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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  April 7, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11am. the us launches air strikes on syria over its suspected use of chemical weapons on civilians. tonight i ordered a targeted military strike on the airfield in syria from where the chemical attack was launched. russia — which backs syria — condemns the attack, calling it "an act of aggression against a sovereign nation" other world leaders backed the us — here, the defence secretary called it "an appropriate response to the barbaric chemical weapons attack". we don't see this as the beginning
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ofa we don't see this as the beginning of a new campaign. we'll be live throughout the day in beirut, moscow and washington with the latest reaction to the unfolding events. the other news. a romanian tourist who fell into the river thames during the westminster bridge terror attack has died. a sharp rise in the number of accident and emergency departments turning away ambulances in england. good morning, it's friday the 7th of april. welcome to bbc newsroom live. russia has strongly condemned us missile strikes on a syrian airbase, describing them as an act of aggression against a sovereign state. it has provoked anger from russia.
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59 tomahawk cruise missiles were fired from two american navy warships in the mediterranean. — their target the shayrat airbase — which donald trump said was the airfield used to launch what he described as a "horrible chemical attack on innocent civilians" earlier this week. six people are said to have died in the air strikes and the base is described as "almost completely destroyed". russia disagrees. we'll bring you all the reaction to this dramatic shift in america's syria strategy — including the latest live from moscow and washington but first this report form david willis. it was a decisive response from an administration that has often seemed disorganised and at times dysfunctional. a fusillade of tomahawk cruise missiles fired from us navy ships in the mediterranean aimed at the syrian air base
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from which america says that deadly chemical weapons attack was launched earlier this week. a line in the sand moment for the new commander—in—chief. on tuesday, syrian dictator bashar al—assad launched a horrible chemical weapons attack on innocent civilians. using a deadly nerve agent, assad choked out the lives of helpless men, women and children. these are the heart—breaking images that moved the president to action, triggering in the process a remarkable shift in foreign policy on the part of his nascent administration. a week ago, white house officials professed little interest in regime change in syria but the use of what they say was a deadly nerve agent by bashar al—assad's forces has changed everything. tonight, i call on all civilised nations to join us in seeking to end the slaughter and bloodshed in syria
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and also to end terrorism of all kinds and all types. news of the missile strike somewhat overshadowed a one—day summit with china's president xi at which the two leaders were expected to discuss the growing threat posed by north korea but depending on where the us goes from here he could find he has his work cut out in syria, a quagmire of a conflict which could define his presidency one way or the other. here, the defence secretary, sir michael fallon, said the uk government fully supported american‘s decision to act. a number of other world leaders have also stated their support for washington's missile strike, as keith doyle now reports. syrian tv reported the air strikes,
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the presenter announcing, one of our air bases in central region was exposed to date to a missile strike by the united states leading to losses. the station then played national music and showed pictures of the syrian army. the country's information minister said he believed the strike was limited in time and space and was expected and he did not expect any military escalation. the british defence secretary said the uk was given advance warning and the government supported the us action. the americans believe they have exhausted all possible diplomatic and peaceful ways of dealing with the use by the regime of chemical weapons, and they have been
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determined to try to prevent future attacks like this so they've taken this action today, limited and appropriate action, against the airfield and the aeroplanes and the equipment that was used, they believe, in this attack. and that is action we fully support. these pictures from russian tv purport to show the aftermath of the air strikes. they show undamaged planes and some damage to the airfield. russia described the us attack as aggression against a sovereign state. this is an act of aggression. a totally made up excuse. all this reminds me of the situation in 2003 when the us and britain with some of the allies invaded iraqi without agreement of the un security council with a major violation of international law. the israeli prime
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minister welcomes the us attack, saying that in both word and action mrtrump senta saying that in both word and action mr trump sent a strong and clear message that the use and spread of chemical weapons will not be tolerated. otherworldly does go similar support. translation: i consider this operation was a response. it must now be pursued at the international level within the framework of the un if possible. so we can finalise the sanctions and prevent any further use of chemical weapons. as the us released pictures of the flight paths of the syrian planes it says we re paths of the syrian planes it says were involved in tuesday's attack, the president of the european council said the eu will work with the us to end brutality in syria. syrian rebel groups called on the us to continue the attacks. they and the world will wait to see if this situation escalates. some news coming to us out of
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russia, the russian defence ministry say syrian air defences will be boosted after the us air strike. they are quoting the defence ministry spokesman to protect the most sensitive instructor facilities in syria, a range of measures will be taken in the near future to strengthen and increase the efficiency of the syrian armed forces air defence. it goes on, the military efficiency of the mass missile strike is extremely low, so essentially downplaying that air strike. according to russian monitoring tools, he goes on, only 23 missiles reached the syrian air base. the us reported they had fired over 50. it says, base. the us reported they had fired over50. it says, it base. the us reported they had fired over 50. it says, it is not clear where the remaining 36 cruise missiles fell. apparently syrian authorities are currently searching for those 36 us missiles. commanders
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at the syrian air base say for syrian troops have been killed as a result of the strike, two are still missing, and six sustained burns. it is already clear that the us cruise missile strike on the syrian air base was in preparation, you suggest, long before today's events. a wide range of reconnaissance and reconnaissance measures, is necessary to prepare such a strike. that suggestion there from the russian defence ministry that the us had been thinking about this for some time, perhaps they are forecasting doubt on the suggestion it was in response to the chemical strike. a robust response there from russia, downplaying any military impact of that air strike. the attack has been condemned therefore not just by attack has been condemned therefore notjust by syria and russia, also condemned by iran. let's get a response from ben james who condemned by iran. let's get a
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response from benjames who was in beirut. what about the region where you are? the iranians have spoken through a number of different officials, quoted on some of the iranian news agencies, one speaking for the foreign ministry called this strike a destructive strike and also echoing some of the lines we've heard from the syrians and the russians, their allies, in this particular conflict. talking about this, it's only in the interests of those terrorists as they were described, that they are fighting. the syrian army spokesperson actually called the united states as actually called the united states as a result of this strike a partner of isis, and the so—called islamic state, and the as rules and front which is part of a wider front. state, and the as rules and front which is part of a widerfront. that group is one of the many groups,
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there are arranged operating in the north—west of syria, and that is the group the syrian military claimed it was targeting in an air strike on tuesday. an air strike they say of course did not deploy chemical weapons. that is very much disputed by the people on the ground who said thatis by the people on the ground who said that is precisely what it was doing. that town is also coming under attack even today according to monitoring groups and sources on the ground. a barrel bomb being dropped there we understand, although with no casualties on the ground. and, then, the suggestion from the us is that this was a targeted response directly to that chemical attack as a way of sending a message to syria that such action will not be tolerated. is there any suggestion now that we're likely to seek a change in approach from syria, that that will be effective in sending a warning shot? there has been no indication whatsoever of a change in approach from syria so far. they have very
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much said in the statements coming out their official sources, since this attack, they will remain steadfast in the policy they have been implementing so far, and they a lwa ys been implementing so far, and they always talk about fighting terrorism, as they see it, any opposition group in syria to them is a terrorist group. some of those overla p a terrorist group. some of those overlap as i said with groups the united states also considered to be terrorist groups, some don't. so we will see what happens in the coming days. of course the syria government deny having dropped chemical weapons on ten in the first place. they would say they don't need to change their course when it comes to that because they don't do chemical weapons, although of course back in 2013 after denying an even more deadly chemical attack just 2013 after denying an even more deadly chemical attackjust outside the mass cursed the syrian government went on to declare large stockpile of chemical weapons which was then, through a deal brokered by the americans and russians,
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decommission is. different people are speculating as to whether the weapons deployed here by the syrian government, if indeed they did, well weapons they had failed to declare at the time or weapons they had manufactured since. ben, thank you. our correspondence sara is in moscow. yes it's the kind of response you might expect. a lot of outrage and indignation at every level. president putin's spokesman says he has condemned the air strike as an act of, aggression, against a sovereign state. he says it will cause serious damage for the relationship between washington and
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moscow, which of course we worried you know is in a pretty awful date. the foreign minister has also been very outspoken, he said there was no evidence to back up the need for this air strike evidence to back up the need for this airstrike in evidence to back up the need for this air strike in syria and has talked about the fact that he believes the united states is simply pushing for regime change in syria and this is not about syrian government forces using chemical weapons, which of course russia continues to insist never happened. soa continues to insist never happened. so a lot of indignation, a lot of anger about what has happened, but i think perhaps the political and even military fallout from this could be contained by the very fact that their run russian casualties in this and the united states give did give advance warning. so perhaps the fallout might be limited. and the russians have always said their support for a side is not unconditional but what are we led to understand by that? russia's position it has been always
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that it russia's position it has been always thatitis russia's position it has been always that it is up to the syrian people to decide theirfuture. that it is up to the syrian people to decide their future. for the moment the president is clearly the man they are backing in syria. he is their ally and has been for a long time. but russia's position is to say then need to be a peace process that will be very complex, at the end of that perhaps the president will go. russia does not exclude that policy, but claims it is leaving that up to the people of syria to decide. i think there is a big question the heart of this, which is was russia informed in advance of what syria was planning to do in the province, whether that was a chemical air strike or even if it was targeting a chemical weapons factory on the ground. either way, the consequences have been awful in terms of civilian casualties. was russia in any way pre—warned of that and if it wasn't what kind of conversations have been going on behind closed doors with syria and with the president's people about
