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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 5, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello. this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and louise minchin. international outrage over a suspected gas attack on rebels in syria, which killed more than 50 people. -- 58. washington has accused the assad regime of barbarism. the un security council will hold an emergency session later. good morning. it's wednesday, 5th april. also this morning: could diesel drivers be compensated for pollution charges planned in some of our cities? prince harry pledges to finish thejob his mother began to rid the world of landmines. the uk still isn't as productive as other developed countries, so should we be working smarter and notjust
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harder to solve the productivity puzzle? i'm in devon this morning to find out. in sport, the best of the night's premier league action including zlatan ibrahimovic‘s injury time penalty which saves the day for manchester united. 50 years on from the summer of love and the release of sergeant pepper's, we ask if, in the words of the beatles, things have been getting better. it can't get no worse, as the beatles said in 1967! and carol has the weather. a chilly start with a touch of frost, but there is sunshine around. more cloud building from the north—west, with the winds easing in the far north—west of is sunderland. good morning. first, our main story: the un security council will hold an emergency session later to discuss a suspected chemical attack in syria, which is reported to have killed at least 58 people,
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many of them children. washington has accused the assad regime of "barbarism", but officials in damascus have denied using chemical weapons. the us, britain and france have called on the united nations to order a full investigation. you may find images in sarah corker‘s report distressing. hundreds of innocent syrians, including many children, struggling to breathe after a suspected chemical attack in idlib province. distressing images and evidence that will no doubt dominate emergency talks held by the un security council later today. global leaders have called for a rapid investigation into what happened here. some of the injured were treated across the border in turkey. medics wore face masks to protect themselves from the toxic gases. translation: we were affected by the
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gas. we couldn't stand up. i felt dizzy and sick. i suffered from shortness of breath. i couldn't breathe. this apparent chemical strike on a rebel held town has brought furious international reaction. the us, britain and france have all blamed the syrian government for the attack. i'm appalled by the reports that there's been a chemical web and attack on a town south of idlib, allegedly by the syrian regime. we condemn the use of chemical weapons in all circumstances. if proven this will be further evidence of the barbarism of the syrian regime. using chemical weapons is a war crime. president assad's regime denied launching tuesday's attack, echoing denials it has made over the course of syria's six year civil war. and just as doctors were treating those who survived, the hospital was hit by an airstrike. the attack will
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overs ha d ow airstrike. the attack will overshadow an international conference in brussels later, discussing aid effort in syria. thousands of civilians are still trapped by fighting. what effective action can international community now take to prevent a repeat of this? injust over one hour we in just over one hour we will get more information on this. we will speak to a professor of environmental toxicology. the prime minister has indicated that free movement of eu citizens across british borders may have to continue in some form for a period after brexit. theresa may was speaking to reporters during the final leg of her visit to the gulf. our political correspondent, eleanor garnier, joins us from westminster. how significant are these comments? what's really interesting is the time that we are getting from ministers as they are discussing immigration policy. suggestions of a sharp cut in eu migration after brexit, seemed to have i think given
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way to more caveat qualification. as the prime minister goes into these negotiations of course the key question is what britain's immigration policy will look like. that's why she was pressed on issue by journalists on her that's why she was pressed on issue byjournalists on her trip to the gulf. she said free movement or curbs on free movement would not come into force straightaway, that there would need to be a phase of implementation, so that businesses and the government too would have time to adjust to the new rules. she did insist that what was good about brexit was that borders and immigration policy would come under british control. clearly she has left open the possibility that freedom of movement might continue, at least temporarily. we know that the talks now have two years to be completed. many have said that the talks are going to be tough, so i think what we are going to be seeing now is the government and the prime minister if you like showing a bit
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of give and take, a bit of compromise, that is probably going to be needed if the government is going to succeed in its mission to make brexit a success. thank you. labour has failed the jewish community by not expelling ken livingstone from the party, according to the chief rabbi ephraim mirvis. the former mayor of london was yesterday given a further one—year suspension for claiming hitler supported zionism in the 1930s. the us military has confirmed that north korea fired a medium—range ballistic missile into the sea off japan overnight. the launch comes on the eve of a visit by china's president xi jinping to the united states to meet president trump. the two will discuss how to curb north korea's nuclear weapons programme. drivers of diesel cars who are facing new charges and restrictions in cities across the uk could receive compensation. the government is expected to reveal
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a new plan to improve air quality later this month and this morning there are hints that motorists could receive support in switching to cleaner vehicles. alexandra mackenzie has more. when buying a new card to you go diesel or petrol? it can be confusing and is possibly a bit of a gamble. a lower vehicle tax introduced by the then chancellor gordon brown has encouraged motorists to opt for diesel. it is regarded as more economical and, in terms of carbon dioxide emissions, less harmful. here is a diesel car being tested. it meets the required standard. but there is increasing concern that diesel cars have met dangerous levels of nitrogen dioxide, thought to have caused thousands of premature deaths in the uk. air pollution limits have been repeatedly exceeded in places, including birmingham, leeds, glasgow and london. tell me what this is! the london mayor described the city's air as lethal. in proposals
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he says all but the newest diesel ca rs he says all but the newest diesel cars will face a charge to drive in the city's emission zone. the prime minister appeared to be offering help for diesel owners. she told reporters: i am very conscious of the fact that past governments have encouraged people to buy diesel cars and we need to take that into account when we're looking at what we do in the future. the government has required to produce a new air quality plant later this month. it comes quality plant later this month. it co m es after quality plant later this month. it comes after the european commission sent a final warning over breaches of legal air pollution limits in the uk. a child has suffered life—threatening injuries after being bitten by a dog in kent. the attack happened in chatham yesterday afternoon. two people have been arrested over the incident and the dog was shot dead by police. the duke and duchess of cambridge will attend what is called a
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congregation of hope and reconciliation. about 200 people are expected to attend the event at westminster valley. families of the victims, faith leaders and first responders will be amongst the guests. back to our main story now and news of a chemical attack in syria, which has claimed the lives of at least 58 people. it came on the eve of a major international summit in brussels about the future of syria. let's speak now to our correspondent ben james, who's in beirut this morning. let's talk a little bit about the incident itself. there is some horrendous information coming out about it. awful pictures, awful footage that has emerged when this is said to have happened, first thing yesterday morning in the town of khan sheikhoun, an opposition held part of the north—west of syria. there are accounts of people
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suffocating, choking, lots of pictures of children being treated for breathing difficulties, some foaming at the mouth. many around the world, including the white house, talking about president assad's government being responsible for this. this is an area that has been under bombardment from syrian and russian forces, but we are getting this statement in the last few hours from the russian defence ministry, saying that there was a syrian strike on this area, but it hit a workshop for the production of lined minds filled with poisonous substances. —— landmines. the organisation for the prohibition of chemical weapons last year put together a report that cited three incidents where there was evidence of the syrian government using chemical weapons, using chlorine in the conflict. also the so—called islamic state using mustard gas, but not the groups operating in this pa rt not the groups operating in this part of syria. you will also remember back in 2013 a big
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conversation around chemical weapons that ended up with president assad's government agreeing to a deal brokered by the united states and russia to decommission and declares the piles of such weapons. —— declared stockpiles. that was said to have been completed at the beginning of last year, but what opposition forces will say is that some of those weapons were potentially not declared and may have been used here. later today the un security council will khamsin in a meeting to talk about what happened and discuss a response to it. -- happened and discuss a response to it. —— convene in a meeting. happened and discuss a response to it. -- convene in a meeting. thank you. prince harry has pledged to help rid the world of landmines by 2025. he's backing the world's two leading charities, which were supported by his mother, diana, princess of wales. in a speech last night harry said he wanted to "finish the job and rid the planet of landmines", as our royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. it was one of the many images of her that caught the world's attention.
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diana, princess of wales, a matter of months before her death, visiting a mine clearance operation in angola. she couldn't understand why the world was doing more and she said so. i committed to supporting in whatever way i can... her intervention upset some politicians who called her ill informed. a few months later diana was dead. but the world had heard. the treaty was passed, real progress was made. forward now to 2017 and it is her son harry who is challenging the world to finish his mother's work. in august, 1997, one month before her death, diana went to bosnia. there she met two boys, both of whom had lost their legs to landmines. the one of them, harry said she had made a promise. when my mother said goodbye to him that august, just weeks before her untimely death, she
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told him that he would not be forgotten. please, help me keep her word and other people like them throughout the world. harry met the man and his friend, both now grown men. both struggling with the life changing effects of weapons of war, which, as diana pointed out 20 years ago, kill and which, as diana pointed out 20 years ago, killand main which, as diana pointed out 20 years ago, kill and main without discrimination long after the wars are over. a rare pink diamond has become the most expensive gemstone ever sold at auction. the 60—carat pink star fetched more than £57 million at sotheby‘s in hong kong. look at that! extraordinary. it does nothing for me. at least you wouldn't lose it down
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the plug hole. if you have that money you probably wouldn't be doing the washing up... we are talking again about this man, zlata n we are talking again about this man, zlatan ibrahimovic. he has saved their skin on a number of occasions. manchester united left it late to earn a draw in last night's premier league match at home to everton. everton scored in the first half, but zlatan ibrahimovic scored a 94th minute penalty. it means united stay fifth in the table. sunderland's board gave their support to david moyes following comments made to a bbc reporter. but they remain at the bottom of the premier league table after a 2—0 loss to champions leicester. heather watson wasted two match points before eventually winning in three sets against her serbian opponent. and defending champion danny willett hopes a return to the masters can spark a return to form. he's failed to win a tournament since donning the green jacket last year. i will be talking more about danny willett and his buildup to the
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masters in a newspaper review, because i've got the menu for the champions neal. i know what it is at it sounds great! —— meal. before that, look at the weather forecast. good morning. a chilly started the day, especially in parts of england and wales where temperatures in some areas are around freezing, a touch of frost around, some sunshine too under those clear skies and for most of the country today it will remain mainly dry as high pressure remains in charge. you can see the squeeze on the isobars in the far north of scotla nd on the isobars in the far north of scotland and northern isles, very windy through the night here. slowly today we will start to see those winds easing. the other thing you will notice on the chart is the cloud, that cloud thicken off to produce showers in western and northern scotland but equally some brea ks northern scotland but equally some breaks in mcleod where we will see sunshine. in northern england, the north—east has the brakes —— that
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cloud. afair north—east has the brakes —— that cloud. a fair bit of cloud towards the midlands. the odd spot coming out of that. east anglia, kent, london, the south midlands, the isle of wight, to the south—west, a beautiful start. nippy if you're heading out, a touch of frost in rural areas. south wales seeing sunshine but north wales prone to a bit more cloud first thing and as we go to the irish sea and northern ireland, a similar story, go to the irish sea and northern ireland, a similarstory, more go to the irish sea and northern ireland, a similar story, more cloud with showers flirting with the north and west. as we go through the course of the day, we see some of the cloud filtering further south. still some holes punched in it, not a bad afternoon in north—east scotla nd a bad afternoon in north—east scotland and parts of north—east england and southern counties, including south wales. temperatures today will be highest in the sunshine. in cardiff we could see 15 or16, 12 or13 sunshine. in cardiff we could see 15 or16, 12 or 13 in sunshine. in cardiff we could see 15 or 16, 12 or 13 in north—east england, maybe even 1a around fife. then tonight we will see some frost
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in parts of eastern scotland, wales and the south—west but that leads us into tomorrow and friday, similar weather to what we will see today. largely dry, sunny spells and variable amounts of cloud. heading into the weekend, high pressure is in scones across much of the country, weather fronts flirting with the north—west, bringing more cloud at times and also some showers. —— ensconced. we will pull in ourairfrom the showers. —— ensconced. we will pull in our airfrom the south, turning much warmer. the highest temperatures in the sunshine are likely to be across southern, central and eastern parts of england where we could see highs of 20, even locally 21 or 22. in old muggy that is 72 fahrenheit. perhaps in aberdeenshire by sunday that is 17 likely. out towards the west, more cloud and showers where we have the weather fronts, and that will suppress temperatures. for most of the uk on saturday, largely dry and
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on sunday, a similar story but with higher temperatures and a bit more sunshine across southern, some western and some northern areas. if you like it warm it's coming your way this weekend, especially sunday, but it won't last. so disappointing! one little bit of news, looking through the papers, have you seen the story about your name, it is going out of fashion in a big way! so upsetting! thanks, charlie! a list of names disappearing fast, amongst them, carol is one. sally, carol and nigel. malcolm is in trouble, the name clive. i just nigel. malcolm is in trouble, the name clive. ijust thought i would let you know! charming! charlie isn't on the list either. there are loads of charlize, i know loads of them! —— charlies. let's look at the front pages and what's going on in
