper‘s half century tim muffet has been of course to the isle of wight to find out. # when i get old. # losing my hair. # many years from now... a whimsical song about getting old, knitting sweaters and wasting away. for 64—year—old gavia, it doesn‘t ring true. it‘s different from the beatles‘ song. it is rather different. i‘m not aware of being 64. i‘m having the time of my life. # will you still need me.
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# will you still feed me. # when i'm 64? i feed myself. and i need myself. i‘m fairly independent currently, and long may it be thus. there's been huge changes in life expectancy over the last 50 years. so, if we look at the 64—year—old in 1967, you would have on average another 12 years of life expectancy. a woman would have around 18 more years life expectancy. today, that's transformed, especially for men, and actually a man aged 64 will have 23 years of life expectancy ahead, so that's over a doubling. not all 64—year—olds are as active as gavia but better diet, less smoking and medical advances have all helped. # when i get older... paul stevens is also 64 and works part—time as a road patrol officer. he‘s been married to
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gwen for eight years. both were previously divorced. commonplace today. not so 50 years ago. itjust makes life easier rather than being frowned on. yeah, a lot of people were stuck in unhappy marriages before that. # grandchildren on your knee... # vera, chuck and dave. grandchildren on your knee. we have george, lenin. if we look back to 1967 and those aged 64, about 5% of their marriages ended in divorce, whereas now it is a third, which results in more blended families. grandchildren are wodnerful. # every summer we can rent a cottage
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in the isle of wight. # if it‘s not too dear. so, a cottage in the isle of wight. # we will scrimp and save. colin and jenny, you are both 64 and this is yours. and it is not too dear. do you scrimp and save? at the end of the day, yes. colin and jenny rent out holiday homes and run a garlic farm. neither have immediate plans to retire. i run the holiday cottages and have a part of the restaurant and the farm shop. the big change has been in women. so, if you go back 50 years, only a quarter of women aged 60—64 were in the labour market. today it is two thirds. changes to the state pension age as well as laws banning age and gender discrimination have all played a role. compared to 1967, being 64 today is a very different experience. tim muffet, bbc news, on the isle of wight. some people clearly enjoying
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themselves, and why wouldn‘t they? later we will speak to the almost 64—year—old promoter of the isle of wight festival and booking paul mccartney to headline the festival. thank you for your messages on what you would like to do. i would like to be working but i hope i can live here in northern ireland by the sea. i never dreamt it would happen.” wa nt to i never dreamt it would happen.” want to live by the sea. her name is nan. she is not a nan by the way. she might be. colin says, hair fading, valentines, no birthday. fed me only rarely, staying out until a quarter to four, you‘re having a laugh. and dawn, iwill still be working. thank you for getting in touch, please send in those messages. i love to read them. touch, please send in those messages. i love to read themm this the sort of view that you would
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like? yes. this is a beautiful weather watchers picture sent in this morning of east yorkshire. we have another one from norfolk. look at this, lovely blue skies. this isn‘t the picture everywhere. the other thing i want to tell you about as pollen season has started is yesterday across england and why is the levels were high —— and wales the levels were high —— and wales the levels were high. for the rest of us it is moderate or low. now, what has happened is high pressure is dominating the weather. we have a weather front moving southwards producing cloud and patchy rain. today too, look at the squeezed isobars for the north of scotland, the wind will strengthen here, touching gale force, even severe gales for the northern isles, especially shetland. this morning we watched the cloud and rain pushed to the south—east. you could hear the odd rumble of thunder but not for long. it is brightening up from the north with sunshine. by the mid—
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afternoon, beautiful for north with sunshine. by the mid— afternoon, beautifulfor northern england if you like it sunny, the same for scotland, however there are showers and it will be windy. as a result, it will be cold for the northern ireland. 0ne result, it will be cold for the northern ireland. one or two showers in the west. northern ireland, bright or sunny spells. highs of about 12 degrees in belfast. in wales, it is brightening with sunshine, 10 degrees in aberystwyth. south—west england, quite a bit of sunshine developing, and you can see the tail end of the cloud from the weather front extending across southern counties. the weather front is still producing showery at the end of south—east and east anglia. —— outbreaks. clear skies across england and wales after that, clear skies for scotland and northern ireland, but still the possibility of severe gales in the north. temperatures in towns and cities between six and eight celsius but
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lower than that in the countryside, certainly low enough for a touch of frost. so, if you are tempted into the garden in the recent weather, bear that in the garden in the recent weather, bearthat in mind. the garden in the recent weather, bear that in mind. so, the garden in the recent weather, bearthat in mind. so, high the garden in the recent weather, bear that in mind. so, high pressure still dominating the weather tomorrow. it will do so for much of the week. still windy in the north, though not quite as windy as it will be later today and tonight. tomorrow we start on a chilly and bright note with sunshine. cloud in the north—west producing drizzle moving south through the day but a lot of it will be high cloud so it will be a bright day with some breaks. it looks like south—west england will hang on to the sunshine for the longest. temperatures continuing just to come down by a notch or two with a top temperature of 13 or 14. the same on thursday. a chilly start with the overnight cloud, some sunshine, variable amounts of cloud and showers in the west. thank you, so, really cold at night. for some of us it certainly is, much more