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what has happened and the possible fallout and how this is now contained between russia and washington. jane o'brien is in washington for us. jane, many people are making a great deal of this suppose its strategy change from the new president. and that is the big question. what is the endgame? this is a one off strike and we are being told by the administration that it is a one—off. it is very limited, very targeted, aimed at showing the president that america will not overrate the use of chemical weapons. it also came with a call from president trump for allies and the civilised world to come together to end the pledge died and terrorism of all types. clearly, and terrorism of all types. clearly, an airstrike on and terrorism of all types. clearly, an air strike on an airfield is not going to do that. it is not going to change the dynamic of this entrenched war. but i think it does
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show most importantly perhaps for the domestic american audience here, that there is a very clear distinction between the obama administration and the tramp administration. the trump administration. the trump administration has been short on words, some of them may not have been very articulate, but the president has shown he will act and thatis president has shown he will act and that is a game changer. one of the points of discussion is the russian us relationship and many people have been saying trump was cosying up to putin and now we see a total willingness to break ranks. and the psychology of that is very interesting because don't forget the secretary of state knows president putin very well. that is from his business connections. he believes president putin is a man who responds to strength. and i think this again is part of the strategy, it is showing the us is not afraid
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to act even when russian interests are involved. and we know that the secretary of state spoke to his counterpart in moscow on wednesday before the strikes and he is meeting him again next week in moscow. now, will this strike gives the us any greater leveraged in this they go see asians? will there be safe zones established in syria? will russia as the secretary of state has suggested start to consider its long—term support for the syrian regime? these are questions now being set up by this strike with potentially more leveraged from the us. thank you, jane. joining us by web—cam is professor malcolm chalmers,
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deputy director general of the royal united of the royal united services institute. is this a targeted response is this wider shift? it is hard to know precisely. the reading at president, the most probable reading, is that this is a one—off response to the use of chemical russians. chemical weapons. syria has signed the chemical weapons convention. it is obliged to a given these up already. but the nature of military action is often that the consequences are not what you intend. their right escalation risks in all. the united states is saying very clearly to putin that this is not a wider attempt to undermine the syrian
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regime, it may well be read as that by the russians. and in terms of the syrian response, what would you expect the president to choose as his next move? i suspect the russians are urging the syria is not to use chemical weapons again and therefore to close off the possibility of further us military action. but there will be anger in the syrian regime and there may well be attempts to retaliate against americans. after all there are now several hundred american forces in the ground in syria and they may well become increasingly target. i'm sure the americans are taking every step they can to safeguard those people. i think the other risk is too american aircraft and indeed british and other aircraft flying over syria in the campaign against ice all. the russians have suspended the agreements with the american air
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forcejudy the agreements with the american air force judy conflict their aircraft flying over syria. it is a pretty crowded airspace there, and the russians do have control of air defence systems which could shoot down american aircraft if they were to target them. so in the air as well there is potential for things getting out of control. it is not in anyone's interest for that happen, but the risks of that happening, where one of the primary reasons in the end of obama stepped back, the involvement of russia is much greater, much more intense than it was three years ago. what are the implications if any further united kingdom in all of this and the british government? our aircraft are being used in the campaign against islamic state in syria. so they are flying over syria most days. and we will be watching our leaders will be
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watching very closely to see whether there is any increased risk to them from russian and syrian air defences over syria. i think the uk government has made clear it supports this action. the use of chemical weapons in such a flagrant violation of previous agreements is something the administration in america felt could not go unanswered. but from a position only a few weeks ago in which their main concern in europe was that the americans were getting too close to russia under president trump, i think there will be some relief that in the case of syria at least, the americans are going back to... president trump is going with the natural instinct of his security establishment rather than those of his advisers who were pushing for a more pro—russia nationalist
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viewpoint. what is motivated this particular move is not geopolitics, it is president trump's believe, very clearly articulated, that these chemical weapons use against populations were morally deplorable and that america could not stand by, and that america could not stand by, and that america could not stand by, and that is more in the tradition of previous american administrations and less of the trump we saw on the campaign trail. so what you make of those people who have been picking over the language of donald trump's press co nfe re nce over the language of donald trump's press conference last night, his statement, whereat the end he said, god bless america, as president is a lwa ys god bless america, as president is always do, and god bless the world. people are saying this is as shift, trump going to a global perspective. is that overselling it? there are lots of conflicting signals and there will continue to be from the
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trump administration. this has to be seenin trump administration. this has to be seen in parallel to some of the su btle seen in parallel to some of the subtle and not so subtle personnel changes in the illustration. but it feels to me this is one bit of evidence which suggests the traditional, rather conservative, national security establishment in the us is beginning to win the struggle against people like steve bannon and others who wanted a moronic or change in american foreign policy, who with deeply suspicious is what they sought as globalism or working closely with allies that supported international law, and i think the american national security establishment does believe that alliances are important and believes international conventions such as that against the use of chemical weapons are important for america's security. this will be seen as a piece of evidence backing them up and that argument up. just as in the past resident at obama was reluctant to
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ta ke resident at obama was reluctant to take action on syria in part because of the risks of escalation and the risks of getting dragged into a deeper and deeper conflict, so this administration will have two conference those risks, it certainly does not feel as if we have an administration which is looking to get out of this, if anything it seems more prepared to take the risks of military entanglement in syria and elsewhere in order to appear strong on the international stage. malcolm, thank you. let's turn to political reaction here. some response from the labour leader. jeremy corbyn has been critical of the us government. we had a statement from him in the last
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human it's saying, the us missile attack on the air base risks escalating the war in styria still further. he goes onto say that, unilateral military action without authorisation or independent verification risks intensifying and multisided conflict that has already killed hundreds of thousands of people. he urges instead for talks, peace talks to take place and he also urges the british government to try to restrain the trump administration and throw its weight behind peace negotiations and a comprehensive political settlement. it says to be stared this statement from jeremy corbyn is in direct odds with what the party's deputy leader has said earlier on we heard from him, saying he backed the us strikes in syria, saying they were a direct and proportionate response to what had been going on in syria,
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referencing the chemical attacks earlier this week. he said, indiscriminate chemical attacks on civilians can never be tolerated and must have consequences. the labour party does not have a single position it seems in response to the us strikes in styria. it that we know the us government was at the forefront of international support that happens overnight. the defence secretary michael fallon said he thought it was an appropriate response to the barbarism, he said, that had ta ken response to the barbarism, he said, that had taken place earlier in the week. he was insistent that the uk was not asked to take part in the strikes, that he had been in close concert tact as had the government on many levels between the us and the uk side, both sides has been in cocos contact and yesterday as well he said he had been called by the defence secretary who had talked him through some of the options that the white house was looking at and then he had been called again by the us
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defence secretary when donald trump had made his decision, to inform him the strikes would take place. michael fallon also said there is no intention at this stage for military action from the uk, he said if that we re action from the uk, he said if that were to be the case then of course the government would go back to parliament, would seek a vote in the house of commons, if there were an appetite for military action. thank you very much. let's turn to other news. a romanian tourist who fell into the river thames during the westminster terror attack has died. andreea cristea was walking on westminster bridge with her boyfriend when they were driven at by the attacker khalid masood, who was later shot dead by police. sangita myska's here to tell us more. remind us of who she was? very few of us will forget those dramatic pictures of her being
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thrown into the river. she fallon as a result of the car driven at pedestrians that day. she sustained massive injuries. she had been walking along the bridge with her boyfriend, they'd come overfrom romania to visit friends. he had planned to propose to her later that evening. she was rescued and taken to hospital. she spent the last two weeks in hospital being treated for the injuries. yesterday herfamily and doctors decided to take the difficult decision to switch her life supposed to system offer. that brings the number of people who were killed in the attack to five. her boyfriend did survive the attack with a broken foot. at her family have released a statement today. let me read part of it. our beloved and replaceable girl was the most unique
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and life loving person you can imagine. they went on to say that thousands of pounds raised by the public to help her will now be given to a charity. they went on to say they would not have been able to get through the last couple of weeks had it not been for the dedication of the medical staff at the hospital and also support officers from the metropolitan police. thank you very much. let's go to the weather now. thank you very much. good morning to you. the weather is in pretty decent shape as we head towards the weekend. things look largely dry and there will be quite a lot of sunshine around for some of us. having said that, it isn't sunny everywhere today. you can see we've
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had quite a lot of cloud across northern ireland, western southern scotland, northern england, into the midlands and wales. this cloud beginning to show signs of breaking up. in these areas we should see spells of sunshine through today. decent sunshine for eastern scotland. for many southern parts of england and the south of wales. in the best of that, 17, 18 degrees is achievable. this evening, as things get dark, the temperatures are going to drop away. it turns chilly overnight. a chilly night. a fog patch in the south—west. towns and cities four to nine degrees. in the countryside, a touch of frost. after that chilly start, tomorrow a beautiful day with blue skies and sunshine. extra cloud and rain across the far north and north—west of scotland. best of the sunshine 21 degrees. it will be warmer still on sunday, towards the south—east, many seeing sunshine. cloud further west. scotla nd seeing sunshine. cloud further west. scotland and northern ireland with rain later in the day. here, it will be cooler. ? this is bbc newsroom live.