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syria. some harrowing images on the front pages and in some of the reports we will show you this morning, this is about the chemical attack, many of the casualties we know now our children and we will talk about that through the morning. the telegraph's main story is about diesel, diesel cars will be given financial help by the government, theresa may has hinted at this on a plane journey she was on last night. cities countrywide preparing to introduce new taxes on diesel cars and the duchess of cambridge at the opening night of a musical extravaga nza opening night of a musical extravaganza last night, 42nd st. the story about the toxic air is the headline on the guardian, that is linked to diesel fumes and emissions we will talk about as well, another one of those images from syria on the front page of the guardian. diesel is the lead story for the mail but they have this photograph, which is quite extraordinary. this isa which is quite extraordinary. this
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is a spanish warship. a close pass is a spanish warship. a close pass is the way we would describe it past gibraltar yesterday. you can just see it here, a tiny patrol boat which warned off the ship. it gives you a sense of what might be going on and what sort of messages people are trying to send. what have you got for us? i said in the sports news, a look at danny willett‘s champion's menu, before the masters kicks off tomorrow, they have a champion's dinner and the reigning champion from yorkshire, danny willett, got to choose the menu. on it was a cottage pie for starters followed by roast beef and yorkshire putting and then apple crumble to finish. of course! he said if the chef doesn't get the yorkshire puddings right, he will be in the kitchen, if they go flat then they won't be happy. my mum's yorkshire puddings are famously flat, she wouldn't be the one for him!|j
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puddings are famously flat, she wouldn't be the one for him! i don't cook them but having watched i know it is to do with the heat of the oil! it is all in the timing! danny willett kicking off the masters with the best type of yorkshire preparation. i think your 0k at the moment, your name. i've got catherine middleton you see. moment, your name. i've got catherine middleton you seem moment, your name. i've got catherine middleton you see. is it with a k ora c? catherine middleton you see. is it with a k or a c? with a c. i'm 0k for now because it is so popular! south sudan is in the grip of a devastating famine, with more than five million people in desperate need of food. as civil war rages in the world's youngest country, the humanitarian crisis continues to escalate. it's a place where people now endure a daily stuggle with starvation. and as anna foster reports, south sudan's only children's hospital is struggling to cope. a blown up tank lies abandoned in a
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field. children whosejob it is a blown up tank lies abandoned in a field. children whose job it is to watch over their family's herds of cows use it as a watchtower. from conflict to crisis. in the capital city, juba, the country's only children's hospital is struggling with the numbers of malnourished children. we admit over 200 everyday and for now it is quite alarming because there's famine in the country and malnutrition rates are rising every day and it is now overwhelming. in the north, famine has been officially declared. aid agencies are still able to provide for villages by road at the moment until the rainy season later this month. then this for our drive to get aid deliveries brew will be impossible. in the villages they survive on the bare minimum. this pot of grain will feed a family of ten for two weeks. guns are never far away in south sudan. we passed a pickup truck full of young children with rifles, one even carried a rocket propelled grenade. wherever
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you go across unity state you will find villages like this one, deserted and abandoned after an attack. here the soldiers pushed to the villages out and took it over as a barracks but what it means is all the crops the villagers might have grown in the field, all the food they might have preserved and kept for cover times, is completely wasted, and wherever the people here end up if they survive the attack means lack of food is a real problem. in liberty stadium, this town was attacked three years ago. 200 people tried to shelter in this mosque and were killed. now it's a sha nty mosque and were killed. now it's a shanty town. many living here fled toa shanty town. many living here fled to a united nations camp set up to protect them. built for 60,000, now more than double that number call it home. un soldiers patrol to keep the peace. aid agencies described this asa peace. aid agencies described this as a man—made famine, a claim disputed by the government. but nobody disputes the scale of the
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problem. right now there's fighting continuing and we really do need a unilateral ceasefire from the government, without that and without the fighting stopping i can't see the fighting stopping i can't see the situation getting any better. more people will be displaced, there will be more problems in terms of us being able to reach them. and the number of people who are at risk will increase. at the maternity hospital in bechu, a baby boy is born into a life surrounded by fences and barbed wire. not to keep him but to keep the raging civil war out. and foster, bbc news, south sudan. —— anna foster. anna foster in south sudan and she'll be presenting drive on bbc radio 5live from there from 4pm this afternoon. later we will have a go at
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d riverless later we will have a go at driverless cars, looking at the issue and we will see what progress has been made. i thought we would have won in the studio the way we we re have won in the studio the way we were selling it —— you were selling it -- were selling it —— you were selling it —— one in the studio. it's 50 years since the beatles recorded sergeant pepper's lonely hearts club band. so all this week we're giving the record a spin and looking at the legacy of those iconic tracks. today we're focusing on getting better and have been to liverpool to ask whether those words ring true half a century on. the song itself... paul mccartney saying it's getting better butjohn saying it's getting better butjohn saying it's getting better butjohn saying it couldn't get much worse, that's kind of reflective of the british attitude, stiff upper lip and we needed more than ever.
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british attitude, stiff upper lip and we needed more than everlj think life has changed a lot since the 605 and 5eventie5. i think in the 605 and 5eventie5. i think in the 605 and 705 people were a lot more carefree. they weren't money orientated like people are now. crime wa5 orientated like people are now. crime was a lot less. our children we re crime was a lot less. our children were 5afer. i think they were definitely better days. were 5afer. i think they were definitely better day5.|j were 5afer. i think they were definitely better days. i would have loved to see how life would have been like in the sixties. but i do enjoy my life now. thing5 been like in the sixties. but i do enjoy my life now. things that are happening around the world are kind of scary but i think that because it'5 of scary but i think that because it's so awful it is bringing the human race together. it was better for youngsters then, a lot better for youngsters then, a lot better for youngsters. i think these days youngsters are stressed, university, they're always in competition with their friends, they're always in competition with theirfriends, this they're always in competition with their friends, this that and the other. we had nothing to be in competition with! a lot of people a5k competition with! a lot of people ask if i would want to live back in the day when the beatles were around andl the day when the beatles were around and i say no, absolutely not, because women's rights and rights
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for people of other races, what they are today if anything i would like to live 30 or 40 years in the future where hopefully thing5 to live 30 or 40 years in the future where hopefully things are more equal. things were better then, if you ask question in 40 years time, people won't remember 2017 but they will still remember the sixties! he's probably right! later we will talk to tweedy and also lord tebbit and you can tell us if you think things are getting better or not. —— twiggy. you wouldn't put those two together, twiggy and lord tebbit!|j know, but we are breakfast! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. community leaders are to return to the scene where a teenage asylum seeker was attacked in croydon to send a message of support to local people. the mp for croydon central gavin barwell, the met‘s borough commander
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and the leader of croydon council will visit the shrublands estate later where 17—year—old reker ahmed was attacked last friday night. 13 people have been charged in connection with the case. an 18—year—old man is being held on suspicion of preparing acts of terrorism after being arrested by police in london. he was detained as he attempted to board a eurostar train at st pancras international station yesterday afternoon. police say the arrest is not related to offences against the uk. bbc london has discovered that on average one tube station was forced to close every day last year because of staff shortages. the most frequently shut station was temple. the number of tube staff fell by more than 700 betweenjanuary and december last year. transport for london says it's recruiting at least an extra 650 50 staff this year. the £27 million restoration of alexandra palace is under way. the eastern end of the palace, which includes the old bbc studios and victorian theatre, will be repaired and refurbished. it's due to reopen in the autumn.
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time to take a look at the travel. and the tube is all looking good so far, no reported problems on any of those lines there. we've got a burst water main in northwest london, the park royal area, there are southbound queues on the a406, its slow to the a40. two lanes are closed on the hanger lane gyratory. in lford, one lane is closed and there's no left turn on ilford hill eastbound at mill road because of gas works and its slow through wapping on the highway from limehouse link towards tower bridge. over to kate kinsella now with the weather. good morning, a much brighter start, sky is looking like this this morning but gradually turning grey like this through the afternoon. some sunshine first thing but cloud riding across all parts by the afternoon. best advice, get out and enjoy the sunshine this morning —— the sunshine turning hazier but ——
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arriving. you might get one or two clearer spells but in the most part it will stay rather cloudy. not quite as cold as it was last night, the minimum between 8—10 in towns and cities. it means a rather great start again tomorrow morning. a lot of cloud around for thursday, some brea ks of cloud around for thursday, some breaks in it, perhaps the sun bursting through here and there, some brighter spells but on the whole of the cast. the maximum 14. the good news is this high pressure will stay over the next two days —— word overcast. a lot of cloud around on thursday and friday but on the weekend we see the return of sunshine —— overcast. sunny spells on saturday with temperatures in the mid teens on sunday and in all that sunshine it could feel rather warm, between 18 and 20. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website. now, though, it's back to charlie and louise. bye for now.
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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment. also on breakfast this morning: harder, faster, smarter working. we're in devon this morning to discover how british businesses are trying to boost productivity. following on from the work of his mother, we'll find out how prince harry wants to help rid the world of landmines by 2025. and after 9am, the presenter and author dawn o'porter will be here to talk about her new novel cows and why she believes women are under too much pressure to follow the herd. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. the un security council will hold an emergency session later to discuss a suspected chemical attack in syria, which is reported to have killed at least 58 people — many of them children. washington has accused the assad regime of "barbarism", but officials in damascus have denied using chemical weapons. the us, britain and france
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have called on the united nations to order a full investigation. officials in damascus have denied using chemical weapons. you may find images in sarah corker‘s report upsetting. hundreds of innocent syrians, including many children, struggling to breathe after a suspected chemical attack in idlib province. distressing images and evidence that will no doubt dominate emergency talks held by the un security council later today. global leaders have called for a rapid investigation into what happened here. some of the injured were treated across the border in turkey. medics wore face masks to protect themselves from the toxic gases. translation: we were affected by the gas. we couldn't stand up. i felt dizzy and sick. i suffered from shortness of breath. i couldn't breathe. this apparent chemical strike on a rebel held town has brought furious international reaction.
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the us, britain and france have all blamed the syrian government for the attack. i'm appalled by the reports that there's been a chemical weapons attack on a town south of idlib, allegedly by the syrian regime. we condemn the use of chemical weapons in all circumstances. if proven, this will be further evidence of the barbarism of the syrian regime. using chemical weapons is a war crime. president assad's regime denied launching tuesday's attack, echoing denials it's made over the course of syria's six year civil war. and just as doctors were treating those who survived, the hospital was hit by an airstrike. the attack will overshadow an international conference in brussels later, discussing aid efforts in syria. thousands of civilians are still trapped by fighting. what effective action can the international community now take
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to prevent a repeat of this? the prime minister has indicated that free movement of eu citizens across british frontiers may need to continue in some form after brexit. theresa may explained that, while immigration would be under british control from the moment the uk left the eu, there would need to be a period of implementation. the us military has confirmed that north korea fired a medium—range ballistic missile into the sea off japan overnight. the launch comes on the eve of a visit by china's president xi jinping to the united states to meet president trump. the two will discuss how to curb north korea's nuclear weapons programme. drivers of diesel cars, who are facing new charges and restrictions in cities across the uk, could receive compensation. the government is expected to reveal a new plan to improve air quality later this month and this morning there are hints the proposals could include extra support
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for affected motorists. a child has suffered life—threatening injuries after being bitten by a dog in kent. the attack happened in chatham yesterday afternoon. two people have been arrested over the incident and the dog was shot dead by police. the duke and duchess of cambridge will attend what's being called "a service of hope" for the victims of the westminster attack. around 2,000 people are expected to attend the event at westminster abbey. families of the victims, faith leaders and representatives from the emergency services will be among the guests. prince harry has pledged his support to help rid the world of landmines by 2025. his mother, diana princess of wales, first shone a light on the issue twenty years ago. since then, 27 countries have been declared as mine free, but an estimated 60 million people still live in areas containing the danger. too many communities remain shackled
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in poverty and fear, but it doesn't need to be this way. with the renewed focus this anniversary demands, we should celebrate the joint commitment to finishing the job and use there example to bring other organisations into this collaboration. we will be talking more about the campaign later this morning. and we are talking about goals. and we are talking about goals. a very late goalfrom and we are talking about goals. a very late goal from zlatan ibrahimovic saved manchester united. they did get a goal last night, as did everton. but it was apparently a dog's dinner off again. —— of a game. as so many times this season, manchester united had to rely on zlatan ibrahimovic last night. his penalty in injury time secured a 1—1 draw at home to everton. the visitors took the lead when captain philjagielka hooked in the opener.