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fresh across scotland and northern ireland than it was yesterday before england and wales with the cloud it is much more mild moso it depends where you are. thank you. in the last year, hundreds of bus routes have been reduced or scrapped altogether, but new laws could change that. yes, those new rules will give city councils more power over routes, fares and schedules, in the same way that a separate body, transport for london, governs public transport in the capital. and it‘s vital. five billionjourneys were made on british buses last year. but not all of them are profitable, particularly in remote areas, so they get a subsidy from the local authority. but those subsidies have faced big cuts over the last year, amounting to £28 million, that‘s about a third slashed from budgets in england and wales. you can see on the map, the darker the map, the bigger the cuts. so the smallest cuts were in the west midlands. cuts of about 2%. the biggest was in the south—west. 17% cuts to budgets there.
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the north—west also saw big cuts too. four councils — middlesbrough, lancashire, torbay and the isle of wight — have had to stop bus subsidies altogether. and that can have a big impact on services, as these people in cumbria noticed after subsidies there were cut two years ago. with me now is lianna etkind from the campaign for better transport. good morning. let‘s clarify this. many would assume may be wrongly that the council at the moment governance bus services. that is not a lwa ys governance bus services. that is not always the case? 8096 of buses outside london and the uk are run as commercial services. bus companies decide where to run the route and what timetable to stick to. 20% are supported services where the local authority subsidises the bus service and has some say in where the buses go and which communities they serve. at the moment the proposals get the local authority more control to make
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it morejoined local authority more control to make it more joined up. local authority more control to make it morejoined up. what difference for passengers? where local authorities decide to use the bus services bill it will enable local authorities to start planning their bus networks as a whole, rather than route by route, and even transport network planning, to make sure the bus timetable matches the rail timetable and when the train comes to the station. it will also enable councils to introduce multimodal and multi— operator ticketing, so instead of buying a bus ticket on one bus and then being told you can‘t use it on the bus back because it isa can‘t use it on the bus back because it is a different company, the bus services bill will enable you to have one ticket or one card for the same fare and use it on buses or even on transport as a whole throughout the city or area. is it fairto throughout the city or area. is it fair to put the pressure on the bus services, the bus companies themselves? you might say the councils have said they will cut how
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much they subsidise the service and then the bus company, a commercial organisation, they exist to make money. then there is a space in the middle where they don‘t overlap. the council is cutting the money, that company needs to profit, and they will never meet. we would like the bus services bill to be supported by sustainable long—term funding and the government needs to recognise that the buses support strong economies and communities, but actually bus companies have nothing to fear from the bus services bill. indeed, when franchising was introduced in jersey in indeed, when franchising was introduced injersey in 2013, bus passenger numbers went up by a third. new routes were put on, frequency increased. actually, i think people will gain from the better bus services. bus companies too, when the services are more attractive, we‘ll see people move from the car or other forms of transport and they will start to ta ke transport and they will start to
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take buses. it is good to talk to you, thank you. more from me after 8am. thank you. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. we will have their headlines at 8am. see you than. good morning from bbc london news. i‘m alice salfield. a shop worker from kentish town who‘s lived in the uk for 26 years has two weeks to challenge his deportation. 20,000 people signed a petition to give stolyjankovic more time after he was arrested last week and taken to a removal centre in dorset. the home office says it doesn‘t routinely comment on individual cases but a local mp is worried about how it‘s been handled. i‘m concerned at the way in which he was detained, and the fact that the proposal was to remove him before he had time to take legal advice or make representations. at the bare minimum, it must be right for people to make representations and to have the opportunity to speak with a solicitor. tonight charlton athletic will pay
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tribute to pc keith palmer, who died in the westminster attack two weeks ago. the club placed a scarf on his seat the day after his death. but in the first match played at charlton since the attack, they will replace his red seat with a white one bearing his warrant number. meanwhile, police say they‘ve released all 12 people they arrested in connection with the attack. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tubes, the central line has severe delays westbound. and there are minor delays too on the dlr. if we take a look at the roads, these are the long delays on the a40 coming in to town after a crash at the polish war memorial. all lanes are now open but it‘s still looking very slow. long delays too on the m1 in both directions approaching junction 6a for the m25 after two separate collisions.