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the headlines: american warships have fired 59 cruise missiles at a syrian airbase, in the united states' first direct action against president assad's regime. donald trump said he'd ordered the strikes because the airfield had been used to launch what he described as a "horrible chemical attack on innocent civilians" earlier this week. it civilians" earlier this week. is in this vital, national security it is in this vital, national security interest of the united states to prevent and deter the spread and use of deadly chemical weapons. defence secretary, sir michael fallon, has said the uk was consulted over the strikes and fully supported the us action.
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that's taken a limited action, a appropriate tack against the airfields involved in the gas attack. jeremy corbyn has condemned the attack saying it risks escalating the war in syria further. he calls for a negotiated settlement to the conflict. in other news, a romanian tourist has become the fifth victim to die asa has become the fifth victim to die as a result of the attack in westminster two weeks ago. let's get across all the sports news now. let's go to the bbc sports centre. ( dustin johnson now. let's go to the bbc sports centre. ( dustinjohnson provided the violet on day one at the masters. he made his way to the first tee and decided he couldn't compete, after a fall at home on wednesday. he was one of the early
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favourites, having won the last three tournaments he's played in. i feel like three tournaments he's played in. ifeel like i'm three tournaments he's played in. i feel like i'm playing three tournaments he's played in. ifeel like i'm playing the best golf of my career right now. for me to pull out is, i mean, it sucks really bad. i'm very sad i have to do it. it's a freak accident. i feel like, you know, iwanted do it. it's a freak accident. i feel like, you know, i wanted to play. i wa nted like, you know, i wanted to play. i wanted to try and play, it's just, you know, i'm not going to be able to compete like this. lee westwood is the leading briton. he struggled on the front nine but made five birdies in a row to come home in 70. he's five shots off the lead. the defending champion had a roller coaster round. he's one over. the leader out is charlie hoffman with a round of 65. hugely impressive in tough conditions on the course. organisers of the
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chinese grand prix have been meeting with formula one teams to discuss bringing forward sunday's race. low cloud and rain in shanghai made it u nsafe for cloud and rain in shanghai made it unsafe for the medical helicopter to operate, preventing drivers from heading out onto the circuit for second pram tase. drivers —— practice. drivers found other ways to entertain the crowds. the forecast for sunday is looking poor conditions. tomorrow could be more favourable for racing. this year's malaysian grand prix will be the country's last. its 19—year run on the f1 calendar will end a year earlier than originally agreed, after the malaysian government questioned the value of the race. the french grand prix returns in 2018 after a ten—year absence. and germany is back on after missing out this year. the arsenal manager, arsene wenger, believes striker alexis sanchez wa nts to believes striker alexis sanchez wants to stay at the club. he's under contract until the end of next season. despite reports suggesting he wants to leave, wenger is confident he'll renew his deal. he wants to leave, wenger is confident he'll renew his deallj
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believe that, basically, he wants to stay at the club. it's down to find an agreement with his agent. i think the players have to first see if they're happy at the time. most of they're happy at the time. most of the time, it's down to find an agreement, where the finances are involved in it, yes. the olympic marathon champion has failed an out of competition drugs test. the 32—year—old kenyan won't be able to defend her london marathon title later this month, after testing poz five for the blood —— positive for the blood booster epo. she's provisionally suspended. she will face sanctions if her b samples fails. great britain will have men's and women's curling teams at the winter olympics. scotland's men needed to win their last three games at the world championships in edmonton to qualify, after beating italy and germany, they completed a late—night extra end victory over russia to
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clinch the birth in pyongyang. kyle edmund will play the first rubber of britain's davis cup quarter final today against france's lucas pui. he helped the team to victory over canada in february. after the injured andy murray, great britain are the underdogs in this tie. coverage across the weeb. that's —— tie. coverage across the weeb. that's -- bbc. tie. coverage across the weeb. that's —— bbc. that's all for now. the united states has launched missile strikes against syria overnight. 59 cruise missiles were fired from us warships at an air base in retaliation for a chemical attack that killed dozens of people earlier this week. russia has strongly condemned the attack. which happened at 1. 40am. president trump said it was in america's national
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security interest to prevent the spread of chemical weapons. this was what he had to sayjust hours after the attack. tonight i recorded a targeted, military strike on the airfield in syria from where the chemical attack was launched. it is in this vital national security interest of the united states to prevent and deter the spread and use of deadly chemical weapons. there can be no dispute that syria used banned chemical weapons, violated its obligations under the chemical weapons convention and ignored the urging of the un security council. until this week, president trump opposed take being action against
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the assad government in syria. here's some of the things he said in the time before he became president.? if they ever did overthrow assad, you might end up with as bad as assad is — and he's a bad guy — but you may very well end up with worse than assad. that attack on children yesterday had a big impact on me, big impact. that was a horrible, horrible thing. i will tell you, it's already happened that my attitude toward syria and assad has changed very much. they will have a message, you will see what the message, you will see what the message will be. tonight, i ordered a targeted military strike on the airfield in syria from where the chemical attack was launched. joining me to discuss that and wider issues around this latest attack,
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our correspondentjonathan issues around this latest attack, our correspondent jonathan marcus. it's fascinating to look back over the history of trump there and see the history of trump there and see the change. is this just in response to this one event? or are we seeing a wider shift of policy in the us? that was then, this is now. then he was a private individual, not hugely versed perhaps in these matters. now he's the president and he has some of the best advice he can get from people who served in the us military around him, like the defence secretary and the national security adviser. everything he's said, everything we've seen from the nature and the scope of the attack is that this is not an attempt to intervene in the war to oust the assad regime. ithink intervene in the war to oust the assad regime. i think we'll see what his changed attitude to mr assad really m ea ns his changed attitude to mr assad really means in the longer term. what this was was a limited, targeted strike to enforce the prohibition against the use of chemical weapons in this case, we
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believe, the sarin nerve agent. it's a step many people in the united states believe that mr obama should have taken in 2013 and so for mr trump, it has the added advantage that he poses now as the anti—obama, the man who acted when president obama failed to take an equivalent step. interestingly, given the us position that this has been cleverly targeted and we know it's aimed for this particular air base from where missiles were launched, the russians have come out this morning and said, oh, it was highly ineffective and hasn't done much damage at all. the war of words now starts. yeah, you're right, the war of words. what the russian ises saying is fairly predictable. the russians are staunch allies of the assad regime, insist that chemical weapons were not used earlier this week and not used by syrian aircraft. the aim of this attack was not to creator onning and to cause huge amounts of damage. cruise missile has
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1,000—pound warhead or it may have submunitions warheads, it's the equivalent of 60 largish bombs dropped on a huge airfield. they've taken out dropped on a huge airfield. they've ta ken out infrastructure. dropped on a huge airfield. they've taken out infrastructure. they've taken out infrastructure. they've taken out infrastructure. they've taken out some aircraft, but the aim of this was not to change the military balance fundamentally in syria or to, you know, destroy assad's air force. that could be done if the americans wanted to do it. it's sending a clear and precise message, and a message, ithink, as much to moscow as it was to damascus. do you think, though, given the robust response of the russians that it is a message that is going to have any impact or see any change in policy from the russian side or indeed from president assad? it will have an impact, we'll see that over time. first of all, the purpose of this is to deter the future use of the nerve agent sarin or other relatively sophisticated chemical weapons. if
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the russians have any influence with the russians have any influence with the assad regime, presumably the hope is in washington that they will impose their views that this is a step that shouldn't be repeated. there is wholesale slaughter of civilians going on in syria day by day any way. but obviously there is this particular western concern and horror about chemical weapons. also the russians now will have a much clearer idea of the administration that they're dealing with. remember, there was this bromance before his election. the russians thought they would have an inexperienced, rather soft figure who was much more malleable to deal with. in fact, what we're seeing now, i think, is that this is an american administration under mr trump, because of the advisors he has and so on, that in many ways is much like previous american administrations. somebody said to me earlier this morning, maybe this action wasn't so very different to
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what a hillary clinton administration might have taken. so, to that extent, the russians now have a clearer idea of who they're dealing with. diplomatic contacts will continue. the secretary of state has a meeting with his counterpart in due course, in a few days' time. so i think, in that sense, the russians have gone through the motions. their ally has been attacked with impunity. they're pound to say these sorts of things. luckily, no russian personnel seem to have been killed in the strike, moscow tells us. perhaps, if you like, this is a fresh start. relations aren't going to be great between moscow and washington. they haven't been and they're not going to be. perhaps they have a clearer understanding of where each side is coming from. good to speak to you. thank you. accidents at school are unfortunate but they are also proving costly, according to figures obtained by the bbc. accidents, such as a blindfolded child running into a goalpost or a being hit by a cricket ball, have cost schools £7 million in three years.