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but united persisted, and when ashley williams handled the ball in injury time he was sent off. a penalty was awarded and ibrahimovic converted. so another draw for united. it is an amazing run, 20 matches unbeaten, but too many draws at home and because of that we are in a position that we are because we have the spirit, the defensive organisation. normally we build well. not today, we didn't create a lot today, but we don't score enough goals. we don't have 5quad5 like man united and chelsea. we had seven players of 18 tonight, 22 and younger. that'5 the future of the club. maybe that's a little bit more difficult now to ta ke a little bit more difficult now to take the next step. still, a point again5t man united and we know we are close to them. maybe it's more
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for next season than this season. sunderland issued a statement ahead of their match against leicester, saying they fully supported their manager david moyes following his controversial comments to a female bbc reporter. on the field, his problems continue. his side lost 2—0 at leicester and so remain bottom of the premier league. islam slimani and jamie vardy scored the goals for leicester i thought we did more than enough to maybe being in front. i didn't think leicester had the form that i've seen leicester had the form that i've seen them in recent weeks. i thought we played well and made it difficult for them. burnley ended a run of seven games without a win by beating stoke city 1—0. george boyd scored the game's only goal. elsewhere, watford beat west brom 2—0. there are six premier league matches as well this evening. in scotland, celtic have already won the premiership title and aberdeen are well placed to finish runners—up. they beat inverness1—0 last night to move 13 points clear of rangers in third place. elsewhere, ross county have moved above dundee to eighth after beating them 2—1.
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the republic of ireland women's football team have threatened to strike in a row over their treatment by the football association of ireland, which could see their match with slovakia next monday called off. a group of 13 players held a press conference yesterday to air their grievances. they want compensation for lost earnings while on international duty and improved resources. the fa! says it's deeply disappointed because it has made repeated offers to discuss payment and compensation. defending champion heather watson is into the second round of the monterray open, following a three set win over nina stojanovic. watson squandered two opportunities to wrap up the match in the second set tie—break and she wasn't too pleased to lose that one. a single break in the final set helped seal the match and setup a second round meeting with sixth seed ekaterina makerova. finally, the masters gets under way tomorrow and danny willett will start the defence
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of his title alongside the american matt kuchar and the australian amateur curtis luck. it's been a tough 12 months for willett, who's struggled for form after becoming the first englishman in 20 years, since sir nick faldo's victory, to wear the greenjacket. to be the masters champion for this tournament has been amazing. to be able to take the green jacket to places and to where it with pride and for people to see the expression on people's faces when they see one in the flesh is something special to see. it was a surprise victory. danny willett winning the title. who knows? maybe augusta will inspire more magic. thank you. new figures out this morning are expected to show the productivity of british businesses continues to lag behind that of other countries, including germany and the us. so should we be working faster, harder and perhaps even smarter to boost economic output? ben is in tiverton, in devon.
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good morning. that's right, that is also known as the productivity puzzle and it is something all businesses and economies are struggling with. this is the table you mentioned. this is a real challenge. the uk still lagging behind other developed countries like the us, italy, france and germany when it comes to productivity stakes. that's a real concern for the government, about how to improve productivity, but also a concern for business, because wea k also a concern for business, because weak productivity is bad news for business, add news for profits and bad news to our living standards, because rising productivity should mean we get a pay rise and it should mean we get a pay rise and it should mean that living standards increase. well, in devon we've been looking at exactly what they do and this place makes this. it might not look like much but the fact that this run is on this track, it goes into all things like machinery, and that means they are more productive and efficient. the machines break down
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they soften. that means you aren't spending money or time preparing them. barry is the boss here. good morning. you make these things here. asi morning. you make these things here. as i say, it doesn't look like much, but it's a really important part of many machines that though in the factories up and down the country. you've improved efficiency, what have you done? we've invested record levels on machines and people, but that's not the only answer because that's not the only answer because that takes time. we looked at how we do things differently. new technologies, with robot loading, you software for reducing cycle times. that's helped with machinists. decision—makers. and more added value. so it isn'tjust the new machines, it means that staff ca n the new machines, it means that staff can be more productive. so they can do stuff that will add real value? that's right. because they
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have more time, the programme inside the job... have more time, the programme inside thejob... they have more time, the programme inside the job... they can have more time, the programme inside thejob... they can make decisions on when they make products. so we've got a new stocking system, so that when we get orders for stocks change and the machinists can decide when to make the product. we can see you need to make the red, the green means it is in stock. that's taking away the job means it is in stock. that's taking away thejob for some means it is in stock. that's taking away the job for some who it may have been a tedious job. that's right, they can go and do something more challenging. the machinists can decide when he makes the work, based on colour coding on the large screen. good to talk to you. thanks. i want to introduce you tojoe, who is an expert on this. we are hearing about manufacturing because it is maybe easier to see how that works. you just make machines more efficient. if you are headdress, or a banker, how do you improve productivity? it is a different
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phenomenon. i work at university. i can increase my productivity by avoiding distractions when i'm marking and so on, but ultimately the only way to increase my productivity is to have larger class sizes or to mark more quickly, spend less time on each essay. so it isn't even clear if you want higher productivity because when you are paying for a service you are paying for somebody‘s time. so if you get less time it may be measured as more productive but it might not be what you need. on the other hand, you have the same issues in terms of capital investment, needing machinery and training, education and skills and so on, there are two sides. one is there's a different type of process, but the other is similar in terms of capital investment and skills. we talked about the league table, why the uk is so behind many other countries. what are we doing wrong in this country? the problem of productivity slowdown in growth and productivity is something which is going to cross
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the g7 nations, but it is worse in the g7 nations, but it is worse in the uk. apart from japan, where we have the worst figures. productivity growth has been close to the row since the crash in 2008. one possible answer is that it is to do with the austerity policies, which have led to weak demand. firms don't see demand and submitted have an incentive to do what this company has done, installing new machinery, training staff and raising productivity through those mechanisms. as we much. there you have it. that's why this is such a puzzle. —— thanks very much. making businesses more productive, but it's not about putting in more hours, it is about working smarter as well. join me after 7am when i will explain more and show you what this does, because i don't get —— i did it muchjustice! thanks very much! we will look forward to that! carol, can you work
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smarter, please? i will do my best. some high temperatures by the weekend if that's any good ? temperatures by the weekend if that's any good? we don't have that this morning, a chilly start to the day, especially in parts of england and wales with the temperature very close to freezing so in rural areas we have some frost around but for most it will be a mainly dry day. high pressure is still very much in charge of our web so not lot happening. we have a squeeze on these isobars in the north of scotla nd these isobars in the north of scotland and the northern isles, still windy for you for a while and then easing through the day. some sunshine on the cards first thing where we have the lowest temperatures and the clearest skies at some cloud around and that producing the showers in western and northern scotland. equally some sunshine here too but you can see in western scotland and much of northern england and away from the north—east, a beautiful start to the day, and east anglia, essex and kent, under clear skies nippy.
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day, and east anglia, essex and kent, under clearskies nippy. for the south midlands, the isle of wight and all points towards the south—west and the isles of scilly, clear skies, temperature dipping, and the same for south wales, but sunshine from the word go. north wales and northern ireland seeing thicker cloud and in northern ireland a few showers, especially across the north and north—west. through the course of the day, all this cloud will start to filter a bit further south. some of it will be thick enough for the odd shower if you're unlucky, depending on your point of view, and even where we have the cloud we have holes developing, the sunshine will prevail across southern counties into the south—west, parts of north—east england and north—east scotland. in the sunshine temperatures could get up to 15 or 16 despite what you can see, more what you would expect under cloud. tonight a touch of frost in parts of
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eastern scotland, south wales and south—west england leading us into tomorrow and friday. a largely dry day, sunny spells, variable amounts of cloud, sunny conditions compared to today. heading into the weekend, high pressure becomes ensconced right across us so we still have weather fronts flirting with the north—west producing more cloud and showers at times, but we start to pull up this milder air from showers at times, but we start to pull up this milder airfrom the azores and the near continent. turning warmer on the weekend, especially sunday. for parts of central, southern and eastern england, we are looking at highs of between 20 and 22, 20 272 fahrenheit in old language, in the west where we have a weather front, more cloud and at times showers, so temperatures won't be at high. at all that sunshine, carol! thank you very much indeed —— look at! the former mayor of london, ken livingstone, has been suspended from the labour party for a further year after claiming hitler supported zionism in the 1930s.
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yesterday a committee found he acted in a manner that was grossly detrimental to his party. but some, including the labour mp wes streeting, say the punishment doesn't go far enough. let's speak to our political correspondent, eleanor garnier, who joins us from westminster. give us an assessment of the damage done at this stage. year. i don't think this is an easy thing for labour, this issue of anti—semitism in the party. they tried to close it down last year with that enquiry and hope that everything was all sorted but this recent episode has opened it allup again. but this recent episode has opened it all up again. remember ken livingstone is a big labourfigure, the former mayor of london, and a key ally ofjeremy corbyn and known to bea key ally ofjeremy corbyn and known to be a colourful character, no stranger to controversy. this latest issue started last year when he was interviewed by a bbc local radio station, he was defending a
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colleague facing allegations of anti—semitism, and it was in that interview that ken livingstone said that hitler had at one time supported zionism. that's the movement that advocates the creation ofa movement that advocates the creation of ajewish movement that advocates the creation of a jewish state. it was that comment that provoked a huge backlash and he himself was accused of being anti—semitic. yesterday a panel that was held behind closed doors, a secret panel if you like, decided that mist livingstone should be suspended from the party for two yea rs. be suspended from the party for two years. he has in fact already served one year of that suspension —— mr livingstone. the panel said he brought the party into disrepute after acting in a manner grossly detrimental to the party. he remains a labour party member, he is banned from holding office or representing the party in any way, and last night, after the result of the disciplinary hearing, ken livingstone remained unrepentant, insisting he had been suspended for
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telling the truth. here's a bit of what he said afterwards. if anyone is upset by what i said then of course i'm sorry but i'm not going to apologise for something i didn't say. i did not say hitler was a zionist. you said he supported zionism in the 1930s, do you apologise for saying that?” zionism in the 1930s, do you apologise for saying that? i got a jewish newspaper here with an article saying what i said was true, if you would like me to read it out i will. you have offended portions of the jewish community, i will. you have offended portions of thejewish community, would you apologise to them ? of thejewish community, would you apologise to them? if i offended theml apologise to them? if i offended them i would but get them to check what i said. there's this cure a situation where he is unrepentant but for the party that just prolongs the agony —— curious situation. but for the party that just prolongs the agony -- curious situation. the reaction last night was pretty strong from some elements in the party. some labour mps said the idea of suspending him was pathetic and embarrassing. the chief rabbi itself
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said the party had failed thejewish community by not expelling mr livingstone and the party yet again showed it isn't sufficiently serious about tackling the scourge of anti—semitism. last yearjeremy corbyn commission an enquiry into anti—semitism in the party after being accused of not doing enough to stamp it out. jeremy corbyn has consistently said he has done everything he can to stamp it out and has always said there is no place for anti—semitism in the party. eleanor, for the moment, thank you very much. 50 years ago, paul mccartney first sang it's betting better all the time, an optimistic message which soundtracked the summer of love. so was he right? all this week, we've been looking at the legacy of the beatles' record sergeant peppers lonely hearts club band. today breakfast‘s graham satchell has been looking at whether things have continued to get better ever since those lyrics were first penned. things were kind of far out in 1967.