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and in lakeside, the m25junction 31 roundabout is partly blocked after the trailer of a lorry became detached from its cab. let‘s have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it‘s a rather grey and, for some, damp start to the day. we‘ve already seen some outbreaks of rain this morning and more to come, fairly light, patchy rain and it is going to stay rather cloudy. it is quite misty and murky, especially the further south you are, but it‘s a mild start. still some spots of rain throughout but, like i said, it is rather drizzly, patchy, light rain, the temperature today getting up to 16 degrees. we‘re still going to have spits and spots of rain at first this evening but gradually they will clear away. taking the cloud with it, so it becomes a clear night. the temperatures therefore a little bit colder than last night, five or six the minimum in towns and cities. but it leads the way to a brighter start on wednesday with some sunshine around at least for the morning. but you will notice the cloud sinking south, first turning the sunshine hazy and ending up rather grey. the maximum temperature tomorrow around 14 degrees. high pressure continues to build in across the country as we head towards the end of the week but it
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doesn‘t mean wall—to—wall sunshine. there is going to be quite a lot of cloud around, especially as we head through the afternoon. but some sunshine or sunny spells through the morning. so, for the next couple of days, yes, cloud around, but gradually the temperature rises just a little as the high pressure builds as we head towards the weekend. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. security services say they have identified the man suspected of killing 11 people in the st petersburg underground attack. they say he is from kyrgyzstan with russian citizenship. three days of mourning for the victims have been declared. good morning, it‘s tuesday 4th april.
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also this morning: the hidden health risks facing firefighters, and how new research is explaining why they are at such a high risk of suffering heart attacks. returning to the honeymoon island where his wife, michaela, was murdered six years ago, john mcareavey tells us about his search forjustice. nearly £30 million has been slashed from bus services in the last year, with more than 500 routes cut or cancelled. but could new rules change the way they operate? i‘ll look at the details. in sport — he‘s apologised, but sunderland boss david moyes will be asked by the football association to explain himself after telling a bbc reporter she might "get a slap". # when i get older, losing my hair many years from now... 50 years on from the release of the album which brought us that song, we‘ve a snapshot of what life‘s like
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when you‘re 64. and with a year until the commonwealth games, we are on portobello beach with the scottish beach volleyball team. and carol has the weather. good morning. we have already seen the sunshine across scotland, northern ireland and northern england. a bright and fresh start. summer showers in the north. for england and wales, quite a bit of cloud with patchy rain moving south. it will brighten open later. good morning. first, our main story. security services have identified the man suspected of killing 11 people in the st petersburg underground attack. the kyrgyz security service has told the bbc that the main suspect in the attack is a kyrgyz national who gained russian citizenship. 11 people died in the blast, and more than 50 are being treated in hospital.
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the country is marking three days of national mourning, as sarah corker reports. in russia‘s second city, a show of grief and solidarity. president vladimir putin was in st petersburg at the time of the attack. above the station where the bombed train ended itsjourney, he paid his respects to those killed and injured on monday afternoon. from underground, images have emerged of the mangled metro train — doors blown out, passengers trying to escape the wreckage, bodies lying on the platform. local media are reporting that the suspect is a man in his 20s from central asia but there are conflicting reports as to whether he was a suicide bomber. translation: law enforcement bodies and special services are working and will do all they can in order to find out the cause of what‘s happened. at a nearby station, a second explosive device was found and defused. security has been tightened across the country. officials say this was an act of terror.