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the campaign for real education says the threat of compensation means some teachers are now "terrified" of being sued. s chris mcgovern is from the campaign for real education. s hejoins us now from tunbridge wells. thanks very much for being with us. you say teachers are terrified of being sued, what's your evidence for that? well, a survey quite recently but one of the teaching unions said that around 90% of teachers actually felt constrained by the fear of being sued. they felt constrained by health and safety regulations. that affects the classroom and affects the playground. out on the playground children are no long, in some schools, allowed to play chasing games, leapfrog, conkers. on the sports field, contact sport is now outlawed in some schools. even at the higher levels, senior school pupils, the idea of going on a
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foreign exchange to france or germany, that's almost disappeared. it's clearly impacting badly on what's going on in the schools today. when you look at these compensation payments, i'm not expecting you to comment directly on any of them, surely if a child is hurt at school, the school has failed in some way, it's right that the family receives financial support or would you disagree with the level of these payments?” support or would you disagree with the level of these payments? i would disagree with the level of the payments. there are some issues about ill legitimate claims and the problem we have is that councils are tending not to contest claims. they are settling out of the court, a claim which came to my notice, was a boy who brought his skateboard into the playground. he fell off it and sued the school and got £8,000. that's a prif husband claim. the real —— frivolous claim. the real conconstituency is the law of unintended consequences. the teachers are afraid. the children are wrapped in cotton wool. rather than explore in the playground or in
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the fields or explore in the trees, they're exploring the internet. they're stuck on their tablets and on their computers, which is far more dangerous. we're robbing children of their childhood. because we're taking out the element of risk. this is a factor which is affecting many schools across the country. sorry to keep it so short, a very busy morning, we're grateful for your time. thank you. there's been a sharp rise of a&es in england turning away ambulances. analysis by the nuffield trust shows ambulances were diverted nearly 500 times last year, almost doubling the average figure for the previous three years. nhs england says too many ambulances are being dispatched and the system is now under review. the head of health for unison, which represents many nhs workers, including nurses and paramedics, is
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with me now. thanks for being with us. what do you make of what's going on here with ambulances being turned away. it certainly reflects the information that we're getting from our members. we're the largest union for paramedics and ambulance staff, as you said. this ties in very much and tallies with the information we're receiving from them. theirjob is becoming increasingly difficult. for us this is very much a symptom of the main problem, which is the lack of funding across the nhs and social care. so everything backs up. if you have patients going to a&e who then can't be either discharged or sent in to a ward because there are no beds, or they get into a bed and then they can't be discharged back home because there's no support mechanisms through social care, all of that tends to feed on each other and the service that seems to be the most publicly affected by it is almost always the ambulance service. they're the ones that are very visible. can you see queues of ambulances outside a&e departments.
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you can see, you hear stories of ambulances being diverted as this one, saying they're not being allowed in. when we say ambulances are turned away, what does that mean for the person who's in the back of that ambulance? it can be dangerous for patients, obviously. there are, as far as for patients, obviously. there are, as faras i'm for patients, obviously. there are, as far as i'm aware, there are still processes in place which mean that say for example, you turn up with a patient in serious cardiac arrest, then something like that most hospitals would still take that patient in and treat them. for others there will be perhaps where the hospital has declared a black alert and is closing its a&e department, then ambulance will have to divert and take people somewhere else. that will vary depend onning where they are. if you're in a city, that may mean a few miles. if you're ina ruralarea, that may mean a few miles. if you're in a rural area, it can be mean a significant, maybe 20—minute drive. for patients that can be frightening and scary. if you're in an ambulance, blue lights, you think
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there's something very seriously wrong with you and there probably is. you want to be treated quickly and safely. thanks very much. ? in a moment all the business news this hour. first the headlines: the us launches missile strikes on syria over its suspected use of chemical weapons on civilians. russia, which backs syria condemns the attack, calling it an act of aggression against a sovereign nation. a romanian tourist, who fell into the river thames you aring during the river thames you aring during the westminster bridge terror attack, has died of her injuries. good morning. the business news: lloyds is setting aside a further £100 million to compensate customers who lost money in a fraud scandal, and the financial watchdog is re—opening an enquiry into it. two hbos employees were among six
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people jailed for stealing hundreds of millions of pounds from small businesses, some of which collapsed. lloyds has already set aside at least £250 million to cover other costs arising from the case. the governor of the bank of england has warned the global financial system is at a "fork in the road" going into the brexit talks. mark carney was giving a major speech on the impact of brexit on the city of london. he said the negotiations would influence how banks are regulated — adding that the uk and european union were "ideally positioned" to strike a trade deal on financial regulation. he warned that continuing to cooperate was vital and turning inwards could mean fewerjobs, lower growth and higher domestic risks. average house prices were 3.8% higher in march than they were 12 months earlier, according to halifax. the country's biggest lender says that rate of growth is a significant slowdown — the slowest rate of increase for almost four years. house prices are rising at less
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than half the rate seen a year ago. last week, the nationwide said that house prices had actually fallen in the last month. activity in the uk's industry and construction sectors fell in february, according to the latest figures that have just been released by the office for national statistics. it said unexpectedly warm weather led to the fall in industrial output, because it meant there was less demand for electricity and gas. the construction figure saw the biggest drop in almost a year — mainly because of a fall in house—building in particular. we also found out the uk's deficit in goods and services increased to £3.7 billion in february — a five month high — which shows we are importing even more than we export. professor alan winters is head of the uk trade policy observatory at the university of sussex. good to see you. so, i'm reading
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some analysis of these figures. some people taking it as a sign that maybe the uk economy is starting to slow down as we prepare to go into these brexit negotiatiations, what do you think? well, certainly the construction figures are not very encouraging. one should never get too excited about single months or even single quarters, but overall, if we look over the last six months orso, if we look over the last six months or so, you don't get the impression that the economy is powering away. soi that the economy is powering away. so i think a plateau or even maybe slight decline is what we're about to see. and for those who don't work in industry, don't work in construction, what do these figures mean for the rest of us, in terms of jobs and prices and so on? well, if the economy is slowing down a bit, it means that there are likely to be fewerjobs. in terms of prices, the big effect on prices is still the
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fa ct big effect on prices is still the fact that we've had a large depression of the exchange rate in the last nine months. that has still got to work through into prices. i think we're going to see positive inflation over the next year into the year after, perhaps. inflation over the next year into the yearafter, perhaps. overall, we're going to find job markets therefore perhaps wages a bit more sluggish than we would hope, prices rising faster than we would hope. we get caught in the vice. just quickly wa nt to get caught in the vice. just quickly want to touch on the trade deficit. we found out that increased, so we are importing even more than we are exporting. but the ons is saying that was due to erratic items, what do they mean by that? erratic items are the things that bounce about from month to month, aircraft, ships, jewels, gold and silver. they're the main components. a big consignment arrives or a big jumbo
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jet you buy and the figures show a big bump. so we're probably right to look at trends without the erratics. but nonetheless, the deficit is still quite large. even without those. thank you very much indeed for that analysis. markets around the world have been reacting cautiously to the us cruise missile strike in syria. when big political tremors like that and uncertainty it brings investors move from riskier stocks. the price of gold, government bonds and also the price of oil they've all gone up. the price of a barrel of oil surged because the air strikes have caused worry about the disruption of oil from the middle east. that's pushed up from the middle east. that's pushed up energy companies and mining. later the latest jobs figures from the us. we see how wall street responds. that's all the business
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for now. the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel. in a moment, we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. first, we leave you with for a look at the weather. thank you, good morning to you. once again we have decent weather on the way for a weekend. a largely dry weekend to come. there'll be sunshine and at times, particularly towards the south—east, it will be very warm indeed. let's look at how things are shaping up so far today. the day started like this in st andrews, beautiful sun rise here. kingston upon thames in london, beautiful sunny skies this morning. it's not that sunny everywhere. there is more cloud in the mix as well. that's how it looks across northern ireland. as you can see from the satellite picture, a lot of cloud across northern ireland, into certain and western scotland, northern england, into parts of wales and the mid—as well. that —— midlands as well. that cloud is showing signs of breaking up. don't give up, we should see spells of sunshine developing. decent sunshine
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for eastern scotland, south wales, southern england and that's where we'll see the highest temperatures, 17 to maybe 18 or 19 degrees. with the dry weather and the sunshine, high pollen levels, especially across england and wales, not great news for hay fever sufferers. with the clear skies by day, overnight, it is going to get chilly again. could see fog patches developing across south wales, the south—west of england into southern counties as well. towns and cities, four to nine degrees. one or two spots in the countryside, cold enough for the touch of frost. after a chilly start touch of frost. after a chilly start to the weekend, things are going to warm up. plenty of strong sunshine. this is saturday's chart and about all of us get to enjoy the sunshine. always thicker cloud, breezier weather and the odd splash of rain for the far north. for the channel islands, southern england, up into wales, the midlands, lots of this strong sunshine, fairly high uv levels, if you're out for any length of time, bear that in mind. levels, if you're out for any length of time, bearthat in mind. 21 degrees inland. close to the coasts,
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pegged back into single digits, particularly with a sea breeze. parts of northern ireland and scotla nd parts of northern ireland and scotland and northern ireland 17, 18 degrees. the far north and north west with more cloud and a bit of rain. no rain in sight for aintree, the grand national. sunday, looks like it will bring higher temperatures still for some of us with warm air wafting in from the south. it is central and eastern parts of england, east wales, eastern scotland that will see the best of the sunshine on sunday. a weather front bringing cloud and outbreaks of rain into northern ireland and north—western scotland. here, on the school side, 10 to 13 degrees. further south—east, 20 to 23 or 24. make the most of the warmth, it won't last long. things turning cooler on monday. stuck back
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this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at midday: are the top stories the us launches missile strikes on syria over its suspected use of chemical weapons on civilians. tonight i ordered a targeted military strike on the airfield in syria from where the chemical attack was launched. russia — which backs syria — condemns the attack, calling it "an act of aggression against a sovereign nation".