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it was the year of the summer of love. swinging london is being called... the beatles song getting better seemed to sum up the progressive optimism of the age. we're listening the track with three people who remember the year well. when you say the 60s, people immediately think the beatles and it's usually my face. twiggy makes everyone look twice... twiggy was the face of the time, androgynous, optimistic, young. for me life was getting better. ithink optimistic, young. for me life was getting better. i think amongst my friends, the young people, it was getting better because we suddenly had a voice. norman tebbit was a pilot in 1967 but already planning his political career. i took the view at that time that a lot of things were getting worse, that the
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industrial scene was getting worse and worse. a greater number of days lost in strikes. every international car company with a factory here was intent on getting out. in1967, intent on getting out. in 1967, things were so bad i couldn't think that much ahead. norwell roberts was the first black police officer in the met. what was said to him by fellow officers in 1960s evan was shocking and will still cause offence to date. 1960s evan was shocking and will still cause offence to datelj remember my first day distinctly because when i met one of my reporting sergeants, he said look, you, i'll see you never pass your probation. i mean, today those words hurt, don't they? did they hurt in 1967? those words hurt in 1967 and they still hurt now. when he first went on the beat, norwell was stared at by white people and called judas
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by some in the black community. progress has been slow but he says of course race relations are getting better. i don't get stared at, put it this way i don't get stared at too much walking down the road. thank god for small mercies! 9067 was the year homosexuality was decriminalised and abortion allowed in some cases and while getting better sounds like a simple, upbeat p0p better sounds like a simple, upbeat pop song, some of the lyrics are routinely honest —— 1967. are used to be cruel to my woman and i beat her and kept her apart from the things that she loved —— i used to be. i forgot that last verse is quite dark. it's much better for women now and it's much better, you know, for gay people all around the world and it's happening everywhere, which is as it should be. for traditionalists the back end of the 60s is where the rot set in. traditionalists the back end of the 605 is where the rot set inlj traditionalists the back end of the 60s is where the rot set in. i think we we re 60s is where the rot set in. i think we were beginning to see the damage
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which was being done to the institution of marriage for example. of course some things are getting better, and refrigerators work better, and refrigerators work better, central heating is better, clothes washers are better, all of those sorts of things which take work off our hands. so fridges are better... is that really it? we have to be optimistic otherwise i don't know what we can do. it can't get any worse? it can't get any worse, as the beatles said in 1967. isn't it funny hearing those recollections! it's an interesting discussion because on what measure do you judge it? fridge based? with bridges, things have got better!m much to discuss! —— fridges. graham satchell reporting. and after 8:30am we'll be speaking to the creative director of liverpool international music festival about the impact the beatles continue to have in their home city as well as further afield. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc
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london news, i'm sonja jessup. community leaders are to return to the scene where a teenage asylum seeker was attacked in croydon to send a message of support to local people. the mp for croydon central gavin barwell, the met‘s borough commander and the leader of croydon council will visit the shrublands estate later where 17—year—old reker ahmed was attacked last friday night. 13 people have been charged in connection with the case. an 18—year—old man is being held on suspicion of preparing acts of terrorism after being arrested by police in london. he was detained as he attempted to board a eurostar train at st pancras international station yesterday afternoon. police say the arrest is not related to offences against the uk. bbc london has discovered that on average one tube station was forced to close every day last year because of staff shortages. the most frequently shut station was temple.
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the number of tube staff fell by more than 700 betweenjanuary and december last year. transport for london says it's recruiting at least an extra 650 50 staff this year. the £27 million restoration of alexandra palace is under way. the eastern end of the palace, which includes the old bbc studios and victorian theatre, will be repaired and refurbished. it's due to reopen in the autumn. time to take a look at the travel. and the tube is all looking good so far, no reported problems on any of those lines there. we've got a burst water main on the hanger lane gyratory. two lanes are closed. the southbound queues on the a406 are stretching back past the ace cafe. in finchley its slow on the a406 westbound from east end road to the a1. in lford, one lane is closed and there's no left turn on ilford hill eastbound at mill road because of gas works. over to kate kinsella now with the weather. good morning. it's a much brighter start, skies looking like this first thing this morning but gradually turning a little greyer like this
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through the afternoon. yes, some sunshine first thing but cloud arriving across all parts through the afternoon. best advice, get out and enjoy the sunshine this morning. study the cloud gradually sinking south at first, turning the sunshine a bit hazier. that thicker cloud arriving across all parts by the afternoon. the temperature getting up to around 14. overnight tonight, the cloud staying with us. you might get one or two clearer spells but in the most part it will stay rather cloudy. not quite as cold as it was last night, the minimum between 8—10 in towns and cities. it does mean a rather grey start again tomorrow morning. a lot of cloud around for thursday, some breaks in it, perhaps the sun bursting through here and there, some brighter spells but on the whole it is rather overcast. the maximum temperature, similar at 14. the good news is this high pressure set to stay over the next few days. so the weather relatively settled.
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a bit of cloud around on thursday and friday but come the weekend we see the return of some sunshine. decent sunny spells as we head through saturday. temperatures in the mid—teens on sunday and in all that sunshine it could feel rather warm, between 18 and 20. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website. bye for now. this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and louise minchin. international outrage over a suspected gas attack on rebels in syria, which killed more than 58 people. —— at least 70 people. washington has accused the assad regime of barbarism. the un security council will hold
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an emergency session later. good morning. it's wednesday, 5th april. also this morning: could diesel drivers be compensated for pollution charges planned in some of our cities? prince harry pledges to finish thejob his mother began to rid the world of landmines. good morning. the uk still isn't as productive as other european countries. it is what is known as the productivity puzzle. should we all be working smarter as well as harder? i am in devon to find out. in sport, the best of the night's premier league action, including zlatan ibrahimovic‘s injury time penalty which saves the day for manchester united. driverless cars are available
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for the british public to try for the first time. we'll be giving them a go. and carol has the weather. good morning. clear skies across england and wales. a chilly start, with frost. a bit of cloud in the north—west. through the day that will sink southwards. still some sunshine. strong winds in the far north of scotland will ease. more detail in about 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. the un security council will sit in emergency session later to discuss a suspected chemical attack in syria. at least 72 people, 20 of them children, are said to have been killed but some estimates put the number much higher. the us has accused president assad's regime of "barbarism" and joined britain and france in calling on the united nations to order
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a full investigation. this morning, the russian defence ministry claimed the incident was caused by the bombing of a rebel—held chemical weapons depot. you may find images in sarah corker‘s report upsetting. hundreds of innocent syrians, including many children, struggling to breathe after a suspected chemical attack in idlib province. distressing images and evidence that will no doubt dominate emergency talks held by the un security council later today. global leaders have called for a rapid investigation into what happened here. some of the injured were treated across the border in turkey. medics wore face masks to protect themselves from the toxic gases. translation: we were affected by the gas. we couldn't stand up. i felt dizzy and sick. i suffered from shortness of breath. i couldn't breathe. this apparent chemical strike on a rebel—held town has brought furious international reaction. the us, britain and france have all blamed the syrian government
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for the attack. i'm appalled by the reports that there's been a chemical weapons attack on a town south of idlib, allegedly by the syrian regime. we condemn the use of chemical weapons in all circumstances. if proven, this will be further evidence of the barbarism of the syrian regime. using chemical weapons is a war crime. president assad's regime denied launching tuesday's attack, echoing denials it's made over the course of syria's six year civil war. and just as doctors were treating those who survived, the hospital was hit by an airstrike. the attack will overshadow an international conference in brussels later, discussing aid efforts in syria. thousands of civilians are still trapped by fighting. what effective action can the international community now take to prevent a repeat of this? earlier on breakfast, our correspondent in
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beirut benjames explained how syria's ally russia has blamed the poisoning on rebels. any around the world, including the white house, talking about president assad's of and being responsible for this. this area has been under bombardment from syrian and russian forces, what we got this statement in the last few hours from the russian defence ministry, saying that there was a syrian strike on this area, but it hit a workshop for the production of landmines filled with poisonous substances. worth saying that the united nations and the organisation for the prohibition of chemical weapons last year put together a report that cited three incidents where there was evidence of the syrian government using chemical weapons, using chlorine, of the syrian government using chemicalweapons, using chlorine, in the syrian conflict. later today the un security council will convene an
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emergency meeting to talk about what happened, to discuss a response to it. the prime minister has indicated that free movement of eu citizens across british borders may have to continue in some form for a period after brexit. theresa may was speaking to reporters during the final leg of her visit to the gulf. our political correspondent, eleanor garnier, joins us from westminster. how significant is this? is it policy? i think what's interesting is that as we hear ministers talking about immigration policy, the tone of what they are saying is i think giving way to caveats and qualification. as the prime minister goes into this brexit negotiations, of course our future immigration policy is going to be a key question. that's why she was pressed by journalists on her question. that's why she was pressed byjournalists on her visit to the gulf. theresa may said freedom of movement, a curb on it, might not come into force treadaway and there
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might need to be a period of implementation so that the government and businesses can get used to the new rules. the prime minister did emphasise that because of rex app, britain would take control of its borders and immigration policy. —— because of brexit. what she has left open the possibility that freedom of movement will continue at least temporarily. the two—year deadline for the talks has now started to get even closer. the clock is ticking and many have said the talks are going to be difficult. i think we are getting that the government is preparing the ground and showing a bit of give and take, a bit of compromise that might be needed if the government is going to succeed in its mission to make brexit a success. labour has failed the jewish community by not expelling ken livingstone from the party, according to the chief rabbi ephraim mirvis. the former mayor of london was yesterday given a further one—year suspension for claiming hitler supported zionism in the 1930s.
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the us military has confirmed that north korea fired a medium—range ballistic missile into the sea off japan overnight. the launch comes on the eve of a visit by china's president xi jinping to the united states to meet president trump. the two will discuss how to curb north korea's nuclear weapons programme. drivers of diesel cars, who are facing new charges and restrictions in cities across the uk, could receive compensation. the government is expected to reveal a new plan to improve air quality later this month and this morning there are hints it could include extra support for affected motorists. alexandra mackenzie has more. when buying a new car, do you go diesel or petrol? it can be confusing, and is possibly a bit of a gamble. a lower vehicle tax introduced by the then chancellor gordon brown has encouraged motorists to opt for diesel.
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it is regarded as more economical and, in terms of carbon dioxide emissions, less harmful. here is a diesel car being tested. it meets the required standard. but there is increasing concern that diesel cars emit dangerous levels of nitrogen dioxide, thought to have caused thousands of premature deaths in the uk. air pollution limits have been repeatedly exceeded in places including birmingham, leeds, glasgow, and london. tell me what this is. it's a poster about air pollution. the london mayor, sadiq khan, described the city's air as lethal. in fresh proposals, he says all but the newest diesel cars will face a charge to drive in the city's ultra—low emissions zone. theresa may said: the government is
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required to produce a new air policy plan later this month. this comes after the european commission sent a final warning over breaches of the legal air pollution limits in the uk. a child has suffered life—threatening injuries after being bitten by a dog in kent. the attack happened in chatham yesterday afternoon. two people have been arrested over the incident and the dog was shot dead by police. the duke and duchess of cambridge will attend what's being called "a service of hope and reconciliation later", for the victims of the westminster attack. families of the victims, faith leaders and first responders will be among the guests. our correspondent is at westminster for us. take us through what will be happening today. this is the first time that the abbey has held the
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service. it will be broken down into two parts. the first will be the more traditional part, the remembrance and prayers for the dead and injured at the westminster attacks. the second part will be an emphasis on what was believed to be a positive response to those attacks. it was that most people put out a hand of love, rather than that of hate. i asked the abbey to summarise what the service would be about. they said while it was a vicious attack, there is no other way to deal with it than a concrete wall of solidarity between communities and as a result of faith leaders, from all across britain. so all of the christian the nominations and also the main religions here in written, hindus, jews. all of those people will be taking place. some in
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the service itself. what do we know about the order of service?m the service itself. what do we know about the order of service? it will begin with an initial blessing and will run through two well—known hymns. there will be a series of readings. the mayor has been invited to make one. in terms of the guests, those who will be inside the abbey, there will be about 1800 people. the prime minister of course is abroad. and as you mentioned earlier the duke and duchess of cambridge and prince harry will be here representing the royal family and it is thought that they will be meeting that the terms and the families of the victims of the attack which took place exactly two weeks ago. the united states has accused the syrian government of brutal, unabashed barbarism, after a suspected gas attack in north syria in which at least 70 people were killed. president assad's regime has denied it launched the attack, but, as one of the last rebel
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strongholds in syria, idlib is a prime target. the last major chemical attack was in 2013, when more than 1,000 people were killed. the regime faced no punishment, despite threats from america. four years on and the syrian regime is even stronger. joining us now is alistair hay, who's a professor of environmental toxicology from leeds university. you've worked in previous war situations before and dealt with chemical attack. what's the evidence you've seen that leads to any conclusions about what happened?” think it is the symptom is that people have and the numbers. there are very few external injuries on people. you were looking at people who seem to have a problem with breathing and asphyxia seems to be
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that primary cause of death. some of the other symptoms in individuals, some people appear to be frothing at the mouth. we know that one of the chemicalfamilies, the the mouth. we know that one of the chemical families, the nerve the mouth. we know that one of the chemicalfamilies, the nerve agent, causes massive secretions of fluid in the lungs, so you get the production of something that's a bit like a soapie film, so when you breathe through but it is like breathing through soapy water. and the other symptoms, the nerve agents, as we suspect, they paralyse the muscles and so any voluntary or in voluntary activity is prevented. so people feel weak, they lose co—ordination, their vision goes. but of course the crucial thing is the muscles that control the breathing and this causes is fixation. so it is something that's very potent and it fits the pattern of what happened in syria in 2013.