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yet, at this makeshift memorial, russians remained defiant and united. translation: i am certain that we russians will not be divided. at this precise moment, all people of all faiths, all religions, and all political borders, everone is united by grief. in recent years there have been several attacks on russia‘s planes, trains, and airports. once again, ordinary russians are asking how and why their loved ones asking how and why their loved ones were killed. earlier, we spoke to our moscow correspondent, 0leg boldyrev, who gave us this update on the investigation. it looks like now the investigation is looking into a single perpetrator who left one explosive device on one
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central station in saint petersburg. that device failed to go off, was later found and deactivated. that device failed to go off, was laterfound and deactivated. then the man, reportedly a young man, blew another device himself in the process. we are getting conflicting reports that he might have been born in one of the central asian republics. either kyrgyzstan or keg stand. —— kazakhstan. investigators are not talking much officially. we don‘t expect any concrete statements from them for several hours. a revised plan to get parents from troubled families back into work, is being launched by the government today. research shows that children from families with no working adults achieve less at school and into adult life. alexandra mackenzie reports. it was after the london riots of 2011 that david cameron introduced the troubled families programme. now new research
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shows the impact that parental conflict and nojob have been children‘s chances of doing well in their adult lives. it‘s solving these multiple problems at once that we need to do, notjust for the adults, but for the children in the family so that they get the best start in life so their chance ins life aren‘t defined by the first few years of it. the £30 million invested will go towards trying to resolve issues that can cause conflict in relationships. unemployment, along with mental health, also drug and alcohol dependency and homelessness. for those at this family centre, it is positive news. early intervention is about avoiding escalating situations further down the line. we welcome that, but believe it is very good value for money in regards to avoiding future problems. others have criticised the scheme for being ineffective and anti—poverty campaigners says it pales into
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insignificance when compared to the amount of money millions of families are losing out on due to changes in benefit payments. within the past few minutes, the prime minister has defended her trip to saudi arabia, saying close ties are needed with the kingdom for security and trade reasons. she has been speaking tojohn pienaar in riyadh. the prime minister said it was right to support the saudi led coalition in yemen. we are concerned about the humanitarian situation. that‘s why the uk was the fourth largest donor to the yemen in terms of humanitarian aid. we will be continuing with that. yes, we will raise the humanitarian issue. it is important we recognise the threat there is in terms of people‘s lives, and we will be supporting that
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through the aid and support we give. do you expect a frosty reception when you raise issues of human rights? the important thing for the united kingdom when we meet people and we want to raise issues of human rights, and that may be in a number of countries, is if we have a relationship with them, we can do that. rather than standing on the sidelines sniping, it is important to engage, to talk to people, to talk about our interests, and to raise difficult issues when it is necessary. ellie price is at westminster for us. the prime minister not polling any punches? absolutely not. prime ministers always get asked these questions whenever they go to countries linked with humanitarian crises. she wasn‘t pulling punches. she is therefore trade talks. she linked trade talks in the
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post—brexit world with security. she pointed out that since the relationship with saudi arabia, that britain‘s relationship has meant it has saved lives. certainly taking on that question and keen to show that britain wants a strong role in the world post—brexit. britain wants a strong role in the world post-brexit. mps have been talking about the possible cost of a deal or no deal in brexit? that's right. a select committee reports suggest the government needs to do more to work out what it would cost if there was no deal reached at the end of the negotiations. the government suggestion that no deal is better than a bad deal is unsubstantiated. theresa may also responded to that. she said the government was looking at every possible outcome and her feeling was that it was in everybody‘s interests to reach a deal. she wasn‘t taking on too much of that. what he said in
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a lancaster house —— house speech, she said it was simply not a major concern to her, she thinks there will be a deal. iraqi forces have opened safe routes out of western mosul. it‘s hoped they will enable trapped civilians to flee the ongoing battle to drive so called islamic state out of its last main stronghold in the country. iraqi government forces are planning to launch a major assault to capture the area. the first official portrait of first lady melania trump has been released by the white house. the image of the former model was taken in the white house by a belgian photographer, and was released with a statement from mrs trump saying she was looking forward to "working on behalf of the american people". social media reaction has been mixed, with some saying the first lady looked "beyond beautiful", while others questioned if the photo had been airbrushed. probably quite a few others didn‘t