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other world leaders have backed the us — here, the defence secretary called it "an appropriate response to the barbaric chemical weapons attack". we don't see this as the beginning of a new campaign. and tailored operation to try to deter the regime from carrying out these type of attacks in future. we'll be live in beirut, moscow and washington with all the latest reaction to today's unfolding events. the other news on bbc newsroom live: a romanian tourist who fell into the river thames during the westminster bridge terror attack has died of her injuries. ambulances under pressure — figures show a sharp rise in the number being turned away by accident and emergency departments in england. good afternoon, it's friday the 7th of april.
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welcome to bbc newsroom live. the us has carried out a missile strike on a syrian air base, in response to the chemical weapons attack earlier this week in idlib province. it is the first direct us military action against forces commanded by syria's president. russia, which backs the assad regime, has condemned the strike. the missile strike hit the shayrat airbase in the west of syria, north of the capital, damascus. six people are thought to have been killed, and the pentagon says aircraft and buildings were severely damaged. the strike was a direct response to the chemical attack believed to have been carried out by the syrian regime, further north in the town of khan skeikhoun. this first report by david willis who's in washington. it was a decisive response from an administration that has
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often seemed disorganised and at times dysfunctional. a fusillade of tomahawk cruise missiles fired from us navy ships in the mediterranean aimed at the syrian air base from which america says that deadly chemical weapons attack was launched earlier this week. a line in the sand moment for the new commander—in—chief. on tuesday, syrian dictator bashar al—assad launched a horrible chemical weapons attack on innocent civilians. using a deadly nerve agent, assad choked out the lives of helpless men, women and children. these are the heart—breaking images that moved the president to action, triggering in the process a remarkable shift in foreign policy on the part of his nascent administration. a week ago, white house officials professed little interest in regime
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change in syria, but the use of what they say was a deadly nerve agent by bashar al—assad's forces has changed everything. tonight, i call on all civilised nations to join us in seeking to end the slaughter and bloodshed in syria and also to end terrorism of all kinds and all types. news of the missile strike somewhat overshadowed a one—day summit with china's president xi, at which the two leaders were expected to discuss the growing threat posed by north korea but, depending on where the us goes from here, he could find he has his work cut out in syria, a quagmire of a conflict which could define his presidency one way or the other. here, the defence secretary, sir michael fallon, said the uk government fully supported american's decision to act.
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a number of other world leaders have also stated their support for washington's missile strike, except of course russia, which has called it an act of aggression, as keith doyle now reports. mobile phone pictures show the immediate aftermath of the attack on the airbase this morning. smoke can be seen and some hangers appear damaged. syrian tv reported the air strikes, the presenter announcing, one of our air bases in central region was exposed today to a missile strike by the united states leading to losses. the station then played national music and showed pictures of the syrian army. the country's information minister said he believed the strike was limited in time and space and was expected and he did not expect any military escalation. these pictures from russian tv purport to
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show the aftermath of the air strikes. they show undamaged planes and some damage to the airfield. russia said nine aircraft were damaged but not all 59 missiles hit their target. the russian foreign minister strongly condemned the attack. translation: this is an act of aggression. a totally made up excuse. all this reminds me of the situation in 2003 when the us and britain with some of the allies invaded iraq without agreement of the un security council with a major violation of international law. the british defence secretary said the uk was given advance warning and the uk was given advance warning and the uk was given advance warning and the uk supported them action. we don't see this as the beginning of a new campaign, rather as a carefully tailored operation to try to deter the regime from carrying out these type of attacks in the future.
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the israeli prime minister welcomed the us attack, saying that in both word and action mr trump sent a strong and clear message that the use and spread of chemical weapons will not be tolerated. other world leaders showed similar support. translation: i consider this operation was a response. it must now be pursued at the international level within the framework of the un if possible, so we can finalise the sanctions and prevent any further use of chemical weapons. syrian rebel groups called on the us to continue the attacks. they and the world will wait to see if this situation escalates. i'm joined by our middle east editor. how optimistic can we be
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that it will work as a deterrent. to start, they say they did not carry out a chemical weapons attack. let's assume they did, because the americans say they had intelligence. well, they have been very severely punished if they did do it. so it will be a big disincentive. i think theissue will be a big disincentive. i think the issue now is will the americans do anything else, will this be the start in new chapter, the secretary of state said just before the attacks yesterday, he said there is no place for president assad in the future of syria. that has been said a lot in the past by the americans, the british, you name it. it has sounded very hollow in the last few yea rs sounded very hollow in the last few years because there was no leverage. if the americans are prepared to use military force, however, they have leverage. so i think those comments
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will be therefore taken much more seriously than they would otherwise have been. but i guess president trump will have to weigh up at this stage how much he wants to get in tangled in the region. yes, and it would be possibly a big entanglement which is why his recess fought shy of it. if they say we want to get assad out, they haven't said that, they said he should be out but not that they would do things to make him get out. what would that mean? would that mean attacking regime buildings in damascus? maybe. would it mean trying to target and kill people? maybe. but if they did that and the resume again to topple, what comes next? the experience of iraq over 2003 shows if there is a vacuum & rule government goes, the consequences can sometimes be a lot worse than what went before. so i
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think there are smart people in washington, i know trump isn't very experienced in foreign affairs, but thereafter very smart people who will be more than aware of these things. so i think that is the next thing. will the americans now say, job done, we've punished them, we have very established deterrence. or will they say, we have more to do, actually, and we will do them now? it will be an interesting few days. one of syria's key allies is russia, and if there was a hoax this might chip away at that support by russia of president assad, it seems judging by the response from putin that it has not. the foreign minister compared it to the 2003 invasion of iraq, which even people who now supported it, then supported it, will now admit it was a catastrophic error. that is quite inflated language. i certainly don't think
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thatis language. i certainly don't think that is going to be happening. i don't think the russians are necessarily wedded to president assad as the leader. i think they would tolerate someone else as long as that was their man,. the key thing about assad is he is their man. that is what they want. they wa nt to man. that is what they want. they want to be able to have an ally, not just an ally, a client, in the presidential palace in damascus. thank you. our correspondent sarah rainsford is in moscow. we were having a look at how the russians are likely to see this play out. they have been pretty robust in their response. they have. the state m e nts their response. they have. the statements we've been hearing from the kremlin, in those president putin has called this an act of aggression against a sovereign
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state. we have also heard from the foreign minister, as jeremy state. we have also heard from the foreign minister, asjeremy said, who has been very robust in his condemnation of what has happened. the defence ministry itself has said, used very similar language. all political forces here underlying that as far as moscow is concerned there was no basis for this attack, they say there was no evidence, there was no investigation, the americans went ahead and carried out these strikes in syria without proper evidence to back up that the syrian government troops had carried out a chemical attack. russia denies that ever happened. a massive difference of opinions that over what has happened. i think if it stops here the fallout will be contained. because russia was given advance warning of what was to come, there were no russian troops who we re there were no russian troops who were killed in this attack, it seems
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they were either evacuated or were not at the site. perhaps the political and any military fallout can be contained, but if the us decides to go further i'm sure moscow will not leave it at that. so we know russia is due to keep technical and military kept annals of communication open with washington. they announced that this morning. but they have suspended the syria as safety agreement, what does that mean? russia is saying the channels remain open but there won't be information going along them. it is basically suspended a deal by which potential crises in the air over syria could be averted. that is potentially very dangerous. it comes at the same time as the defence ministry has said the defence systems in syria will be reinforced. that is something of a covert warning, a veiled warning, that is russia or indeed syria felt the need they could strike from those as
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defence systems, they could bring down american planes. of course, thatis down american planes. of course, that is not something that has been contemplated up until now, but it is a suggestion that if what happened in syria is escalated, those systems are in place. thank you very much. our correspondent in washington is jane o'brien. jane, are targeted, measured response, we are told, or part of a wider change in strategy by the trumpet ministration? at the moment there are no signs any more military action is being planned. the secretary of state has said this was a one—off. it was a very carefully targeted message to president assad that the us would not tolerate any chemical attacks. and also a clear message to russia that even when russian interests are involved the us will act. and i think one of the
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reasons it also gained quite a lot of bipartisan support here in the us is was because it was limited and there is no sense that any strikes or limb military action against the assad regime are in the offing, and i think that is the important message. one of the issues being explored of course is the knock on impact for us russia relations. and the suggestion that it is perhaps a very deliberate move to show the russians that there is strength in the us position, and we know the secretary of state thinks putin responds well to shows of strength. he knows putin from his business connections, and that is certainly the measure of the man he has taken. interestingly, he know he spoke to his counterpart in russia on wednesday. he is meeting him next week. the question here is does this