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you say something that's very potent. can you name it might be? some people have mentioned sarin or chlorine. it isn't chlorine. chlorine was used many times by the syrian regime last year and it is primarily an irritant. could it be sarin? there a number of different nerve agents. sarin has been chosen for because it is volatile and spreads more readily. others are much less volatile. until there's some investigation will never know for certain force of ita to fit the picture. what likelihood is there of a conclusive assessment of what's happened? at conclusive assessment of what's happened ? at the conclusive assessment of what's happened? at the moment we are in a situation of claim and counterclaim about who is responsible and exactly what it is. what will give it conclusive evidence of what it was and who did this? it needs on the ground investigation, it needs inspectors to be able to go in. they
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need a ceasefire so inspectors can get in says the safely. previously inspectors have been shot at when they are trying to get evidence. they need munition samples and blood and year in samples and talk to people. you said munition samples, that's so they've can work out how this material ended up in that place —— you're in. the suggestion was it was a depot that was hit, that was storing something. —— beau ryan. there's no evidence that i have seen that the rebels have access to chemical weapons. the syrian regime should have disarmed. it was required to do this under a treaty it entered into in 2013 so it should have disarmed. but there are many questions. what is the prominence of this weapon, who supplied it, where
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did they get the material? lots of u na nswered did they get the material? lots of unanswered questions but the suggestion it is from a rebel stockpile is really highly improbable. -- rebel. the effects are devastating. some of the pictures are too horrendous to even look at or think about. this is indiscriminate. you can't see it, there's nothing you can do? absolutely nothing. the only protection is if you have a gas mask and a protective suit but of course civilians don't have that. this is the problem with chemical weapons, they are indiscriminate. you can't believe the syrians are experiencing this yet again. we've seen people trying to be treated in this desperate situation hosing people down, is there a treatment? there is a treatment. they would look at the situation of individuals and the doctors in syria sadly are well versed in what they need to do now. iand versed in what they need to do now.
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i and others have been involved in training some of the doctors. they know what to do so they will clean people, remove their clothing so the doctors are not at risk from handling contaminated clothing. there are antidotes you can give to block the action of these agents and of course people will need help in some instances with their breathing because the breathing is what is compromised in the main. so there are procedures, but you see the pictures, they are working flat out really to save lives. we're hearing a large number of children amongst those affected, many of them killed, does it make any difference, adult to trial, to how you're affected? same symptoms really, no —— adult to child. we are all vulnerable, these are very child. we are all vulnerable, these are very potent agents. generally it is through inhalation but they also penetrate through the skin as well. the symptoms are very similar
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irrespective of age. professor, thank you very much we time this morning. you're very welcome. we can catch up with carol who has been talking about the cold and the sunshine. good morning. where we have had clearer skies by night, temperatures have dropped, a touch of frost in england and wales this morning and that's where we start with a good deal of sunshine. for many today it will remain mainly dry, mainly because at the moment there are showers. high pressure firmly in charge of the weather, the weather not changing that much through the next few days but the one thing that will is the wind in the far north of scotland. today it will ease, still very gusty at the moment. you can see quite a bit of cloud in the northern half of the country, producing showers in the north and north—west of northern ireland this morning, also across western scotla nd morning, also across western scotland and the northern isles, where it will be windy for the next few hours, but in between the showers, bright and sunny skies, but
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more cloud as we go towards dumfries and galloway. in northern england, a fair bet of cloud producing some showers. north—east england off to a bright start with sunshine. in east anglia, essex, kent, london and the isle of wight, a chilly start, especially in the countryside, but a fair bit of sunshine, as we have in south—west england and the isles of scilly. south wales ensuing some sunshine. north wales hanging onto a bit more cloud. through the day this cloud will tend to rotate around the area of high pressure, so coming south. the best of the sunshine in southern counties, south wales, parts of north—east england and eastern scotland. in the sunshine we could easily sea temperatures up to 15 or16, could easily sea temperatures up to 15 or 16, under the cloud temperatures will be suppressed so why is of 11 —13. tonight some frost in eastern scotland and south—west england —— highs of. on friday the
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weather similar to today. again, largely dry, the odd shower, sunny spells and variable amounts of cloud. as we head into the weekend, what will happen is we will still be dominated by high pressure sitting right across us. we have weather fronts flirting with the north—west of the country introducing more cloud and the odd shower but by sunday, look at this, the air coming up sunday, look at this, the air coming up from the azores and the near continent, so pumping up warm air. this doesn't represent sunshine, just the temperature we are talking about here. so the central, eastern and southern parts of the uk could see temperatures between 20 and 22, 22 is 72 in old language, and 17 in aberdeenshire. where we have the weather fronts nearby, a aberdeenshire. where we have the weatherfronts nearby, a bit more cloud, so a faint yellow, temperatures not quite as high. looking at saturday, a chilly start, a touch of frost for some first thing. afair a touch of frost for some first thing. a fair bit of sunshine around, our weather front dangling
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in the north—west producing this cloud, some rain and showers. as we head into sunday, again a chilly start but more sunshine on sunday away from the north—west where we hang onto this cloud, and on sunday we are likely to see the highest temperatures but it won't last. thanks very much. we can see it is sunny outside because stay with us, you will see in a moment. driverless cars look set to play an increasing role in getting us from a to b in the future. but how ready are we to trust a car that drives itself? that's one of the questions being asked at a project in south east london, where fiona lamdin is for us this morning. we are possibly in the most connected place. above me we have the cable cars, the airport is very close by. we have the river bus and taxis and the tube, and right on cue, the driverless pod arrives. this is the first day they are using
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them, the public haven't been in yet. let me show you around, nick, good morning. show me how some of these work. we have a camera at the front, we have some senses. tell us how it works. a combination of lasers and cameras that allow the vehicle to understand where it is, what it sees and how to navigate to get to its destination. let's go and have a test. as we get in, i have told you it is driverless, i should point out there is someone here in the corner. good morning. you are here just the corner. good morning. you are herejust for the corner. good morning. you are here just for safety but when these things start you wouldn't be here, would you? we will always have someone would you? we will always have someone to monitor, but only for safety. we're going to get in if we can get our cameraman in. here we go. the doors are going to close. and we're off. how fast are these things going to go? at the moment up to 50km/h, about nine mph, four
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metres per second ——15km/h.m to 50km/h, about nine mph, four metres per second --15km/h. it is pretty smooth, you jump in and it ta kes you pretty smooth, you jump in and it takes you on a slow, leisurely trip and you type in where you want to go? you will summon the vehicle with an app and it will take you to your destination. the trials are about understanding what the public think about these vehicles as a service in the city. is this a reality, how many years before these pods could be everywhere in the city? in cities it could be very quick, it could be a couple of years where we could see these as a commercial service operating in geographically constrained environments as a commercially viable service. how will it be, 20 years, 30 years, will we be ditching the car? will we say to our children, we won't go on a long carjourney, actually we camp late ca rd long carjourney, actually we camp late card games... is that a reality, are we going to stop driving —— can play. reality, are we going to stop
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driving -- can play. we are confident that automation will make things safer, cleaner and more affordable but we need to bring the public on that journey and that's what these trials are all about.” don't know if you saw but we actually did stop, we are getting out and we have... good morning. you have been looking into what the public think about these pods. what does the research say, are people nervous? it is interesting because this is a new type of vehicle. we've looked at over 120 people, different age groups and backgrounds, cyclists, car users and non— car users, we have found there is a utopian view and a dystopian view, some are scared about technology and others ask aired. it falls into two age groups, younger people are excited. —— are scared. young people really wa nt excited. —— are scared. young people really want this product and a service instead of a product because they aren't getting their licences as much and at the other end elderly people want it because it extends
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their use of cars. really interesting demographic changes.” asked my taxi driver on the way this morning, wanting to know what he felt about being out of a job in the next number of years, the only thing he said is that you can't talk to anyone, when you get in these pods they are quite isolating and lonely. a lot of discussion and thoughts. back here in an hour to take you on another journey! quite back here in an hour to take you on anotherjourney! quite a few questions, charlie? iwas curious, was it preprogrammed to go from one place to the other? it is at the moment but the idea is you will be able to choose where to go. fascinating! yes! we will be back with her later and she can answer your questions. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning: four months after the chancellor pledged £23 billion to get the uk working harder and smarter, ben's in devon to find out how british businesses are trying to solve the puzzle of productivity.
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that looks like a puzzle, ben? good morning, guys. welcome to devon, i promised earlier i would explain how this works and why this was part of the answer to the productivity puzzle. this traditionally would have been done with ballbearings, there are now no ballbearings in it and it means it breaks down less often and is used in machinery countrywide, so less time wasted and more productive time. we are talking about the productivity puzzle because the uk is way behind other european countries in terms of productivity, behind france, germany and the us. what can be done to address it? why isn't itjust about working harder? it's about working smarter. more on that in about half an hour. but before that, the news, travel and weather where you are this morning. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. community leaders are to return to the scene where a teenage asylum seeker was attacked in croydon to send a message of support to local people.
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the mp for croydon central gavin barwell, the met‘s borough commander and the leader of croydon council will visit the shrublands estate later where 17—year—old reker ahmed was attacked last friday night. 13 people have been charged in connection with the case. an 18—year—old man is being held on suspicion of preparing acts of terrorism after being arrested by police in london. he was detained as he attempted to board a eurostar train at st pancras international station yesterday afternoon. police say the arrest is not related to offences against the uk. bbc london has discovered that on average one tube station was forced to close every day last year because of staff shortages. the most frequently shut station was temple. the number of tube staff fell by more than 700 betweenjanuary and december last year. transport for london says it's recruiting at least an extra 650 50 staff this year. the £27 million restoration of alexandra palace is under way. the eastern end of the palace, which includes the old bbc studios and victorian theatre,
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will be repaired and refurbished. it's due to reopen in the autumn. time to take a look at the travel. and in the last few minutes the central line has been part suspended, we'll bring you more information on that once we have it. we've got a burst water main on the hanger lane gyratory. two lanes are closed. you can see those southbound queues on the a406 are stretching back from brentfield road. the marylebone flyover also has queues heading into town from the a40 westway. and in east london, traffic on ardleigh green road is queueing for one mile into town towards the a12. over to kate kinsella now with the weather. good morning. it's a much brighter start, skies looking like this first thing this morning but gradually turning a little greyer like this through the afternoon. yes, some sunshine first thing but cloud arriving across all parts through the afternoon. best advice, get out and enjoy the sunshine this morning. study the cloud gradually sinking south at first, turning the sunshine a bit hazier. that thicker cloud arriving
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across all parts by the afternoon. the temperature getting up to around 14. overnight tonight, the cloud staying with us. you might get one or two clearer spells but in the most part it will stay rather cloudy. not quite as cold as it was last night, the minimum between 8—10 in towns and cities. it does mean a rather grey start again tomorrow morning. a lot of cloud around for thursday, we'll get some breaks in it, perhaps the sun bursting through here and there, some brighter spells but on the whole it is rather overcast. the maximum temperature, similar at 14. the good news is this high pressure set to stay over the next few days. so the weather relatively settled. a bit of cloud around on thursday and friday but come the weekend we see the return of some sunshine. decent sunny spells as we head through saturday. temperatures up in the mid—teens and on sunday and in all that sunshine it could feel rather warm, between 18 and 20. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website.