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really care either. six years ago, newlyweds michaela and john mcareavey set off on honeymoon to mauritius. days later, michaela was dead, killed in her hotel room in the middle of the day. two hotel workers were accused of her murder, but later acquitted in court. this week, her husband john has returned to the island still determined to getjustice for his wife. mark simpson reports from mauritius. this is a returnjourney this is a return journey most people thoughtjohn this is a return journey most people thought john mcareavey would this is a return journey most people thoughtjohn mcareavey would never make. he first came to mauritius six yea rs make. he first came to mauritius six years ago. it was his honeymoon. but 12 days after getting married, his wife, michaela, was murdered. john and michaela wari well—known couple backcombing northern ireland. our father is one of island micro‘s one of —— most successful gaelic
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football managers. in a way the boys are mummy‘s boys and i‘m daddy‘s girls. michaela was killed at this hotel. she disturbed intruders. they panicked and killed her. two hotel workers later went on trial for murder but both were found not guilty. the death of a young irishwoman on honeymoon on this holiday island made headlines around the world. in mauritius, it is front—page news again this week, withjohn front—page news again this week, with john mcareavey‘s front—page news again this week, withjohn mcareavey‘s sudden to return. people will be shocked because we gathered that he has started a new life, that he would move on and forget about this tragedy. i think people will be surprised to see him and to see that his quest for the truth is still there. a tragic story.
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john mcareaveyjoins us from the mauritian capital, port louis. thank you for being with us. there must have been a really emotional journey for you. how are you feeling being back on the island? yeah, it's never easy coming back to mauritius. the reality is this is my third time back here. the first time back after the trial in 2012. but my overriding feeling is one of determination. were all aware of what happened in the past and the injustice that happened in 2012. but 2017 for me is the start of a new process. i‘m just very much engaged in seeking determination from the narration of authorities in thatjustice can ultimately be served for michaela. we saw in the peace there that you return to the capital has produced headlines. i wonder how people have
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been responding to you return? has it been supportive? it has, and i suppose i wondered myself how my visit would be treated. we haven‘t been here five years and i suppose i was worried that perhaps the narration public were just a little bit setup of this case by now and wa nted bit setup of this case by now and wanted to forget about it. —— bit fed up. but largely the response has been very positive. they have assured me they are still very much committed to smack —— to resolving this case. words can be easily spoken and at this stage nearly six and a half years later from michaela‘s death, what we need is action. so i‘m very much hoping that when we return to ireland, we can start to see the wheels ofjustice turn quicker. the response from the
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morrison public has been good, has been warm. i have spoken to many people. not just as been warm. i have spoken to many people. notjust as a victim of this trial today, the mauritian people have felt this as well. their reputation has been tarnished by this. i think they are very much hoping that this can be resolved themselves. so hopefully together we will be able to uncovering new information that can help‘s achieve that goal. i know you are there with members of your family. how important is that for you? you want to getjustice, important is that for you? you want to get justice, but important is that for you? you want to getjustice, but also it must be such an emotional, geographically for you to be back there, knowing what happened some years ago? it‘s not easy. i‘m lucky that the family members that we have here, my
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sister and brother—in—law mark hart, we have been very supportive together in this process. it istive. it is emotional. i suppose the kind of the feelings that were experienced here before can tend to creep in. but ijust think that experienced here before can tend to creep in. but i just think that you have to keep a focussed mind on our sole objective and that is to reach justice for michaela. if you have got a clear focus, justice for michaela. if you have got a clearfocus, a clear objective then you can really put your energy towards that and that‘s what we‘ve been doing and so far it has been working for us. and john, please tell me you don‘t wa nt to and john, please tell me you don‘t want to talk about this if it is uncomfortable, but do you feel you have been able to grieve properly or will that only happen when you‘ve gotjustice? will that only happen when you‘ve got justice? i guess it will that only happen when you‘ve gotjustice? i guess it has been a complicated process. as a 26—year—old man i had to learn a lot