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strike against syria, against a russian ally, will this give the us more leveraged in those talks next week? will it give a greater impetus to getting russia around a table and saying we need safe zones for some aliens, we need to find a way to end this war? asjeremy was saying, there is a perception that russia is not wedded to assad, there has been a 180 degrees turn in the us, only a few days ago the administration was saying the fight was not against a sound, it was against islamic state, now they're worth they are saying assad can't stay. there has been a dramatic shift there. i think this strike could give the us more leveraged with russia in those talks about what happens next, next week. and what you think it tells us as well about how president trump is being advised, jeremy made the point
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that some people had doubted his credentials, but of course there are some big brains in the white house to help? and a lot of generals. that is something this cabinet had been criticised for, too many generals and oppositions. but it is something donald trump likes, we know he asked them for options and they gave them, them for options and they gave them, the options were always there, president obama also had those options, the difference is donald trump decided to use them. i think thatis trump decided to use them. i think that is the other message she was trying to send domestically, back here in the us, he is very different from obama. you had great rhetoric, you had a highly articulate president, in that situation, who did not act. donald trump may not be able to frame his arguments quite so coherently, but he will act. jane, thank you. let's get the latest from our
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westminster correspond and. think the british government has been at the british government has been at the forefront of the international support of the us in those strikes in syria. so michael fallon said the us and uk governments at all different levels had been in contact. he said he had spoken to the us defence secretary who had talked him through the different options that were on the table. he then spoke to him again later on to be told john trump had made the decision for those strikes to go ahead. and michael fallon said he thought and the government thought that those strikes were an appropriate response to what they said were barbaric chemical attacks earlier this week. they said they we re earlier this week. they said they were limited attacks and they were appropriate. but michael fallon did stress and other times that this was
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a response by the united states and that the uk had not asked to be involved. and if there were to be any military action by the uk, he said the uk government would go to the commons, go to parliament, and get mps to vote on whether that should take place. there is no sense at the moment that there is appetite for the uk to get involved. as for the opposition, the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, has come out in criticism of the us government, saying their strikes risked escalating the war in syria further, as he also calls on the british government to urge restraint on the trump administration, saying they should be putting everything behind a peaceful negotiation and a comprehensive political solution. it has to be noted thatjeremy corbyn's sta nce has to be noted thatjeremy corbyn's stance is at direct odds to what his deputy has said, who has come out in support of the us strikes. the
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labour party are not speaking with one voice on the issue at the moment. the liberal democrats have called for the government to get the nato alliance together to see what more can be done, but they have also supported the strikes. so overwhelmingly i would say on the side at the moment, there has been support for the strikes, apart from jeremy corbyn who is saying that this could risk escalating the situation in syria further. eleanor, thank you. as we've been reporting, russian television has shown footage of some of the damage caused to the airbase. the syrian army said significant damage had been caused. the pictures show rubble and black burn marks in areas the missiles hit. the kremlin has reacted angrily to the strike, with a spokesman calling it an act of aggression against a sovereign nation. joining us now via web—cam from moscow is andrey kortunov, director general at the russian international affairs council. thank you forjoining us. how much
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ofa thank you forjoining us. how much of a surprise was this attack to the russian government? it is hard to tell. i think we can imagine they expected a softer or at least not that fast action by the us. yesterday the russian spokesman stated that moscow might reconsider its attitude towards the damascus regime and that support for a sad is not unconditional. i think they thought that would be enough to delay military action by the us. when you say they had put out this line that their support was not unconditional, where do you think possible movement might be?” unconditional, where do you think possible movement might be? i think if indeed it turns out that assad used chemical weapons, that would definite but must call in difficult
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position. moscow believes the solution of the chemical situation in syria was a major accomplishment. soi in syria was a major accomplishment. so i think that would mean the russian support for the assad regime would be made much more conditional and that means russia should push the regime harder than it has been doing. but now the situation has changed rheumatic clay and basically i think after the strike, when i can see russia confirming its support for the regime because they are perceived as a victim of aggression. you said it might change of it came to light that assad's forces had chemical weapons, but russia seem in no hurry to look into that and have
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backed assad and say there is no evidence. russia called for an impartial and thorough investigation of the incident, and i think the line which will be used in moscow that unfortunately... action, and now we have to face the consequences. our secretary of state is coming to moscow next week and we can only hope this issue will be discussed and damage limitation operations. thank you very much. apologies for the trouble with the line there. a romanian tourist who fell into the river thames during the westminster terror attack has died. andreea cristea was walking on westminster bridge with her boyfriend when they were driven at by the attacker khalid masood, who was later shot dead by police. a little earlier we spoke
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to our correspondent sangita myska. she told us what happened after ms cristea fell into the thames. she sustained massive injuries. she had been walking along the bridge with her boyfriend, they'd come overfrom romania to visit friends. he had planned to propose to her later that evening. she was rescued and taken to hospital. she spent the last two weeks in at st bartholeme's hospital in london being treated for those injuries. yesterday her family and doctors decided to take the difficult decision to switch her life support system off. that brings the number of people who were killed, the victims of khalid masood, to five. her boyfriend did survive the attack with a broken foot. and her family have released a statement today. yes, a very moving statement. let me read part of it... our
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they went on to say that thousands of pounds raised by the public to help andreea will now be given to a charity. they went on to say they would not have been able to get through the last couple of weeks had it not been for the dedication of the medical staff at the hospital and also support officers from the metropolitan police. there has been a sharp rise in the number of accident and emergency departments in england turning away ambulances compared with the previous three years. the nuffield trust think—tank says its analysis shows ambulance services are facing even more pressures than nhs hospitals. here's our health correspondent, jane dreaper. a service under strain.
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ambulances are diverted when hospitals are exceptionally busy. it's a temporary measure to take the pressure off a&e, but it means patients have further to travel for urgent treatment. today's report shows how the number of diverts has leapt in the past few months. during the three winters beginning in 2013, this happened on average 249 times. but in this most recent winter, the number of diverts jumped to almost 500. the report says this is bad for patients and explains why ambulance trusts in england are missing their expected response times. 500 or so — you may say "well, it's not a very big number." they are the tip of the iceberg. they have doubled. they reveal a service under tremendous pressure. there'll be 500 diverts but there'll be many more a&e departments working right at the limit that they could have diverted. and the report says morale is low among ambulance staff, another sign of pressure. nhs england believes too many ambulances are being dispatched to simply try to hit targets,
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and it's reviewing the system. jane dreaper, bbc news. let's ta ke let's take a look at the weather. prospects are good. that thermometer will rise over the next few days. we are forecasting a lot of sunshine but it is not that sunny everywhere today. just like yesterday, benny north—western parts of the country are north—western parts of the country a re pretty overcast. north—western parts of the country are pretty overcast. northern ireland, the north—west of england, within this area we don'tjust have sunshine but also some low cloud. the temperatures are failures appointing. the beautiful weather is in the south and east. the sun is pretty strong and will remain so through the weekend. this evening and tonight and into tomorrow morning, very little change on the weather front. quite
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morning, very little change on the weatherfront. quite nippy first thing. some mist around but a beautiful start to saturday. temperatures creeping up on saturday, more sunshine in these areas where currently it is overcast. we could be up to 20 degrees of crossed some southern and central areas. by the time we get to sunday it could be as high as 23, and 20 across yorkshire. the northwest hanging onto a bit more cloud and some rain. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines at: 12. 30pm: american warships have fired 59 cruise missiles at a syrian airbase, in the united states' first direct action against president assad's regime. russia — which backs syria — says its air defences will be strengthened and condemns the attack as a "an act of aggression against a sovereign nation". defence secretary sir michael fallon said the strikes were designed to deter the regime from launching chemical attacks and that the uk
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was consulted beforehand. the united states made it very clear last night that although we're all together in a coalition against terrorism and helping to fight daesh terrorism and helping to fight daesh terrorism in iraq and syria, this was to be a united states operation on its own. let me emphasise, we fully support it. labour leaderjeremy corbyn has condemned the attack, saying it risks escalating the war in syria still further. he calls for a negotiated settlement to the conflict. a romanian tourist, andreea cristea, has become the fifth victim to die as a result of the attack in westminster two weeks ago. a man spared jail for domestic violence, after telling a court he
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would lose an offer to play cricket, has been sent to prison. the 34—year—old originally received a suspended sentence for assaulting his wife, after the court heard he would lose out on a professional cricket contract, if he were jailed. we can cross to our correspondent at manchester crown court. this is quite a complex case. yes, it is. so bear with me, but the sail yant points, the first —— salient points, the first thing is that mustafa bashir was certainty to prison with immediate effect, jailed for 18 months. originally he had been sentenced here at court last month, but given a suspended sentence. he had admitted having assaulted his wife on several occasions, having hit her with a cricket bat, having forced her to drink bleach. but in mitigation, at the time, his defence lawyer told the court that if he was