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now, though, it's back to charlie and louise. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and louise minchin. the main stories: the un security council will sit in emergency session later to discuss a suspected chemical attack in syria. at least 72 people, 20 of them children, are said to have been killed, but some estimates put the number much higher. the us has accused president assad's regime of "barbarism" and joined britain and france in calling on the united nations to order a full investigation. this morning, russia claimed the incident was caused by the bombing of a rebel—held chemical weapons depot. earlier, a professorfrom leeds university told us this was highly improbable. there is no evidence that i am aware of that the rebels
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had that i am aware of that the rebels ha d a ccess that i am aware of that the rebels had access to chemical agents and chemical weapons. the syrian regime should have disarmed. it was required to do this under a treaty that it entered into in 2013. it should have disarmed. but there are many questions. what is the prove na nce many questions. what is the provenance of this particular weapon? who supplied it? where did they get the material? lots of u na nswered they get the material? lots of unanswered questions. the prime minister has indicated that free movement of eu citizens across british frontiers may need to continue in some form after brexit. theresa may explained that while immigration would be under british control from the moment the uk left the eu, there would need to be a period of implementation. labour has failed the jewish community by not expelling ken livingstone from the party, according to the chief rabbi, ephraim mirvis. the former mayor of london was yesterday given a further one—year suspension for claiming hitler supported zionism in the 1930s. the us military has confirmed that north korea fired a medium—range
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ballistic missile into the sea of japan overnight. the launch comes on the eve of a visit by china's president xi jinping to the united states to meet president trump. the two will discuss how to curb north korea's nuclear weapons programme. a child has suffered life—threatening injuries after being bitten by a dog in kent. the attack happened in chatham yesterday afternoon. two people have been arrested over the incident and the dog was shot dead by police. a parliamentary report has called for radical changes to the nhs in england, saying there's been a shocking lack of long—term strategic planning. a committee of medical experts and peers suggest the health service needs better funding and staff training. the government says more money has been committed to the nhs and social care. the duke and duchess of cambridge will attend what's being called "a service of hope" for the victims of the westminster attack later.
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around 2,000 people will be in the congregation at westminster abbey. families of the victims, faith leaders and representatives from the emergency services will be among the guests. drivers of diesel cars who are facing new charges and restrictions in cities across the uk could receive compensation. the government is expected to reveal a new plan to improve air quality later this month and this morning there are hints the proposals could include extra support for affected motorists. a rare pink diamond has become the most expensive gemstone ever sold at auction. the 60—carat ‘pink star‘ fetched more than £57 million at sotheby‘s, in hong kong. coming up on the programme, carol will have the weather for you. we are talking about zlatan
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ibrahimovic after he scored injury time penalty. this time, just a draw. i could you can look at manchester united's season one of two ways. there are probably 20 games which are unbeaten but half of them are drawers, which is why they are still in fifth. as so many times this season, manchester united had to rely on zlatan ibrahimovic last night. his penalty in injury time secured a 1—1 draw at home to everton. the visitors took the lead when captain philjagielka hooked in the opener. but united persisted, and when ashley williams handled the ball in injury time he was sent off. a penalty was awarded and ibrahimovic converted. so another draw for united. it's an amazing run, 20 matches unbeaten, but too many draws at home and because of that we are in the position that we are because we have the spirit, the defensive organisation.
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normally we build well. not today, we didn't create a lot today, but we don't score enough goals. we don't have squads like man united and chelsea. we had seven players of 18 tonight, 22 and younger. that's the future of the club. maybe that's a little bit more difficult now to take the next step. still, a point against man united and we know we are close to them. maybe it's more for next season than this season. sunderland issued a statement ahead of their match against leicester, saying they fully supported their manager david moyes following his controversial comments to a female bbc reporter. on the field, moyes's problems continue. his side lost 2—0 at leicester and so remain bottom of the premier league. islam slimani and jamie vardy scored the goals for leicester. i thought we did more than enough to maybe being in front. i didn't think leicester had the form that i've seen them in recent weeks.
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i thought we played well and made it difficult for them. burnley ended a run of seven games without a win by beating stoke city 1—0. george boyd scored the game's only goal. elsewhere, watford beat west brom 2—0. there are six premier league matches as well this evening. in scotland, celtic have already won the premiership title and aberdeen are well placed to finish runners—up. they beat inverness1—0 last night to move 13 points clear of rangers in third place. elsewhere, ross county have moved above dundee to eighth after beating them 2—1. the republic of ireland women's football team have threatened to strike in a row over their treatment by the football association of ireland, which could see their match with slovakia next monday called off. a group of 13 players held a press conference yesterday to air their grievances. they want compensation for lost earnings while on international duty and improved resources. the fa! says it's deeply
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disappointed because it has made repeated offers to discuss payment and compensation. defending champion heather watson is into the second round of the monterray open, following a three set win over nina stojanovic. watson squandered two opportunities to wrap up the match in the second set. a real paddy from her after that. a single break in the final set helped seal the match and setup a second round meeting with sixth seed ekaterina makerova. finally, the masters gets under way tomorrow and danny willett will start the defence of his title alongside the american matt kuchar and the australian amateur curtis luck. it's been a tough 12 months for willett, who's struggled for form after becoming the first englishman in 20 years, since sir nick faldo's victory, to wear the greenjacket. to be masters champion for this 12 months has been amazing. to be able to take the green jacket to places and to wear it with pride and for people to see it, the expression on people's faces
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when they see one in the flesh is something special to see. he tweeted this morning to say that the champions dinner last night was excellent, so i am assuming that means the yorkshire puddings were a success! fabulous. an estimated 60 million people around the world still live in fear of unexploded landmines. so following in the footsteps of his mother, prince harry has pledged to "finish the job" and rid the planet of the danger by 2025. in a speech at kensington palace yesterday, he paid tribute to his mother, explaining how she visited bosnia in 1997 and made a promise to two boys who lost their legs there. when my mother said goodbye to him that august, just weeks before his untimely death, she told him he
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would not be forgotten. please help me keep her word to those two children and others throughout the world who still need us to finish thejob and world who still need us to finish the job and rid the world who still need us to finish thejob and rid the planet world who still need us to finish the job and rid the planet of landmines. princess diana first shone a spotlight on issue 20 years ago. let's have a look at what has happened since then. these steps collapsed down on
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themselves with the weight... joining us is sean sutton. 60 million people still affected. you we re million people still affected. you were at the event last night with prince harry. he is very emotional about this, actually. it was a very moving speech. what a tribute to his mum. amazing. prince harry is raising awareness for this issue, but also for the extended commitment from the british government, which is very welcome. again, a great testimony to his mum and the work she did all those years ago. interesting, when you see those
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images of her kitted out and doing those press trips she did, the spotlight that it put on the issue then matters now, just as it did then. you met her many years ago? yes, i'm a photographer by trade and a big part of my work is still documentary photography. i had an exhibition with the royal geographical society and i spoke to her about the pictures and met other guests at that time, ken and jerry. ken rutherford and gerry whyte, who both lost legs to mines some years before. so we all met her at the same time and we were also together last night. give us a sense of where these mines are. i understand in some areas they are just in houses? there's a real landmine emergency at the moment in the middle east, in iraq, where i'vejust come the moment in the middle east, in iraq, where i've just come from, there's a terrible problem.
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minefields run around villages, through them, around schools. as an example, one village, before we started working there, 44 families had returned, ten people had died, five people injured. this was in october. now that village has been cleared and 520 of the original 540 families have gone home. that's because of the work that we are doing. otherwise they would still be in camps ortrying doing. otherwise they would still be in camps or trying to rent somewhere. it is a race against time. there is amazing work being done and this event last night was the champion of fact that there are many countries that we can finish. we can make landmine —— the countries landmine free if we come together. talking about the practicalities, how do you know initially that an area has a problem
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with landmines? without being fisheaters —— facetious is because someone fisheaters —— facetious is because someone gets injured, and you start looking? people are forced to go home. most people know they are in a dangerous area. there are also booby—traps in dangerous area. there are also booby—tra ps in houses. dangerous area. there are also booby—traps in houses. technically there are ways you can find out, about whether there are landmines, by using machines or dogs, finding exactly where the rows are. but everywhere at that environment, you have to consider a dangerous. as i said, ten deaths in that village. they find out the hard way which parts are more dangerous than others. imagine living like that, with your kids. in that environment is the —— environment. with your kids. in that environment is the -- environment. you say you can clear a place, but that notion of being there, the possibility that something might be missed. very
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unlikely. every day i walk on land that we've cleared. it is part of my job to document the problems and solutions we offer. i would take my family there, i honestly would. i feel very confident in the work we do and we have to. if you are going to clear land and pass it on to the authorities, to let the kids go back to school, you've got to be pretty sure that it's cleared. painstaking work. thank you very much. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: the un security council is to hold emergency talks after a suspected chemical attack in syria left dozens of civilians dead and wounded. in the last few minutes the foreign secretary boris johnson in the last few minutes the foreign secretary borisjohnson has arrived ata secretary borisjohnson has arrived at a conference on syria which is being held in brussels this morning and has been giving his reaction. i think what it shows is this is a government that has absolutely no
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compassion for its own people, that has put itself beyond the pale. i certainly think that it will need to be investigated and the question of culpability for what has been done will need to be established and where it is possible to bring criminal prosecutions, as you suggest, i think that is certainly appropriate. but i think what it confirms to everybody is that this isa confirms to everybody is that this is a barbaric regime that has made it impossible for us to imagine them continuing to be an authority over the people of syria after this conflict is over. i simply don't see how that can happen. borisjohnson boris johnson speaking ahead borisjohnson speaking ahead of that un security council meeting taking place later today and the latest figures this morning, it's being reported as many as 72 were killed in that attack. we will be discussing it further on breakfast but a little pause for the moment
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and catch up with the weather. a chilly start in some parts of england and wales under the clear skies by night, we have seen the temperatures tumble lower enough for a touch of frost but here we have some sunshine. for most today it will remain mainly dry, i say mainly because a few showers are in the forecast. high pressure remains the driving force for the next few days, things fairly settled, but the strong wind will change in the northern isles. . still gusty but today it will ease down. quite a lot of cloud in the north—west of the uk and through the day some of that will go south. even so we day some of that will go south. even so we will still see some holes in the cloud and sunny spells developing, just not everywhere. by 4pm, across kent and southern counties generally, we are going to hang onto that sunshine and that will extend into the channel islands but only 11 as the maximum here. from the isles of scilly to
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south—west england, again we are looking at some sunshine. as we go through south wales, into gloucestershire, the midlands, much of the rest of wales, we're looking ata of the rest of wales, we're looking at a cloudier scenario and some of this is icloud so it will be bright but not wall to wall blue skies. for northern ireland and scotland, cloud in the north—west but even so, some holes in that but the brighter skies will be in the east and in the east we could see temperatures up to 15. parts of the northeast also favoured to hang onto a bit of sunshine as we go through the day. generally speaking those are our temperature values, 11—14, in the sunshine we could hit 15 or 16. for example, cardiff. cold in the northern isles. a touch of frost in eastern scotland, south wales and south—west england, moving us into another day tomorrow and also friday of very similar weather conditions. largely dry, one or two showers, sunny spells but variable amounts of
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cloud, so chasing the holes in the cloud, so chasing the holes in the cloud to find the sunshine. but turning warmer. high pressure once again really ensconced as we go through the weekend. weather fronts coming from the north—west will introduce more cloud and at times the odd shower in the north—west, but by sunday we are pulling in milder air, warmer but by sunday we are pulling in milderair, warmerair but by sunday we are pulling in milder air, warmer airfrom the azores. so on sunday we can expect temperatures across parts of central, southern and eastern england between 25 and 22, 22 is 72 fahrenheit. aberdeenshire, 17. —— 20 and 22. this represents the warm air, it isn't sunshine. you can see out to the west we have a paler yellow, so here not as mild. so on saturday we start on a chilly note, a touch of frost, a fair bit of sunshine around, a bit more cloud in the north—west but even so, glimmers of sunshine, one or two showers and by the time we get to sunday, again
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after a chilly start, sunshine developing widely across england and wales and eastern scotland. for the rest of scotland and northern ireland, bright spells, but again with our weather front close by, rain and showers but sunday will see the highest temperatures, up to 22 in the areas i mentioned, but it won't last. but thank you for bringing us some sunshine! see you in halfan bringing us some sunshine! see you in half an hour. new figures out this morning are expected to show the productivity of british businesses continues to lag behind that of other countries, including germany and the us. so should we be working faster, harder, and perhaps even smarter, to boost economic output? ben is in tiverton in devon for us this morning. some robotic machinery? yes, welcome to devon, i've made some friends this morning, these are some of the machines they have here because this place makes all sorts of things. linear motion technology, replacing things like the ballbearings and making sure the equipment that moves
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can do so more efficiently and productively, meaning fewer brea kd owns productively, meaning fewer breakdowns and less time spent repairing machines, more time producing. barry is the boss. good morning. we are looking at some of this scenery you have installed, it comes at great expense but it is how you improve productivity, and it's not just about sackings. you improve productivity, and it's notjust about sackings. it is about upscaling staff and challenging them to do different things, turning them from machine minders into programmers and decision—makers. we look around this factory, it now allows the staff to do more, to do more value added stuff and allows them to be more productive. exactly, it has helped us to grow because we have been moving mundane jobs onto more added value jobs. come to me because i want to introduce you to do other people. when we talk about manufacturing, the challenge is you can see how you might be more productive, but looking at services... sarah and jo are with
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me, they make stuff here and putting more machines in would be more productive, but what if you are a bank, hairdresser or restaurant, services, how would you do it? lots of ways, but you just need to make sure employees know what is required of them through things like appraisals and effective management, because all too often people are promoted into positions of management when they don't know what is required. communication and training is the most important thing. how would you make sure you have the right staff to do the job, we talked about replacing humans with robots and putting those humans on to add more value. it sounds that easy but it isn't that easy in practice? definitely not. it's all about recruiting to make sure you have the right people for the right job with the right skill set. joe, why is the uk struggling to improve productivity? it improved after the financial crisis, then it dropped,
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and we have struggled to get to the levels of the four. we've seen the same pattern across much of the advanced nations —— before. productivity has fallen... we have had .3% since the financial crisis. one answer might be in this country we are failing to have an industrial strategy at the government level, we don't have policies to get companies to invest in new machinery and train their workforce. instead we have had austerity and that isn't intrusive toa austerity and that isn't intrusive to a productive high reach economy. if anyone is watching and they run a business big or small, what do they need to start thinking about? for employers it's about making sure you have the right policies and procedures in place, so your focus on what you want to achieve. if everyone is aligned to the same
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goals you have a better chance of improving productivity. good advice. for the moment, thanks very much. that's the issue, we talk about productivity, it feels like an issue a bit difficult to grasp but it's really important for business because if productivity improves, our wages go up and living standards go our wages go up and living standards 9° up our wages go up and living standards go up too. there's a real fear this is the first generation were living standards are rising as quickly as have in the past and that all comes down to productivity. it's called the productivity puzzle. thanks very much, ben. all this week on breakfast we're celebrating 50 years since the beatles released their iconic album sergeant pepper's lonely hearts club band. today we're focusing on the track getting better and breakfast‘s graham satchell has been asking whether those words still ring true five decades on. things were kind of far out in 1967.