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about life at that time, but i do feel that i have grieved, but i don‘t think from my understanding and my own, isuppose don‘t think from my understanding and my own, i suppose experience, grieving isn‘t something that you do at one stage and then you park it and that‘s that. it is a process and i guess, you know, justice for michaela would certainly aid that, but i need to stress that this isn‘t about me. this is about michaela, you know and sometimes in, you know the process, the meetings, what actually happened to michaela can get lost in that, you know, she was a 27—year—old woman who had just begun a new stage in her life and she was brutally murdered. brutally murdered on her honeymoon and that‘s just so unjust and so unfair and i‘ve taken the lead together with michaela‘s family in ensuring that 0k, we can never bring michaela
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back, but the least what we can do is ensure thatjustice is served so hopefully this, me being here and appealing to the public will start to trigger a little bit more activity which can ultimately lead to our sole objective. john, i know there is a confidential phoneline that has been set—up. are you hoping that has been set—up. are you hoping that that will encourage people to come forward with perhaps some fresh evidence? yes, absolutely. there is many ways that people can make contact. we‘ve set—up a confidential phoneline which exactly, it already exists, but we have retained the services of a registered usher. that‘s a private thing where people can that‘s a private thing where people ca n co nta ct that‘s a private thing where people can contact anonymously if they wish, they can arrange to meet with this usher or send information via
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post and i think it‘s important actually to stress that because sometimes after five or six years, maybe people just don‘t want to come forward for whatever reasons, fear of reprisal, you know, it is a very small country and in a lot of cases, a lot of people, a lot of parishes would know each other, but it‘s more important that people search in their hearts and their conscience and do the right thing. so if they do have information, whether large or small, maybe irrelevant or irreleva nt or small, maybe irrelevant or irrelevant they are probably not the people to make that call. if you have anything at all, get in touch with the authorities or get in touch with the authorities or get in touch with the authorities or get in touch with the registered usher and the details of that, we will be disclosing today in our press conference. john, it has been really good to talk to you this morning. thank you very much for your openness and your honesty this morning. we wish you all the best. here‘s carol with a look at this morning‘s weather.
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pollen season is underway. and particularly silver birch. high pressure is very much dominating our weather currently. we have got a weather currently. we have got a weather front moving south—east wards. that‘s been producing a lot of cloud and splashes of rain across south—eastern areas and it is still with us. that will move away, but we will be left with quite a bit of cloud in its wake and that could still produce some showers. but brightening up across south—west england, wales and northern england, scotla nd england, wales and northern england, scotland and northern ireland seeing sunny spells. a few showers and here the wind will strengthen. so for northern england this afternoon, there will be a fair bit of sunshine. temperatures up to 11 or 12 celsius. similarly so for eastern scotland, but a lot of showers across the northern isles, gales and severe gales for shetland. 0ne across the northern isles, gales and severe gales for shetland. one or two showers in the west of scotland with sunny spells. bright or sunny
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skies across northern ireland, highs of 12 celsius in belfast. across wales, again a fair bit of sunshine. temperatures up to ten celsius in aberystwyth. you can see the tail end of the weather front producing cloud across devon and somerset and dorset, and the isle of wight and kent and east anglia and also the east midlands. here we‘re prone to the odd showerment that clears away into the north sea and behind it, there will be clear skies. still gales or severe gales across the far north of scotland and in towns and cities, we‘re looking at temperatures six, seven and eight, but in the country sigh, lower than that. in the countryside once again, you can expect to see a touch of grass frost. under those clear skies, it means tomorrow morning will start on a bright notement againen the influence of high pressure. the weather settled for the rest of this week. still a squeeze on the isobars, still windy
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across the north, not as windy as it will be later today or tonight. cloud in the north—west will spill southwards during the day. a lot of this is high cloud. so it will be bright, rather than wall to wall blue skies, but the south—west of england should hang on to sunshine. here we are looking at a high of 12 celsius. dan and lou. thank you very much. they risk their lives protecting us from dangers such as burning buildings, road traffic accidents and floods. but are firefighters also exposing themselves to hidden health dangers? researchers think they are closer to understanding why firefighters run such a high risk of having heart attacks. joining us from edinburgh is amanda hunter, the lead author of a new report into heart attacks among firefighters, and with us on the sofa is les skarratts from the fire brigades union. good morning both. thank you very much forjoining us. amanda, explain