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given his liberty, if he were given a suspended sentence rather than being jailed at the time, that he stood to sign a contract to play professional cricket for leicestershi re professional cricket for leicestershire and the judge, on weighing up various factors at the time, took that into account and decided that because there was a professional cricketing career potentially there in the balance, that he should be given a suspended sentence. as soon as that court hearing concluded and there was lots of press reporting around what had happened, leicestershire county cricket club said one lickly there was no “— cricket club said one lickly there was no —— said publicly there was no such contract. they contacted the crown prosecution service. the cps then notified the court. and the court, in any court case, after a sentencing has the right to call defendants back in for a sentence to be reviewed, if new information comes to light. that's what's happened today. the judge told mr
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bashir that he had fundamentally misled the court. because of that he has reviewed the sentence. it's still an 18—month term, but he will be serving it in jail. still an 18—month term, but he will be serving it injail. he still an 18—month term, but he will be serving it in jail. he was sent to prison straight away. mustafa bashir didn't show any particular reaction to it. he had told the court today, his lawyer on his behalf, had told the court that he never intended to mislead anybody. that there were a series of misunderstandings that his probation officer and original defence team had got the wrong end of the stick. he had played for a local cricket league and had been signing a contract previously for that league and had played in the past in pakistan for a local team there. but that he had not intended anybody to think that he was going to go and signa think that he was going to go and sign a professional contract at leicestershire. nevertheless, the judge did not accept his defence today, sent him to prison. the other thing to add into this complexity, you may remember at the time, when
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thejudge was passing you may remember at the time, when the judge was passing sentence last month, he also made some comments about the vulnerability of mustafa bashir‘s wife. he spoke about the fa ct bashir‘s wife. he spoke about the fact that she had gone to university and had a network of friends and was not particularly vulnerable. there was a lot of criticism at the back of that from domestic abuse charities amongst other organisations and the judge today said he wanted also to make some comments about that. he explained in court that he had been referring to guidelines which are in place cross all courts issued by the sentencing guidelines council about the vulnerability of witnesses. there is a measuring index, if you like, looking at different factors which can makea looking at different factors which can make a victim especially vulnerable. that can include not having a support network, maybe having a support network, maybe having come here from another country, not being able to speak the language, not having friends or independence. he was pointing out,
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he said, that although mustafa bashir‘s wife was plainly vulnerable, that she did have a network of friends and that she had been to university, she had some independence. she wanted to make the point today, he said there were misunderstanding and misreporting and he didn't want bashir‘s wife to go away thinking that she hadn't been believed. he wanted to make the point, she had been believed and is vulnerable. he wanted to set it in the context of explaining the issue of the guidelines he was working to. thank you very much. let's return to our main news this morning — those us missile attacks on a syrian government airbase, in response to tuesday's suspected chemical weapons attack. 59 cruise missiles were fired from us warships in the mediterranean at the air base which the americans say was used in the attack. russia has strongly condemned the attack which happened at 20
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-- 1. —— 1. 40pm. president trump said it was in america's national security interest to prevent the spread of chemical weapons. this was what he had to say shortly after the attack was launched. tonight i ordered a targeted military strike on the airfield in syria from where the chemical attack was launched. it is in this vital, national security interest of the united states to prevent and deter the spread and use of deadly chemical weapons. there can be no dispute that syria used banned chemical weapons, violated its obligations under the chemical weapons convention and ignored the
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urging of the un security council. years of previous attempts at changing assad's behaviour have all failed and failed very dramatically. asa failed and failed very dramatically. as a result, the refugee crisis continues to deepen and the region continues to deepen and the region continues to deepen and the region continues to destabilise, threatening the united states and its allies. tonight i call on all civilised nations to join us in seeking to end the slaughter and blood shed in syria. our correspondent ben james is in beirut. clearly many people are coming out toissue clearly many people are coming out to issue their response to this decision by president trump. yes, indeed. one response that'sjust dropped in the last ten minutes or so is from the syrian presidency
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itself of bashar al—assad, a statement that was carried by state tv, read out, they quoted it as saying that what the us has done is nothing more than thoughtless, irresponsible behaviour. they're talking about the us misled by imaginary and hectic propaganda. they're saying that this attack has only increased syria's determination to strike at terrorist agents and to continue to crush them. they're certainly saying their resolve continues in continuing to fight in this conflict as they have before. whether they will or not remains to be seen. the syrian government deny using chemical weapons in that attack on civilians. they said it was an airstrike attack on civilians. they said it was an air strike of conventional weapons that hit a chemical weapons store on the ground, despite lots of activists at and the accounts of
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doctors treating the patients that emerged from that town saying otherwise. something else that has been carried by state news agency in syria in the last couple of hours resolves around civilian casualties of today's air strike. they claim that nine civilians were killed in villages around this air base, including four children. so if true, i guess, undermining the credibility ofa i guess, undermining the credibility of a strike, the motive of which is to protect children in syria. if not true, seeking to give that impression and cast the americans and crates, if you like. —— hypocrites. we managed to get through to someone who lives within a kilometre of the air base. this man's windows of his home were broken. he did say he could see on the other side of the air base further destruction. we will continue to try to get further accou nts continue to try to get further accounts from the ground, notjust at the base, but around it. we have heard accounts from the air base
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itself that there was a great deal of damage there. a notion that with the warning that the americans had to give through protocol to the russians, they had an anningment to warn one another of military operations, the russians would have warned the syrians. they may have had some notice to get some of their hardware out of the that base before the cruise missiles struck. observing, in terms of the wider region, varying responses from countries in the middle east. iran is another country that has responded. of course, another key ally of president assad in syria. the iranians through a statement quoted on state news agencies there from their foreign ministry spokesperson talked about this strike as being destructive, talking about it in terms of terrorism, in terms of backing the very terrorist groups that the united states professes to tackle, like the so—called islamic state and others. they're very much echoing the
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sentiments that we've heard from the russians, who say that the american action is only defeating their other stated object of defeating the likes of the so—called islamic state. for now, ben, thanks very much. with me is robert fox, defence correspondent for the evening standard. thanks very much for coming in. a lot of discussion essentially about whether this is a measured rgs targeted response which can be contained and pass on a sort of warning to syria, or whether there isa warning to syria, or whether there is a risk of escalation. there's a lwa ys is a risk of escalation. there's always a risk of escalation and there are two or three tracks here which are quite difficult to pursue, one is the legal track. was he entitled in law to do this? that is much more complicated than it may appear. what trump did and one can guess who is behind it, i would think it's guess who is behind it, i would think its general guess who is behind it, i would think it's generaljim matis the defence secretary. lieutenant
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general hr mcmaster, the national security adviser. they would have worked it out with lawyers. what they're responding the term is "proportionality". they were only 100 pound of high explosive warhead. they gave warning and aimed at an air base. this was one of the most likely places, not only where the attacks were launched from, they would know that from satellite tracking, but they suspect there's other chemical and materials stored there. that is very important. that is the weakest point for both the russians, as a permanent member of the security council and assad himself. because if he is using chemical weapons, and there are now five occasions of this, notjust what we saw over the weekend, but elsewhere last month, for example, then he is going against express instruction, resolution of the un security council, which further more
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he signed up to. now in terms of the syrian response that ben was walking us through, a statement coming forward saying this had only increased their resolve. so is there a sense that this will not have any impact. ordo a sense that this will not have any impact. or do you think that's just words and assad will be thinking about his options? well, i don't think he'll be thinking of his options. think i he's beyond that now, from what i understand from his psychological condition, personally. the fact is this is the usual explain away. we are the victim, the victims of this aggression. it is absolutely bog standard syrian propaganda if i may put it like that. what is most worrying for the, first of all, the assad family, and who is trying to run the military behind them, is he is now off the diplomatic chess board. this is what america has been saying. because of the allegations and indeed proof that chemical weapons were used
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we've had this fantastic testimony, eyewitness testimony, shortly after the event, in the guardian newspaper, their man, good for him, got in, saw it and the idea that this was a spontaneous explosion of a bomb factory from the syrian free army or such like and their allies, it's simply nonsense because chemical weaponry of this kind does not go upwards in these terms. the doctors have eyewitnesses of stuff coming down, bombs were dropped. and to compound the injury, the insult, the hospital where they were treating, were bombed afterwards. if it's aerial bombing, it's not the rebels, it's not the insurgents. how many angels dance on the head of a pin arguments is nonsense. can we lay this that this is absolutely against the geneva protocols against chemical and biological warfare, which gathered up all the stuff that began in 1925, post the first world
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war against gas attacks. this is a protocol that syria, in its day, signed up to. then you had the incident in 2013, where there was a red line, well, it had been crossed and obama and cameron blinked. so that they put in place this un security council resolution 2118, in september. i haven't heard that quoted in a morning's broadcasting, frankly. further more, assad signed up frankly. further more, assad signed up to that. we will get rid of chemical stocks. we will not use chemical stocks. we will not use chemical weapons. now does trump, is he empowered as the senior member of the un security council to carry out action? where i have some understanding of the position he and matis and tillerson had gotten to is they knew fine and dandy there was going to be, every ever in the present circumstances been instruction a mandate or advice to action from the un security council.