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the song itself isn't really saying things are getting better. paul mccartney saying it's getting better butjohn saying it couldn't get much worse, that's kind of reflective of the british attitude, stiff upper lip and we need it now more than ever. i think life has changed a lot since the '605 and '705. i think in the '605 and '705 people were a lot more carefree. they we ren't money—orientated like people are now. crime was a lot less. our children were safer. i think they were definitely better days. i would have loved to see how life would have been like in the '605. but i do enjoy my life now. things that are happening around the world are kind of scary but i think that because it's so awful it's bringing the human race together. it was better for youngsters then, a lot better for youngsters. i think these days youngsters are stressed, university, they're always in competition with their friends, this that and the other.
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we had nothing to be in competition with! a lot of people ask if i would want to live back in the day when the beatles were around and i always say no, absolutely not, because women's rights and rights for people of other races, weren't what they are today. if anything i'd rather live 30 or 40 years in the future where hopefully things are even more equal. nah, '605 was much better than they are now. if you ask the same question in 50 years time, people won't remember 2015 or '17, but they'll still remember the '605! are things getting better? i think it is how you judge it, isn't it? let us know your thoughts anyway. see you at 8am. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. community leaders are to return to the scene where a teenage asylum seeker was attacked in croydon to send a message of support
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to local people. the mp for croydon central gavin barwell, the met‘s borough commander and the leader of croydon council will visit the shrublands estate later where 17—year—old reker ahmed was attacked last friday night. 13 people have been charged in connection with the case. an 18—year—old man is being held on suspicion of preparing acts of terrorism after being arrested by police in london. he was detained as he attempted to board a eurostar train at st pancras international station yesterday afternoon. police say the arrest is not related to offences against the uk. bbc london has discovered that on average one tube station was forced to close every day last year because of staff shortages. the most frequently shut station was temple. the number of tube staff fell by more than 700 betweenjanuary and december last year. transport for london says it's recruiting at least an extra 650 50 staff this year. the £27 million restoration of alexandra palace is under way.
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the eastern end of the palace, which includes the old bbc studios and victorian theatre, will be repaired and refurbished. it's due to reopen in the autumn. time to take a look at the travel. the central line has no service anticlockwise between hainault and woodford because of a faulty train. long delays around the hanger lane gyratory because of a burst water main. two lanes are closed. these southbound queues on the a406 stretch from past brentfield road. there's been an accident in stoke newington, one lane is blocked northbound on the a10 at stamford hill. and in east london, traffic on ardleigh green road is queueing for one mile into town towards the a12. over to kate kinsella now with the weather. good morning. it's a much brighter start, skies looking like this first thing this morning but gradually turning a little greyer like this through the afternoon. yes, some sunshine first thing but cloud arriving across all parts through the afternoon. best advice, get out and enjoy the sunshine this morning.
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study the cloud gradually sinking south at first, turning the sunshine a bit hazier. that thicker cloud arriving across all parts by the afternoon. the temperature getting up to around 14. overnight tonight, the cloud staying with us. you might get one or two clearer spells but in the most part it will stay rather cloudy. not quite as cold as it was last night, the minimum between 8—10 in towns and cities. it does mean a rather grey start again tomorrow morning. a lot of cloud around for thursday, we'll get some breaks in it, perhaps the sun bursting through here and there, some brighter spells but on the whole it is rather overcast. the maximum temperature, similar at 14. the good news is this high pressure set to stay over the next few days. so the weather relatively settled. a bit of cloud around on thursday and friday but come the weekend we see the return of some sunshine. decent sunny spells as we head through saturday. temperatures up in the mid—teens and on sunday and in all that sunshine it could feel really rather warm, between 18 and 20. i'm back with the latest
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from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and louise minchin. international outrage over a suspected gas attack on rebels in syria which killed at least 70 people washington has accused the assad regime of barbarism. the un security council will hold an emergency session later. good morning. it's wednesday, 5th april. also this morning: could diesel drivers be compensated for pollution charges planned in some of our cities? prince harry pledges to finish thejob his mother began — to rid the world of landmines. the uk lags behind france, germany
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and the united states when it comes to productivity, but is it about working harder orjust to productivity, but is it about working harder or just about working a bit smarter? i'm in devon to try and find the answers to the uk's productivity puzzle. in sport, the best of the night's premier league action including a zlatan ibrahimovic injury time penalty which saves the day for manchester united. driverless cars are available for the british public to try for the first time — we'll be giving them a go. and carol has the weather. good morning. over the next few days the weather will be very samy. it will be largely dry and variable amounts of cloud and sunny spells. temperatures are set to climb into the low 20s by under. i'll have more details in 15 minutes. at least 72 people including 20
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children are now thought to have been killed in a chemical weapons attack on a rebel town in north—west syria. members of the un security council will meet later for members of the un security council will meet laterfor an members of the un security council will meet later for an emergency session to discuss the incident and just a warning as well, you may find some of the images in sarah corker‘s report upsetting. hundreds of innocent syrians, including many children, struggling to breathe after a suspected chemical attack in idlib province. distressing images and evidence that will no doubt dominate emergency talks held by the un security council later today. global leaders have called for a rapid investigation into what happened here. some of the injured were treated across the border in turkey.
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medics wore face masks to protect themselves from the toxic gases. translation: we were affected by the gas. we couldn't stand up. i felt dizzy and sick. i suffered from shortness of breath. i couldn't breathe. this apparent chemical strike on a rebel held town has brought furious international reaction. the us, britain and france have all blamed the syrian government for the attack. using chemical weapons is a war crime. president assad's regime denied launching tuesday's attack, echoing denials it has made over the course of syria's six year civil war. and just as doctors were treating those who survived, the hospital was hit by an airstrike. the attack will overshadow an international conference in brussels later, discussing aid effort in syria. thousands of civilians are still trapped by fighting. what effective action can the international community now take
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to prevent a repeat of this? speaking this morning — ahead of a conference on syria in brussels — the foreign minister borisjohnson described the act as barbaric. he also joined the united states and france in calling on the un to order a full investigation. i think what it shows is that this isa i think what it shows is that this is a government that has no compassion for its own people. that has put itself beyond the pail. i think it will need to be investigated and the question of culpability for what it has done will need to be established and where it is possible to bring criminal prosecutions where you suggest, that is certainly appropriate, but i think what it confirms to everybody is that this isa
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confirms to everybody is that this is a barbaric regime that has made it impossible for us to imagine them continuing to be an authority over the people of syria after this conflict is over. i simply don't see how that can happen. the prime minister has indicated that free movement of eu citizens across british borders may have to continue in some form for a time after brexit. theresa may was speaking to reporters during the final leg of her visit to the gulf. our political correspondent, eleanor garnier, joins us from westminster. how significant are these comments? well, i think this is interesting because the tone we're getting from ministers talking about immigration seems to have changed. that idea of a steep cut in eu migration after brexit i think has given way to caveats and a but of qualification. of course, as theresa may goes into the brexit negotiations, a key question isjust
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the brexit negotiations, a key question is just what our immigration policy is going to look like and that's why the prime minister was pressed on her trip to the gulf. the prime minister said that curbs on free movement of people night not come in straightaway, there might need to be a period of implementation so the government and businesses too can get used to the new rules. she said our borders and our policy on immigration would come under british control after brexit, but i think she left over the possibility that free movement might continue for a little bit, albeit, temporarily. the two years for the talks to be completed has now started. many have said this is going to be tough. i think what we're seeing is the prime minister, government, laying the ground if you like, showing there may need to be a bit of give, a bit of take, compromise, if the government is going to make a success out of brexit. eleanor, thank you.
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labour has failed the jewish community by not expelling ken livingstone from the party — according to the chief rabbi, ephraim mirvis. the former mayor of london was yesterday given a further one—year suspension for claiming hitler supported zionism in the 1930s. drivers of diesel cars who are facing new charges and restrictions in cities across the uk could receive compensation. the government is expected to reveal a new plan to improve air quality later this month and this morning there are hints it could include extra support for affected motorists. alexandra mackenzie has more. when buying a new car, do you go diesel or petrol? it can be confusing and is possibly a bit of a gamble. a lower vehicle tax introduced by the then chancellor gordon brown has encouraged motorists to opt for diesel. it is regarded as more economical and, in terms of carbon dioxide emissions, less harmful. here is a diesel car being tested.
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it meets the required standard. but there is increasing concern that diesel cars omit dangerous levels of nitrogen dioxide, thought to have caused thousands of premature deaths in the uk. air pollution limits have been repeatedly exceeded in places, including birmingham, leeds, glasgow and london. tell me what this is! it's a poster about air pollution. the london mayor described the city's air as lethal. in fresh proposals he says all but the newest diesel cars will face a charge to drive in the city's ultra low emission zone. the prime minister appeared to be offering help for diesel owners. she told reporters, "i am very conscious of the fact that past governments have encouraged people to buy diesel cars and we need to take that into account when we're looking at what we do in the future". the government has required to produce a new air quality plant later this month.