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to us what, you were looking at intense temperatures and effects on the body. what did you find? problem with sound we‘re going to pause while we sort out the microphone. have you got a microphone on, les? yes. they seem to have found the correlation between working at high temperatures. what‘s your reaction to the research. ? we're grateful to amanda and her colleagues for the research. i think the report itself is deeply worrying and deeply concerning and what the report indicates and i have to stress this isa training indicates and i have to stress this is a training scenario, this is something we trained for. the reality is the temperatures could be much higher and stress levels be higher also. but what this report demonstrates is that in these times
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of firefighters in hostile environments, we lose a lot of water which we know anyway. but more importantly, our blood seems to thicken and that provides the deep concern for us. it seems our body and our heart has to work harder to send the blood around the body and that‘s the first time we‘ve come across this evidence. so you think it will be a surprise to most firefighters. it is not the sort of job you go into thinking it will be at all times low risk. most people are aware of what they‘re putting themselves through?” are aware of what they‘re putting themselves through? i have been a firefighter for 35 years and worked in busy fire stations. what we weren‘t aware of were the physical logical stresses in that our blood gets thicker in high temperatures. that seems to demonstrate why a lot of our members in the fire brigades‘ union die from heart attacks either within the hostile environment or shortly after the fire. ok. we can
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speak to amanda now. les you have explained a lot of what was in the report. amanda i‘m not sure if you we re report. amanda i‘m not sure if you were able to hear him. is there anything that needs to be changed or should be done when firefighters are working in the intense temperatures? this was research funded by the british heart foundation. we showed the combination of the heat and physical exertion increased the blood clotting and impaired relaxation and they are two processes that happen in the evolution of a heart attack in a susceptible person. what we think could mitigate the risks are limitingks posure to hot temperatures and physical exertion infire temperatures and physical exertion in fire suppression scenarios and trying to cool and reduce body temperature as quickly as possible when they are removed from that situation and adequately rehydrating themselves. do you think this will
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lead to changes? in terms of trying to bring the body temperature down as quickly as possible and maybe in talking to potential firefighters before they come into the roles? well, we have got that information and that's what is hurting firefighters. the key issue as amanda says is to limit firefighters in the fires that we attend and that's probably the very quickest fix we can do for firefighters. that's limiting firefighters in the fires to about 15 minutes. we lost 10,000 firefighters over the last seven years so 10,000 firefighters over the last seven years so the firefighters that are employed now have to go into fires a lot more. now we have got this knowledge we have to say the government must reinvest in the fire service, have more firefighters so we don't have to go into these who is tiles environments on a frequent basis. amanda, i know, it was brief, thank you for your time this morning. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. we have already had
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some lovely weather watchers photographs of the sun rising across the eastern side of the country. this is east yorkshire. some sunshine in norfolk. the easter and of england is far cloudier today because we have weak weather fronts. the pressure is generally high. some sharp showers across southern counties of england. they are moving out of the way. it is the eastern end side of england where we see cloudy and damp weather. you can see
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the breeze blowing in the north and with it some heavy showers. it is light and patchy as we head towards the afternoon across central and eastern parts of england. it feels fresh. cooler. n‘koulou fearne northern ireland and scotland. enhanced by that brisk wind across scotland, bringing in lots of showers. those showers comment in thick and fast this evening. the winds at severe gales. elsewhere, a chilly night. temperatures sevens and aids in towns and cities. close to ground frost levels in the countryside. that is a sign of things to come. it looks as if the north—east of scotland and the far south and south—west of england will have the best of the suntan on wednesday. a dry picture for the
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majority. quite a bit of cloud be entering. with the westerly field, it will feel fresher. temperatures on thursday and friday dipping down to rant about average for the time of the year. —— roundabout the average. this is business live from bbc news, with susannah streeter and sally bundock. gateway to india — britain‘s chancellor looks to the sub—continent for new trade ties in a post—brexit world. live from london, that‘s our top story on tuesday, 4 april. as the uk leaves the european union, can it get a boost helping india‘s development as one of the world‘s fastest growing economies? also in the programme: president trump lands a blow to internet privacy, paving the way for internet providers to sell their customers‘ browsing history.
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we look of the financial markets

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