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funnily enough, the biggest victim of these terrible chain of events is the un security council itself and its credibility. a final thought on that then. one of the key stumbling blocks in the security council is russia. and china. are we likely to see any change in position from those two allies of syria? china will be taking counsel. because it's more remote and it doesn't have a dog in the fight. doesn't have forces on the ground. let's go to russia. i think russia has got to have some serious thinking now, because we've heard a lot of blah, blah, blah about strengthening air defences, the trouble is with the s 300 and s 400 air defences, which they put round eastern europe, as well as in syria, these were supposed to be whiz, bang, practical, state—of—the—art which could stop anything like any british fighter that you could put up, any american fighter. we now suspect the americans know how to jam the command and control of that. the russians, as i wrote yesterday,
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sorry to quote myself, the russians and the syrians physically on the ground, with their forces are in a much, much weaker position than we've been led to believe. they cannot close the fight off. this makes it even worse for them. very interesting indeed. thanks very much indeed. ( the (the headlines: we start with the top story, the us launches missile strikes on syria, over its suspected use of chemical weapons on civilians. russia, which backs syria, condemns the attack, calling it an act of aggression against a sovereign nation. and in other news, a romanian tourist, who fell into the river thames during the westminster bridge terror attack, has died of her injuries. the green party has launched its
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local election campaign. the leader said protecting the environment from the risks posed by brexit was one of the risks posed by brexit was one of the main focuses of the campaign. a short time ago — the main focuses of the campaign. a short time ago - we have seen the labour party rush to trigger article 50. we have seen the wheels come off the brexit bus. as far as i can see, the brexit bus. as far as i can see, the green party are the only party saying we need to be honest like this. we can have an nhs that works, social care... that from the launch of the green party's campaign. now for after a century, they've provided a life line for women and children from domestic violence. women's aid says a lack of funding is putting lives at risk. june kelly reports. these children in an art class are
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the victims of domestic violence. they may not have been physically hurt, but they have been traumatised as they witnessed their mothers being abused. you're good at sticking aren't you? yeah. when their mothers fled their parters, their mothers fled their parters, the children had to leave their homes, schools and friends and relocate to this refuge in surrey many miles away. claire arrived here last year, with her young son. we're left with one carrier bag, literally. five minutes to grab what we could. it was very, very, very scary. very frightening. thejourney here, all the way i'm thinking, "i am dog the right thing? just felt really distressed. all my belongings, my child's toys, just left behind. i came here and basically, i broke down and cried and cried. although her partner didn't harm her physically, he subjected her to years of mental torment. what is known as coercive
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control. he used to say things like he'd shoot me if he found me with another man. once he threatened me with a hammer. i used to say, i'll lock you out and he'd say, "i'll smash your windows." he had total control. the government has a straty to tackle violence against women and girls. it's earmarked at least £40 million for domestic violence services. those on the frontline say there needs to be a rethink on funding. the government is putting money in at the moment, which we're very grateful for. but it's a very short—term approach. what we need is a longer term approach and longer term investment, with a long—term strategy. so that refuges can continue to function. if that doesn't happen, refuges will close and more willoughby die. —— mo women will die. this reef udge run by the charity women's aid is so short on
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space that this office will soon be converted into an extra bedroom. staff will then have to work from a shedin staff will then have to work from a shed in the garden. the demand for places is constantly increasing. yet one in six specialist refuges in england have closed since 2010 because of a shortage of money, according to domestic violence charities. and they're warning that around the country the future of many more is injeopardy. in response the ( government said, tackling owe deftic abuse is a key priority for this government. we continue to work with women's aid to sure refuges receive the support they need. we've also announced a major new programme of work, including a domestic violence and abuse act to transform the way we tackle domestic abuse. at the refuge in surrey, new arrivals are provided with the basics for mums and children as they start a new life. but for all the women and children they give a home to, there are many more that they have to turn away.
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eta has said it will disarm tomorrow. more than 800 people were killed during their campaign of violence. thousands of others were injured. you come here to the heart of the town, it's hard to imagine this was once the heart land of eta, for decades the place for bombings, extortion, assassinations, a time where former eta members tell us they were literally fighter for basque independence. others say it was a time of pervasive peer, a time —— fear, a time when bodyguards and special forces had to be deployed across this region and in the basque region of france to try to keep security. the human costs are incalcuable. thousands of people, many women and children, were either
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killed or injured in the violence. on the other side, nearly 400 prisoners are still in jails in france and spain, farfrom their families, serving life sentences. everyone here has a story. the story now is that eta says it is unilaterally giving up its guns. that's because the french and spanish governments tell them they will get nothing in return. in some senses the move is symbolic. there hasn't been violence here in spain by eta for many years. years ago, eta unilaterally announced a ceasefire. what this new move means is that the last insurgency in europe is coming to an end. basque politicians and their supporters say they will continue to fight for independence but with very different means. here, gp practice closures have hit record levels with hundreds of thousands of patients forced to
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change surgeries last year. according to figures obtained by medical magazine pulse. the royal college of gps said doctors could no longer cope with growing patient demand. but nhs england said all patients would still be able to register with a surgery. it added that an aextra £1 billion had been invested in general practice in two years. this is what you came for week, some extraordinary acts by young people are being celebrated at the rotary young citizen awards in manchester. there are seven winners from across the great britain and republic of ireland. two of them are sophia and amber cowburn. our brother was a party animal,
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life and soul of the party, he was a fashion student, he was very popular. he wasjust, like, the greatest person. in 2010, ben cowburn was just 18 when he took his own life in an adult psychiatric unit in cornwall. within a few hours of losing ben, we were in disbelief. it shouldn't have happened. ben shouldn't have been able to take his own life in a mental health hospital. his sisters, sophia and amber, wanted to keep ben's legacy alive. so they set up their own charity, the invictus trust, as a way to support other teenagers with mental health problems. after ben has passed away, really not very long after, my mum sat down with us — my sisters and my dad — and just said that she felt really strongly that we had to change the services, we really didn't want to become a family that became quite bitter because we felt that ben had been let down. we needed to change what was available for teenagers in cornwall and what support and services could be enhanced to really better provide it. after three years of campaigning for a mental health unit for young people in cornwall,
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it has recently announced that the nhs will be building the first—ever specialist unit in the county. it feels amazing. it's been seven years now that we've been running the charity, but sometimes it's gone so fast, sometimes it's gone so slow. we've been lobbying for a unit, which has been a long, hard journey, and we finally got confirmation that the nhs will build a unit for young people in cornwall. all this week, the bbc news channel will be featuring the stories of past and present award winners. and tomorrow, we'll be broadcasting the 10 year anniversary ceremony live from manchester. that's at 10.30 tomorrow. ina in a moment, the news at one. first the weather. the sunshine in the last few days has been a little hit—and—miss. yes, admittedly many of us have enjoyed the sunshine. there's a lot of it about across southern and eastern areas of the uk. but north—western parts, particularly northern
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ireland, western scotland and the north—west of england have been stuck under the cloud for a couple of days now. the cloud is going to be shifting over the next day or two. we'll all get at least some sunshine, but not necessarily today. the high pressure's very slow to move. that means that the cloud is slow to move as well. they don't break up easily either. the best of the weather today is across southern and eastern parts of the country. also across england and wales, in some areas the pollen levels remain high through today and into the weekend. let's look at the weather for this evening and overnight — here's friday night, lots of dry weather about. lots of clear skies as well. once again, it's going to be quite hippie. there could be —— nippy. there could be some frost around. the weekend, warm sunshine on the way for many of us. once again, there'll be more sunshine around, particularly across these more north—western areas where it's been cloudy. that cloud should eventually shift. you will get sunshine in places like liverpool, through the lake district,
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south—western scotland and into northern ireland. here's a snapshot of 4pm on saturday. temperatures in some areas may already reach 21 degrees celsius. that will be the exception weather than the rule. for most of us it's closer to the high teens. still fresh across northern ireland and western scotland. say around 10, 12 degrees. more breeze off the atlantic and cloud as well. for the grand national, the weather's looking beautiful. light winds and 17 degrees. come sunday, we're going to see even warmer weather. this air keeps coming in from the south. this is warm weather for the time of the year. so i think some southern and eastern, perhaps central areas will see those temperatures climbing into the low 20s. probably will end up being the warmest day of the year. we'll find out. 23 degrees on london and even 20 is just about possible across yorkshire. even southern scotland into the high teens as well. on monday, it looks like those temperatures are going to be
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climbing back down again. it's a two—day wonder. the us launches missile strikes on the syrian airbase believed to have mounted a chemical weapons attack earlier this week. nearly 60 cruise missiles were fired from two american navy ships in the mediterranean in the early hours of this morning. tonight, i call on all civilised nations tojoin us in tonight, i call on all civilised nations to join us in seeking to end the slaughter and bloodshed in syria. as syrian television shows the aftermath of the attack, russia says fewer than half the missiles hit their target, and strongly condemns the action. the governement here gives the attack its full support, butjeremy corbyn says it risks further escalating the war in the country. we'll have the latest from our correspondents in washington and moscow. also this lunchtime...
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