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it comes after the european commission sent a final warning over breaches of legal air pollution limits in the uk. the us military has confirmed that north korea fired a medium—range ballistic missile into the sea of japan overnight. the launch comes on the eve of a visit by china's president xi jinping to the united states to meet president trump. the two will discuss how to curb north korea's nuclear weapons programme. a child has suffered life—threatening injuries after being bitten by a dog in kent. the attack happened in chatham yesterday afternoon. two people have been arrested over the incident and the dog was shot dead by police. prince harry has pledged to help rid the world of landmines by 2025 and "finish the job" started by his mother princess diana. in an emotional speech at kensington palace last night, the prince introduced two victims of landmines who his mother had first met 20 years ago. our royal correspondent, nicholas witchell reports.
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it was one of the many images of her that caught the world's attention. diana, princess of wales, a matter of months before her death, visiting a mine clearance operation in angola. she couldn't understand why the world wasn't doing more, and she said so. i am committed to supporting in whatever way i can... her intervention upset some politicians who called her "ill informed". a few months later, diana was dead. but the world had heard. a treaty was passed, real progress was made. forward now to 2017 and it is her son, harry, who is challenging the world to finish his mother's work. in august 1997, one month before her death, diana went to bosnia. there she met two boys both of whom had
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lost their legs to landmines. to one of them, harry said she had made a promise. when my mother said goodbye to zarko that august, just weeks before her untimely death, she told him that he would not be forgotten. please help me keep her word to zarko and malic, and others like them throughout the world. harry met zarko and his friend, both now grown men. both, though, struggling with the life changing effects of weapons of war, which, as diana pointed out 20 years ago, killand main without discrimination long after the wars are over. the duke and duchess of cambridge will attend what's being called "a service of hope", for the victims of the westminster attack later. faith leaders and members of the emergency services will also be among the guests. it will be led by the dean
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of westminster, the very reverend drjohn hall, who we can speak to now. thank you very much forjoining us ona thank you very much forjoining us on a busy day. tell us about the service. what will it be like? what will it feature? well, i think one of the things is that we need to ta ke of the things is that we need to take into account the very shocking events that happened a fortnight ago and to recognise that we have the families of the victims and many of those who were injured in the terrible attacks on westminster bridge and of course, at the palace of westminster. so we shall be reflecting on the experience and on what happened and asking ourselves the question — why on earth did this go on? what was it for? it seems so pointless, so random, so meaningless, so we're left a bit bewildered and shocked by it. so that's the first thing. the second thing is we're representing the whole community. many of those people who were involved in responding to what happened, both in the police and in the ambulance
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services and the fire service and the hospitals and so on, so many people who were involved, so many people who were involved, so many people who were engaged at the time and we want them to have a moment to reflect on what happened and also to look forward so the main theme is what hope is there at a time of darkness, at a time of sorrow, at a time of loss? i think the sense is that we're bringing the whole community together. we're having people from all the faith tradition speaking together, praying together, present there, some of them sadiq khan will say a prayer who is the muslim mayor of london, thank goodness that's the case. and others as well. so the point is, that we wa nt to as well. so the point is, that we want to say we're all together. we stand together and there is hope in that. we need to build a more harmonious and more cohesive society in which all the diversities are enriching us and we come together in peace and friendship. and you outlined all those questions, so many of us have asked
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ourselves and it is a difficult message and those questions alongside that message of hope, isn't it? it is a difficult message to get across, but i think we're in a very extraordinary society. we often speak about the times of turmoil and times of difficulty within our national life and in the west, generally speaking in europe where there are many things which are dislocating us at the moment. you know, we are a very rich, diverse society and that genuinely in my view is a strength. all the different faiths together and we can live in peace and harmony together. there is no doubt about that in my mind. it was very interesting after the events we had a meeting of the different faith leaders across london with the metropolitan police the day after the attack happened and all the faiths were there together and it was very powerful to me that especially the muslim
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leaders said, "this act is no part of us. this is not part of our faith. we repudiate it completely." there is a wider question for us which is how someone who has become dislocated, no longer has his own roots in society, is as it were outside the community, who might feel tempted for some reason which ke went possibly understand to do something which is really an act of hopelessness, no hope, no future and nojoy in it. to do something as terrible as happened on the bridge and at the palace of westminster, how can we as a community ensure that those desperate people, who might be out to do that sort of terrible thing are discouraged from doing so and don't do it. it is a really important question for us. and the picture we have got a view is poignant because it happened only metres from where you are standing,
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right in the heart of london. absolutely at the centre of our democracy. although you might say, well, there were not many people killed, but each death is a terrible thing in itself. of course it is not the same as 2005, 7/7, were so many people were killed and injured. nevertheless, it has international significance. the whole world was watching. because it is right here. and the houses of parliament, the palace of westminster is the centre of our democracy. we have the judicial structure here, the supreme court is here. we have the civil service here. so bia—bi, the established church with the judiciary and the executive and the legislature, all around parliament square. it was a real attack on the centre of our national life, on our democracy. i appreciate your time this morning. the dean of westminster, thank you so much. and that service at westminster
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abbey will be broadcast on bbc one from 11:30 this morning. and dan is presenting it. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning. the un security council is to hold emergency talks after a suspected chemical attack in syria left dozens of civilians dead and wounded. theresa may has suggested that the free movement of eu citizens into the uk could continue for a period of time after brexit. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. we've got some beautiful weather watcher pictures this morning. this one from guernsey, guernsey, lovely sunrise. if you have an allergy, tree pollen will be causing you problems this morning. docking of high pressure, it is dominating our weather and
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will continue to do so right away to the weekend. the weather remains settled and samey except for across the northern isles, where it is still very windy. this morning, there has been a cold start across parts of england and wales, with clear skies and the touch of frost. the cloud will be moving southwards. by the cloud will be moving southwards. by the time we get to mid—afternoon, parts of south—east england are hanging onto the sunshine. a little more cloud developing during the afternoon but a lot of it will be high—level cloud. across the isle of wight, the isles of scilly in south—west england, the same. south wales will see sunshine but a bit more cloud across the west of wales. moving into cheshire, when fisher and cumbria, more cloud. equally, there will be some holes here and there. after this morning's showers in northern ireland, many of them feeding and limited sunny spells. western scotland will see a lot of showers feeding as well put the brighter skies will be in the east.
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perhaps 14 or 15 celsius. and it is the same across north—east england. we'll see the brightest skies with more cloud elsewhere. even so, there will still be some holes. these are the temperatures you expect. in the sunshine in cardiff, it could hit 15 or16, sunshine in cardiff, it could hit 15 or 16, for example. overnight, we are expecting frost in the eastern parts of scotland, south wales and the south—west. but tomorrow and friday, the weather will be quite samey. largely dry with sunny spells and variable amounts of cloud. so that leads us into the weekend. high pressure will become ensconced across us. pressure will become ensconced across us. the warmest day of the weekend will be sunday but on saturday and sunday with weather close to the north west, we will see more cloud here and also some showers. but we are pulling in milder air. 22 celsius is absolutely feasible across central, southern and eastern parts of england. where we hang onto the shoulder
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conditions, we are more likely to see 13. after a chilly start on saturday, for many parts of the uk will see sunshine coming through. in the sunshine, we will see the highest temperatures. across the north—west, we will hang onto cloud. showers at times with some bright spots. on sunday, starting off on a chilly note. but look at the sunshine across england, wales and eastern scotland. with a weather front close by, we're seeing more cloud in the north—west. but still, some brightness. not as warm. and if you do not like it that warm, well, in the early part of next week it will turn more unsettled and the temperatures will come back down. something for everyone. and i did see that 22, carol! bennies wearing hive is jackets and goggles today, talking about how businesses become more productive.
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—— ben has gone all hi—vis. it is all about increasing productivity. there is a tendency to look at machines like this as replacing humanjobs machines like this as replacing human jobs but it machines like this as replacing humanjobs but it is machines like this as replacing human jobs but it is about increasing productivity because of all the lee mcculloch these machines are doing thejobs all the lee mcculloch these machines are doing the jobs that humans do not necessarily want to, or that are not necessarily want to, or that are not necessarily want to, or that are not necessarily the best use of their time. it is about freeing up human power to go and do otherjobs that add more value to the business. these machines around us and to the productivity and help to solve the productivity and help to solve the productivity puzzle in the uk, about why the uk is still way down the rankings, behind the us, france and germany when it comes to productivity, and why it is notjust about asking us all to work harder, it is about getting us to work smarter, too. joe, good morning. why is it that the uk is still so far
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down the league table of productivity? we do not have policies in place in this country to preside incentives to firms to do what this country has done, investing in new technology. —— to provide incentives. we are working in the right direction here but we do not have an industrial strategy. instead we have had austerity, and credit driven growth. all of the big pieces of the policy puzzle is just not there. there is a tendency to think that robots willjust replace humans and the humans will get fired and unemployment will go up but it is really about using human skills and upscaling that workforce, isn't it? that is the key question. what happens to the people you replace with robots. do you train them up, do they learn to do more skilled work or to they end up out of the
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sector, maybe in a lower skilled sector, maybe in a lower skilled sector, making coffee orflipping burgers? in the long—term, technology ends to higher productivity but it is not always automatic. and the key to all of this, why we need to get about this, is that higher productivity should mean higher wages and higher wages should mean that living standards go up. that has not happened because as you heard, it is still pretty sluggish in this country. we will talk more in half an hour about how the uk can solve that productivity puzzle. thank you very much, ben. back to our main story now and the syrian government has been accused of brutal, unabashed barbarism, after a suspected gas attack in north syria in which at least 70 people were killed. foreign minister boris johnson hasjoined the united states and france in calling on the un to order a full investigation. this morning, russia claimed the incident was caused by the bombing of a rebel—held chemical weapons depot. but earlier on breakfast, professor alastair hay
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from leeds university told us this was highly improbable. there is no evidence that i am aware of that the rebels have had access to chemical agents or chemical weapons. the syrian regime should have disarmed. that was required to do this under a treaty that it entered into in 2013. so it should have disarmed. but there are many, many questions. what is the province of this particular weapon, who supplied it and where did they get the material? lots of unanswered questions. we're joined now by president of the syrian american medical society, dr ahmad tarajki who's in california this morning. we have seen some very harrowing images on our tv screens of the immediate aftermath. what are you making of what you have seen and heard so far? thank you for posting
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me. unfortunately the situation is very horrific, as you referred to. over the last week, the frequent incidents of attacks, from a mixture of chlorine gas and what looks like syrian products, has called civilians and civil society to be very horrified. we have been alarming the national community about such an attack. as we have experienced before over the last few yea rs, experienced before over the last few years, usually those attacks will start on a smaller scale, as if the regime is testing the water of what the international community will respond to. and with the absence of responses, the attacks have increased and now we have larger scale attacks. to increase the fatalities of these attacks, the regime unfortunately attacked the hospitals that have experience in dealing with patients who are exposed to chemical attacks. that is why we have seen attacks on this
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larger scale, and we have seen people in the streets because of a lack of infrastructure, the hospitals unable to treat them. also, during the attacks themselves, we have seen how one of the hospitals was attacked, and also there was another attack, two attacks on to make units, the first responders, white helmet units. can ijust ask you, responders, white helmet units. can i just ask you, briefly, responders, white helmet units. can ijust ask you, briefly, if i may, about the reaction you have heard so farand about the reaction you have heard so far and what hope you have that anything tangible will be done as a result of what has happened now? certainly, we are looking at two levels. on the international platform, this is a major challenge to the united states and the un security council. we heard two days ago from ambassador haley, as she was advancing the united states agenda of supporting international
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human rights and accountability. people are looking at the united states and what it achieved, what it promised two days ago. on the local level, inside syria, people see this as part of the general agenda, displacing civil society, displacing people out of these towns. the scenario is made to continue to displace people, similar to what we saw in mediya where people are being forced out of their towns, comparable to what is going on. eventually, people are displaced out of the town and that displacement is what is causing... i appreciated but i'm sorry, we are out of time. —— i appreciate it. thank you. there will
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be more on that throughout the day, including the bbc news channel. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and susannah streeter. britain s prime minister suggests freedom of movement could be extended after brexit as the european parliament has it's say on the deal. live from london, that's our top story on wednesday, 5th april. this is the scene live in strasbourg where politicians are laying out what they see as the priorities for brexit negotiations. we will talk more about that in the programme. also in the programme: iceland's parliament considers making it the law to pay men and women the same.
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